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MAY 2014 | SERVING AMERICA’S FINEST BEER COUNTY | SAN DIEGO

San Diegans Win 11 Medals at the 2014 World Beer Cup

Coronado Brewing Company, Champion Mid-Size Brewery and Brewmaster

Vol. 4 No. 6

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Pairs well with life. We put our beer in cans so you can take it anywhere life takes you, including places bottles aren’t always welcome. Places like tailgating, golfing, boating, and camping. Of course, they’re also a great choice for parties, dinners with friends or just enjoying at home. Try one of five delicious styles today. Great beer for the great outdoors, and the great indoors, too. Great beer. No exceptions. No excuses.

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HABITUS IPA 2014 Gold Medal Winner Rye Beer Category


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Reader, San Diego’s reputation as craft beer hub will be further solidified this month, as the California Craft Brewers Association (CCBA) hosts a general meeting May 19 and 20 in Escondido. Open to established breweries, as well as breweries in planning, allied trade members and distributor members, this two-day event includes workshops and a beer garden BBQ at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens Escondido on May 19, before a full day (9:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.) at the Center for the Arts in Escondido, with more than 300 brewers and industry professionals expected in attendance. Visit californiacraftbeer.com/ccba-general-meeting for more information. Also, please check out West Coaster’s new videos! We’ve published “Behind the Brew” pieces on Ballast Point’s Sculpin IPA, as well as Alpine Beer Company’s Nelson IPA. Both beers have unique stories, and we thought video would be a fun way to tell them. Visit youtube.com/westcoastervideos to view. Cheers,

Ryan Lamb Executive Editor West Coaster

Dries growlers overnight


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders RYAN LAMB MIKE SHESS Publisher MIKE SHESS mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor RYAN LAMB ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director KAYLA COLEMAN kayla@westcoastersd.com Graphic Designer ASHLEY DREWITZ ashley@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant TOM SHESS thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers SAM TIERNEY sam@westcoastersd.com BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com GONZALO QUINTERO drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors BRETT NELSON ERIKA BOLDEN KRISTINA YAMAMOTO LORAH SMITH MARC FIGUEROA MITCH STEELE TIM STAHL

West Coaster, THE WEBSITE Web Manager MIKE SHESS Web Editor RYAN LAMB Web Master JOSH EVERETT West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2013 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


WRITERS

COLUMNIST

INTO THE BREW Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

COLUMNIST

PLATES & PINTS Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan and the author of the San Diego Beer News Complete Guide to San Diego Breweries (available on Amazon. com). In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including USA TODAY, The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast, San Diego Magazine and U-T San Diego.

COLUMNIST

THE CARBOY CHRONICLES Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

COLUMNIST

THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D. is a San Diego native, three-time SDSU grad, career educator, and co-founder of the popular multimedia craft beer discussion craftbeertasters.wordpress.com. An avid homebrewer, Cicerone Certified Beer Server, and seasoned traveler, Dr. Quintero takes great pride in educating people about craft beer and the craft beer culture. By approaching the subject from the perspective of a scholar and educator, Dr. Quintero has developed a passion for spreading the good word of local beer.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 19

COLUMNS

Into the Brew

Sam Tierney discusses quality in beer production, and what it means for judges 21

The Carboy Chronicles

Ryan Reschan talks lambic brew days with North County homebrew club Society of Barley Engineers 23-24

Plates & Pints

Brandon Hernández dives into new venue from Churchill’s owner Ivan Derezin, called The Bellows 27

The Doctor’s Office

Gonzalo Quintero, Ed.D. wonders why there isn’t more of a beer presence in his hometown of National City 11-12

PLUS +

Brews in the News

San Diego brewers win 11 medals at the 2014 World Beer Cup; three local breweries make the Brewers Association’s Top 50 Breweries of 2013 list 13

The Leasks

Marc Figueroa tells the story of Donna and Charles Leask, longtime local beer advocates 15

World Beer Cup Judging

Stone Brewing Co. Brewmaster Mitch Steele divulges how beers are judged at the World Beer Cup (via hoptripper.com) 30

Located in the Beachwalk Retail Center 437 S. Highway 101, Suite 107 Solana Beach, CA 92075 www.sandiegobeerworks.com | 858.353.7174

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Global Beer Network

NITRO TAPS

Craft Beer Directory & Map

CASK ALES ALWAYS ON TAP

Are we missing any locations? E-mail directory@westcoastersd.com 44

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California Malting Co.

The U.S. importer of 10 European brands is celebrating its 20th birthday this month with parties supporting Pints for Prostates 39-43

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Artisan snacks Local brews Lively neighbors Exceptional company

YEAR ROUND DRAFTS

From our Southern California magazine, Erika Bolden goes behind the scenes of the burgeoning craft malt industry 38

20

San Diego craft beers on tap at all times

American Craft Beer Week

Sure, it’s always Beer Week in San Diego, but this CraftBeer. com-created week (May 12-18) celebrates America’s small breweries 35

North County’s premier local craft beer bottleshop and tap room!

Cheers to Moms

Societe’s Lorah Smith toasts the mothers of the craft beer industry 17

OPENING THIS MONTH

Glossary Terms that start with “V” through “Z” straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com

ON THE COVER: Shawn DeWitt (front, left), Wade Hurley and Ryan Brooks from Coronado Brewing Company hold their Champion Mid-Sized Brewery and Brewmaster Awards at the World Beer Cup in Denver, April 11.

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SAN DIEGANS WIN 11 MEDALS AT THE 2014 WORLD BEER CUP + Coronado takes homes Champion Mid-Sized Brewery Award

San Diego brewers earned 11 medals at the 2014 World Beer Cup. The winners were announced at the Gala Awards Dinner/Ceremony on April 11, which took place following the 2014 Craft Brewers Conference in Denver. Out of 94 categories of beer, San Diegans won 4 gold medals, 4 Silver medals, and 3 Bronze medals. In total, 1,447 breweries entered 4,918 beers from 62 countries. 220 judges from 32 countries determined the winners. In addition to winning 2 medals, Coronado Brewing Company was awarded World Beer Cup Champion Brewery and Brewmaster in the Mid-Sized Brewing Company category.

Category 79 (Old Ale or Strong Ale, 40 entries) – Old Ale 2013 by AleSmith Brewing Co. – Gold

Category 10 (Rye Beer, 47 entries) – Habitus by Mike Hess Brewing Co. – Gold

Category 18 (American-Style Sour Ale, 32 entries) – Framboise de Amorosa by The Lost Abbey – Silver

Category 24 (Aged Beer, 14 Entries) – Aged Navigator Dopplebock by Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits / Home Brew Mart – Bronze

Category 88 (Imperial India Pale Ale, 106 entries) – Hop 15 by Port Brewing Co. - Bronze

Category 46 (Australasian-Style Pale Ale or International-Style Pale Ale, 33 entries) – Sculpin IPA by Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits / Old Grove - Gold

Category 13 (Other Strong Beer, 44 entries) - May the Port Be With You by Pizza Port Solana Beach – Bronze

Category 89 (American-Style Amber/ Red Ale, 90 entries) – Shark Bite Red by Pizza Port Bressi Ranch – Silver

Category 82 (Classic IrishStyle Dry Stout, 36 entries) – The Pugilist by Societe Brewing Co. Silver

Category 80 (Barley-Wine Style Ale, 53 entries) – Old Scallywag by Coronado Brewing Co. - Silver Category 86 (American-Style Strong Pale Ale, 97 entries) – Islander IPA by Coronado Brewing Co. - Gold

WestCoasterSD.com | 11


BREWERS ASSOCIATION TOP 50 CRAFT BREWERIES OF 2013 Based on sales volume. Rank change from 2012 listed after city and state. 1. Boston Beer Co. (Boston, MA) 0 2. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. (Chico, CA) 0 3. New Belgium Brewing Co. (Fort Collins, CO) 0 4. Gambrinus (San Antonio, TX) 0 5. Lagunitas Brewing Co. (Petaluma, CA) 1 6. Deschutes Brewery (Bend, OR) -1 7. Bell’s Brewery, Inc. (Galesburg, MI) 0 8. Duvel Moortgat USA (Kansas City & Cooperstown, MO/NY) N/A 9. Brooklyn Brewery (Brooklyn, NY) 2 10. Stone Brewing Co. (Escondido, CA) 0 11. Matt Brewing Co. (Utica, NY) -3 12. Harpoon Brewery (Boston, MA) 1 13. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery (Milton, DE) 0 14. Shipyard Brewing Co. (Portland, ME) 1 15. Abita Brewing Co. (Abita Springs, LA) -1 16. Firestone Walking Brewing Co. (Paso Robles, CA) 4 17. Alaskan Brewing Co. (Juneau, AK) -1 18. New Glarus Brewing Co. (New Glarus, WI) -1 19. SweetWater Brewing Co. (Atlanta, GA) 5 20. Great Lakes Brewing Co. (Cleveland, OH) -1 21. Anchor Brewing Co. (San Francisco, CA) 0 22. Long Trail Brewing Co. (Bridgewater Corners, VT) -4

Check out West Coaster’s new “Behind the Brew” online video series. The first BTB featured Ballast Point’s Sculpin IPA. The second focuses on the iconic Alpine Nelson; visit youtube.com/westcoastervideos to watch!

23. Summit Brewing Co. (St. Paul, MN) 0 24. Oskar Blues Brewery (Longmont, CO) 3 25. Full Sail Brewing Co. (Hood River, OR) 4 26. Founders Brewing Co. (Grand Rapids, MI) 4 27. Rogue Ales (Newport, OR) -5 28. Victory Brewing Co. (Downingtown, PA) -2 29. Ballast Point Brewing Co. (San Diego, CA) 17 30. Ninkasi Brewing Co. (Eugene, OR) 1 31. Southern Tier Brewing Co. (Lakewood, NY) 6 32. Cold Spring Brewing Co./Third Street Brewhouse (Cold Spring, MN) -4 33. Flying Dog Brewery (Frederick, MD) -4 34. Odell Brewing Co. (Fort Collins, CO) -1 35. Stevens Point Brewery Co. (Stevens Point, WI) 0 36. Bear Republic Brewing Co. (Cloverdale, CA) -2 37. Lost Coast Brewery and Cafe (Eureka, CA) 1 38. Left Hand Brewing Co. (Longmont, CO) 5 39. CraftWorks Restaurants & Breweries, Inc. (Chattanooga & Louseville, TN/CO) -7 40. Breckenridge Brewery (Denver, CO) 1 41. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. (San Diego, CA) -2 42. Blue Point Brewing Co. (Patchogue, NY) -6 43. Sixpoint Brewery (Brooklyn, NY) New 44. BJ’s Chicago Pizza & Brewery, Inc. (Huntington Beach, CA) -4 45. North Coast Brewing Co. Inc. (Fort Bragg, CA) -3 46. Uinta Brewing Co. (Salt Lake City, UT) 3 47. Allagash Brewing Co. (Portland, ME) 1 48. Saint Arnold Brewing Co. (Houston, TX) -3 49. Gordon Biersch Brewing Co. (San Jose, CA) New 50. 21st Amendment Brewery (San Francisco, CA) New


C

harles Leask used to be a wine snob of sorts. Hailing from Central California, where grape juice flows like water from Mendocino to Paso Robles, it was easy to see why. But a move to San Diego and a nudge from his wife changed all that. “I’ve always liked beer and I brought Charles to the other side,” said Donna, his wife of 45 years. “I have always liked the taste more than wine.” Someone once said that behind every good man is a great woman. Truer words canBe er not be said about Charles and Donna Leask, San ■B Diego’s First Couple of Craft Beer. yM arc The Leasks, who left their hometown of BakersF ig field in 1971 so Charles could study biochemistry at UC ue ro a San Diego, have been an integral part of the San Diego beer community since the beginning. They were there when Bolt Brewing opened in Fallbrook in 1987 and when Karl Strauss opened its first location on Columbia Street downtown in 1989. And when Stone Brewing Co. opened its doors on Mata Way in San Marcos in 1996, of course they were among the first visitors. “We saw a small blurb in the paper and we went,” Donna said. “I think they only had three or four beers on tap and there weren’t very many people there.” The craft beer scene is vibrant as ever these days. And the Leasks, both now retired and living in Oceanside, are very much in the thick of it all, regularly visiting breweries and attending beer events around town. “Anytime we have a special event, they are always there,” said Mark Purciel, owner of Oceanside Ale Works. “And they always have a smile on their face, like two kids at Disneyland. I always tell them it wouldn’t be a function without them.” More than supportive, Purciel said he appreciates their knowledge of the community and their willingness to provide feedback on his brewery’s product, either good or bad. “When a new beer comes out, my brewers always want to know what Charles and Donna think about it,” Purciel said. “They give constructive criticism, almost like a beer judge. They don’t use blan-

Donna and Charles at the grand opening celebrations for Societe Brewing Company in Kearny Mesa. Photo by Brian Deppe

ket adjectives that really don’t describe the virtues of the beer. They are always the go-to people if I have a question about my prices, my beer or what new breweries are opening.” The Leasks are more than craft beer fans. More than ambassadors too. They are educators who spread the word whenever and wherever possible. The Leasks carry in their car several information guides from the San Diego Brewers Guild and give them out if they meet someone who is being introduced to the local beer scene. “We always take the opportunity to help people learn more about craft beer in San Diego,” said Charles, who volunteered at the Bottled & Kegged exhibit at the San Diego History Center, where he helped visitors learn about San Diego’s beer history. It’s their way to help spread the word, and in a small way, help breweries and the people behind them succeed. They have been doing it for years, well before the days of the social media megaphone. “Early on we thought, ‘How can we help? By telling people about it,’” Charles said. “That will help.” And it has. “The great thing about them is they are equal opportunity supporters of the San Diego craft beer scene,” Purciel said. What’s interesting is that despite having all the equipment to brew their own beer, the Leasks are not homebrewers. Charles has even been a member of QUAFF (Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity) for more than 10 years—he said he joined simply to learn and understand the brewing process. So why not brew at home? “We never started because there are all these great beers out there to try,” Donna said. “Why go through all that trouble when there’s so much good beer right here?” “It’s people like the Leasks that make owning a small local brewery one of the best gigs out there,” Purciel said. Truer words were never said.

San Diego’s First C

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A Toast to the Moms of the Craft Beer Industry

I

By Lorah Smith, Societe Brewing Company

n an industry that is predominantly male, we now have more come to the tasting room, and help out when they can.” Lynda goes and more women proving to be successful, just as their male on to share how her three kids are her top priority. She works while counterparts. Even more impressive to some, as time goes by, they are at school, and when she picks them up and brings them back we see more of those same women realize they can in fact raise to the brewery they watch canning, help with food vendors, or do a family in the midst of the excitement that is the craft beer industheir homework. She really enjoys the times when the entire family try. So, as Mother’s Day approaches, and we raise our glasses to all is there at the brewery together. Lynda doesn’t think of the brewery mothers, let’s take a moment to explore the lives of some of our local as something separate from her children, she stated how they “started brewery moms. the brewery not just to make great beer, but to leave a legacy for the Rachael Akin, Co-founder of Benchmark Brewing Company, kids as well.” explains that not only has she found raising her daughter far easier It’s refreshing to see the idea of family seems to be strong among now than she ever did when in a 40+ work week at another job, but the craft beer community! she’s able to give her daughter a leg However, in spite of the growing up in an industry now growing with number of children being born into the female contributors. She explains, industry, many still believe that being Lorah Smith with her children at Societe in “I know that my daughter is already a mom, and running, or working for, a Kearny Mesa. Photo by Mike Sardina more aware of beer than her peers, and brewery is a difficult task. And they are that some people judge us for that, but right, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad beer isn’t evil. It is our business so she thing or something to keep those women knows about it. When she is older she from their passion. In fact, it just might will respect it way more than anyone give them that extra set of skills to tackle who might judge me for having her in the challenges of the industry. the brewery ever will.” “You know, I find working in the I agree that including our children craft beer industry much like being a in our business from the start will promom,” says Sarah Trigg, Pintswoman vide a respect and love for the craft here at Societe Brewing Company. “I of brewing. All three of my kids were don’t see it as a job. It’s something I look born into the craft beer industry. The forward to and enjoy doing every day! I youngest was being brewed while we assess needs, provide the best possible were opening Societe Brewing Comproduct, served up with love and attenpany; she’ll never know a life before tion, and always try to give the best exSociete. So, I’ve had my fair share of perience possible while having fun doing the stares and overshares concerning so! It also lends itself to having a higher what is or isn’t appropriate for my chillevel of patience.” Sarah’s approach is dren. However, I believe they, even at not unlike that of my own, Rachael’s, or such young ages, grasp the gravity of it Lynda’s, and I suspect that of many other all. Sure it’s cute their first words were moms in the industry. “beer” or “hops” or “barley,” but they When all is said and done, being are also learning the science behind it part of a fast-growing, fast-paced, fullall, the craft, the respect for the art. They’ve seen the work that goes scheduled life that is craft beer is not for the faint of heart. It often fills into selecting a brewery location, the effort involved in demolition the plates of the moms in the industry that much more. Thankfully, and construction, and they have learned the care that goes into creatbeing moms might just be giving us all the upper hand. ing each and every beer as well. Despite the best of intentions, women introducing their children Cheers and Happy Mother’s Day! to this industry will encounter naysayers who will offer up judging looks or unsolicited advice. Some see a woman behind the bar with a Lorah Smith has been an integral part of Societe Brewing Combelly nine months in, a new mom nursing her child while also enjoypany since before its inception. Despite all she does with and for ing a beer, or teens cleaning kegs or bussing tables, and think this is the company, family always comes first. She is wife to Travis Smith, irresponsible or inappropriate. Though, for every skeptic, there are and mother to their three amazing children. If there was anything she those of us in the industry who see the positive outweighing all unwere more passionate about than her family, Societe, or craft beer, it certainty of their uncertainty. would be food. She absolutely loves creating mouthwatering fare to “Our kids have always been a part of everything we do,” expair with fantastic craft beer. plains Lynda Hess, Head of Operations at Mike Hess Brewing. “They

WestCoasterSD.com | 15


World Beer Cup Judging BY MITCH STEELE, STONE BREWING CO. BREWMASTER

A

s I was watching the live stream of the 2014 World Beer Cup awards ceremony the other night on the The Brewing Network, I noticed in the chat room a lot of suppositions about how the competition is run. As a long time judge, I thought I might take a little time to explain how the competition for the WBC (and the GABF) is organized and how the judging process works. Special thanks to Technical Brewing Projects Coordinator and long time Competition Manager Chris Swersey from the Brewers Association, who reviewed this post and added some valuable detail about the process. First off, the competition is blind, meaning that judges do not ever know what beers they are tasting in any given session. The only information provided is a random identification number and a description of what (if any) special ingredients might be in the beer (about a third of all beers are entered in styles allowing entering brewers to specify fruit, BJCP Judging Scoresheet includes a detailed spices, type of wood, etc.). The random numscoring system-not used at WBC or GABF bers assigned to each specific beer change BEER SCORESHEET for each round they are judged, making the process truly a blind competition. Judging sessions are divided into a morning session and an afternoon session for each day of the judging. In each approximately 3 hour session, 6 or 7 judges are assigned to sit at a specific table, and they judge 1, 2 or 3 flights of beer (most often 3). The judges stay at the same table for each half-day session. Each round consists usually of 10-12 beers, so there can be 20-30 beers total in each session, and with 2 sessions per day, that results in 40-50 beers being judged by any particular judge over the day. Unless it is a medal round, the table is usually split in half, and one side of 3-4 judges gets one round of samples, the other side of judges get a different round of samples, though they are always the same style. Morning sessions tend to focus on lower alcohol styles; afternoon sessions tend to include higher alcohol or higher flavor styles. This is not a hard and fast rule, just a general theme. Also, at any given table styles tend to be scheduled as less flavorful followed by more flavorful – for example, golden ale followed by stout. It is common to have 2 different styles judged in any session, though for each individual flight in a session, they are all the same style. So for example, in one session, a team of judges at a table could have 2 flights of American Pale Ale, then 1 flight of Imperial Stouts (I am not divulging what styles I judged). Categories with 12 or fewer entries are judged in one first and final round, meaning AHA/BJCP Sanctioned Competition Program

http://www.bjcp.org

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org

Judge Name (print) _____________________________

Category # _______

Judge BJCP ID ________________________________

Subcategory (spell out) __________________________________________________ Special Ingredients: ___________________________________

Judge Email __________________________________ Use Avery label # 5160

BJCP Rank or Status:  Apprentice  Recognized  National  Master  Honorary Master  Honorary GM  Provisional Judge  Rank Pending

Subcategory (a-f) ______

Entry #

Bottle Inspection:  Appropriate size, cap, fill level, label removal, etc.

Comments ___________________________________________________________________________________

 Certified  Grand Master __ Aroma (as appropriate for style) Comment on malt, hops, esters, and other aromatics  Mead Judge

Non-BJCP Qualifications:  Professional Brewer  Beer Sommelier  Non-BJCP  Certified Cicerone  Master Cicerone  Sensory Training  Other ______________________ Descriptor Definitions (Mark all that apply):  Acetaldehyde – Green apple-like aroma and flavor.

 Alcoholic – The aroma, flavor, and warming effect of ethanol and higher alcohols. Sometimes described as hot.

 Astringent – Puckering, lingering harshness and/or dryness in the finish/aftertaste; harsh graininess; huskiness.

 Diacetyl – Artificial butter, butterscotch, or toffee aroma and flavor. Sometimes perceived as a slickness on the tongue.  DMS (dimethyl sulfide) – At low levels a sweet, cooked or canned corn-like aroma and flavor.  Estery – Aroma and/or flavor of any ester (fruits, fruit flavorings, or roses).

 Grassy – Aroma/flavor of fresh-cut grass or green leaves.

_________/12

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

_________/ 3

Appearance (as appropriate for style)

Comment on color, clarity, and head (retention, color, and texture)

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

_________/20 Flavor (as appropriate for style) Comment on malt, hops, fermentation characteristics, balance, finish/aftertaste, and other flavor characteristics

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

_________/ 5

 Light-Struck – Similar to the aroma of a skunk.

Mouthfeel (as appropriate for style)

 Metallic – Tinny, coiny, copper, iron, or blood-like flavor.  Oxidized – Any one or combination of stale, winy/vinous, cardboard, papery, or sherry-like aromas and flavors.

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

 Phenolic – Spicy (clove, pepper), smoky, plastic, plastic adhesive strip, and/or medicinal (chlorophenolic).

Overall Impression

 Musty – Stale, musty, or moldy aromas/flavors.

 Solvent – Aromas and flavors of higher alcohols (fusel alcohols). Similar to acetone or lacquer thinner aromas.

 Sour/Acidic – Tartness in aroma and flavor. Can be sharp and clean (lactic acid), or vinegar-like (acetic acid).  Sulfur – The aroma of rotten eggs or burning matches.

 Vegetal – Cooked, canned, or rotten vegetable aroma and flavor (cabbage, onion, celery, asparagus, etc.)

Comment on body, carbonation, warmth, creaminess, astringency, and other palate sensations

_________/10

Comment on overall drinking pleasure associated with entry, give suggestions for improvement

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

SCORING GUIDE

 Yeasty – A bready, sulfury or yeast-like aroma or flavor. Outstanding Excellent Very Good Good Fair Problematic

(45 - 50): (38 - 44): (30 - 37): (21 - 29): (14 - 20): (00 - 13):

World-class example of style. Exemplifies style well, requires minor fine-tuning. Generally within style parameters, some minor flaws. Misses the mark on style and/or minor flaws. Off flavors/aromas or major style deficiencies. Unpleasant. Major off flavors and aromas dominate. Hard to drink.

BJCP Beer Scoresheet Copyright © 2012 Beer Judge Certification Program rev. 120213

Total

Classic Example  Flawless

Wonderful

 

Stylistic Accuracy     Technical Merit     Intangibles    

_________/50

Not to Style

Significant Flaws Lifeless

Please send any comments to Comp_Director@BJCP.org

all 6-7 judges taste all the beers, choosing (usually) 3 winners. Categories with 13-24 entries are judged at one table, but in two flights. In the first flight, the table is split in half. Each group of 3 or 4 judges evaluates half of the entries, passing 3 on to the final round. In the second and final flight, all 6-7 judges taste the 6 finalists, choosing (usually) 3 winners. Categories with 25-48 entries are judged at two tables, in two flights. In the first flight, half of the total number of entries is assigned to each table, and each table is split in half. Each of the four groups of 3 or 4 judges evaluates their share of entries (never more than 12), passing 3 along to the final round at one table, for a total of 12 finalist entries. In the final round, all 6-7 judges taste the 12 finalists, choosing (usually) 3 winners. Categories with 49-72 entries are judged at three The beer evaluation form used for tables, in three flights. In the beers in the first round of WBC and first flight, one third of the GABF. Judges who don’t write a total number of entries is as- lot of comments on this form may signed to each table, and each not be invited back. It’s important table is split in half. Each of feedback for the entering brewers. the six groups of 3 or 4 judges evaluates their share of entries (never more than 12), passing 3 along to the second round at one table, for a total of 18 second round beers. The second round table is split in half, with each group of 3 or 4 judges evaluating 9 beers and passing along 3 finalist entries. In the final round, all 6-7 judges taste the 6 finalists, choosing (usually) 3 winners. Categories with 73-96 entries are judged at four tables, in three flights. In the first flight, one quarter of the total number of entries is assigned to each table, and each table is split in half. Each of the six groups of 3 or 4 judges evaluates their share of entries (never more than 12), passing 3 along to the second round at one table, for a total of 24 second round beers. The second round table is split in half, with each group of 3 or 4 judges evaluating 12 beers and passing along 3 finalist entries. In the final round, all 6-7 judges taste the 6 finalists, choosing (usually) 3 winners. Categories with more than 96 entries are judged at tables increasing every time another 24 entries is added. Most categories have 2-3 rounds. Categories with more than 192 entries like India Pale Are are judged over 4 rounds. For most styles, the tasting flow is structured in multiples of 12 or 24 entries. For certain high alcohol or high BU styles the multiple is 10 or 20 instead of 12 or 24. During the first round (only) comments are filled out that are returned to the entering breweries (see photo). In rounds 2, 3, and sometimes 4, for each category, 3 of the CONTINUED ON PAGE 29

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Monday

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Tuesday

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Wednesday

$3 Draft Beer (all day)

Thursday

No Corkage or Capage on Wine & Beer (all day)

Friday

Sweet Friday 2 for 1 Desserts (all day)

Saturday

Wings & Wells Half off Basket of Wings | $4 Wells (all day) Brunch with Epic Bloody Marys Bottemless Mimosas (11am-2pm)

Sunday

20% Off for Current SDSU Students (5pm-close) *Restaurant Only with Valid Student ID Brunch with Epic Bloody Marys & Bottemless Mimosas (11am-2pm)

knbwinecellars.com | 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. San Diego CA 92120 | 619.286.0321


INTO THE BREW

ON THE QUALITY OF BEER AND BEER CRITICISM By Sam Tierney

Evaluating beer is serious business at this QUAFF judging session

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hat is good beer? Is it beer that is free from commonly-accepted brewing flaws? Beer that is perfectly balanced? Beer that moves us? How do we even decide what is good and what is bad? Aroma and taste, the two senses with which we experience beer the most profoundly, are notoriously difficult to calibrate and standardize. They are easily manipulated by our environments and physiological states. The character of a beer can seem like night or day depending on what beers we have before it, or even what we ate for lunch. Breweries often devote considerable resources and training to sensory analysis as a discipline. It takes multiple trained tasters to form significant conclusions about a beer. Any one taster might be “blind” to an aroma or flavor in a beer, but as a whole, a taste panel can create meaningful data. Organized competitions such as the Great American Beer Festival and World Beer Cup award medals based on blind tastings by panels of professional judges in a controlled environment. This is considered the most reliable form of beer judging, though it certainly has its limitations. For one, we only see the medal-winning beers. Why those beers won and what the judges actually thought of both the winners and losers is not disclosed. We can deduce that any medal-winning beer will be a well-made example of its respective style, but that’s basically where the utility stops. Beer writing has often been accused of a failure to call out bad beer, and most writers admit to devoting their efforts to promoting beer that they like, instead of spending time on beers that they don’t care for. There is certainly enough good beer out there to occupy the time and energy of any beer writer, but I think that writers have to be willing to give negative reviews when they are deserved. To put it bluntly, there are breweries consistently selling flawed, poorly-made beer. Feedback from credible writers can help brewers who may not be critical enough of their own products, and can help consumers identify why they might not have liked certain beers. Intelligent criticism can also help bring sanity and perspective to the stylistic and philosophical path of modern brewing. Pointing

out that someone’s West Coast IPA smells like rancid butter is fairly simple, and the issue will make itself evident regardless of critical coverage, but there is a real opportunity for education and commentary within criticism of beers that claim to be an established style and are clearly something else, or are a complete mess of mismatched ingredients. What both of these approaches require is a cautious, considered methodology. Considering the pitfalls of our own palates, criticism should be approached with a healthy skepticism toward our own opinions. Generic, poorly-articulated criticism doesn’t help anyone. If you are going to write negatively about a beer (and I put stuff like Beer Advocate, Ratebeer, and Untappd into this discussion – really any public forum), a constructive approach is a must. If you think a beer has obvious brewing flaws like diacetyl or oxidation, discuss the possible causes of them. If the bottle is dated and is out of code, then that needs to be taken into account. If it has no bottled-on date, then the brewer needs to answer for it. If you get a buttery beer on draught, then the possibility of dirty beer lines must be accounted for. Though many off flavors can be due to poor service or handling, the brewery is ultimately responsible for the quality of their beer at the point of sale, and proper criticism can provide them with valuable feedback on improving their quality control mechanisms. Stylistic criticism is the most difficult because it really takes a deep understanding of beer style and context – by any account a subjective endeavor. I really believe that you have to know the rules before you break them, and also to recognize when others break them. Effective criticism depends on this knowledge and ability. As the beer market becomes more and more saturated, I hope we see more intelligent, thoughtful criticism to help elevate the conversation between drinker and brewer. Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


May 15, 2014 1st Course- Saison Bockwurst, Madarin Orange/Red Cabbage/Carrot Slaw, Honey/Black Pepper Stone Ground Mustard

Uncle Gus and Chef from the Handlery are back in the beer dinner game and are kicking off their new series with the great beers brewed by Cosimo Sorrentino at Monkey Paw brewing. Join us for a unique night of food and beer pairings in the 950 Lounge at the Handlery Hotel as Chef and Cos introduce a six course pairing menu. It’s a deep dive in to the flavors and aromas of Monkey Paw’s small batch brewing done with foods designed specifically for each beer.

For Tickets, please go to: http://handlerymonkey.brownpapertickets.com

2nd Course- Pineapple Express Smoked Shrimp, Beer Braised Onions/Piquillo Peppers/Chickpeas, Micro Green Salad, Roasted Cantaloupe Vinaigrette 3rd Course- Sweet Georgia Brown Achiote Rubbed Duck Confit, Poached Pear Flat Bread, Collard Greens 4th Intermezzo- Kong Blood Orange Sorbet float 5th Course- Rich Man’s Double IPA Cochinita Pibil, Queso Fresco Polenta, Grilled Vegetables 6th Dessert- I-5 with Coconut and Salt ‘Nanner Puddin’ Brule


THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

Members of SBE, including President Andy Gamelin (second from left) enjoy the lambic brew day. Photo by Ryan Reschan

Sour Ale Brew Day 2014 with Society of Barley Engineers BY RYAN RESCHAN

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arlier in the year North County San Diego’s homebrew club Society Of Barley Engineers (SBE) celebrated 20 years of homebrewing with a special anniversary meeting full of great stories and great beers. Current President and Cofounder Andy Gamelin brewed up a special beer for the occasion, a beer he called “barley champagne,” a high alcohol, light-in-color beer that was carbonated to Champagne-like levels. Along with the anniversary ale were several versions of the club’s lambic-style ale brewed the previous year. Although no one in the club can quite remember exactly when it started, SBE starting making lambic-style sour beer beer as a group – either fermenting the beer on their own, or filling 50-gallon food-grade plastic barrels – around 15 years ago. Bill Sobieski, who is currently working on opening Hoparazzi Brewing in Anaheim this year, was one of the brewers who spearheaded the sessions. When the Southern California Homebrewers Festival rolled around each year, SBE would tap several sour ales at the club’s bar, including all kinds of fruited variations on the base beer. When the festival moved to its current location in Ojai, California, SBE stopped attending the festival with their bar and the group brewing sessions were no longer held. But, in June of last year, Gamelin arranged for a brewing session at his house in Vista. Club members simply had to bring their brewing system to the house and set up in the driveway. Carbon-filtered Vista tap water, grain, and aged hops were provided for the brewers by the club. Batch sizes ranged from 5 to 12 gallons, with brewers mashing in one to three times during the day. The grain bill for the lambicstyle ale was 70% premium 2-row pale ale malt, 21% white wheat malt, and 9% flaked wheat. Aged hops were added at the start of the 60 minute boil, although some members boiled longer, to provide a few IBUs and impart their preservation properties. The target mash temperature for the single infusion mash was 153°F, but there was some variation between brewers that wouldn’t matter in the end when all of the wort was blended in the fermentors. Although it wasn’t a traditional lambic recipe or process, this system made it easy for allgrain brewers to produce a maximum amount of wort in a minimal amount of time.

Fermentation went well and the beer was sampled after a few months and found to be heading in the right direction with its flavor profile. In November members of the club gathered back at Gamelin’s house with their kegs or carboys to get fills from the barrel. Some members added oak to secondary fermentation while others added fruit or just left it alone for more conditioning. We were all surprised at how well the beer tasted for being so young; normally, a year or longer is needed for the wild yeast and bacteria to produce the desired flavor profile and to clean up any off flavors produced during fermentation. With a successful result, another brew day was planned for 2014. On April 26, a few dozen SBE members gathered again in Vista for another day of brewing and sharing beer. Nearly half a dozen brewing systems were set up, with big variations in size and equipment. Mashing was conducted in coolers, direct fired mash tuns, and even “brew-in-a-bag” style in the boil kettle. Brewers were able to wander around, check out the various systems, borrow a piece of equipment when needed, and pick each other’s brains about brewing philosophy and techniques. Gamelin had several beers pouring from his gigantic 14-keg chest freezer, including last year’s lambic-style beer, a gueuze (a blend of 1, 2, and 3-year old sour ale), a Belgian golden ale with Brettanomyces, and a kriek. For inspiration, some authentic lambic and gueuze from Cantillon was opened, including a bottle of 1996 Rose de Gambrinus and 2012 Classic Gueuze. The dregs of each were added the barrels, mixing with the bacteria and yeast already prepared. A combination of Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Brettanomyces lambicus, Roselare (a mix of strains from Wyeast), yeast from the better of last year’s barrels, and other mixes of yeast and bacteria propagated from commercial lambic and farmhouse ales were used for fermentation. After brewing up 110 gallons of wort, the brew day was concluded and the waiting period begins. If all goes well, attendees of the 2015 National Homebrewers Conference in San Diego will have the opportunity to taste the results.

WestCoasterSD.com | 21


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PLATES & PINTS

Chef Schuyler Schultz’s duck leg confit with dandelion salad.

potentially perfect pairing Chef Schuyler Schultz breathing life into new eatery, The Bellows

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BY BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ

s a food journalist, I’m often asked for employee recommendations by restaurateurs with voids in their kitchen brigades. Cheffing is a transient profession, so there are always qualified individuals in search of work or employed culinarians open to making the leap in pursuit of a real or perceived next step in their careers. Still, it’s rare that I go so far as to offer suggestions. Having done so in the past and received negative feedback from owners and chefs who didn’t jibe, either during interviews or, worse yet, post-employment, I’ve learned not to hold back unless I have what seems like the perfect match-up. Last year, such a seemingly optimal situation occurred when Ivan Derezin, the owner of Churchill’s Pub & Grille in San Marcos, contacted me asking if I knew any chefs who might be interested in helming a new project of his near California State University, San Marcos, called The Bellows. Envisioned as a restaurant providing a communal atmosphere and artisanal food a cut above typical North County edible options, as well as top-shelf spirits, wine and craft beer, it would require a gastronome with a flair for creative, gourmet-style cuisine that would be elegant yet approachable and also affordable. Several names came to mind, but one topped my short list—Schuyler Schultz. Regular readers of this column may remember that exotically spelled name. I spotlighted Schultz in the February 2013 edition of West Coaster, shortly after the debut of his book, Beer, Food and Flavor: A Guide to Tasting, Pairing, and the Culture of Craft Beer (available on Amazon.com). That manual to the glories of beer-and-food symbiosis not only demonstrated his deep-rooted affection for craft ales and lagers, but also his impressive devotion to classic European culinary preparations and encyclopedic knowledge of ingredients the world over. A true renaissance man in the kitchen, not to mention a fan and frequenter of Churchill’s since relocating to San Diego from Las Vegas a few years back, I felt he was the right guy for the job. I’m as critical of myself as the breweries and restaurants that I critique, but so far, it looks like I’m inclined to think I nailed this one. From their first meeting, Schultz and Derezin have clicked, meshing as seamlessly with each other’s wants and sensibilities as imperial stout and coffee. And the duo’s symbiosis has grown over the past several months, as they worked together to develop a heavily Mediterranean menu that offers a combination of en vogue dishes (kale salad, Brussels sprouts, mussels) as well as a nice collection of items unique to San Diego County. Just as a read of Schultz’s book says a lot about him, so too

does a perusal of The Bellows’ bill of fare. While shareable jars of spreads and such aren’t new, the The Bellows’ fire theme is incorporated chef takes it to in these locally-made tap handles. territory that’s more rarely charted locally, providing a quartet of potted creations presented in an almost ascending order of adventurousness, from chicken liver pâté and potted brisket to cold-smoked salmon rillettes and a simple yet fantastic pâté of whipped tuna and Vermont butter. Cured meats and fine cheese are up for grabs as well, but the aforementioned quartet stand out and are indicative of Schultz’s care and respect for classics. But The Bellows isn’t all about the meat. Derezin, a vegan, helped make sure of that. As a result, guests can also dine on shareable portions of sweet peperonata with salty Niçoise olives, halved and scored king trumpet mushrooms in an earthy shiitake broth, or black quinoa and kohlrabi salad seasoned with Merkén, a spice blend with a smoked aji pepper base. For those without restrictions, rustic yet refined salads of giant white beans and Sicilian tuna, mussels and potatoes, and artichokes given salty bite from crumbled ricotta salata await. Schultz, along with sous chef Matt Colony, is also making the most of a state-of-the-art wood-fired oven, from which a variety of flatbreads perched on flaky foundations of crust from Sadie Rose Baking Co. emerge. Traditional four-cheese and Margherita varieties are on the menu, but the best of the bunch are more creative offerings like a plum and prosciutto pie with gorgonzola that outshines similar pear and blue cheese models throughout Southern California. A salame flatbread is given spicy life care of bright red Fresno chilies while another features many styles of garden bulb—scallions, roasted leeks, caramelized onions—nicely matched with bacon and goat cheese. Entrées show off Schultz’s knack for creating complete dishes marrying several components. Crispy-on-the-outside, internally moist duck confit goes well with a dandelion salad and olive vinaigrette, while salmon and mussels share room in a delicate, saffroninfused broth with sunflower root and Brussels sprouts. Steak frites, house-made sausages and a Berkshire pork chop add mains with familiar appeal, as well.

WestCoasterSD.com | 23


The Bellows has a lot to offer, and that was the whole point. Derezin says it would have been easy to simply build a similar concept as his popular craft beer bar and restaurant, but that wasn’t his goal. With The Bellows, he aimed to bring the type of thoroughly cohesive, luxe yet relaxed dining and imbibing experience to North County. Such venues are in short supply in that region, making this an even loftier project, but one that looks to have been executed to the now shared vision of what may be one of the most dynamic, well-suited and mutually passionate tandems to come along in a while. In catching up with Schultz, I was sure to get a few recipes from his new stomping grounds for West Coaster readers to try their hands. And since he is an insatiable beer nut, I also asked him for his recommendations on ideal pairings for each. After all, solid pairings is what this article—and this restaurant—is all about.

Panna Cotta .5 gal cream 32 oz mascarpone cheese 8 oz white sugar 1 Tbl vanilla bean puree 8 sheets gelatin

Mascarpone & Vanilla Bean Panna Cotta with Strawberry-Rhubarb Compote

Combine cream, mascarpone, sugar, and vanilla. Warm mixture over medium heat and whisk until all the cheese is incorporated. Soak gelatin briefly in cold water until they become soft. Gently squeeze out excess water, add to warm mixture, and stir well. Have stemless martini glasses, or other ramekins, cleaned and chilled. Carefully pour mixture into each dish and let set for several hours until firm. Serve with strawberry-rhubarb compote. Strawberry-Rhubarb Compote 10 lbs rhubarb 8 lbs strawberries 8 cups white sugar 4 lemons 1 Tbl Vanilla extract Cornstarch – see recipe method Trim any woody bottoms of leafy tops from the rhubarb stalks. Cut into ½” pieces. (This should yield approximately 8 quarts of cut rhubarb.) Trim the tops off the strawberries and quarter them. (Cut them into 1/6s if they are especially large. This should yield approximately 4 quarts of cut strawberries.) Remove the zest of the lemons using a Micro-

plane grater. Juice the lemons. In a very large bowl combine the rhubarb, strawberries, sugar, lemon zest, and lemon juice and toss together until the fruit is evenly coated. Put mixture in a large container, cover, and leave in the walk-in overnight to macerate. Drain the juice which has formed with the fruit into a large measuring pitcher. Combine 1 Tbl of cornstarch per cup of juice with one cup of the juice to make a slurry. (For example: if you have 8 cups of juice, mix 8 Tbl cornstarch with one cup of the juice.) In a large pot bring the juice, reserving the slurry, to a boil. Now add the slurry and stir until it returns to a boil and thickens. Add the fruit and vanilla extract, stirring it carefully to coat it with the thickened juice. When the mixture has warmed through, but has not been boiled, remove it from the heat and transfer to a large wide pan and chill.

Duck Confit 20 lbs duck legs 8 lbs rendered duck fat Kosher salt White pepper Fresh thyme Bay leaves

duck leg confit with dandelion green salad

Place a wire rack in the bottom of a large pan. Mix salt and pepper in a small bowl. Snap any large bay leaves in half and pick thyme into small sprigs. Sprinkle each duck leg on both sides with salt and pepper mixture. Arrange legs in the pan. Tuck bay leaf pieces and thyme sprigs between the duck legs. Let legs rest, uncovered, in the refrigerator overnight. Re-arrange cured duck legs in another pan and remove most bay leaves and thyme sprigs. Heat enough rendered duck fat to completely cover all the legs in a pot until liquefied. Tightly cover with aluminum foil and place in a 200 degree oven. Let cook for approx. 6 hours while monitoring temperature. After time has passed check legs for tenderness. Remove pan from oven and let cool. Chill everything together. Legs will last in the refrigerator for at least three weeks.

6 oz pitted cured black olives, coarsely chopped Zest of 3 lemons, zested with a Microplane grater Juice of 3 lemons 2 Tbl Dijon mustard 2 tsp garlic, chopped lemon-black olive 1 oz Italian parsley, coarsevinaigrette ly chopped 1.5 cups extra virgin oil .5 tsp black pepper .5 tsp kosher salt Combine all ingredients of a mixing bowl and thoroughly combine. Preparation: 2 confit duck legs 1 bunch dandelion greens .25 cup lemon-black olive vinaigrette Roast duck legs in 400 degree oven until skin is crispy. Clean dandelion greens and slice into 1” pieces. Toss with dressing.

24 | May 2014

Left: Schuyler Schultz and Matt Colony (right) Right: The restaurant’s peperonata (center), plus a black quinoa and kohlrabi salad (left), and potatoes with white beans, mussels and tuna


WHAT’S YOUR LEGACY?

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THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE

CRAFT BEER INBOUND S

NATIONAL CITY LOOKS TO UP ITS SELECTION OF LOCAL BREW

BY GONZALO J. QUINTERO, ED.D.

an Diego County may be the craft beer capital of the world, but there is a city within county lines that is almost completely devoid of craft beer. It’s not a city hidden in the mountains, or at the edge of the desert. The city that I am referring to is National City, home to nearly 60,000 residents just five miles south of downtown San Diego. Recently, city leaders have taken the initiative and made a call to arms to bring craft beer to National City. What does that mean for the future of San Diego’s second oldest community? I recently had a chance to visit City Hall to discuss the future of craft beer in the community with Ron Morrison, Mayor of National City.

Why craft beer, and why now?

The timing is just about perfect. Our city is on an upswing; it is revitalizing and reenergizing. There’s been a lot of reenergizing with new and returning citizens with new outlooks: young people, young families, artisans, people looking for a good clean night life – these are the people reenergizing the city. For a long time we had a bad reputation for having a seedy nightlife along National City Boulevard. “The mile of bars” it was called. That’s a thing of the past and something that is no longer a part of our community. The thing about craft beer is that it is a contagious type of thing. It excites people, brings diverse crowds, and a kind of customer that expects more. In our downtown area – 8th St./National City Boulevard – we are starting to see physical redevelopment of the streets, sidewalks, and landscaping. We are also seeing our residents, such as Big Ben’s Market, offering craft beer and cornering the market as it develops. Also, our close relationship with the Navy is vital; there are tens of thousands of Navy personnel right at our doorstep every day at 32nd Street Naval Base. This is a new Navy, one composed of a bunch of young and sophisticated people. They are looking for craft beer, organic food, and a good night life.

What are the competitive advantages of the city?

National City is an open market, and we are a very accepting community. We have a base of customers with very few options to get craft beer. Additionally, National City leaders, and the local government as a whole, are actively encouraging business development to revitalize our downtown area. Also, geographically, there is easy access to National City: the I-5 borders us on the west, the 805 borders us on the east, and we have two trolley stops, one at 8th Street and one at 24th Street. There is a huge audience passing by on the freeways, passing through on the trolley. We are improving the walkability of our streets to attract this huge audience into our easily accessible city.”

Nick Salem recently added a bigger selection of local beer thanks to local demand. Photo by Dr. Q

Can craft beer be family-oriented?

Yes. I have been to a number of breweries in San Diego that you could mistake for a family restaurant. These types of places attract people from far and wide. They can be a great destination point. It’s a very special niche in people’s minds, and they meet a great need: good, wholesome adult and family-oriented entertainment. Families should be able to do more at night than watch television.

How do you think the citizens of National City would react to an influx of craft beer businesses?

National City is a very unique community. There is a huge sense of identity. Whether you live here now, lived here at one point, or are from here, you will always be from National City. There is a real sense of place, of community, of ownership. Knowing history and being a part of it can lead some to wanting to maintain it, but here you find an openness and acceptance to change. Involvement is huge here. People love to be involved, informed, and be a part of the process as well as solutions. An attitude of acceptance comes from realizing we have a great city, a great history, and a great future because of the community here.”

NATIONAL CITY WORKING WITH SDSU

National City isn’t tackling the issue of community revitalization and business development alone. Recently the city partnered with San Diego State University (SDSU) and the Sage Project. I spoke with Dr. Jessica Barlow, professor at SDSU and Director of the Sage Project, to learn more about how SDSU and National City developed this new and unique partnership.

What is The Sage Project?

The Sage Project is a partnership between San Diego State University and a city. Faculty and students tackle projects identified by the city partner that address their smart growth, quality of life, and sustainability goals through their coursework. The Sage Project is modeled after the University of Oregon’s Sustainable City Year Program. The success of this model is that students participate in high-impact educational activities that allow them to develop creative designs, solutions,

WestCoasterSD.com | 27


and ideas for existing projects in their own community. The students also engage in community service with the city partner. In this way, the students see that their work is valued and can make a real contribution to their community. The city also benefits from the large number of students investing thousands of hours in these projects. Our current city partner for this, our pilot year, and for next academic year (201415) is National City. In the future, we hope to partner with other cities throughout the county. I know National City is trying to attract craft beer to its community. The Professional Certificate in the Business of Craft Beer program is a part of this; what are they doing to help the city reach their goal? We’re so glad the certificate program is involved with this. Students in a few of the courses from the certificate program are involved in determining the best approach for bringing the industry down to National City. The marketing class is identifying specifically what would be the best approach for increasing interest in craft beer by considering such factors as increasing the number of craft beer handles at local restaurants, planning a beer-focused event such as a festival, opening up some tasting rooms, or establishing a microbrewery. They are considering how to make National City a destination for craft beer in the South Bay, perhaps along the lines of what North Park is for the City of San Diego. The brewery start-up class will be evaluating specific locations throughout National City that might be best suited for such venues.

BIG BEN’S

The prospects are already popping up. In fact, one venue has already taken the initiative to bring in more craft beer. Recently remodeled market Big Ben’s has been a part of the city for many years. Over the last 13 years it has been under the ownership of local business-

man Nick Salem. I had a chance to speak to Mr. Salem on the outdoor patio of the restaurant attached to the market.

Why craft beer?

I have owned liquor stores, grocery stores, and gas stations in National City Mayor Ron Morrison San Diego since 1992. During is excited about the prospected that time I have seen the rise of of more beer in National City. craft beer in San Diego. Seeing Courtesy photo how craft has grown, how customers desires have changed, I had the idea that National City could better service this need. Having craft beer on the shelf helps get people in. They get excited about the beer, have access to it, come in for it, and then they look around and see what else we have. I’m excited because I’m my own customer. I want organic food, craft beer, healthy options. I want people to have access to what I would expect for myself and my family. Bad luck hit the Salem family in Dr. Jessica Barlow from SDSU is July of 2013 when a fire engulfed working with National City through the store. “I had a choice,” said Mr. the Sage Project. Courtesy photo Salem, “we could rebuild or we could grow. Instead of rebuilding we decided to go first class. We have been in business long enough to know the concept would work, so, we put our money where our mouth is. The concept, aside from having craft beer and biodynamic wines, is to have a place in National City where people can buy organic pro-


duce, groceries, dairy, grass fed beef, healthy products. It is a one-stop shop for people who want natural and organic products, the first of its kind in National City. We learned the value of these products, we teach our staff about the value of these products, and our customers learn the value of the products. We believe that if we accomplish this we will help people to learn and understand how what we are doing is good for them.” With an open minded community, supportive leadership, and the interest of local educational institute, National City is on the verge of a renaissance. What shape will it take? It is too soon to know. What is known, however, is that opportunities abound in the area. So who will take that leap of faith and bring craft beer to National City in a big way? Disclosure: Gonzalo Quintero, Ed.D. is an instructor for San Diego State University’s College of Extended Studies Professional Certificate in the Business of Craft Beer program, as well as a member of the Traffic Safety Committee in the City of National City. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 10-12 samples are again selected for moving on to the next round. By the time the beers make it to the final round, they have been selected and passed through as being one of the top 3 in each previous round. The final round (the medal round) can consists from anywhere from 6-12 samples that have arrived via a process of elimination. If a table is doing a medal round, the table is not split, and every one of the 6 or 7 judges tastes and evaluates the same beers to award the medals. Note that you may taste 2 rounds of a certain style, yet may not judge in the medal round, which can get sent to a different table of judges. The judging requires consensus on the 3 beers being passed forward. It is not based on scores. No scores are given, unlike in the Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) homebrew competitions. The 3-4

judges at WBC and GABF have to all agree on which 3 beers are the best of the round and are deserving of being passed on. This can take a fair amount of discussion, though the process is helped by the fact that each style has very specific Style Guidelines and each judge is required to use those guidelines for the basis in which they judge the beers. And if a beer is not perfect in any way with respect to the style, it will not be given a gold medal. Which is sometimes why there is no gold medal awarded in a category. It’s not a ranking contest, medals are given based on very specific guidelines for gold, silver and bronze awards. By the time the judges get the remaining beers for the medal round, the beers are, by and large, world class examples of the particular style. And determining which get awarded medals can be tough and at times contentious. The discussions and debates that occur are always respectful, but judges are not always in agreement over which beers deserve to be awarded a medal. This year there were 94 separate categories that were judged. All the judges have proven skills in taste evaluation of beers and knowledge of beer styles. In an impressive showing, 75% of the judges this year were from outside the United States. And no judge is allowed to judge in a category that they have a beer entered in. It was a pleasure and an honor to sit at the table with some of the best brewers in the world and judge this year’s World Beer Cup. The integrity of the competition is at the highest level, and my congratulations to all the winners this year, many of whom are good friends. Editor’s note: This article originally appeared on Mitch’s blog, hoptripper.com, which provides a unique perspective on the brewing world. At the Craft Brewers Conference this past month, Mitch was the recipient of the Brewers Association’s Russell Schehrer Award for Innovation in Craft Brewing, determined by a committee vote made up of members of the Brewers Association advisory board.


American Craft Beer Week MAY 12-18, 2014

Declaration of Beer Independence

I

declare that these are historic times for beer, with today’s beer lover having inalienable rights, among these life, liberty, and the pursuit of hops and malt fermented from the finest of U.S. small and independent craft brewers with more than 2,700 of them brewing today, and,

I declare the beer I choose to enjoy is not a commodity, but more importantly an artistic creation of living liquid history made from passionate innovators. The beer I drink furthers our culture and teaches us geography and helps to nurture a sense of community, and helps to make the world a better place, and, I declare to practice the concept of “Informed Consumption,” seeking and deserving to know if my beer comes from a small and independent brewer or if it is owned by a mass production brewing company. I want to know why so many of my local beer brands are not available in many of my favorite restaurants, bars and beer stores, and I encourage beer sellers to offer a wide selection of beer styles and beer brands that includes beer from my local and regional breweries, and, I declare American craft brewers provide flavorful and diverse American-made beers in more than 140 distinct styles that have made the United States the envy of every beer-drinking nation for the quality and variety of beers brewed. I declare that beer made by American craft brewers helps to reduce dependence on imported products and therefore contributes to balanced trade, and, I declare to champion the message of responsible enjoyment of craft beer, the beverage of moderation, as the makers of these beers produce libations of substance and soul that are sincere and authentic, and the enjoyment of them is about savoring the gastronomic qualities including flavor, aroma, body and mouthfeel, while practicing responsible appreciation. I therefore declare to support America’s small and independent craft brewers during American Craft Beer Week, May 12-18, 2014, and beyond…

Signed:

®

CraftBeer.com Presented by the Brewers Association

Made official in 2010 by the House of Representatives, the goal of American Craft Beer Week (#ACBW) is to celebrate the United States’ small and independent craft brewers. Here in San Diego, one day in particular showcases the multitude of good beer we both offer and attract: May 17

Butcher’s 1-Year Anniversary

Having taken over Manzanita’s old digs, Butcher’s is throwing a birthday bash complete with live music and food trucks. 11 a.m. to noon is the VIP hour ($25 gets you unlimited tastings, a t-shirt and a plastic pint glass - be sure to drink and the special Anniversary IPA) and noon to 6 p.m. is $5 general admission. Music includes Najor Giulino Duo, Action Andy and the Hi-Tones, Without Papers, and Takahashi. Food trucks include Porkateers and Pizza Pazza.

Aztec’s 3rd Annual Bacon & Brew Fest

14 teams will compete to create the best dishes using four pounds of bacon from Cook Pigs in Julian (yes, the pigs were fed Aztec’s spent grain). Limited samples will be available for attendees on a first-come, first-serve basis. The event goes from 2 - 7 p.m. with live music all day.

Firestone Walker’s “Walker’s Wild Ride”

Co-founder of Paso Robles’ Firestone Walker, David Walker, will journey to four San Diego beer bars (Blind Lady Ale House 3 p.m., Live Wire 5 p.m., Toronado 6:30 p.m. and Hamilton’s 8 p.m.) in his ‘64 Rover, tapping specialty kegs all along the way; they’ll be spinning a wheel to determine which beer from the Barrelworks operation will be pouring at each location.

North Park Festival of Arts

This long-running beer festival is always a hit on Ohio Street. More than 30 local breweries will be on hand, with general admission going from noon - 5:45 p.m. No day-of tickets will be sold though, so buy early! VIP starts at 11 a.m. with unlimited sampling ($55) and GA attendees get 13 four-ounce tasters for $30. View the rest of this month’s event calendar at WestCoasterSD.com/event-calendar

30 | May 2014


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BEER FESTIVAL

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EN

TRIANGL

Free Admission Arts & Craft Vendors Bounce Houses Music & Food Trucks

ER O LU B RY C

LA JOLLA

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GO

   

    

GOLDENARTS TRIANGLE & CRAFT

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ERED 19

86

Nobel Athletic Fields & Rec. Center Saturday, June 28

10AM - 4PM

10,000 Sq. Ft. Craft Beer Garden 11AM - 4PM

Craft Beer Garden Tickets $25

Purchase at: www.lajollagtrotary.org San DiegoÕ s Finest Craft Brewers

Event supports 45+ local non-profits through Rotary Club of La Jolla Golden Triangle Sponsors


A food, farm and craft beer pairing event celebrating the unique role of craft brewers, local growers, and restaurateurs in cultivating community and health. Proceeds from this event benefit Community Health Improvement Partners’ efforts to tackle obesity through the development of a healthy, sustainable and regional food system.

SUNDAY MAY 18, 2014 1:00-4:00pm

$55 for General Admission $25 for Designated Driver Visit: www.sdchip.org/brew to purchase tickets Sponsorships Available

LOCATION:

SILO in Makers Quarter 753 15th Street San Diego, CA 92101 SAN DIEGO’S TOP BREWERS, RESTAURANTS, AND FARMS FEATURED INCLUDE: Stone Brewing Company Coronado Brewing Company Ballast Point The Lost Abbey URBN Alchemy Cultural Fare & Cocktails The Grill, Lodge at Torrey Pines Sadie Rose Baking Co. Stehly Farms Organics Sage Mountain Farm Connelly Gardens ....and many more!

Harder + Company Community Research | Hughes Marino


PADRES TAILS, TROOPS & TAPS TAILGATE PARTY! S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 9 T H V S . N E W YO R K M E T S A pre-game tailgate party & Padres game celebrating North County’s thriving craft beer industry. Drunken Pig BBQ and Belgium Delights on-site for purchase.

Tailgate Party

VIP: 2-5pm. Standard entry: 3-5pm.

Padres Game

Upper Infield sections 300-312. First Pitch at 5:40PM.

VIP-level ticket ($50):

Standard Ticket ($35):

• Padres game ticket, • 10 beer tasting vouchers • “Meet and Greet” + special beer • Souvenir koozie

• Padres game ticket • 8 beer tasting vouchers

Breweries in Attendance: Latitude 33 Brewing Company, Aztec Brewing Company, Belching Beaver Brewery, Iron Fist Brewing Co., Prohibition Brewing Company, Oceanside Ale Works, Breakwater Brewing Company, Mother Earth Brew Co., Legacy Brewing Co., Backstreet Brewery, White Labs, Arcana Brewing, and Iron Fire. Directly supported by Cigar Grotto Gives Back and Paws’itive Teams with special thanks to West Coaster Magazine and Local Wally’s Guide to San Diego.

TICKET PURCHASES: www.padres.com/northcountybrew QUESTIONS? CONTACT: Julia Speace (619) 795-5164 or jspeace@padres.com Jamie Hinde (619) 795-5118 or jhinde@padres.com

westcoastersd.com

drinkupsandiego.com


Micro-maltster Curtis Davenport checks out his new crop of barley in the Santa Ynez Valley. Photo by Kristina Yamamoto

Malt and a ornia-Crafted

Calif

ustry

Changing Ind

BY ERIKA BO

LDEN

I

n Southern California we proudly “drink local.” Having a favorite brewery in your community is part of your identity as a craft beer consumer. But the beer you are drinking is not as local as you think; domestic base malt is grown and malted almost entirely in the northern and middle United States. Thanks to the entrepreneurial efforts of craft maltsters, however, this is changing for the first time since the craft beer movement began. CALIFORNIA MALTING CO. California Malting Co. is a new craft malting operation in Santa Barbara County. Curtis Davenport – farmer and micro-maltster – oversees his 2014 planting of 2-row barley on fifty acres, sharing land with vineyards in the Santa Ynez Valley. Davenport is at the forefront of a changing industry. He expects to yield about two tons per acre from his current crop, which he will harvest in July or August of 2014. West Coaster recently put him in touch with Firestone Walker’s Barrelworks operation, and he’ll soon provide them malt for a small-batch collaboration

with local homebrewers utilizing wild yeast from the area. Last year, Davenport successfully sold his first viable load to Telegraph Brewing Co. in Santa Barbara and to two microbreweries opening in Goleta and Carpinteria. To malt his 2013 barley, he leased a kiln from Rebel Malting Co. in Reno, Nevada and repurposed a shipping container into a traditional floor malting system. While Davenport hopes to increase California Malting Co.’s yield and malting capacity to the point where he can provision a regional craft brewery, which would require about 500 tons, malting is only one aspect of Davenport’s vision. “I’m most interested in connecting farmers who want to grow heirloom grain with brewers who can preserve the identity of the grain,” said Davenport. “With the current state of the industry, this is impossible.” No infrastructure is in place to turn a regional farm’s barley into malt for a craft brewery, and giant malting facilities could never process such a customized load. Davenport’s agricultural concerns dovetail with this opportunity to supply a niche market. “I come from a farming perspective over brewing. The initial motivation

for California Malting Co. was to promote the agricultural benefits of grain crops. Barley is a ‘dryland crop’ that needs little to no irrigation in an average year, so it can be well-suited to California. But I also want farmers to see the benefit of rotating crops. For example, if you take acreage of vegetables out of production for the entire year and rotate in a grass like barley, you are restoring organic material to the soil,” Davenport explained. The biodynamic advantages don’t end there: “If you have fields of tomatoes, squash, and strawberries, pests and diseases that target those crops will flourish – rotate barley in and you can break their life cycle and naturally reduce them the next year.” A Wyoming native, Davenport grew up in Colorado and attended Westmont College in Santa Barbara as a biology major with an ecology focus. He went on to work with esteemed organic Santa Barbara farmer Tom Shepherd for three years, where he gained experience with native grass restoration and became interested in barley. Davenport is a fan of breweries that make rustic, earthy saisons showcasing malts in a traditional way, like Upright Brewing Co. out of Port-

WestCoasterSD.com | 35


land, Oregon. “I would love to see farmhouse beers made on farms,” he said. Funky sours and eastern European pilsners also exhibit flavors that fuel his passion for raw ingredients. If malt is the focus, why not grow and process specialty malt that you can sell in smaller quantities at a higher price? “My focus in base malt is simply because it is what 90% of beer is made of. I’m interested in altering grains as little as possible. If I have something special like White Sonora Wheat I don’t want to roast it to the point where its subtleties are replaced by too much char. Low-kilning base malt allows the grain to have its unique characteristics shine through. But I understand the importance of crystal and caramel malt, and I’m interested in making them eventually.” CRAFT MALTSTERS GAINING MOMENTUM In March 2012 a group of North American craft maltsters entered into talks about their emerging industry. At the 2013 Craft Brewers Conference (CBC) in Washington D.C. they set goals for bylaws and applied for non-profit status, and in January of 2014 their website went live. The Craft Maltsters Guild’s first annual meeting, will take place in Denver at the 2014 CBC in April. Their mission is “to promote and educate the general public about the tradition of craft malting in North America” among other, industry-oriented goals. Recognizing the need to open the lines of communication between the malting and brewing industries, a Brewers Association (BA) working group comprised of prestigious brewers and industry professionals has prepared a white paper for publishing at the end of April that includes a wish list for all maltsters. Chris Swersey, Technical Brewing Projects Coordinator for the BA, oversaw the paper throughout development. “There are technical elements to the paper, but really it is the result of hundreds of conversations over the last few years with breeders, growers, maltsters, and brewers,” Swersey said. “We’re trying to distill some of the things we’ve heard and learned about ideals for malting barley. We are looking into key areas; for instance: what is the diastatic power of the malt you use now and what would it be ideally? We want a consensus, even a range – some sort of happy spot for all-malt brewers. Then we look at how that differs from what is currently being offered.” Malting is a tradition historically bound to America’s identity – Samuel Adams worked in his family’s malthouse, not as a brewer. The practice has waned since Prohibition. But just as the beer industry has changed significantly

in the last thirty years, so too will the malt industry shortly. “This is important,” Swersey said, “because while craft brewers are making 7.8% of the volume of beer in the U.S., a pretty small proportion, they are consuming around 27% of the malt consumed by all U.S. brewers. Maltsters sell volume. Craft beer is four to five years away from gobbling up onethird of the malt consumed by U.S. brewers. It can take eight to ten years to bring a new malting barley variety into industrial production. Because brewers’ needs differ from what is available, change with intent needs to begin now.” More research is needed on malted barley. Swersey continued, “We don’t even have the nomenclature for talking about flavor and aroma in base malt, besides generalizations of the raw ingredient. Ask twelve different brewers about what malt flavor means and you’ll get twelve different answers.” The most significant research on the subject is being done at North Dakota State University, Oregon State University, and University of Idaho.

36 | May 2014

I’m interested in altering grains as little as possible. If I have something special like White Sonora Wheat I don’t want to roast it to the point where its subtleties are replaced by too much char.

had no one to sell it to in parts of the country like New England. If the craft malting industry can help small farms stay viable, that is in everyone’s interest. Farmers have a hard time direct-marketing, so we’ve created a new market for them.” Additionally, the flavor potential of craft malt is greater than what is currently available. “A large malting company can’t blow a 100ton batch on experimental flavors,” Davenport said. “There’s real potential to taste differences in barley from a particular region or year, but the territory is unexplored. We should be thinking about breeding specific varieties of barley for their flavor and regional growing requirements, not their disease resistance.” Craft malting is the necessary step between a regional family farm that wants to incorporate a rotation of barley and a brewer working on a 15 to 30 bbl system. GROWING AND MALTING 2-row barley is planted from seed in November right before the rainy season begins (in a non-drought year). A seedhead emerges on the sheath of grass as the plant grows to waist height about four months after planting. By summer the barley begins to dry out and is harvested with a combine when the grain has a moisture content of 13%. Because malt is sold by weight, the health and heft of each grain is the primary factor in producing a successful yield. After harvest the straw stalk might go back to the grower – Davenport gives his to one of his farmers, who then uses it for various purposes in his pumpkin patch – and the raw barley is sent to a seed cleaner before the barley kernels are sent to the maltster, during which the plant undergoes a short dormancy. The malting process begins when barley kernels steep in water in a large, conical tank at about 58˚F for two days. Saturated with fluid that activates enzymes, the “chitted barley” now begins germination. Keeping the grain aerated at this point is essential for development, and it prevents any fungal growth. A traditional maltster utilizes floor malting, a process in which damp grain packed about four inches deep is regularly turned with a shovel. Modern and industrial maltsters use a pneumatic malting germination system which is automated and can handle much larger loads. Three to five days into germination, an acrospire grows at one end underneath the husk and tiny rootlets emerge from the other side, while beta glucanase breaks down cell walls – this is called modification. This readies enzymes that will convert the grain’s starches to fermentable sugar that yeast can eat and make into beer. A maltster observes what state

ADVANTAGES OF CRAFT MALTING

Almost all of the domestic malt used in U.S. beer – macro and craft alike – comes from a few industrial malting facilities in North America. These large-scale plants handle quantities of barley shipped in by train car from a number of states. Regardless of whether the production levels of the breweries they are supplying are in the thousands, or millions, of barrels per year, the base malt is often the same. This is at odds with the ethos of craft beer. Andrea Stanley, President of the Craft Maltsters Guild and owner of Valley Malt in Hadley, Massachusetts explained, “One of the major reasons craft beer has been successful comes from the desire to support local. Craft malt is more expensive than commodity malt but we offer what they can’t: a locally-sourced primary ingredient.” The importance of craft malt isn’t just to uphold craft beer values, Stanley told West Coaster. “Barley is a cover crop that restores the soil. It is agriculturally beneficial to farmers, but until recently they


of modification the grain is in, and then determines if it is time to terminate germination in the “green malt” which has swollen to 46% moisture content. It is essential that modification be observed closely, as different malt requires a different level of development; a pilsner malt is less modified than 2-row barley malt, for example. Under-modified malt will clog a brewing system and over-modified malt will produce beer with too little body. Germination and modification are terminated by the application of indirect heat, called kilning. This also stabilizes starches and gently toasts the grain. Kilning is done low and slow; at its highest point over a 24-hour period, the temperature will not exceed 200˚F. Now the finished base malt, which has dried out to 3% moisture, is ready for storage and use. MALTING MATTERS As the demand and popularity for craft beer continues to rise, small farmers and micro-maltsters have stepped up to deliver what large companies can’t: regionally-focused, premium-quality barley. Imagine the one-off possibilities if there were signature barley types for every growing region in America. Like the Maris Otter variety, the flavor and performance of which can’t be replicated anywhere outside the United Kingdom, California could have its own malt. Not only are operations like California Malting Co. offering craft beer drinkers broader selection and a more nuanced, local product, they are reinvigorating the relationship between growers and brewers. “The conversation has started,” said Chris Swersey. “The malt market is fast becoming more complex and increasingly differentiated.” Editor’s note: This article, as well as the one on pages 32 and 33, originally appeared in the spring edition of our West Coaster Southern California magazine, which covers San Diego to Paso Robles. To view or download that issue, plus the three that came before it, please visit WestCoasterSoCal.com. Cheers!

Davenport’s traditional floor malting system in a repurposed shipping container. Courtesy photo

The Lost Abbey's Lost Barrels at Ritual Friday 5.23.2014


The exclusive U.S. importer for ten European breweries, with nearly 60 labels on their roster like Gulden Draak, Piraat, Petrus Aged Pale, Popperings Hommel, and Praga, is throwing a nationwide series of parties and benefit events that kick off in San Diego this month.

PINTS FOR PROSTATES Global Beer Network celebrates 20 years by raising money for the cause

This custom-built donation cask will visit 100 USA bars. Photo courtesy Global Beer Network

Each location listed below will have a visit from the traveling celebratory chalice and a donation cask (shown to the left). Global beer is donating $10,000 to Pints for Prostates, a grassroots campaign that funds education and awareness efforts to help fight prostate cancer. 100 participating pubs will match the fundraising efforts for a total donation of $20,000. Here are the dates, times and locations of local events: SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2 P.M. - CLOSE: Brabant (2310 30th St., South Park) FRIDAY, MAY 16, 5 P.M. - CLOSE: KnB Wine Cellars (6380 Del Cerro Blvd., Del Cerro) SATURDAY, MAY 17, 12 P.M. - CLOSE: Public House (830 Kline St., La Jolla) MONDAY, MAY 19, 4 P.M. - CLOSE: Encinitas Ale House (1044 South Coast Hwy. 101, Encinitas) FRIDAY, MAY 23, 6 P.M. - CLOSE: Hoffer’s Cigar Bar (8282 La Mesa Blvd., La Mesa)


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

17. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 18. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 19. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Barleymash 600 5th Ave. | 619.255.7373 www.BarleyMash.com 4. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 5. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 6. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 7. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 8. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 9. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 10. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 11. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 12. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 13. Stone Brewing Tap Room 795 J St. | 619.727.4452 www.StoneBrewing.com 14. Taste and Thirst 715 4th Ave. | 619.955.5995 www.TasteAndThirst.com 15. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 16. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com

2. Belching Beaver North Park 4223 30th St. | 760.703.0433 www.BelchinBeaver.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Carnita’s Snack Shack 2632 University Ave. | 619.294.7675 www.CarnitasSnackShack.com 5. Coin Op Game Room 3926 30th St. | 619.255.8523 www.CoinOpSD.com 6. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 7. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 8. DiMille’s Italian Restaurant 3492 Adams Ave. | 619.283.3153 www.DiMilles.com 9. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 10. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 11. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 12. Nate’s Garden Grill 3120 Euclid Ave. | 619.546.7700 13. Polite Provisions 4696 30th St. | 619.677.3784 www.PoliteProvisions.com 14. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 15. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS

1. Ballast Point Little Italy 2215 India St. | www.BallastPoint.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

B

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com

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Upas St

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HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com

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BREWERIES 1. Mike Hess Brewing (North Park) 3812 Grim Ave. | 619.255.7136 www.HessBrewing.com 2. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 3. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

UPTOWN

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com

1 3 5

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

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3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

16. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 17. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 18. The Haven Pizzeria 4051 Adams Ave. | 619.281.1904 www.TheHavenPizzeria.com 19. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 20. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 21. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 22. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 23. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 24. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 25. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net 26. Waypoint Public 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.facebook.com/WaypointPublic

Ho m e

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= NEW LOCATION

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LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brewing Company 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.246.6759 www.LaJollaBeer.com 3. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

D

PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Barrel Republic 1261 Garnet Ave. | 858.270.9922 www.BarrelRepublic.com 3. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 4. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 5. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 6. Latitude 32 Pub 5019 Cass St. | 858.273.0501 www.Latitude32Bar.com 7. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 8. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 9. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 10. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 11. Sinbad Cafe

40 | May 2014

1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 12. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 13. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 14. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars 15. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Chip’s Liquor 1926 Garnet Ave. | 858.273.1536 2. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St. | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

E

POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 3. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 4. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 5. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 6. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 7. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 8. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 9. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 10. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 11. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 12. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 13. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 14. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 15. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com 16. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse 2150 Harbor Island Dr. | 619.291.9110 www.TomHamsLighthouse.com

1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com 2. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station) 2816 Historic Decatur Rd. | 760.294.7899 www.StoneWorldBistro.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

BREWERIES 1. Modern Times Beer 3725 Greenwood St. | 619.546.9694 www.ModernTimesBeer.com

F

MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 2. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 3. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 4. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 5. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 6. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Del Mesa Foods & Liquor 6090 Friars Rd. | 619.299.1238 www.Facebook.com/DelMesaLiquor 2. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 3. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Benchmark Brewing Co. 6190 Fairmount Ave. Ste G | 619.795.2911 www.BenchmarkBrewing.com 3. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 4. Groundswell Brewing Company 6304 Riverdale St. | 619.795.2337 www.GroundswellBrew.com 5. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 6. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

G

SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900 www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com

2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Dani P’s Cork & Tap 560 Greenbrier Dr. | 760.967.0128 www.DaniPsCorkTap.com 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 6. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BREWERIES

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. 2Kids Brewing Co. 8680 Miralani Dr. #123 | 858.480.5437 www.TwoKidsBrewing.com 2. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 3. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 4. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 5. Intergalactic Brewing Company 9835 Carroll Ctr. Rd. | 858.750.0601 www.IntergalacticBrew.com 6. Mike Hess Brewing (Miramar) 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 7. Pacific Brewing Company 8680 Miralani Drive | 303.819.7086 www.PacificBrewingCo.com 8. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 9. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com 10. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 3. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 4. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

= NEW LOCATION

BREW PUBS

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

H

NORTH COUNTY COASTAL BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net

BREW PUBS

1. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com

BREWERIES 1. Arcana Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.ArcanaBrewing.com 2. Legacy Brewing Company 363 Airport Rd. | 760.705.3221 www.LegacyBrewingCo.com 3. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 4. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com


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CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

I

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 2. Hooleys Irish Pub 2955 Jamacha Rd. | 619.670.7468 www.Hooleys.com 3. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 4. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 5. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Helix Liquor 444 West Chase Ave. | 619.444.0226 4. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 5. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. BNS Brewing & Distilling 10960 Wheatlands Ave. | 619.208.9799 www.BnsBrewingAndDistilling.com 2. Butcher’s Brewing 9962 Prospect Ave. | 619.334.2222 www.ButchersBrewing.com 3. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY

1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

J

NORTH COUNTY INLAND BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 5. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 6. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 2. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 3. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com

3. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Barrel Harbor Brewing 2575 Pioneer Ave. | 760.734.3949 www.BarrelHarborBrewing.com 3. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 4. Booze Brothers Brewery 2545 Progress St. | 760.295.0217 www.BoozeBrothersBrewery.com 5. Dos Desperados 1241 Linda Vista Dr. | 760.566.6209 www.DosDesperadosBrew.com 6. Fallbrook Brewing Co. 136 N Main Ave. www.FallbrookBrewing.com 7. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 8. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 9. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 10. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 11. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 12. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 13. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 14. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 15. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com 16. Valley Center Brewery 28477 Lizard Rocks Rd. www.ValleyCenterBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 2. Smokin Beaver 146 N Kalmia St. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

K

POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brother’s Provisions 16451 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 855.850.2767 www.BrosProvisions.com 2. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 3. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 4. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 4. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS

1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

= NEW LOCATION BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

L

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Brandy Wine Liquor 1655 Brandywine Ave. | 619.421.1970 2. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 3. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 4. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Border X Brewing 8684 Avenida De La Fuente Ste. 8 619.787.6176 | www.BorderXBrewing.com

M

COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900 www.Hooleys.com 4. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 5. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 6. The Ugly Dog 6344 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.269.8204 www.TheUglyDog.com 7. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 8. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 9. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

N

ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Del Mar Rendezvous 858.755.2669 www.DelMarRendezvous.com 4. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 5. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com

Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis. com 7. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 8. Priority Public House 576 N. Coast Hwy 101 | 858.204.6656 www.PriorityPublicHouse.com 9. San Diego BeerWorks 437 S. Highway 101 | 858.353.7174 www.SanDiegoBeerWorks.com 10. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 11. Sublime Tavern 3790 Via de la Valle | 858.259.9100 www.SublimeTavern.com 12. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 13. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 14. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

BREWERIES 1. Culture Brewing Co. 111 S. Cedros Ave. | 858.345.1144 www.CultureBrewingCo.com

O

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

P

MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brooklyn Girl Eatery

4033 Goldfinch St. | 619.296.4600 www.BrooklynGirlEatery.com 2. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 3. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 4. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 5. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 6. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 7. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 8. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 9. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com 10. Toma Sol 301 W Washington St. | 619.291.1159 www.TomaSolTavern.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

BREWERIES 1. Acoustic Ales Brewing Experiment 1795 Hancock St. | 619.299.2537 www.AcousticAles.com

Q

ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

R

RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

S

JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

BREWERIES

1. Nickel Beer Company 1485 Hollow Glen Rd. | 760.765.2337 www.NickelBeerCo.com


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V

is for Valley Center Brewery

Valley Center Brewery is planning to open this new space by June 7. Photo via ValleyCenterBrewery.com

This glossary of terms comes straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com, with San Diego breweries listed in bold

dained minister, performed a wedding at his brewery using hose clamps instead of wedding rings.

Valley Center Brewery - Brewing on a 3.5 BBL system, VCB is currently moving to a larger facility which they hope to open on June 7.

Whirlpool - A method of collecting hot break material in the center of the kettle by stirring the wort until a vortex is formed; a brewhouse vessel designed to separate hot break trub particles from boiled wort.

Vorlauf - At the outset of lautering and immediately prior to collecting wort in the brew kettle, the recirculation of wort from the lauter tun outlet back onto the top of the grain bed in order to clarify the wort. Water - One of the four ingredients in beer. Some beers are made up by as much as 90% water. Globally, some brewing centers became famous for their particular type of beer, and the individual flavors of their beer were strongly influenced by the brewing water’s pH and mineral content. Burton is renowned for its bitter beers because the water is hard (higher PH), Edinburgh for its pale ales, Dortmund for its pale lager, and Plzen for its Pilsner Urquell (soft water lower PH). Wet Hopping - The addition of freshly harvested hops that have not yet been dried to different stages of the brewing process. Wet hopping adds unique flavors and aromas to beer that are not normally found when using hops that have been dried and processed per usual. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Company - Owner Dave Hyndman, an or-

White Labs - The experimental tasting room connected to the yeast production facility/brewery is hosting Franken Fest on May 9, with four varieties of beer that have 96 different yeast strains. Wort - The bittersweet sugar solution obtained by mashing the malt and boiling in the hops, which becomes beer through fermentation. Yeast - During the fermentation process, yeast converts the natural malt sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. Yeast was first viewed under a microscope in 1680 by the Dutch scientist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek; in 1867, Louis Pasteur discovered that yeast cells lack chlorophyll and that they could develop only in an environment containing both nitrogen and carbon. Zymurgy - The branch of chemistry that deals with fermentation processes, as in brewing. Also the name of the American Homebrewers Association bi-monthly magazine.


Westcoaster  

May 2014