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JULY 2014 | SERVING AMERICA’S FINEST BEER COUNTY | SAN DIEGO

AleSmith’s Peter Zien and Tony Gwynn collaborated to create this unique beer, available all season long. Read more on page 2; 1994 photograph courtesy of John Schulz, StudioSchulz.com

The first #sdbeer billboard! See it this month at University & Texas


Tony Gwynn in 1994, the year he achieved his highest singleseason batting average, .394; photograph courtesy of John Schulz (StudioSchulz.com)

TONY GWYNN COLLABORATES WITH

ALESMITH Beer released ten days before the death of Mr. Padre

B

ack in February, AleSmith’s Peter Zien was invited to Tony Gwynn’s Poway home. As reported in the media, Gwynn wanted to bring a unique San Diego beer to the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, New York, and Zien obliged. He brought samples of AleSmith X, IPA, Anvil ESB, Nut Brown, and Horny Devil to get a sense of Mr. Padre’s preferences. “We discussed the malt, hop, and fermentation characteristics of each style,” Zien told West Coaster. “We then discussed with Tony what he liked about beer. I remember him clearly stating that he liked beer to be ‘light, but with a kick.’” Later that night, Zien pondered Gwynn’s feedback, as well as how important of a figure he is to San Diego. “Then it hit me -- let’s craft a San Diego Pale Ale, a style that technically doesn’t exist, but one that San Diego brewers and others around the country are familiar with, due to our liberal use of the almighty hop cone.” The beer would be light-colored and hoppy, with low bitterness but elevated alcohol -- around 6%. Zien presented the idea to Gwynn in a follow-up meeting at the Miramar brewery, along with the name, 394, which represents the .394 batting average that the legendary baseball player achieved in 1994, his highest single-season batting average. The response was enthusiastic, and the meeting was fun for all. “The Gwynns were very excited to meet the AleSmith team members, who were equally

excited to meet them,” said Zien. Zien and company got to work. The first sample beer, brewed on their small-scale Sabco system, was delivered to the Gwynn household three weeks later for Tony and Alicia to taste. “Smiles abounded, but Tony did ask us to pull back on the bitterness level some. He wanted the beer to finish with a sweet malt aftertaste,” said Zien. After a re-brew, the beer was happily approved along with the in-house artwork designed by Alex Barbiere. At time of writing, Tony Gwynn’s 394 San Diego Pale Ale is scheduled to be a baseball season-long offering, having debuted at the Padres Beer Fest on June 6, ten days before Gwynn’s death from cancer. West Coaster also recently learned that the beer is expected to be packaged in 12 oz. 6-packs by August of this year. “It was truly a privilege and an honor to brew this beer for him,” Zien told us. “Although Tony was going through treatments during the beer brainstorming and testing, he was always upbeat, cheerful, and frequently flashed that warm smile. His family at AleSmith is committed to honoring his memory with every batch of Tony Gwynn’s 394 San Diego Pale Ale that we produce. What better of a tribute could there be than to have ‘Tony Gwynn’ and ‘San Diego’ on the same label?”


arty ry Street P a s r e iv n n A , 2014 JULY 19TH • GA: 12:30-5pm 0pm VIP: 12–1:3

Benefiting

Y E AR S

VIP Ticket s include a Private Co llaboration Cask Sess ion with M HB & participatin g brewerie s!

Four. Score.

Eleven guest breweries. Two live bands. Great food and some of the best craft beer in the world. We’re four and you score. General Admission tickets include unlimited beer samples, 4 food tasters and a cool keeper glass. VIP ticket holders get early entrance, plus a private party featuring the collaborative efforts of MHB’s Grazias Vienna Cream Ale dosed 10 different ways by our guest breweries and special treats by Andrea’s Truffles. Get your tickets before they sell out!

Coin Op, Crazee Burger, O’Brien’s, Sicilian Pizza Thing, Slater’s 50/50, Toronado, URBN Pizza, Waypoint ticketsauce.com/e/hess-fest or scan the QR code mikehessbrewing.com

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WRITERS

West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders RYAN LAMB MIKE SHESS Publisher MIKE SHESS mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor RYAN LAMB ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director KAYLA COLEMAN kayla@westcoastersd.com Graphic Designer ASHLEY DREWITZ ashley@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant TOM SHESS thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers SAM TIERNEY sam@westcoastersd.com BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com GONZALO QUINTERO drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors JOHNNY CAITO JOHN SCHULZ KRISTINA YAMAMOTO MARC FIGUEROA SARAH GATHMAN

West Coaster, THE WEBSITE Web Manager

MIKE SHESS

Web Editor

RYAN LAMB

Web Master

JOSH EVERETT

West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location. © 2014 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”

COLUMNIST

INTO THE BREW

Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

COLUMNIST

THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

COLUMNIST

PLATES & PINTS

Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan and the author of the San Diego Beer News Complete Guide to San Diego Breweries (available on Amazon.com). In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including USA TODAY, The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast, San Diego Magazine and U-T San Diego.

COLUMNIST

THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE

Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D. is a San Diego native, three-time SDSU grad, career educator, and co-founder of the popular multimedia craft beer discussion craftbeertasters.wordpress.com. An avid homebrewer, Cicerone Certified Beer Server, and seasoned traveler, Dr. Quintero takes great pride in educating people about craft beer and the craft beer culture. By approaching the subject from the perspective of a scholar and educator, Dr. Quintero has developed a passion for spreading the good word of local beer.


TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNS 16-17

29

31

37-38

Plates & Pints

Brandon Hernández grabs a short ribs and slaw recipe from Chef Alex Carballo of the upcoming Urbn St. Brewing Co.

The Carboy Chronicles

Ryan Reschan discusses the scene at this year’s National Homebrewers Conference, held in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Into the Brew

Sam Tierney dives into the differences between ales and lagers, and what it means to the craft beer drinker

The Doctor’s Office

Dr. Q focuses on how Chaldean Americans have come to own and operate so many craft beer-slinging spots in San Diego

PLUS + 6

8-9

11-13

14

19-20

25-26

35

40-41

43-45

47-51

Kelsey McNair

QUAFF member takes home yet another award for IPA, and the club barely misses out on big award in Grand Rapids

Breweries in Planning

Marc Figueroa looks behind the scenes at Abnormal Wine Company, which is getting into the beer business

#sdbeer

Some of our favorite posts on Instagram that use the hashtag #sdbeer… post your photos to promote local beer!

Ancient Brews

UCSD Extension student Sarah Gathman gives up a behind-the-scenes peak at one class that focused on ancient recipes

Brews in the News

Paragraph-sized clips of San Diego beer news. Make sure to get more by signing up for our newsletter at westcoastersd.com

Pink Boots Society

Photos from the inaugural meeting of San Diego’s Pink Boots Society chapter, plus news from a special brew at Latitude 33

Coffee & Beer

Photos from a unique coffee and beer share at Mostra Coffee, who have worked with AleSmith and Karl Strauss on beers

Guildy Pleasure

Behind the scenes at Sierra Nevada’s Beer Camp, where SDBG President Brian Scott helped brew a festival beer

Night of the Living Yeast

A scary tale of homebrew gone wrong from the blog alealerocknroll.com (follow the author on Twitter @SDFriarCat)

Craft Beer Directory & Map Are we missing any locations? E-mail directory@westcoastersd.com

ON THE COVER: Tony Gwynn, photographed in 1994, the year he achieved his highest single-season batting average. Mr. Padre’s collaboration with AleSmith will soon be available in 12 oz. 6-packs. Photo courtesy of John Schulz, StudioSchulz.com


Kelsey McNair (center), flanked by Lagunitas CMO Ron Lindenbusch (on McNair’s right), and Russian River Co-Owner/Brewmaster Vinnie Cilurzo (on McNair’s left) at the California Craft Brewers Association General Meeting in May. Photo by Tim Stahl

T

he American Homebrewers Association (AHA), the organization devoted to promoting the community of homebrewing, hosts the annual National Homebrewers Conference, this year held in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The conference is a three-day event where homebrewers congregate to learn about beer and brewing, to interact with other members of the community, and to share and to taste a lot of delicious commercial and homebrewed beer. Importantly, the conference culminates in the National Homebrew Competition, the largest beer judging competition in the world. After two days of judging what is seemingly an impossible amount of beers—the competition saw 8,685 entries this year—the best beers in each style category were awarded a gold, silver, or bronze medal. Additionally, the AHA recognizes the Homebrewer of the Year and the Homebrew Club of the Year for their achievements in brewing. San Diego homebrewers have done well in this competition in years past, and this year was more of the same. For starters, Kelsey McNair was awarded the gold medal in the IPA category for his hoppy delight, Hop-Fu!, a 7.5% ABV San Diego IPA. “I designed the beer to deliver a huge blast of hop flavor and aroma featuring lemon and orange citrus, oily dank hop resins, pine, and tropical fruit,” says McNair. The hop profile is impressive, featuring Columbus, Centennial, Chinook, Warrior, Simcoe, Amarillo, and Citra hops. McNair says he “immediately fell in love with Citra’s raw juicy orange and tropical fruit, which played really well with all the other hops.”

The judges at the competition love Hop-Fu! too. Not only did the beer beat out 851 other entrants in IPA in this year’s competition, but the same beer has won medals in 2010, 2012, and 2013. Other San Diego homebrewers to win medals this year included Peggy and Tom Kelly with a Belgian Strong Ale, and Justin Fleming with an English BY MIKE V. SARDINA Brown Ale. The historic local homebrew club, Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity (QUAFF), had a tremendous showing in this year’s competition too. QUAFF was this year’s runner-up for the AHA Club of the Year by a narrow margin of just six points behind the incumbent winner, The Brewing Network club. Travis Hammond led the coordination of QUAFF’s efforts, saying,“I am proud of the work we have done as a team, and I believe we can win [Club of the Year] next year. Just don’t tell that to The Brewing Network.” Look for Team QUAFF to make a strong showing next year, when the conference and the competition returns to San Diego June 11 through June 13.

Local Homebrewers Earn Recognition at the National Level

KELSEY MCNAIR’S IPA STANDS OUT, AGAIN

Besides being a homebrewer and a member of QUAFF himself, Mike Sardina is the Assistant Executive Officer at Societe Brewing Company in San Diego. Mike’s passion for San Diego-style IPA—including hoppy beers from Alpine, Societe, and other San Diego breweries—inspires him to eat, sleep, and drink all things San Diego Beer. Follow him on Twitter @SocieteMike


IN THE WORKS

ABC group photo: Matt DeLoach (Winemaker/Co-Owner), Sean McMahan (On-Site Supervisor for RDWS), James Malone (Winemaker/Co-Owner), Mike Arquines (Executive Chef) and Derek Gallanosa (Head Brewer/Beer Curator). Photos by Rob & Ren Quitasol (RenAndRob.com)

Rancho Bernardo’s Abnormal Part of New Wave of Breweries-In-Planning BY MARC FIGUEROA

T

he Abnormal Wine Company is getting into the craft beer business. The small Rancho Bernardo winery, opened two years ago by co-owners James Malone and Matt DeLoach, is expanding its operations to include a brewery and restaurant. The new 5,000-square-foot facility just off Rancho Bernardo Road is eyeing a mid-July opening, according to head brewer Derek Gallanosa. A former brewer at Karl Strauss, Gallanosa said the Abnormal Beer Company will be brewing on a 10-barrel system and will feature classic styles, among them American Pale Ale and IPA. “We want our beers to be very drinkable, not something that destroys your palate,” he said. Mike Arquines, co-owner of the Lab Dining Sessions and Mostra Coffee, has been brought in as executive chef. With Arquines’ connections, Gallanosa said he also plans to make a coffee beer. The brewery operation will be a prominent feature in the restaurant, situated behind the bar in an area enclosed by glass.

8 | July 2014

“It’s kind of like a human aquarium,” Gallanosa said. “I will be brewing right behind the tap handles when you walk in.” Abnormal will have 40 taps, featuring local breweries along with Gallanosa’s creations. The first batches of Abnormal beer won’t be available until August. The new brewery/winery/restaurant will change its name to AWC, which stands for Ale, Wine, Comforts. The trifecta of offerings – also included are a music stage, Chef’s table, wood-fired grill and in-house charcuterie – will give patrons plenty to choose from while providing AWC artisans an abundance of freedom with their creations. “There’s a lot of potential to do a variety of different things,” Gallanosa said. “We want to sell an experience.” AWC will have inside seating for approximately 150 people and also feature outside patio seating for up to 40.


OPEN TO THE PUBLIC IN THE WORKS, continued

Beer Brewing

Dos Desperados

So far in 2014, five breweries have opened their doors to San Diego beer drinkers. (La Jolla Brewing receives an honorable mention for welcoming folks on December 30, 2013.) Additionally, Valley Center Brewery and Urbn St. Brewing have begun brewing, but weren’t quite ready at time of press to let the public into their establishments. In 2013, 27 breweries began operations, and there are more than 30 breweries currently in the planning stages.

Pacific Brewing

Council Brewing

Quantum Brewing


#sdbeer Over the next three pages we’ll share some of our favorite photos from Instagram that were uploaded using the hashtag #sdbeer. Warning: Thirst for a tasty, locally-brewed beer may occur.

@alesmithbrewing

@beercon

@bigwavedave25

@breezycoral

@breweryadvertising

@catsontap

@channel5news

@christenac

@costhebrewer WestCoasterSD.com | 11


@dietbeer

@dosdesperados

@erin369

@evrbottle

@fitzjive

@helmsbrew

@heroesbrewfest

@indianjoebrewing

@jeffhdsee

@mishmashgourmet

@natesquill

@oawbrew

Follow @westcoastersd on Instagram, and don’t forget to use #sdbeer in your uploads


Our favorite #sdbeer photos will appear in the August issue of West Coaster San Diego

@scavengerstour

@sd_alchemist

@sdbeerlife

@societebrewing

@stonecompanystores

@tapthattaproom

@thatssofletch

@thebrewproject

@themexicanner

@tommy619bjj

@urgegastropub

@vkopp6912

WestCoasterSD.com | 13


ANCIENT

BREWS By Sarah Gathman,

UCSD Extension Brewing Certificate Program Student

I

n the Origins and History of Brewing class I had a unique opportunity to try the very first beers ever brewed. Our instructor Christopher McGreger and Yuseff Cherney brewed our class three historical replicas of what ancient civilizations drank. Although the exact era when people began brewing is unknown, it is believed that people were brewing in the Neolithic Age in Gobekli Tepe 12,000 years ago. During the empires of the Sumerians, Assyrians, and Babylonians, it is accepted that brewers had perfected the art of brewing and there are records of 40 types of beer brewed during that time (McGreger). The beer we got to taste in class is called Kaš (pronounced ‘kash’) Kal. It was quite a bonding experience for our class as we all tentatively bellied up to the ancient brews still actively fermenting to taste history. The first beer we tried was made from two row malt, kamut, spelt, a yeast starter consisting of malt extract, sourdough yeast, and a culture of Lambic yeast from White Labs (probably not available in ancient times). The beers followed the basic recipe consisting of 1/3 malted barley, 1/3 unmalted barley, and 1/3 beer bread ball with sourdough yeast. The second beer was the same as the first, except without a yeast starter. The third beer was made from two row malt, spelt, and black barley – and it was pink! These beers were not heated before fermentation, and we relied on the low pH of fermentation and alcohol concentration to kill off bacteria that could hurt us. Each beer tasted remarkably different. I enjoyed the first beer the most since it tasted like liquid bread. The second and third beers were more acidic: due to the lack of a yeast starter, wild yeast and bacteria had a greater chance to influence fermentation. We also got to try beer balls (called Titab); early brewers likely traveled with these beer balls and used them to start a new brew. The balls were made with yeast, two row malt, kamut, spelt, and black barley. The baked balls had a crust on the outside that pro-

14 | July 2014

(top left) early yeast starters with grains; (top right) the author’s brewing experiment. (bottom right) One of the ancient brews served in class at UCSD; Photos courtesy @sarahgbrewgirl tected the yeast inside. People would crush up the balls into water and would have the yeast and barley needed to make beer. When fermentation was complete they could scoop up the yeast and other ingredients and reform the ball to be used again. Mentally jump forward about 14,000 years from Gobekli Tepe to the first settlers of America. I had a chance to brew my “Settlers’ Beer” today which is our extra credit assignment in class. I perused my American history book from high school to refresh my memory about the first American settlers and what they may have had available. I feel that the settlers of Jamestown would have had access Juniper berries, black tea from England, corn, and chamomile, and so did I at my local homebrew store. I made a tea with the berries, chamomile, black tea, and corn flakes. I dissolved my maple syrup into warm water, mixed in the tea and used some yeast from a cider I had fermenting. I decided to put an airlock on my carboy, but I might be getting a little big for my settler britches thinking I understood the “disease of beer” before Louis Pasteur. I’ll let you know how it tastes. Sarah Gathman is part of the first cohort of students in UCSD Extension’s Brewing Certificate Program, and she created a personal blog (ucsdbrewingprogram.com) to give an insider look into the brewing world of San Diego and her experiences in the program. Sarah has a degree in Molecular Biology from UCSD and has worked as a enzymologist/ fermentation scientist in the biotech industry. Follow her on Instagram @sarahgbrewgirl or email her via sarah@ucsdbrewingprogram.com


URBN Renewal T PLATES & PINTS

he only bitter aftertaste residents of El as well as a pair of URBN Coal-Fired Pizza eaterCajon Brewing Company’s namesake ies in North Park and Vista, Mangini is no stranger community expected when that brewpub to craft beer or its customer appeal. But passion, was installed on their main drag in 2011 understanding and business sense aren’t enough to was what might follow a swig of its India pale ale. open a brewpub. There’s the whole brewing thing Unfortunately, the owners of that business to consider, and in filling the brewmaster role, burned through two infusions of taxpayer funds Carballo sourced from his old stomping grounds, registering in the hundreds of thousands of dolhiring Callaway Ryan, a senior brewer from Stone lars, which would have been fine had they made Brewing Co. with roots extending back to popular any notable impact on the local beer scene, decent Minneapolis operation, Surly Brewing Co. brews or enough money to stay open. None of that “He brings a little East Coast with a dose of transpired, forcing the business to go bankrupt and West Coast swagger,” says Carballo. “I would say unceremoniously shutter its doors last summer. it’s like if Dr. Dre and Eminem made craft beer— Understandably, that left El Cajon citizens disapDre beats over East Coast rap…the earlier years, pointed, angry and sporting a highly visible black of course. With Callaway’s brewing talent, Jon’s eye in the heart of its downtown area. keen eye for design and my love for this industry, Fortunately, a group of bona fide hospitality we plan to turn some heads for sure.” industry professionals was able to see that vacated Dubbed URBN St. Brewery, the brewpub will blemish as an opportunity to take a second swipe feature 40 taps, 10 of which will be designated for at bringing an authentic craft beer experience to the beers produced onsite. Carballo says the tap list will BY BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ East County municipality. But it took a popular perfeature beers and styles from all over the world, insonality in the local beer scene to spearhead the efcluding 10 taps which will be outfitted with smallfort. That individual is chef Alex Carballo. A veteran toque whose batch brews. Carballo has several methods for marrying the beer served as executive chef at Indigo Grill, Brigantine and The Fishand food elements of the brewpub as well as providing means for ery, but is most well-known for helming Escondido’s high-profile appreciating the ales and lagers they’ll serve. beer mecca, Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens, his resume is “My goal is to properly train our staff so that they get ‘it.’ We an impressive one. There was only one thing missing from it. will have some basic recommended pairings, but that only goes “I’ve always wanted to start my own project, and what better so far. Our staff will have knowledge of the beers we are servway to kick off my entrepreneurship than opening a brewery and ing so they can properly guide our customers,” says Carballo. “We restaurant in my own backyard?” A La Mesa resident, Carballo will also have some fun events like craft beer education sessions, was motivated to have an impact on the area he calls home, and and food-and-beer dinners. Maybe I’ll even convince my good pal quickly recognized El Cajon Brewing’s closing as a potential posiand pairing partner “Dr.” Bill Sysak from Stone to join me for old tive. “After I heard it had closed, I jumped on the opportunity right times’ sake.” away and started looking for the right partnership.” While pairing-based events will feature dishes custom-made The symbiosis he sought was found in Jon Mangini and the to illustrate the compatibility of beer and food, the everyday menu URBN Restaurants Inc.. The muscle behind East Village’s BASIC currently mirrors URBN’s North Park location. However, house-

URBN St. Brewery chef Alex Carballo breathing flavorful life into former El Cajon Brewing Company brewpub

Chef Carballo brewer Callaway Ryan

16 | July 2014

Opposite page: Chef Carballo’s short ribs and blue cheese slaw. Photo by Ryan Lamb


made sausages, brunch items, whimsical desserts and other venuespecific items will be introduced once the business’ and its staff get their footing. For now, an original taste of Carballo’s cuisine is provided in the following summer-specific recipe for grilled short ribs with a quick-and-easy blue cheese-studded coleslaw. “Grilling is always great with beer, because when you grill food, it brings out the caramel notes in beers such as brown ales, porters and pale ales. Hoppy beers are nice with spicy food because of the cooling effect they have. Also, the spiciness brings out the beer’s citrus notes.” In addition to a recipe, Carballo also shared some tips for pairing beer with food. First and

foremost, he says, do not over-complicate things, racking your brains and, in the process, over-thinking the pairing. “Start easy. For example, pale ales and porters are very food-friendly beers that go great with many types of cuisine. Try them with some of your favorite foods and make some notes about what you like in the pairing.” He also points to the wealth of information that exists on the Internet, and suggests attending beer-and-food dinners because of the amount of insight into pairing methodologies that is typically doled out at such events. Like the ones Carballo and company will hold at URBN St. Brewery. OK, that’s a bit of a shameless plug, but it seems allowable for someone working to heal a wounded community through craft beer.

Chef Alex Carballo's Grilled Short Ribs with Quick & Easy Blue Cheese Cole Slaw Yield: 4 servings 1 1/2 pounds pork short ribs, cut into 1/8-inch thick slices with bones attached 2 cups URBN St. Brown Ale (or your fa-

vorite brown ale to substitute) 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup red onion, diced 2 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp garlic, crushed 1 Tbsp salt 2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes 1/2 Tbsp freshly cracked pepper

1 tsp cumin 1 cup Quick & Easy Blue Cheese Cole Slaw (recipe follows) fresh cilantro leaves, for garnish

Place the ribs in a sealable plastic bag. Whisk together the remaining ingredients and pour into the bag. Refrigerate and let marinate for at least 30 minutes (and preferably, overnight). Preheat grill to high (use charcoal for best results). Place the ribs on the grill for 2 minutes per side. Reserve some of the marinade and brush onto the ribs as they are grilling. Transfer the ribs to a low-heat section of the grill and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, depending on heat level. The ribs will be ready when they start to break when lightly squeezed. Remove from heat and serve, family-style, on a large platter with coleslaw. Garnish with cilantro leaves and serve immediately.

Quick & Easy Blue Cheese Coleslaw Yield: 10 to 12 servings

2 12-ounce bags broccoli coleslaw (in the bagged salad section of the grocery store) 1/2 cup scallions, thinly sliced

1 jalapeño, seeded and thinly sliced 1/4 cup whole milk (optional) 1/4 cup sour cream 1/2 sprig cilantro, chopped dash Worcestershire sauce 1/2 cup mayonnaise 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar

1/3 cup blue cheese, crumbled dash garlic powder salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Place the coleslaw, scallions, jalapeño and cilantro in a bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, milk, sour cream and Worcestershire sauce until completely incorporated. Stir in the rest of the ingredients. Add half of the dressing to the slaw mixture. Season with salt and pepper, then add desired amount of additional dressing to the mixture. Cover and refrigerate for 20 minutes.


SAVE THE

BREW DATE AUGUST 23rd 2014

TH

IR S

TY

FOR KN O WL

E

DG

E

4th Annual Beer-Con 9am-8pm Marina Village Conference Center San Diego, CA

15

Hand Selected

Breweries

Industry Speakers

Special Lunch Pairing

Tickets www.beer-con.com

Swag Bag T-Shirt + More!


BREWS

IN THE CA BREWERIES ELIGIBLE TO SAVE CASH Starting this summer, California craft breweries will have a new way to save money. Effective July 1st, the sales and use tax rate in California will lower to 3.3125% on all qualifying equipment purchases and leases. This reduction is due to an exemption of the state portion of the tax, currently 4.1875%. Local sales and use tax will remain in effect.

NEWS

Qualifying equipment includes property used in manufacturing, processing, refining, or recycling tangible personal property; R&D; or maintaining, repairing, measuring, or testing any qualified property. This not only covers brewing equipment, but devices used in quality control and machinery maintenance as well. Items that do not qualify are consumables, inventory, furniture and fixtures, or equipment used to store finished products that have completed the manufacturing process. So how can craft breweries get this new exemption? Simply provide the seller with a completed exemption certificate at the time of purchase. You may provide a certificate for each purchase, or you may issue blanket certificates. Exemption certificates, as well as guidance for issuing blanket certificates, can be found on the State of California Board of Equalization website by visiting http://www.boe.ca.gov/sutax/manufacturing_exemptions.htm#Purchasers Debra Druther, CPA works with a team of dynamic professionals at Lavine, Lofgren, Morris & Engelberg, LLP, one of the largest independent certified public accounting firms in San Diego. She has over six years of tax and accounting experience, with the last two focused on the craft brewing industry. Debra is a craft beer fan and candidate for the San Diego State University Professional Certificate in the Business of Craft Beer. Got questions? E-mail her via drutherd@llme.com

NEW HOP PICKER Just in time for this year’s hops, Ramona’s Star B Buffalo Ranch & Hop Farm has received shipment of a massive German-made Wolf harvester. The machine was made in the 1970s, and last month had to be cut in half before loaded into a shipping container. Despite what this means for the increase in productivity, Star B is still planning to allow homebrewers to pick their own hops on certain dates this month, while supplies last; follow them on Facebook for updates.

BREAK-IN + ARSON ATTEMPT AT RITUAL North Park’s Ritual Kitchen was the victim of an arson attempt by two suspects on May 22. The pair climbed over a patio fence and through the rear door. Surveillance footage (available on cbs8.com) shows them pouring gas in several locations throughout the business, igniting fires, and then leaving, causing an estimated $20,000 in damage. During the shutdown, Ritual was able to donate enough food to help feed people at three separate shelters with Just Call Us Volunteers. Thankfully for fans of local beer and food, Ritual reopened on June 1.

WestCoasterSD.com | 19


RUSSIAN RIVER AGAIN TOPS AHA LIST The American Homebrewers Association’s (AHA) members like their beers bitter and voted Russian River Brewing Company’s Pliny the Elder the “Best Commercial Beer in America” for the sixth year running. The poll is conducted annually by Zymurgy magazine — the journal of the AHA. This is the 12th year that AHA members voted for up to 20 of their favorite beers in an online poll. Members were able to choose any commercial beer available for purchase in the United States. As in recent years, flavorful IPAs and double IPAs continue to outshine the rest, and comprised eight of the top 10 beers. Two San Diego beers ranked in the top 10: Other local beers in the top 50 included Arrogant Bastard Ale (T18), Stone 1. Russian River Pliny the Elder 7. Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA 8. Stone Enjoy By IPA 2. Bell’s Two Hearted Ale 9. Founders Breakfast Stout 3. Ballast Point Sculpin IPA 10. Goose Island Bourbon County 4. Bell’s Hopslam 5. The Alchemist Heady Topper Stout 6. Lagunitas Sucks Ruination IPA (26), Green Flash West Coast IPA (31), and Stone IPA (37).

ginner homebrew equipment kits. Beginner kits were most commonly purchased by 30-39 year olds. • Revenue Brewing: For shops that primarily sell homebrew supplies, gross revenue grew on average by 10.5 percent in 2013. Additionally, the survey found that nearly 36 percent of businesses see homebrew/home winemaking supplies as a supplemental source of income, meaning a growing number of businesses are adding sales of home beer and wine making supplies to their existing portfolio. • Opening Doors: There was considerable growth in new shop openings, with 37 percent of respondents indicating they have been open for three years or less. Furthermore, more than 60 percent of shops reported seeing a new shop open in their area in 2013. • Beer vs. Wine: Sales of beer ingredients outpaced wine ingredients among home beverage supply retailers, with an average of 35 percent of retail revenue coming from beer ingredients versus 21 percent from wine ingredients. The full report on homebrewersassociation.org contains additional information on customer demographics, marketing and sales. Results demonstrated significant advancement in several areas monitored by the survey, including gross revenue, store openings and beginner equipment sales, indicating a growth in the industry. The AHA conducts this survey every year to provide homebrewers and supply retailers with the latest industry information.

More than 1,600 breweries were represented in this year’s poll, and the topranked brewery is Russian River Brewing Company, which had five beers in the top 50. Bell’s Brewery, Inc. took second, followed by Stone Brewing Co. in third. Ballast Point landed in thirteenth place. Additionally, the best portfolio of beers was awarded to New Belgium Brewing Co., which had 60 beers receive votes in the poll. The top contenders in the category include: 1. New Belgium Brewing Co. 2. Boston Beer Co. (Samuel Adams)

3. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. 4. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery 5. Stone Brewing Co.

HOMEBREW SALES HOP 10 PERCENT IN 2013 The American Homebrewers Association (AHA) released the results of its fifth annual Homebrew Supply Shop Survey in May, detailing the current state of the home beer and wine supply retail industry. Examining data from 408 shops across 48 states, the survey—which had a 48 percent increase in participants from last year’s report—found that gross revenue grew for shops on average by 10 percent in 2013. “Homebrewing is on the rise, both as a hobby and a business,” said American Homebrewers Association Director Gary Glass. “With the U.S. now home to some 1.2 million homebrewers, supply shops are experiencing solid growth. The growth in homebrew supply businesses means it is easier than ever for Americans to get into the hobby of homebrewing.” Survey highlights include: • Homebrew Beginners: There was a 24 percent increase in sales of be-

20 | July 2014

SAINT ARCHER @ SLEEP TRAIN The Miramar-based brewery is in the midst of another big expansion, and they’ve just finalized a partnership with Live Nation and the Sleep Train Ampitheatre in Chula Vista to become the first local brewery to pour at this venue, from a custom built bar. The Sleep Train Ampitheatre will host several acts this summer, including KISS and Def Leppard (July 6), Brad Paisley (July 10), Slightly Stoopid (July 26), Dierks Bentley (July 27), Mötley Crüe (July 30), Arcade Fire (August 5), Rascal Flatts with Sheryl Crow and Gloriana (August 17), Nine Inch Nails and Soundgarden (August 21), Wiz Khalifa (August 23), Marc Anthony (August 29), The Offspring with Bad Religion and Pennywise (August 30), Dave Matthews Band (September 5), Blake Shelton (September 6), Linkin Park (September 16), Drake and Lil Wayne (September 20), and Jason Aldean (September 25).


Sour Power at Ciro’s Pizzeria and Beerhouse

JULY 25th Event Draft List

(including but not limited to, lineup subject to change)

Firestone Walker’s Agrestic Ale Logsdon’s Seizoen Bretta Farmhouse Ale Almanac Bourbon Sour Porter 13’ Noble Ale Works 5 and Dime made with Raspberries

Allagash Brewing Company Interlude Farmhouse Ale made with Brettamyces 13’

The Bruery Tart of Darkness 12’ The Bruery Berazzled Wild Ale Lost Abbey Framboise de Amorosa Lost Abbey Spontaneous Celebration Wild Ale made with Peaches

All specialty kegs tapped @ noon! sponsored by

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PRESS BOX SPORTS LOUNGE East County’s Finest Craft Beer Bar 15 Minutes East of Downtown

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PINK

BOOTS SOCIETY New SD Chapter

Photos by Kristina Yamamoto

In early June the inaugural meeting for the new San Diego chapter of Pink Boots Society was held at Monkey Paw Pub in the East Village. “Co-chair Laura Ulrich and I are very excited about the new direction that we are taking Pink Boots Society on a local level,” said Denise Ratfield, event organizer for International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day, held in March. “I told her that I wanted to have the best chapter on the planet and I’m going to make that happen.” All women who work in the local beer industry are invited to become members of the group, which focuses on education and empower empowerment with 1,194 members and counting.

Cheers! Kat Snodgrass (Stone), Nicole Mandala (Stone), Cassie Lintz (Stone), Carli Smith (Rock Bottom La Jolla)

Denise Ratfield (Stone), Melody Campbell (Iron Fist / Vista Brewers Guild)

Rian Van Nordheim (Stone), Nicole Mandala (Stone)

Elizabeth Mandala (Modern Times)

Laura Ulrich (Stone) WestCoasterSD.com | 25


NEW BREW for PINK BOOTS Latitude 33’s Kevin Buckley explains the origins of this special brew, created to help support Pink Boots:

During the Rhythm & Brews fest in Vista I had posed the question to Denise Ratfield from Stone, “How does the Pink Boots Society get the funds to have their scholarship program?” After some conversation throughout the day, it became apparent that Latitude 33 and Pink Boots needed to pair up for a brew day. The ending result will be a hoppy oatmeal pale ale featuring a trifecta of New Zealand hops (Motueka, Nelson and Southern Cross) named Worldly Scholar. Very early in our discussions on what to brew and how this could be of benefit to Pink Boots, we received assistance and support from various people and organizations. David Cryer, the festival director of Beervana in New Zealand, has been a huge supporter of this project after being introduced to Denise by Luke Nicholas of Epic Brewing Company in Auckland. Aside from releasing this beer in San Diego, David has paved the way for some of this brew to be shipped to New Zealand where it will be represented at the Beervana fest by Denise in August. Glenn Gallagher from Country Malt has been very diligent in helping to get the ingredients for this brew. Country Malt was even generous enough to donate some of the ingredients. Local artist Monarose Ryan has also chipped in by designing a wonderful label for the limited bottle release of this collaboration. The efforts and generosity of these great people have been invaluable. Denise and I have been friends for a while, and I have had the pleasure of working with several members of The Pink Boots Society. I am very honored and pleased that we can use this project to help the PBS. Part of the proceeds from this brew will be donated to The Pink Boots Society to aid them in providing their scholarship program. Look for this beer to be out in San Diego County in early July!

Follow our local Pink Boots chapter @PinkBootsSD and with the hashtag #PBSSD 26 | July 2014


Celebrating

B

dependence D n I n a i ay elg Observed

SATURDAY • JULY 19TH • 2PM - CLOSE Wear your black, red, and gold that day and cheers to Belgium’s Birthday with these food and beer specials!

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•SAUSAGES

-FRIKANDEL: deep-fried beef brat -BOUDIN BLANC: cream-based link of roasted chicken with duck fat

•OSTEND FISH -Creamy Flemmish stew of seafood, cheese and seasonal veggies

Bottle Beer List!

•GLASSWARE GIVEAWAYS from: Delerium Duvel La Trappe Ommegang

•RARE & SPECIALTY Belgian Drafts ALL DAY!

LOCATED IN THE HEART OF SOUTH PARK, BRABANT IS SAN DIEGO’S ONLY AUTHENTIC BELGIAN PUB, SERVING TRADITIONAL LOW-COUNTRY CUISINE AND FINE BEGIAN ALES.

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The beer hall; photo © Brewers Association

THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

A TRIP TO GRAND RAPIDS 2014 NATIONAL HOMEBREWERS CONFERENCE BY RYAN RESCHAN

M

ore than 2,700 attendees descended on the 36th Annual American Homebrewers Association (AHA) conference held in Grand Rapids, Michigan this past June. In a poll conducted by the Brewer’s Association, Grand Rapids was voted Beer City USA in 2013 and shared the title with Asheville, North Carolina in 2012. The city is home to world renowned Founders Brewing Company and HopCat, a brewpub voted one of the best beer bars in the country. Other notable breweries in the city include Brewery Vivant, Harmony Brewing Company, and Grand Rapids Brewing Company. The conference was held at DeVos Place, a convention center located along Grand River with attendees staying in hotels within a short walking distance. This year 75 speakers talked during 55 seminars held throughout the three day conference. Topics ranged from making the transition to all-grain brewing, water chemistry, brewing sours beers, barrel aging beer, blending yeast strains, and making mead. Kara Taylor from White Labs and Mitch Steele from Stone Brewing Co. were local experts giving talks on yeast blending and brewing with botanicals. With four different tracks of talks going on this year, the seminars were less crowded than those at last year’s conference in Philadelphia. Also different from last year was the Welcome Toast on Thursday night, where over 50 breweries from Michigan (plus a couple from California) poured their beers for thirsty homebrewers. Club Night was in its usual Friday night spot and is always a great way to try new, weird, classic, and/or experimental beers. The homebrew competition was also the largest the AHA has put on. More than 8,000 homebrews were judged over two rounds of competition. The top three entries in the 28 categories from each of the 12 judging centers moved on to the second round judging

that took place during the conference. 969 entries were evaluated by 212 of the country’s top beer judges with the winners being announced during the Saturday night awards ceremony. New to this year’s competition was the Radegast Club of the Year award that went to the club that made the most exceptional and positive impact on its local community. The Carolina BrewMasters of Charlotte, NC beat out 25 other homebrew clubs including San Diego’s QUAFF (Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity) for the inaugural award. The club raised $77,500 in charitable donations to their local community in 2013. Homebrew Club Of The Year was a close race between QUAFF and The Brewing Network going into the final round of competition. The Brewing Network won the award by six points, making it their fourth win in a row. Considering QUAFF is a San Diego based club and The Brewing Network is a loose group of brewers from all over the country, it’s remarkable that any real homebrew club got close to winning. A special thanks goes to Travis Hammond for leading the Team QUAFF competition team to a near victory in this year’s competition. Local winners included Kelsey McNair winning gold in India Pale Ale (IPA) category 14 yet again with his beer Hop Fu!, Justin Flemming winning bronze in English Brown Ale category 11, and Tom and Peggy Kelly winning bronze in Belgian Strong Ale category 18. The great news is that the National Homebrewers Conference is coming back to San Diego next year. Mark your calendar for June 11-13, 2014 and be sure to be a registered AHA member to get tickets. While San Diego has not been voted Beer City USA, it will be time again to show the country that our county is one of the top destinations for craft beer in the world. So get brewing and help QUAFF try to take Club Of The Year on our own turf. Cheers!

WestCoasterSD.com | 29


INTO THE BREW

T

Tales of Ales & Lagers

ake a look at a beer label or bar menu and you’ll see that most beers are described as either an ale or lager. But why? What makes a beer of one type or another, and do all beers fit this dichotomy? As with anything in life, things can get complicated. Nearly all beers are fermented with one of two species of yeast: Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Saccharomyces pastorianus. Ales are fermented with the former and lagers with the latter. Remember that and you are almost home free. Almost. The name lager comes from the German word lagern, which means “to store,” as these beers were historically kept in cold cellars (“lagered”) for several months before consumption. This cold storage allowed the beers to mature, carbonate, and clarify at a time when most other beers were drunk fresh, cloudy, and relatively flat (think un-fined cask ale). These days, the defining character of a lager comes not from lagering itself (though that is still done), but from a colder fermentation of about 45-55F with S. pastorianus yeast strains. These yeast strains were originally formed from a hybridization of S. cerevisiae with a cold-tolerant yeast from South America that was an early passenger of transatlantic trade. This particular method of fermentation creates a lower level of fruity esters, and also more sulfur character, which can be reminiscent of a struck match. This is due to sulfur dioxide produced by S. pastorianus yeast strains during fermentation, which also has the beneficial property of acting as an anti-oxidant, prolonging freshness. S. pastorianus yeasts also have the ability to break down and metabolize raffinose, a longer-chain malt sugar that S. cerevisiae yeasts leave behind, leading to potentially dryer beers. The overall result is a “cleaner” fermentation character that allows the hops and malt to stand out more in the flavor profile. All commercial strains of S. pastorianus yeast are descended from two original isolates from the Carlsberg brewery in Copenhagen, where single-culture fermentation was first developed in the late 19th century. This means that compared to S. cerevisiae

BY SAM TIERNEY

strains, the genetic diversity of S. pastorianus strains is much more limited and most strains give a somewhat consistent character to beer. S. cerevisiae strains are a different story, as they were isolated later on and never had a single source like S. pastorianus strains. S. cerevisiae yeast strains have evolved in breweries in all of the historic brewing regions, from the weizen yeasts of Bavaria, to the abbey yeasts of Belgium and the ale yeasts of England, all with distinctly different fermentation character. As lager brewing with the new pure S. pastorianus yeast cultures took over most of the world, brewing with S. cerevisiae yeasts endured most strongly in the United Kingdom, and we have subsequently come to call most beers fermented with S. cerevisiae “ale,” though other S. cerevisiae-fermented beers like hefeweizen, kölsch, and porter were at least not historically called ales in their native regions. Perhaps the most category-defying style (ignoring wild beers, that’s for another day) is steam beer, as it is essentially made like as ale but with a S. pastorianus yeast strain. Saccharomyces cerevisiae likes to ferment at warmer temperatures (60-75F), which increases the amount of fruity esters and higher alcohols that it produces. This leads to typically rounder, fuller-tasting beers with varying degrees of fruity character from subtle, as in the American-type strains commonly used for IPAs, to high levels of banana, stonefruit and pear-like aroma in some German and Belgian strains. Warmer fermentations are also faster, leading to beers that can be ready to drink in just over a week. Lagers can take at least three times that, with some brewers lagering their beers for several months. This ties up valuable tank space in the brewery, which can be cost-prohibitive for most small breweries. For this reason, you see many more ales being brewed by local breweries. Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park

WestCoasterSD.com | 31


WHAT’S YOUR LEGACY?

Oceanside’s Neighborhood Brewery

ience. al exper n io s s e f rs Pro h 25 yea screen. it w e g Gold Medals a n rit rojectio rman he p e h G it f o w r Clan Ross Scotch Ale rewe g room San Diego International Beer festival inning b s tastin seating o f -g o o y -t . t s s Spaciou Award w n p r Ple e grou Growle Hellfire IPA ies, larg egs and t K r , LA International Film festival a s p e s l t t r d t o o e p B k s , o , s s g bo Pint The Chesty Irish red meeting t is bein n ble for e a m LA International Film festival il n i a v a a t r e c e a t ! p ery d en Event s he brew amplifie

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now at t

CHECK IN ONCE AT BREWERY AND SHOW THE CHECK IN TO RECEIVE A FREE TASTER

KEEP THE GLASS SPECIAL!

Stop by with this ad and keep the pint glass for $2.00 (a $3.00 savings).

@legacybrewingco Facebook.com/legacybrewingcompany 760-705-3221 | legacybrewingco.com 363 Airport Road Oceanside, CA 92058


&

Coffee

Match Made In Heaven

Beer

Local beer promoter Michael J. Macare (aka @dragonaftermarket on Instagram) recently asked his friends at Mostra Coffee roasters if they’d host a special bottle share and coffee tasting for select enthusiasts. Mostra’s creations have made their way into AleSmith and Karl Strauss beers, with Stone coming up soon. On June 19 several types of coffee were blended with various beers at a tasting party.

The partial beer list 2013 Bourbon County Stout infused with coconut and cocoa 2013 Pizza Port San Clemente Double Entendre AleSmith BA Kopi Luwak Speedway Stout AleSmith Speedway Stout with Vietnamese Coffee AleSmith Speedway Stout with Mostra Coffee cold press Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee Belching Beaver Dammed DIPA Belching Beaver Peanut Butter Milk Stout infused with raspberries Bootlegger Far Out IPA Cigar City 5 Beers for 5 Years Porter Cigar City Humidor Series American Sour Ale Cismontane XPA Citra

Firestone Walker 3 Floyds Dry Hopped Blonde Barelywine Firestone Walker Parabola 2012 Firestone Walker Parabola 2013 Firestone Walker Velvet Merkin 2013 Founders KBS BA Imperial Coffee Stout Golden Road Get Up Off That Brown Green Flash / Pizza Port / Stone HWY 78 Scotch Ale infused with Mostra Coffee cold press Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee Hoppin Frog Boris The Destroyer Oatmeal Stout Hoppin Frog Double Imperial American Stout Karl Strauss BA Wreck Alley Imperial Stout Kuhnhern 4th D Olde Ale Local Option Morning Wood Coffee Amber

Modern Times Blazing World Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout Pipeworks Imperial Ends of Days Milk Stout with cocoa, vanilla beans, cinnamon sticks, and ancho chillis Pipeworks Vanilla Coffee Abduction Stout Real Ale Coffee Porter Revolution Dethstar BA Russian Imperial Stout Rip Current BA Old Ale Anniversary Steigl Radler Terrapin Tangerine Creamsicle The Brewery Cuir The Brewery Mash & Grind Coffee Barleywine The Brewery Rue’D Floyd BA Imperial Porter infused with cherries and coffee vanilla beans

WestCoasterSD.com | 35


THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE

Craft Beer’s Chaldean Community

A

Chaldean-Americans bringing craft beer to a shop near you BY GONZALO J. QUINTERO, ED.D.

ccording to San Diego’s Chaldean American Chamber of Commerce (CACOC), “San Diego has the world’s second largest population of Chaldeans, the indigenous people of Iraq, in the world (outside of Iraq) with an estimated 71,000 people. Another 200,000 Chaldeans reside throughout the United States, particularly in the Chicago, Detroit and Phoenix areas. The Jonathan Salem population enjoys steady growth (unfortunately) due to Tony Konja Joseph Salem brothers Jonathan and Joseph a constant influx of Christian refugees who have fled Iraq Salem of South Bay Liquor in Chula Visin the face of religious persecution. Like many ethnic groups, ta, as well as brothers Sid and Omar Mikhail of Chaldeans began immigrating to America in search of better Downtown San Diego’s Best Damn Beer Shop economic, religious and political freedom and opportunities.” located inside Krisp, and Geoi Bachoua propriThe CACOC asserts that 6 out of 10 food stores in San etor of Bine & Vine in Normal Heights. What Diego are owned by Chaldean Americans. With a population of follows are the thoughts and feelings of some of 71,000 people, Chaldeans compose just over 2% of San Diego county’s population (Source: 2013 U.S. Census) yet own 60% of Sid Mikhail & San Diego’s preeminent Chaldean champions of the county’s food stores. This means that Chaldeans, essential- Geoi Bachoua craft beer. ly, own the majority of independently owned and operated food stores, a number that is actually proportionately larger when you take into account that the other 40% of food stores are, mostly, comprised of national super market chains and big-box stores. In the San Diego craft beer community, this means that if there is a liquor store, convenience store, or bottle shop that you frequent in search of your favorite craft beers, chances are, you are visiting a Chaldean-owned business. Chaldean American elder statesman, San Diego resident, and business-owner Tony Konja, owner of Del Cerro’s KnB Wine Cellars, affirmed the above assertions stating that his people, “facing religious persecution, have been immigrating to the United States since the turn of the 19th century. Our blood lines trace us back to being merchants, and naturally in the land of opportunity, we continued to be just that. My family, the Konjas, were no different; we immigrated here in 1974, sponsored by my Aunt Sue who led the way by marrying a Chaldean man who immigrated to the US in the 60s. After serving in the US military, Mike Najor along with my aunt bought a super market in Chula Vista that employed her eight siblings, which served as the building block of all the stores that we own today.” Now, the family owns Keg N Bottle stores,KNB Wine Cellars, Brabant Belgian Bar & Café in South Park, plus five other non-branded liquor stores. This happened as each uncle and aunt helped one another in not only financing and cosigning for the additional locations, but in actually working at the stores to ensure their family’s success. “I am truly blessed to have witnessed that love and strive to do my part to ensure that continues today. You will find a similar story for each of the Chaldean families you will encounter.” West Coaster had a chance to learn the story of San Diego’s Chaldean community when speaking not only with Mr. Konja, but also with other Chaldean American business owners, including

The Chaldean community is a small percentage of the San Diego population, but a large part of the craft beer movement. Can you share why this may be? Tony Konja: Chaldeans, for the past 50 years, have been investing in San Diego business, specifically grocery stores, liquor stores and gas stations. As the San Diego craft beer movement hit us all pretty hard in the past 10 years, the Chaldeans already had the brick and mortar stores in place to embrace it. Any good merchant will listen to customers’ requests and bring in the products that are being sought after. What made it so successful for us was the quick response time it took to make adjustments on our shelves and inventory. We don’t have to run this up a corporate latter, and request that the store shelf schematic change; at best, you may have to ask your father and mother, or a brother and sister, and I’m not joking! Jonathan Salem: We are all first or second generation Americans. Our family first immigrated from Iraq to Detroit and later came to San Diego. When our parents immigrated here in the late 1970s and early 1980s there were a lot of liquor stores and convenient stores available for purchase in San Diego. In fact, at that time this was the easiest option because, in that era, nobody wanted these businesses and these were the only businesses which Chaldeans were “allowed” to buy. Our parents saw it as a unique and available option. Theoretically, had there been other businesses available at the time, the Chaldean community in San Diego would be known for owning something else, but liquor and convenience stores are what we got, and we grew with them. As the first wave of Chaldeans found opportunity and, later, success, our numbers kept growing and growing.


Sid Mikhail: Our families came from Northern Iraq with high levels of education; they were doctors, lawyers, engineers, as well as merchants. The most accessible step, and the best fit, was the retail space. In our case our families bought liquor stores and convenience stores because there was good, honest living to be made with them.

Craft beer really picked us. The craft beer community, the people in our neighborhood, demanded it. If you listen to your customers, build relationships by staying on the same page, it is the best way to grow your business. Ultimately, the customer has had the most power in determining why we sell craft beer, the vote with their dollar.

What is it about craft beer that appeals to Chaldean business people?

What should people know about the Chaldean role in San Diego’s craft beer community?

Geoi Bachoua: Money. The industry is strong right now and liquor stores are trying to take advantage. Liquor stores follow trends, fads, and what’s “hot” at the moment. It’s business.

Geoi Bachoua: I’ll just be real and say most Chaldeans are just in it for the money. However, I’ve been selling craft beer since 2001. It evolved from my hobby of collecting and drinking craft beer since I was in my late teens (1995-1999). My intent on building our former business’ (South Bay Drugs) craft beer section was to simply have the community taste what I was tasting, and, if they liked it, to explore other products and styles. It was, and still is, more than just about making money.

Tony Konja: Now some brought in a few craft beers while some of us went a little wild and brought anything we could get our hands on. Call us crazy, call us innovators, call us what you want, but the result is an amazing beer selection of Tony Konja: over 2,000 craft beers from all over the I want to say Chaldeans own something world. Unfortunately, from a business in the neighborhood of 1,200 of the standpoint today, every store in town aforementioned business in the County including big box retailers are selling of San Diego. I don’t think Chaldeans craft beer, which has decreased some of went looking for craft beer, rather craft the draw to our locations. I caution the beer was looking for a home and Chalbeginner beer enthusiasts not to accept The Caldean Flag deans embraced it, learned about it, and continue to the mediocre selection that the big box retailers have explore it. For example, Jonathan Salem and I, along to offer. Just because you see Stone, Ballast Point and with other friends, enjoyed tasting some sours last month at Press Green Flash doesn’t mean the beers are stored well. All of these Box, his craft beer sports bar in Rancho San Diego during a “beer breweries have some of my favorite beers, and some of my longest sharing” program they run on Wednesday nights. relationships in the industry. You won’t find any Belching Beaver or Mother Earth brewing on their shelves though, or the knowlWhat would you like to accomplish with your craft beer cenedgeable staff that goes along with our stores. tric businesses? Jonathan Salem: Tony Konja: As the sons and daughters took over the family businesses we addOur family goal is to bring a friendly atmosphere, consistent craft ed items that we are into. We, my brother and I, for example, were beer offering, knowledgeable staff, fresh beer, at a reasonable price into craft beer. It made the work of running the store more fun beto your neighborhood near you. cause we enjoyed the product as well as the people that enjoy craft beer. The main thing, from a business standpoint, is the customer Jonathan Salem: base. Craft beer people are pleasant people who are nicer, excited We want to always keep up with the latest beers. We take pride in to try new things, and spend more money on it. Craft beer people being the best craft beer spot in the South Bay. We are remodeling are not your average liquor store customer. and redesigning our store to keep up-to-date. Joseph Salem: Sid Mikhail: The craft beer customer is a very savvy consumer who comes in We want to raise people’s awareness about craft beer in our comwith an agenda, as well as an open mind. They do their research, munity. The majority of people downtown, whether they’re resiknow everything about the beers they are purchasing or trying for dents or people who work here, don’t know about us. We pick and the first time, and they are happy to spend more on a better or new choose products based on our community’s needs, craft beer or not, product. and we want to meet more customers so we can adapt and bring new and needed items to our shop. Sid Mikhail: For us, we are a market first and foremost, not just a liquor store What can we expect from the Chaldean craft beer commuor beer shop. In fact, we sell more food than anything. I like to nity in the future? believe that Best Damn Beer Shop brings the majority of people in to Krisp, but it’s our natural food selection that’s the real catalyst.


Tony Konja: For KnB, our future plans are to grow our brewing business. We are still using guest brewers, but we are looking for somebody to take this over and give it the attention it deserves to take it to the next level. Our newest venture Brabant Belgian Café is a joint venture with my brother Randy, Adam Parker, and yours truly. I first met Adam at my Keg N Bottle on El Cajon Blvd as a college kid buying craft beer (unusual at the time, especially when all his friends were buying 40s of Old English). He helped make KnB in Del Cerro what it is today. He showed through his hard work and that red beard of his the passion I’m looking for, and he is now an equity partner in Brabant. Jonathan Salem: We hope to finish the remodel and redesign of South Bay liquor this summer. We are also growing our craft beer-centric restaurant, Press Box, out in East County more and more every day. Aside from this, we are always looking for opportunities to spread craft beer throughout San Diego. Sid Mikhail: By the end of 2014 Golden Hill will be the home of a second Krisp store that will house the second Best Damn Beer Shop. There are very few organic food markets that are also craft beer-centric in the immediate area. We will provide new products and services to the area of Golden Hill in a meaningful way. What should people know about the Chaldean people? Tony Konja: Well you can look to guys like Sid, at Best Damn Beer Shop, who took his family supermarket, reinvented the concept to a relevant health food market called Krisp, and added one of SD’s best selections of craft beer as well as a home brew shop. You can look at Joe & Johnny at South Bay Liquor and Press box. They have a retail mecca of beer at their retail location and come up with great beer events for you to enjoy at their bar and restaurant. They are an awesome brotherly duo in the craft beer community, and we are lucky to have them. Now I’ve mentioned many Chaldean names, but there are so many more that have made tremendous improvements to elevate our craft beer community. My parents Jim & Bernadette at the top, my older brother Roby, my younger sister Vicky and youngest brother Randy. All of which, own, one way or another, and make up the Keg N Bottle Family. Jonathan Salem: Chaldeans are hard workers. We try take care of the customers as best we can. We are very family-oriented. The craft beer community is very much like a family. That is probably why we like it so much. The craft beer community makes us happy. It is so rewarding to make people happy and satisfied with a rare beer or good recommendation. Sid Mikhail: We are Chaldeans, and we take our culture and traditions very seriously. We are very family-oriented, this means that we tend to help each other out and stick together to cross promote. So, when you have an opportunity to work with a Chaldean business person, it is important to keep it real and keep your word, because we sure do.


GUILDY PLEASURE Sierra Nevada Invites Guild Reps to Brew

I

n early June, brewers guild representatives from across the country traveled to Chico to help brew a special beer that will be served at each of the festivals that are part of Sierra Nevada’s seven-city Beer Camp Across America, which starts this month. Brian Scott, Karl Strauss Equipment Maintenance & Packaging Supervisor, and San Diego Brewers Guild President, represented our city, where Beer Camp makes a stop July 20 (Scott is pictured in the black shirt adding grain). Every craft brewer in the nation was invited to pour beer at the fest closest to them.


“Just to be here is incredibly inspiring,” said Scott during the pilgrimage to Northern California. “I’m seeing so many different things that I would love to convince Matt (Rattner, Karl Strauss Co-Founder and President) to buy.” Here are the Beer Camp stops: • Sat, July 19: Northwest Edition at Sierra Nevada Hop Field in Chico, CA, 12-5 p.m. • Sun, July 20: Southwest Edition at Embarcadero North in San Diego, CA, 1-6 p.m. • Fri, July 25: Rocky Mountain Edition at Civic Center Park in Denver, CO, 5-10 p.m. • Sun, July 27: Midwest Edition at Navy Pier in Chicago, IL, 12-5 p.m. • Fri, August 1: New England Edition at Thompson’s Point in Portland, ME, 5-10 p.m. • Sat, August 2: Mid-Atlantic Edition at Penn Treaty Park in Philadelphia, PA, 12-5 p.m. • Sun, August 3: Southeast Edition in Mills River, NC, 1-6 p.m. In addition to locals being a part of Guildy Pleasure, Ballast Point’s Yuseff Cherney, James Murray and Colby Chandler were invited to brew in late April. Their collaborative effort, Electric Ray India Pale Lager, will be part of the 12-pack Sierra Nevada is putting together for release in mid-July. Other collaborators include Allagash, Firestone Walker, Russian River, Ninkasi, Asheville Brewers Alliance, Victory, Oskar Blues, Bell’s, 3 Floyds, Cigar City, and New Glarus. At time of press, several Beer Camp-related events were scheduled to go down locally, with tappings happening at O’Brien’s (July 11), San Diego Brewing Co. (July 15), Hamilton’s (July 16), West Coast BBQ (July 17), Slater’s 50/50 (July 17), McGregor’s (July 18), South Paw (July 19), and Toronado (July 21).


Saturday 7/26 The Nards

Drunken Jukebox from Hell playing live at 11pm


Night of the

Beer brews and stews… Photo by Ildar Sagdejev

livingyeast

s w e r b e m o h f o A story gone wrong

BY JOHNNY CAITO

B

oom! An explosion rocked the warm, California night. “Good God, they’re firing at us,” I thought. “They’re launching a grenade attack right here in my living room.” I was jolted awake by the sudden blast not long after falling into a deep sleep. REM sleep was just on the horizon, so it goes without saying that the blast was an unwelcome disruption. My family, visiting from out of state was also awoken by the thundering wallop. Frightened and bewildered, we rose, wiping our tired eyes and made our way into the kitchen to see that the top cupboard had been blasted open. Razor sharp shrapnel littered the floor as my precious home-brewed IPA dripped down onto the counter-top. Wounded soldier. Man down! I feared the worse, but held out hope that no more of my heavily hopped, 22oz bottles of liquid goodness would fall victim to the random bottle bomb. I was aware of the possibility of exploding bottles which can be brought on by a number of issues: bacteria due to insufficient sanitizing, over-carbonation, and high temperatures. I knew that a lack of attention to detail could lead to this type of event, causing the pressure to build to the point that the thick glass would be unable to contain the reaction, resulting in a powerful explosion. What in God’s name was I thinking trying to brew my own beer? Just a couple of years prior, I would have never imagined the possibility of brewing. I was content with drinking fizzy yellow crap, filled with nasty rice adjuncts, fancy cans that turned the mountains blue, and buying into the less filling/tastes great non-

sense. Then the clouds parted, trumpets blared and the hop God’s baptized me in a sea of craft beer. But now I was brewing my own beer? Such an Arrogant Bastard I was. The thought flooded into my mind faster than the brew flooded from the cupboard. Sure, there’s exhilaration in the consumption of one’s own creation. A sense of pride. Babied and fostered into a Frankenstein; a living being of yeast and hops. I live in San Diego, one of the great brewing cities in the United States, so there’s no shortage of brewed excellence. There’s no way I could compete. We have some of the top IPA’s, not only in the country but in the world. Any day Alpine’s Nelson or Pure Hoppiness can duke it out with AleSmith’s IPA or Societe’s The Pupil. Then there’s the sours and barrel-aged beers from Lost Abbey and the welcoming garage-style tasting rooms at Mother Earth Brewing and Mike Hess Brewing. It’s a slugfest, no matter how you put it. There’s a plethora of giants within a short distance, and once you get the taste of a true masterful beverage, there’s no turning back; no matter how good your own brew is. The morning following the initial blast, I grabbed a ladder to begin the messy duty of discarding shards of glass, and soaking up the remnants of the golden ale. I stood face to bottle with the exploding beasts, and asked them why they betrayed me like this. “I boiled you and fed you delicious pungent hops and beautiful yeast that you ate, farted out and created alcohol. I transformed

WestCoasterSD.com | 43


you from a malty based mixture of sugar and water, I gave you life and turned you into beer, and now you repay me by exploding? I could’ve sat back, downed a Green Flash  Palette Wrecker, but instead you’ve wrecked by cupboard, and wrecked my kitchen. How dare you!” As I reached down to grab another rag, Boom! Another explosion rocked the cupboard overhead. The golden ale again fell from above, flooding down like Niagara Falls onto my counter top. Cloudy thoughts quickly shifted from, “oh no, not another one,” to “uh oh, there goes another one.” My thoughts came into focus. I was now at war with about twenty, 22oz bottles of beer. “I’ve been betrayed,” I thought, left alone to fight a battle against a fierce, golden amber beast that stands eleven inches tall and weighs in at 22 ounces. Alpine Brewing Co. has never betrayed me like this.  Stone Brewing Co.  has never betrayed me.  Monkey Paw Brewing  has never betrayed me. They’ve always been so pleasant with their Cascade, Centennial, Chinook and Nelson hops. Even far, far away beers like  Allagash Curieux  from Portland Maine have always treated me as a close friend, and have offered to tickle my taste buds with their Jim Beam, bourbon barrel-aged  Tripel  and take me to beer euphoria. They’ve never threatened violence, and never made me question the importance of an eyeball or forced me to envision a piece of glass slicing through my jugular. On any given day I can take a short stroll down to the local bottle shop, fall in love all over again and take home a beautifully slick bottle with a sexy green label and a red circle with the word  Pliny the Elder  draped across its body. Or if I’m feeling like a real mad man, and ready to go a round or two with a beautifully seductive conquest, I can pick up Alesmith’s  Horny Devil; the incredibly delicate and complex  Belgian Strong Pale Ale, which packs a mighty punch at 11% abv. Or I could go with her speed demon counterpart,  Speedway Stout; a beast of a  Russian Imperial Stout  that’s black as night, smooth as velvet, and as dangerous as a Soviet spy, hot on my trail and determined to steal my thoughts and take my memories. “I’ve got to get rid of them,” I said. I feared that more would explode, leaving my family and myself in grave danger, so I had no other option. “I must exterminate them,” I thought, as I stepped back into the war zone. But I faced resistance. Not from the enemy, but from my family. “It’s too dangerous,” they said. Apparently, their visions of sliced jugulars and ripped up eyeballs were more than just fantasy. This was real. They were frightened. “I think we need to call the fire department,” they said. It took a moment for these words to bounce off of my eardrums, and rattle around in my cranium before I was fully able to comprehend the madness.

44 | July 2014

Good God, the fire department? What are they, nuts? It’s not like they’re grenades, and there’s not a chance in hoppy hell that I’m calling them to dispose of some beer. The fire chief will think I’ve gone bat-shit crazy. Off the rails, totally nuts. Most certainly a total lunatic, and at the very least a raging drunkard. “No way,” I said. “I have a better idea. I’ll just wrap myself in a couple of sweatshirts, tie a towel around my neck, put on some sunglasses and snow gloves and remove the bottles one by one and throw them all away.” Done. It was a simple plan. One I was sure would be most effective. It was a good plan, but unfortunately my family was not on board. This was not a battle I was going to win. So after much deliberation, and some back and forth bickering, I sucked it up and made the short journey to the local fire department. I approached the side entrance, took a deep breath, and prepared myself, knowing damn well that there was a possibility that I would be detained, locked snuggly into a strait jacket and trans-

The author prepares for battle with his angry homebrews. Johnny blogs at alealerocknroll.com, and you can reach him on Instagram @alealerocknroll and on Twitter @SDFriarCat

ported directly to the loony bin. Inside I could hear the sounds of college football. After two knocks, the door opened. “What can I help you with?” said the man, dressed in shorts and a blue fireman shirt. “Okay. This is going to sound completely bizarre,” I said, “but I’ve got a bit of a situation.” I described the unusual circumstance and my family’s concern. “Do you think you guys can come out and give me a hand with these things?” I asked. At the very least I figured that their face shields and thick suits would protect them from the savage beasts. “Well, we’ve never encountered a situation like this, but I’ll send the guys out,” he said. Ten minutes later they arrived in a full length rig, blowing the air horn to let me and anyone else within a three block radius know of their arrival. I met them outside, and again explained the dilemma. Following the full brief, they entered. They eyed the closed cupboard, keeping their distance and stared at it as though it was


the den of viscous, man-eating vipers. “We’re not going to be able to remove them,” said one of the men. “What you’re going to have to do is leave them in there for a couple of weeks—maybe three weeks and give them a chance to settle before you remove them.” A shocking development. No doubt. My creation had become too dangerous for even the bravest of men. “Can’t you just remove them for us,” we asked. “No. It’s too dangerous,” they responded, exiting the kitchen and returning to the station. It became apparent that we were left alone, stranded on a five man dingy in the middle of the great Pacific with no sign of help. Man versus monster. It was my time to rise up and destroy my once close friend. A friend I spent hours creating. Hours of sweating over a boiling kettle, precisely measuring the hops and the grain, and weeks of constant temperature control, a secondary fermentation process and an extra dose of hops. But let this be clear. This was no longer my friend; despite the heavenly pine and citrus notes that escaped from the bottle and traveled up through my nostrils to zap my senses. It was my time to conquer. I dug deep into my closet, in search of armor, attempting to locate my bag of winter clothing on this 80-degree day. Something to protect me from the beasts or the vipers, whatever was hiding behind the wooden doors. I located a fleece, along with a thick, hooded wool sweatshirt. I wrapped my neck in a large towel to protect the ever important jugular as I slid on two pairs of winter gloves. As I struggled to pull the second pair on over the other, I couldn’t help but hear the ghost of Johnny Cochran, “if it doesn’t fit, you must acquit.” I was ready, fully equipped and ready for battle. I climbed atop the counter and slowly opened the cupboard. I feared that any moment one of those deadly vipers would strike, sink his deadly fangs into my arm and drop me like a bowling ball to the kitchen floor. Once the cupboard was completely opened, I could see an army of soldiers, a full regiment, standing tall and staring me directly in the eye. Quickly, I grabbed them by their necks, two at a time and slid them carefully into a 32-gallon trashcan. Clank. Clank. Clank. They each found their resting place at the bottom of the can. “I’m sorry,” I said, whispering

WINNER OF 2 BRONZE MEDALS AT THE DENVER INT’L BEER COMPETITION FOR HOP THE RIPA AND BEERUCCINO 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. Suite C/N San Diego, CA 92111

WED 12-8 THU 12-8 FRI 12-9 SAT 12-9 SUN 12-7

underneath my breath. “I should’ve been more careful with you. Sanitized you better. Taken better care. I’m sorry.” I could feel the broken glass that littered the battlefield, but stayed focused and continued the mission. “Snap out of it,” I thought. “Now is not the time for compassion. Destroy the savage. Cry later.” As the final bottle slid down into the trash, clanking against the rest of his buddies, I felt a sense of accomplishment. The mission was complete, and we had won the war. Although no medals were awarded and no victory flags were flown, we knew that we had won. We triumphed. Luckily, there were hundreds of options to celebrate this momentous occasion. In years past, it felt as though you’d have to fly thousands of miles, squished between two strangers on a 747 jet and fly for hours across the dark Atlantic to obtain a tasty beverage. Fortunately, this is no longer the case. On any given day, I can shuffle down the street and find American brewed beer in bottle form, or something freshly tapped among dozens of beers that will satisfy the most stringent of hop-heads, Belgian enthusiasts, spine-tingling sour-lovers, winter-warming Imperial Stouts, Porters, Reds, Ambers, or cool-me-down Pilsners, Lagers, Wit’s and Hefeweizen’s. The savage beasts had been defeated. It was a wicked journey. A firefight, a battle, a cry for help, and an overwhelming victory. The faded and bizarre disposal of my own creation slowly blurred into a pint of AleSmith IPA. “Cheers,” I said, as we clanked the glasses together in triumph.


FREEDOM

TO POUR

44 CRAFT BEERS

ON TAP

POUR YOUR OWN BEER 1261 GARNET AVE PACIFIC BEACH CA 92109 BARRELREPUBLIC.COM PH: 858-270-9922

DAILY 4:00 to 6:00 pm


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP 18. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 19. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 20. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 21. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Barleymash 600 5th Ave. | 619.255.7373 www.BarleyMash.com 4. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 5. Ciro’s Pizzeria Gaslamp 536 Market St. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 6. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 7. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 8. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 9. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 10. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 11. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 12. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 13. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 14. Stone Brewing Tap Room 795 J St. | 619.727.4452 www.StoneBrewing.com 15. Stone Company Store 1202 Kettner Blvd. | 619.450.4518 www.StoneBrew.com 16. Taste and Thirst 715 4th Ave. | 619.955.5995 www.TasteAndThirst.com 17. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Ballast Point Little Italy 2215 India St. | www.BallastPoint.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

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UPTOWN

BOTTLE SHOPS

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

35th St

University Ave

Adams Ave

NORMAL HEIGHTS

805

30th St

4

19

4 18

8

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14 4

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17

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16 20 18 5 13 3

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Market St

2

4 1

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Pers hing Dr

10

12

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19

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7

3 Redwood St

Florida Dr

India St

2

5 15

Fairmount Ave

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India St

N Harbor Dr

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Euclid Ave

23 25 1 24 26

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11 Texas St

Hawthorn

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Florida St

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Park Blvd

5th Ave

163

d Blv

1

13

Adams Ave

97

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HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com

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BREWERIES 1. Mike Hess Brewing (North Park) 3812 Grim Ave. | 619.255.7136 www.HessBrewing.com 2. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 3. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com

LITTLE ITALY

6

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

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1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com

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St orn awth WH

3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

HOME BREW SUPPLY

1 3 5

16. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 17. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 18. The Haven Pizzeria 4051 Adams Ave. | 619.281.1904 www.TheHavenPizzeria.com 19. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 20. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 21. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 22. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 23. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 24. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 25. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net 26. Waypoint Public 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.facebook.com/WaypointPublic

1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

St India

1

2. Belching Beaver North Park 4223 30th St. | 760.703.0433 www.BelchinBeaver.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Carnita’s Snack Shack 2632 University Ave. | 619.294.7675 www.CarnitasSnackShack.com 5. Coin Op Game Room 3926 30th St. | 619.255.8523 www.CoinOpSD.com 6. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 7. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 8. DiMille’s Italian Restaurant 3492 Adams Ave. | 619.283.3153 www.DiMilles.com 9. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 10. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 11. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 12. Nate’s Garden Grill 3120 Euclid Ave. | 619.546.7700 13. Polite Provisions 4696 30th St. | 619.677.3784 www.PoliteProvisions.com 14. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 15. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com

Ho m e

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= NEW LOCATION

Market St


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LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brewing Company 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.246.6759 www.LaJollaBeer.com 3. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

D

PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Barrel Republic 1261 Garnet Ave. | 858.270.9922 www.BarrelRepublic.com 3. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 4. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 5. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 6. Latitude 32 Pub 5019 Cass St. | 858.273.0501 www.Latitude32Bar.com 7. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 8. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 9. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 10. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 11. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com

12. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 13. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 14. The Promiscuous Fork 3801 Ingraham St. | 858.581.3663 www.ThePromiscuousFork.com 15. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars 16. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Chip’s Liquor 1926 Garnet Ave. | 858.273.1536 2. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St. | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

E

POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 3. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 4. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 5. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 6. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 7. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 8. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 9. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 10. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 11. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 12. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 13. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 14. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 15. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com 16. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse 2150 Harbor Island Dr. | 619.291.9110 www.TomHamsLighthouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

= NEW LOCATION

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com 2. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station) 2816 Historic Decatur Rd. | 760.294.7899 www.StoneWorldBistro.com

BREWERIES 1. Modern Times Beer 3725 Greenwood St. | 619.546.9694 www.ModernTimesBeer.com

F

MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Balboa’s Tap House 4421 Genesee Ave. | 858.277.8226 www.Facebook.com/DonDiegosTacoBar 2. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 3. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 4. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 5. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 6. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 7. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Del Mesa Foods & Liquor 6090 Friars Rd. | 619.299.1238 www.Facebook.com/DelMesaLiquor 2. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 3. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Benchmark Brewing Co. 6190 Fairmount Ave. Ste G | 619.795.2911 www.BenchmarkBrewing.com 3. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 4. Council Brewing Company 7705 Convoy Ct. | 858.256.0038 www.CouncilBrew.com 5. Groundswell Brewing Company 6304 Riverdale St. | 619.795.2337 www.GroundswellBrew.com 6. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 7. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

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SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900 www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION? Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREWERIES 1. 2Kids Brewing Co. 8680 Miralani Dr. #123 | 858.480.5437 www.TwoKidsBrewing.com 2. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 3. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 4. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 5. Intergalactic Brewing Company 9835 Carroll Ctr. Rd. | 858.750.0601 www.IntergalacticBrew.com 6. Mike Hess Brewing (Miramar) 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 7. Pacific Brewing Company 8680 Miralani Drive | 303.819.7086 www.PacificBrewingCo.com 8. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 9. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com 10. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

H

NORTH COUNTY COASTAL BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net 2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Dani P’s Cork & Tap 560 Greenbrier Dr. | 760.967.0128 www.DaniPsCorkTap.com 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 6. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 3. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 4. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

BREW PUBS

1. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com

BREWERIES 1. Arcana Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.ArcanaBrewing.com 2. Legacy Brewing Company 363 Airport Rd. | 760.705.3221 www.LegacyBrewingCo.com 3. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 4. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com


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CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

I

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Boll Weevil 53 9621 Mission Gorge Rd. 619.334.5353 www.BollWeevil53.com 2. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 2955 Jamacha Rd. | 619.670.7468 www.Hooleys.com 4. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 6. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Helix Liquor 444 West Chase Ave. | 619.444.0226 4. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 5. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. BNS Brewing & Distilling 10960 Wheatlands Ave. | 619.208.9799 www.BnsBrewingAndDistilling.com 2. Butcher’s Brewing 9962 Prospect Ave. | 619.334.2222 www.ButchersBrewing.com 3. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY

1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

J

NORTH COUNTY INLAND BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 5. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 6. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 2. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 3. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Prohibition Brewing Co.

2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 3. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES

1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Barrel Harbor Brewing 2575 Pioneer Ave. | 760.734.3949 www.BarrelHarborBrewing.com 3. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 4. Booze Brothers Brewery 2545 Progress St. | 760.295.0217 www.BoozeBrothersBrewery.com 5. Dos Desperados 1241 Linda Vista Dr. | 760.566.6209 www.DosDesperadosBrew.com 6. Fallbrook Brewing Co. 136 N Main Ave. www.FallbrookBrewing.com 7. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 8. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 9. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 10. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 11. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 12. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 13. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 14. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 15. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com 16. Valley Center Brewery 28477 Lizard Rocks Rd. www.ValleyCenterBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 2. Smokin Beaver 146 N Kalmia St. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

K

POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brother’s Provisions 16451 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 855.850.2767 www.BrosProvisions.com 2. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 3. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 4. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 4. PW Mart 12906 Pomerado Rd. 858.748.7693 5. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS

1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

= NEW LOCATION 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

L

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Brandy Wine Liquor 1655 Brandywine Ave. | 619.421.1970 2. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 3. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 4. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Border X Brewing 8684 Avenida De La Fuente Ste. 8 619.787.6176 | www.BorderXBrewing.com

M

COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900 www.Hooleys.com 4. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 5. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 6. The Ugly Dog 6344 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.269.8204 www.TheUglyDog.com 7. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 8. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 9. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

N

ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Del Mar Rendezvous 858.755.2669 www.DelMarRendezvous.com 4. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com

5. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis. com 7. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 8. Priority Public House 576 N. Coast Hwy 101 | 858.204.6656 www.PriorityPublicHouse.com 9. San Diego BeerWorks 437 S. Highway 101 | 858.353.7174 www.SanDiegoBeerWorks.com 10. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 11. Sublime Tavern 3790 Via de la Valle | 858.259.9100 www.SublimeTavern.com 12. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 13. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 14. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

BREWERIES 1. Culture Brewing Co. 111 S. Cedros Ave. | 858.345.1144 www.CultureBrewingCo.com

O

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

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MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Brooklyn Girl Eatery 4033 Goldfinch St. | 619.296.4600 www.BrooklynGirlEatery.com 2. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 3. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 4. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 5. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 6. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 7. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 8. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 9. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com 10. Toma Sol 301 W Washington St. | 619.291.1159 www.TomaSolTavern.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

BREWERIES 1. Acoustic Ales Brewing Experiment 1795 Hancock St. | 619.299.2537 www.AcousticAles.com

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ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

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RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

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JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

BREWERIES

1. Nickel Beer Company 1485 Hollow Glen Rd. | 760.765.2337 www.NickelBeerCo.com


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A Thousand Words... Gents from Hamiltons/Monkey Paw/Small Bar compete in the Dogfish Head Intergalactic Bocce Tourney at the Ace Hotel in Palm Springs, May 2014


Back Street Brewing Co

15 Main St. Ste 100 lamppostpizza.com/backstreet

Aztec Brewing Co

2330 La Mirada Ste 300 aztecbrewery.com

Latitude 33 Brewing Co 1430 Vantage Ct Ste 104 lat33brew.com

Mother Earth Brew Co

Iron Fist Brewing Co

204 Main Street motherearthbrewco.com

1305 Hot Springs Way #101 ironfistbrewing.com

Prohibition Brewing Co

Indian Joe Brewing Co

2004 E. Vista Way prohibitionbrewingcompany.com

2379 La Mirada Dr indianjoebrewing.com

Belching Beaver Brewing Co

Barrel Harbor Brewing Co

Visit Vista in North San Diego County to enjoy a large selection of award winning craft beer. Ten breweries with more breweries opening soon. Vista - it’s a craft brew destination.

Associate Member:

980 Park Center Dr Ste A belchinbeaver.com

2575 Pioneer Ave. Ste 104 barrelharborbrewing.com

Booze Brothers Brewing Co

Valley Center Brewery 12650 Cumbres Rd Ste B Valley Center ValleyCenterBrewery.com

2545 Progress St Ste D boozebrothersbrewery.com

www.vistabrewersguild.com


INTRODUCING THE FUGU VODKA “TACO SHOP SERIES” Look for Piña and our other local flavors in stores now.

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West Coaster  

July 2014

West Coaster  

July 2014