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SEPTEMBER 2018

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SERVING AMERICA’S FINEST BEER COUNTY

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SAN DIEGO

Wet Hop Beer Season 1 0 0 + G E R M A N - S T Y L E L A G E R S | B AY C I T Y ' S N E W B R E W E R | A N D M O R E

VOL. 7 ISSUE 8

E N J OY # S D B E E R & S TAY S O C I A L @ W E S T COA S T E R S D


Coming soon to North Park / Univ Heights (across from Live Wire)

#indiebeer #battenbeer


Sore Eye Cup Champions Anthony Tallman and Derek van Leeuwen of Burgeon Beer, at The Ugly Dog Pub. More on page 6. Photo by Tim Stahl

The WC Team:

Table of Contents:

PUBLISHER

MIKE SHESS

6-7

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

RYAN LAMB

13-20

O KTO BER FEST !

22-26

LO C A L WET H O P BEER S

28-30

T H E P U BLI C A N S : EDDI E & JOA N N

29-31

BEER I N T H E H E A DLI G H T S

EDITOR-AT-LARGE ART DIRECTOR ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE MEDIA CONSULTANT COLUMNISTS

m i ke @we stco a ste r sd. co m

BR EWS I N T H E N EWS

r y a n @ we stco a ste r sd. co m

BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ

b ra n do n @ we stco a ste r sd. co m

K AYLA COLEMAN

k a y l a @we stco a ste r sd. co m

MARK STEPHENS

m a r k@ we stco a ste r sd. co m

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Q & A : B AY C I T Y' S AU ST I N P I N DER

t h o m a s. sh e s s@ g m a i l . co m

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P RO H I BI TC H I N ' : KR I ST I N E B A KER

BETH DEMMON

b e t h @ b e t h de m m o n . co m

38-40

P L AT ES & P I N T S : N U T I STA

BRIAN TROUT

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LO C A L BEER EV EN T S

TOM SHESS

b r i a n @ b r i a n f e r m e n t s. co m

GONZALO J. QUINTERO, ED.D.

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#S DBEER P I CS

drqc b t @ g m a i l . co m

IAN CHEESMAN

i c h e e sm a n @ g m a i l . co m

CONTRIBUTORS

KRISTY WALKER MAGDA AGUIRRE MATT DE LA CRUZ SANDY HUFFAKER TIM STAHL

46-47

DO CTO R ' S O FFI C E: S O U T H N O RT E

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BEER I N T H E H E A DLI G H T S * O U R MA P S A N D DI RECTO RI ES A RE I N T H E SHO P. . . STAY TU N ED! * ON THE COVER:

Wet hops at Nickel Beer Company in Julian, as part of a graf (beer/cider hybrid) collaboration with Newtopia Cyder

TOUC H BASE WITH US: inf o@westcoaster sd .com

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• At the 6th Annual Sore Eye Cup awards ceremony in early August, Burgeon Beer’s Treevana West Coast IPA was named the champion. After online nomination and voting, a final round of ten beers was professionally judged. Each beer had to be a yearround brand, brewed by a local, independent brewery. Burgeon beat out the following finalists for the title: Hipster Latte (Wild Barrel), Aurora Hoppyalis (Karl Strauss), HopFu! (North Park), The Butcher (Societe), Tabula Rasa (Second Chance), .394 (AleSmith), Dank Drank (Pariah), Banksy (Burning Beard), and Domestique (Rouleur). Last year’s top beer was Benchmark’s Oatmeal Stout, and that beer was thus ineligible for competition this year. In 2016, Second Chance Beer Company’s Tabula Rasa won first place. AleSmith’s Speedway Stout won in 2015, as well as the first annual cup in 2013. Alpine’s Nelson IPA was 2014’s winner. Sore Eye Cup organizer Brian Beagle also runs the Indie Beer Show podcast (formerly SD BeerTalk Radio). The name Sore Eye comes from the blog’s original purpose – sports photography. The event, hosted at The Ugly Dog Pub and sponsored by TapCraft, also benefited nonprofit Mama’s Kitchen; you can still donate to the cause at https://support.mamaskitchen.org/fundraiser/1026034. • The Brewers Association recently added three juicy/hazy styles to its guidelines, and 706 entries were made into three categories for the 2018 Great American Beer Festival competition, which will be streamed live on Saturday, September 22 by The Brewing Network. This large number of entries dethroned American-style India Pale Ale as the largest competitive field, with 414 juicy or hazy IPAs, 181 juicy or hazy pale ales, and 161 juicy or hazy double IPAs. • More from the Brewers Association: Production volume for craft brewers increased five percent as of June 30. The press release also showed that as of June 30 there were 6,655 active breweries, up from 5,562 during a comparable timeframe last year. An estimated 2,500 to 3,000 breweries are in planning, based on active Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) licenses. “While more mature, the market continues to show demand for small and independent craft brewers,” said Bart Watson, chief economist, Brewers Association. “There are certainly industry headwinds, but this stabilized growth rate is reflective of the market realities that exist for brewers today.”

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“The data demonstrate that 2018 is on pace to have the highest number of brewery openings and closings to date. However, even as breweries close, openings continue to far outpace the number that shutter,” added Watson. “New players looking to enter the space should be aware of the constructs of the current landscape, work to differentiate themselves and will need to make quality beer to succeed.” SD Brewers Guild board member Matthew Zirpolo, co-owner and president of Burgeon Beer Company, commented on the press release. “With more than 130 independent craft brewing locations in San Diego, our local community is experiencing firsthand that it takes a lot to run a successful brewery. The increased competition does present challenges, which are also coupled with rewards. In San Diego, we are lucky to have a cohesive tight-knit community. This provides local breweries with an array of resources (ingredients, knowledge, access to information, collaborations, etc.) that allow us to make ‘top-notch’ beer in San Diego at an exponential rate.” Zirpolo added, “We are seeing some complications and losses as a result of the competition and current industry stabilization that’s taking place. In the last month, we saw Intergalactic and ChuckAlek announce closures. It is devastating to see this happen to our brewery members, which is an unfortunate result of industry stabilization. “Breweries are finding creative ways to standout, choosing to focus their efforts and time on marketing, and ultimately doing more than just brewing great beer. It’s also important for everyone to innovate and brew new styles, which will help keep the customer engaged and intrigued. The quality of beer has always been a necessity, but with so many options now available to consumers, the first overall impression of a brand is crucial. “From my personal experience with Burgeon Beer Company, I feel that new breweries opening now need to have three things executed well. The brewery needs to have a knowledgeable and experienced brewer who can produce high-quality beer immediately. They need a system in place for selling the beer and effectively marketing the brand. Lastly, a brewery needs someone who knows ‘the numbers’ and can efficiently run the company’s operations. “There used be room for ‘more beer’ in San Diego, and the marketplace has changed to only allow space for “exceptional beer.” As a result of these changes, I truly believe it’s a great time to be a craft beer consumer in San Diego. The quality of beer that is being produced here in America’s Finest City is second to none. It’s why we’ve earned the name ‘Capital of Craft.’” T


Burgeon Beer brewery assistant Brian Casey drinking from the Sore Eye Cup at The Ugly Dog Pub. Photo by Tim Stahl


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INTO THE GLASS

OKTOBERFEST AND GERMAN LAGERS

By Brian Trout BrianFerments.com

Germans have been perfecting the art of brewing for centuries (Weihenstephan since 1040 AD), and have greatly influenced the technology, terminology, and processes we use today. German lagers are nuanced, refined, accurate, and precise. It is no wonder that beer–obsessed San Diego is gearing up to celebrate Oktoberfest 2018 by brewing German-style lagers. These lagers are tricky to make well to insure ultimate quaffabillity en masse and Ein Maß – those 1 litre mugs. Many German Lagers, especially the ones made for Oktoberfest, are malt-forward, but never sweet, sticky, or cloying. Rather, the beer’s maltiness evokes the comfort of rich, fresh baked bread. They are typically hopped lightly to provide counterweight to the soulful malt-centricity. Specifically, German “noble hops” add a deep cool forest edge with earthy, spicy, and floral notes. The word Lager means “to store.” Lagers typically take two to three times as long to produce as ales. Lager yeast fermentation is slow and low (46F–52F) using Saccharomyces pastorianus. When the beer is done fermenting it is rolled over to a long cold–storage period (lagering). The end result is a beer that is crisp and clean without the fruity notes or the more distinct ale yeast character. Prior to the invention of refrigeration, the lagering process was performed by rolling barrels into caves or dug out cellars, and using ice chunks from nearby frozen lakes to keep things cold. WESTCOASTERSD.COM

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German Lager Glossary Here is a quickie guide to the German beer styles you will likely find during Oktoberfest.

Dunkel – Translates as “dark,” but not too dark. It is a deep brownish color with dark bready tasting notes.

Pilsener – German pilsner is crisper and drier than other pilsners, with a bit of pronounced hop character at the finish.

Helles – Helles translates to “light.” Helles is pale golden in color,

and showcases pilsner malt. Helles should be rounded and with a refreshing finish.

Schwarzbier – Schwarzbier means “black beer,” but don’t fear

the dark! Unlike other similarly colored beers (Russian Imperial stouts, porters) Schwarzbiers are dark lagers based on dunkel, helles, and/or pilsners, and are low on the aggressive roast character. Schwarzbiers can be drunk in large quantities without getting the same kind of palate fatigue one might get drinking the same amount of a porter or stout.

Vienna Lager – Slightly toasty malt and hops are in check. Today, many of these are brewed in Mexico.

FestBier (Wiesn) – If there was an official beer for Oktoberfest,

this is it. Fest lagers have a higher ABV than other lagers, but usually a similar golden color to a big helles. Sometimes a small bit of toastier malts will be used in these beers.

Märzen – März means March in German, the month these amber-

colored festival beers are brewed for enjoying during Oktoberfest. Some Märzens have similar tasting notes to Vienna lagers and dunkels, with loads of dominating rich toastiness.

Bocks –

March to May is the typical season for bocks, but they are sometimes available during local Oktoberfest events. They are higher in alcohol, richer, maltier beers than typical lagers. Look for maibock (helles bock), traditional bock, doppelbock, and eisbock, the strongest type of bock.

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Societe tasting room manager Lia Garcia

WESTCOASTERSD.COM

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Oktoberfest: The History

On October 12th 1810, Kronprinz Ludwig (later King Ludwig I) and Princess Therese of Saxon–Hildurghhausen were married. They invited the citizens of Munich to attend the reception, which was thrown on the fields in front of the city gates. On October 18th, horse races were held as a part of this celebration. The field was named Theresienwiese (Therese’s Meadow), and was eventually shortened to Wiesn.

1810 – On October 12, Kronprinz Ludwig (later King Ludwig I) and

Princess Therese of Saxon-Hildurghhausen were married. They invited the citizens of Munich to attend the reception, which was thrown on the fields in front of the city gates. On October 18, horse races were held as part of this celebration. The field was named Theresienwiese (Therese’s Meadow), and was eventually shortened to Wiesn.

1811 – Oktoberfest was born. The city of Munich was presented with

a repeat of the previous year’s wedding festivities, horse races, and a newly added agricultural show designed to boost Bavarian farming.

1818 – Beer stands were introduced to the festivities to quench the thirst of party goers.

1870 – Carnival-like rides were added to the festival. 1898 – Smaller beer stands grew into large Oktoberfest beer tents. Cancelled

– Since its inception, Oktoberfest was cancelled 24 times due to two Cholera epidemics, the Austro–Prussian War, the Franco–Prussian War, and both World Wars.

1946–1948 – Following World War II, Munich only celebrated a smaller “Autumn Fest” and the stronger Oktoberfest Beer was not allowed to be served.

1950 – A new Oktoberfest tradition was born when the fest opened

with a twelve-gun salute, followed by the incumbent Mayor of Munich tapping the first keg of beer and proclaiming, “O’zapft is!” (“It’s tapped!” in Austro-Bavarian dialect). Oktoberfest has begun the same way every year since then.

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Below: The El Cajon Oktoberfest hall / Left: Rough Draft beertenders Bri Villagomez and Allison Bradford with company founder Jeff Silver.


Oktoberfest: 21st Century

Over time, Oktoberfest grew, adding to the spectacle with more beer, more food, and more rides with each passing year. Oktoberfest is now the largest folk festival, beer festival, and funfair in the world, attracting visitors from all over the globe.

In 2017 alone, here were some fun Oktoberfest stats: – – – – – – – – – – – – –

75+ Countries Attending 14 Large Tents 20 Small Tents 1,981,000+ Gallons of Beer 127 Oxen 57 Calves 500,000+ Chickens 140,000+ Pairs of Sausages 5 Lost Children, 14 Lost Youth helped by local youth welfare 4,055 Lost and Found Items 12,000 Mugs Confiscated by Security 759 Filming Permits Granted 56 Press Releases Granted

In Germany, the 2018 (185th) Oktoberfest runs from September 22 through October 3.

Oktoberfest Events in San Diego

Dust off your lederhosen and dirndls, it’s time for Oktoberfest in San Diego! Here are some upcoming festivities:

3 Punk Ales: Beer to Boots (no date set yet) AleSmith: October 6 and 7 at the tasting room, featuring AleSchmidt Oktoberfest, food pairing, and music.

Amplified: September 29 at both Pacific Beach and East Village locations.

Burning Beard: September 22 will see multiple beer releases at the El Cajon brewery.

Carlsbad Rotary: October 6 with German food and beer, plus live music and entertainment.

Coronado: September 29 at the Knoxville headquarters.

EdUcate: October 13 homebrew competition, beer garden, and fundraiser for University City public schools.

El Cajon: September 28 to October 7 (Fridays 4 to 10, Saturdays noon to 10, and Sundays noon to 9.) Big party!

Encinitas: September 30 with music, Bavarian dancers, and a 200+ vendor street craft faire.

Eppig: September 9 in North Park, September 29 at the Point Loma Waterfront Biergarten.

Gordon Biersch: September 19 Festbier tapping party with brats and live Oompah band.

Hamilton’s (and South Park Brewing): October 6 with

both imported German lagers and local selections; German food.

Home Brewing: September 28 "Hometoberfest" Oktoberfestthemed can release, plus stein holding contests and more.

Karl Strauss: September 29 at the main brewery in PB. Small batch German-style beers, brats, sausages...

Knotty Barrel: October 6 third annual Oktoberfest celebration. La Mesa: September 28 to September 30, going on since 1973 with exhibitors, family-friendly fun, and beer!

Mike Hess: August 31 tapping party for "OktoberHess" with specialty steins.

North Park Beer Co: September 22 "Parktoberfest" can

release, stein holding challenge, and (fake) sausage toss contest.

Ocean Beach: October 12 to 13, taking over the streets of OB. Rock Bottom: September 18 Rocktoberfest tapping, with brats and lederhosen.

Rough Draft: September 28 party, celebrating Sausagefest Lager. Savagewood: September 29 (tentatively scheduled) festivities, with more details TBD.

Societe: October 6 during tasting room hours. Steins, pairings from Biersal, contests and games.

Thorn Brewing: Date TBD, both the North Park and Barrio locations will have beer, steins, sausages, games.

Urge San Marcos: October 14, a mix of local and German

beers; steins from Mason Ale Works and Mike Hess Brewing.

Division 23: Early October, date TBD.

WESTCOASTERSD.COM

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Homemade Sauerkraut Sauerkraut is a living and wild fermented food that translates to “sour cabbage” and has been made for centuries as a way of preserving the harvest. It is easier to make at home than you might think. • Required time: 30 minutes prep, 2–6 weeks fermenting with occasional check–in • Recommended Listening: something in the Krautrock genre

EQUIPMENT

– Food grade bucket –or– fermenting crock (any food–safe container can work) – Big rubber bands –or– string – Tea towel – Weighted disk (plate and growler) – Knife and cutting board –or– food processor – Food scale (recommended) –or– measuring spoons

INGREDIENTS

– Non–iodized salt (Kosher, sea salt, pickling salt) – Cabbage (I use the standard green cabbage) – 1 pint of filtered drinking water

SPECIAL INGREDIENTS (optional) – – – – –

Caraway or cumin seeds Juniper berries Brown mustard seeds Garlic Carrots (shredded)

THE PROCESS B STEP 1 Weigh and shred the cabbage (a food processor makes quick work of this task) and place it into your clean fermenting vessel. [I used 6.3 pounds(#) of shredded cabbage] Note: The amount of cabbage will reduce to about ¹/₃ its original volume. B STEP 2 Sprinkle your salt on top of the cabbage. Use 10 grams (g) of salt per 1# of cabbage. Ex. 3# of cabbage needs 30g of salt. [I used 63g of salt for my 6.3# of cabbage.] Note: If you don’t have a scale, add about 1½ tablespoons (T) of salt for every head of cabbage (a regular head of green cabbage weighs approximately 2.5#).

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B STEP 3 Add your other items to the fermenter. [I used 2T of juniper berries, 2 teaspoons (t) of caraway seeds, and 1t of brown mustard seeds.] B STEP 4 Pour 2 pints of filtered drinking water per 5–6# of cabbage. Note: This step is optional, however, it will help ensure your success by making more brine early on in the process. B OPTIONAL STEP 5 I put 2T of juice from my previous batch of sauerkraut per 5# of cabbage into the bucket. You can do this using any high–grade living sauerkraut to give your fermentation a jump–start. B STEP 6 Clean and rinse your hands; make sure no soap residue is left on them (I recommend fragrance–free or Boraxo hand soap). With clean hands, punch down the mixture, while pressing and tossing it around to mix and compress it well. If you’re doing it right, it will sound like boots tramping on snow. You should also see the juices start to come out of the shredded cabbage and it should start compressing and reducing in size to about ¹/₃ its original volume. Tamp all the kraut evenly on the bottom of your vessel, so that every strand of cabbage is wet in the salty brine. B STEP 7 Place a clean plate or crock weight on top of the cabbage to assure it is fully pressed into the brine. Add extra weight using a growler or jar filled with water and lid on top as needed. B STEP 8 Cover your fermenting vessel with a fastened tea towel (using the large rubber band or string) in order to prevent things falling into it and to protect it from critters. Open your kraut every 2 days to check fermentation progress, rotate/mix, and taste it. You should notice the saltiness start to fade as tartness from Lactobacillus increases. Remove any extra weight you added (growler or jar full of water) after two days. At this point all the juices should be released from the cabbage and it should be fully compressed. You may start to see some cream or white cheesy looking bloom in different areas of the ferment. Fear not! This is called Kahm Yeast and is totally harmless. Simply scrape it off with a spoon and discard it if desired, but this step is optional. Ferment your kraut for 2 to 6 weeks. You will know when it is done by taste.


When fermentation is complete, put your kraut in clean and sanitized jars. Make sure you pack the sauerkraut tightly down into your jars and ladle a layer of the sour juice on top. Store refrigerated. Note: I burp my kraut jars (opening them, or leaving the lid slightly loose) a bit the first 2 weeks in the fridge. Sometimes when you are packing the kraut CO2 gets trapped and can start a small amount of refermentation, resulting in a mildly carbonated sauerkraut. Success! Enjoy your homemade sauerkraut!

German Lagers in San Diego

San Diego has been busy crafting up some German Lagers to pour into your steins this Oktoberfest season.

2Kids Five Finger Discount (Munich Helles Lager), 5.5% 3 Punk Ales Dead Ramones (Pilsner), 4.8% 3 Punk Ales Eternal Gates Of Helles (Helles), 4.7% 3 Punk Ales From Ashes Rise (Smoked Schwarzbier), 5.3% 3 Punk Ales Kellerbier (Unfiltered Pilsner), 5.2% 3 Punk Ales Oktoberfest (Märzen), 4.5% 3 Punk Ales Old Glory (Light Lager Collab w/ Resident), 3.8% 32 North Das Bruder (Vienna Lager), 6.1% 32 North Pilsner the Conqueror (Lager), 5.1% Abnormal No Adjuncts (Zwickel Helles Lager), 4.4% AleSmith AleSchmidt Oktoberfest (Märzen Lager), 5.5% AleSmith Spezial Pilz (Pilsner), 4.9% Amplified Ale Works Bombshelles (Helles Bock), 8.5% Amplified Ale Works Doc Märzen (Märzen), 5.3% Amplified Ale Works License to Pils (Dry–Hopped Pilsner), 5.5% Amplified Ale Works Vienna Gadda Da Vida (Vienna Lager), 5.5% Attitude Famoso Lager, 5.0% Attitude Victorioso Kölsch, 4.8% Bagby Gotta Pay The Pils (Pilsner), 5.3% Bagby It's Festastic! (Märzen/Oktoberfest), 5.9% Bagby No Hype (Helles collab. w/ Benchmark) 5.2% Bagby Schwarz Story (Schwarzbier), 5.0% Bagby Sweet Ride Bohemian/Czech/Intl, 4.5% Ballast Point Longfin Lager, 4.5% Barrel Harbor Czech Lager (Pilsner), 5.2% Bay Bridge Liberty Lager, 5.0% Bitter Brothers Bitter Bills Pils (Pilsner), 5.2% Bitter Brothers Oktoberfest (Märzen), 5.5% Black Plague Revival (Lager), 4.8% Burgeon Beer Pistil Pilsner (100% German Ingredients), 5.2% Burning Beard Chromatic Fantasia (Dunkles Bock), 10.0% Burning Beard Kellerklaus (Unfiltered Leichtbier), 3.8% Burning Beard Klausbier (Leichtbier), 3.8% Burning Beard Lieber Augustine (Vienna Lager), 6.0%

Burning Beard Name TBD (Munich Dunkel), 6.0% Burning Beard Roggen the Lightning, Roggenbier, 5% Coronado Helles Bock, 8.0% Coronado Oktoberfest, 5.5% Coronado Schwarzbier, 5.0% Coronado Seacoast (Pilsner), 4.9% Deft Helles, 5.2% Deft Märzen, 5.8% Division 23 Direct Drive (Dopplebock), ABV TBD Division 23 Helles Yeah (Helles), 5.6% Division 23 Märzen, ABV TBD Dos Desperados Magnifico (Lager), 4.7% Duck Foot Old Bro (Bohemian Pilsner), 5.0% Ebullition Green Ghost (German Lager), 4.7% Embarcadero Bahia Sur (German Amber Lager), 5.8% Eppig Natural Bridge: Festbier (German Style Festbier), 6.0% Eppig Natural Bridge: Pilsner (Bavarian Style Pilsner), 5.1% Eppig Natural Bridge: Schwarzbier (German Black Lager), ABV 4.9% Gordon Biersch Festbier, 5.3% Gordon Biersch Golden Export (Helles), 5.0% Gordon Biersch Maibock, 7.2% Gordon Biersch Märzen, 5.9% Gordon Biersch Schwarzbier, 4.4% Helix Day Party! (Hoppy Pilsner), 6.0% Helix Night Party! (Schwarzbier), 5.6% Helix Praguenosis (Red Czech Lager), 5.4% Home Brewing Caffeinator (Coffee Doppelbock Collab. w/ Modern Times), 8.1%

Home Brewing Hometoberfest (Festbier), 5.8% Home Brewing Märzen Of Our Lives (Märzen Collab. w/ Doug

Hasker), 6.0%

Home Brewing Match Maker (Dry Hopped Ale Collab. w/ Eppig), 5.9% Home Brewing Positive Pils (Pilsner), 5.1% Iron Fist Summer City (Pilsner), 4.2% Karl Strauss Columbia Street (Amber), 4.5% Karl Strauss Oktoberfest (Märzen), 5.0% Knotty Brewing Knottoberfest (Oktoberfest Märzen), 5.6% Latchkey Dopplebock, 7.0% Latchkey Festbier, 6.0% Latchkey Hausschlüssel (German Pilsner), 5.5% Latitude 33 ColdCraft (Lager), 4.2% Legacy Iron Wharf (Lager), 5.2% Legacy Iron Wharf (Grapefruit/Peach/Fruited Lager), 5.2% Lightning Biergarten Lager, 4.7% Lightning Elemental Pilsner (Kellerbier), 6.2% Longship Ragnabock (Dopplebock), 8.1% Longship Sunstone (Pilsner), 4.6% Mason Ale Works Donny's Pils (Lager), 4.5% Mason Ale Works Oktoberfest, 5.0% Midnight Jack Munich Helles, 5.0% Mike Hess OktoberHess (Märzen Lager), 5.6% Mikkeller Building Blocks (Keller Pilsner), 5.4% Mission Bock at it Again (Traditional Bock), 6.5% Northern Pine Del Märzens (Märzen), 5.7% North Park N.P. Lite (Helles), 5.1% WESTCOASTERSD.COM

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North Park Parktoberfest (Festbier), 5.7% Pariah IWCBD My Cat From Helles (Lager), 5.0% Port Port Pils (Pilsner), 5.5% Pure Project Rain (Unfiltered Pilsner), 5.5% Resident Oktoberfest 5.8% Rip Current Breakline (Traditional Bock), 6.7% Rip Current Choppy Surf (Bohemian Pilsner), 5.3% ABV Rip Current Delaminator (Doppelbock), 8.0% Rip Current High Surf (Helles), 5.2% Rock Bottom Rocktoberfest (Märzen), 6.1% Rough Draft Sausagefest Lager (Märzen), 5.4% Savagewood Helles Lager, 5.0% Savagewood Märzen, 6.5% Second Chance 3rd Anni. Collab. w/ Maui (Imperial Pilsner w/ Jasmine Flowers), 7.7%

Second Chance Over the Line (Munich–Style Helles), 5.2% Societe Die Kellnerin (Oktoberfest), 4.5% Societe The Baroness (Helles), 5.2% Societe The Exciseman (Black Lager), 5.4% South Park Golden Hill (Festbier/Märzen), 5.3% South Park Here and Gone (Kölsch), 4.8% Stumblefoot Creekside (Blonde Lager), 5.0% Stumblefoot Märzenbier (Märzen), 6.5% Stumblefoot Schwarzbier (Schwarzbier), 5.0% The Lost Abbey Road To Helles (Helles), 5.2% Thorn Marty Zen (Märzen/Oktoberfest), 5.2%

Burning Beard's bourbon barrel-aged Chromatic Fantasia Dunkles Bock

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COVER STORY

WET HOP BEERS OF 2018


E

very summer sees the harvest of fresh hops and brewers eager to craft truly seasonal beers with them. Here’s your guide to San Diego’s scene this year.

First Out Of The Gate: Thunderhawk Alements On July 26, West Coaster reported on what we believed was the first wet hop beer brewed in San Diego County this summer (Nickel Beer’s collaboration with Star B Ranch). Well, it turns out that Miralani Makers’ District brewery Thunderhawk Alements beat Nickel by three days. To craft a ten-barrel wet hop version of their English pale ale Liberty’s Teeth, Thunderhawk’s Bill Lindsay worked with Solo Salsido of El Cajon’s Hopmentation Farm to harvest Nugget and Cascade hops for the brew kettle. “This beer uses English Ale yeast which has some nice subtle esters that complement most wet hops,” said Thunderhawk’s Jonathan Barbarin. “We also split this beer into kegs containing different wet hop varieties, including Chinook, Cascade, and Brewer’s Gold. The flavor and aroma from the secondary wet hopping creates some incredible, diverse flavors. Chinook hops created an herbal, dill, sweet Tzatziki profile. Cascade is probably the most bitter of the bunch, with lemon peel and earth, finishing with a subtle dank bitterness. The Brewer’s Gold was the fruitiest of the bunch, projecting a strong aroma of honeydew melon rind, with the flavor to match. One of the most interesting parts of drinking a pint of these wet hop beers is the slightly sticky mouthfeel from the copious amounts of hop oils, without leaving a cloying bitterness.”

Most Dedicated: Nickel Beer Co. Readers who’ve followed these wet hop articles for the past few years know that Tom Nickel is San Diego’s leader in wet hop beer brewing. On Thursday, September 13, his Kearny Mesa bar O’Brien’s Pub will feature around a dozen of the wet hop beers he was involved with this year; most of those were brewed at his Julian brewery Nickel Beer Co. while others are collaborations from around town, including a graf (beer/cider hybrid) made with Newtopia Cyder from Scripps Ranch. Over that weekend (9/14 - 9/16), the taps will feature even more beers made in San Diego with local hops. In October, the emphasis switches to Yakima Valley/Pacific Northwest hops.

Most Dedicated (Honorable Mention): Viewpoint Brewing (Relative) newcomer Viewpoint is working on seven wet hop beers this year, with the angle of exploring the characteristics of wet hops throughout

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the season. The first one tapped was a 4.8% Cascade session IPA collaboration with Nickel; a second version is planned for the end of harvest. Others brewed by time of press included a wet hop amber and a wet hop extra pale ale with Crystal, Nugget, and Cascade.

Farm-To-Table Connection: Royale The owners of Valley Center hop and produce farm Nopalito also own Point Loma bar and restaurant Royale. On Sunday, September 16, the farm is hosting a party with MIHO Catering and wet hop beers by South Park Brewing, North Park Brewing, and Nickel; tickets are $80 at www.SundayAsado.BrownPaperTickets.com. The next weekend, Saturday, September 22, there’s a “Wet Hop Week” kick-off party at Royale, with wet hop IPA-battered fish & chips, plus the wet hop beers on tap.

New Beer Competition: Bocce Fest On September 30, Viewpoint Brewing co-founder Charles Koll will lead a brand new beer competition coinciding with the Del Mar-Solana Beach Rotary’s 22nd annual “Bocce Fest” at the old Polo Fields, all to raise money for charities Just In Time and Reality Changers. The competition will be judged by a panel of industry professionals headed by Paul Sangster, master BJCP beer judge and co-founder/brewmaster of Rip Current Brewing Company. The competition includes a wet hop beer category, and they’re hoping to have close to 50 San Diego breweries participate.

More Wet Hop Beers in San Diego: Amplified Ale Works debuted Wet Zeppelin IPA with Cascade and Centennial from HopsMeister at their E-Vil (East Village) grand opening on Friday, August 24. Bitter Brothers brewed a Brut Wet Hop IPA on August 17 with Cashmere hops from Star B, as a collaboration with Nickel Beer. The name: CashmereOutside. Burgeon Beer will use Pacific Northwest hops to brew Sticky Fingers (100% Mosaic) Double IPA some time in early September. There’s also a New England-style, 100% Citra collaboration with Pizza Port in the works. Burning Beard’s third annual Circle of Wet Hops is the wet-hopped version of the core lineup Pale Ale, featuring 100 pounds of Star B Cascade (5.2%). The second annual all-Neomexicanus collaboration IPA with Nickel is called Room 101 (6.5%). Culture’s gluten-reduced IPA: Hops. Wet hops. ABV: (00)7.0%. All Cascade and Chinook from SD Golden Hop Farm in Fallbrook. Brewed on August 11.

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The Pure Project crew gathered fresh hops from Ramona's Star B Ranch in August


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Deft Brewing will use Chinook and Centennial hops grown on their patio for WetHopt. Cones will likely be harvested in mid-September. Duck Foot is adding Cascade and Centennial hops from HopsMeister in their West Coast-style IPA The Contender.

Pure Project teamed up with Star B Ranch (Cascade, Nugget, Horizon) on Desert Convoy Murky IPA (7%). Women’s Beer Collective was also on hand to help pick some of the smaller bines that weren’t machine-processed. This beer was on tap for the Convoy Flight on August 26 at O’Brien’s Pub, Common Theory, Shanghai Saloon, and Soho Gastropub.

Fourpenny House in La Mesa celebrated their grand opening in April, and they’re brewing three wet hop beers this year, all with help from Hopportunity Farms in Julian: Beatrix Blonde with Julian Gold (4.2%); Fourpenny Ale with Cascade (5.4%); and Pacific Crest Ale with Chinook (6.2%)

Quantum’s Anti-Matter IPA, made with Cascade hops from Renquist Farm in Valley Center, is 8.0%.

North Park Beer Company worked with Chinook hops from Nopalito Farm to brew Chinopalito again, on August 17.

Second Chance Beer’s Single Hop IPA (7%) uses all Cascade from Hopportunity Farms in Julian.

Pizza Port’s five brewpubs are all brewing at least one wet hop beer this year. The headquarters at Bressi Ranch will can their batch, a West Coaststyle, all-Citra IPA collaboration with Burgeon Beer, for a tentative end of September release. Solana Beach will be brewing ‘Merica West Coast IPA with Mosaic hops (7%), and Citra Supreme with Citra hops (8%). Ocean Beach’s Wet Lambo IPA uses fresh Mosaic, and Dr. Greenthumb IPA has all Citra. Carlsbad’s Plant 2 Pint is a 6% strong pale ale with Mosaic, and Raceway is a 7% West Coast IPA with Citra. Outside of San Diego County, but worthy of a mention, Pizza Port San Clemente is brewing Riptide IPA with fresh Citra, and Contender Pale with fresh Mosaic.

South Park Brewing is working with locals Nopalito Farm (Hoppy Red 6.6 7%) and Star B (Baby Buck XPA 5.8 - 6.2%) again this year. The beers should be on tap late August or early September.

Rock Bottom La Jolla is working with HopsMeister Farm to brew Hop Tub Time Machine IPA (6.8%).

Thorn’s wet hop beer is a collaboration with Urban Surf 4 Kids. Hop Grom is 5.5% with Chinook, Comet, and Pacific Gem Hops.

—Ryan Lamb Photos by Matt De La Cruz (@brewstills)


THE PUBLICANS

*The Publican series focuses on San Diego’s bar owners*

Joann Cornejo and Eddie Trejo, Machete Beer House BY SHELDON M. KAPLAN Photo by Magda Aguirre


M

achete Beer House is located at 2325 Highland Avenue, in a relatively nondescript part of National City. Like other areas of National City, there is change afoot, a slow but escalating evolution, with sections being slowly nudged along towards gentrification by businesses such as Machete, as it is known to all and sundry. Machete opened its doors in 2015 next to, at the time, a fast food chicken shop. That space is now occupied by a second location of Salud!, the hip taqueria originally established in Barrio Logan. The National City incarnation of Salud! opened in May of this year, no doubt enticed by the proximity of Machete, the area’s first true craft beer bar. Salud! is the perfect place to grab some Mexican food to-go and then wander next door to Machete, and right into a little slice of Mexico. Enjoy it with a beer from one of the thirty taps and/or 100+ bottles. Husband and wife owners Eddie Trejo (“ET”) and Joann Cornejo (“JC”) were doing just that when I arrived for our interview.

up kitchen. Last year for Beer Week we did a Bottle Logic and Mexican concha (sweet bread) pairing. We love our (Mexican) culture, obviously our place speaks to that culture… it’s beautiful, you know? It's a beautiful thing.” Joann was born and raised in National City, and Eddie was born in Chihuahua, Mexico. His family moved to San Diego when he was three years old. The two met in 2002 at a Halloween party at USD, and they’ve been married for about a year. Joann has a Bachelor’s in History and Spanish Literature and Language from USD, where she later returned to get her Masters in Education. Besides helping run Machete, Joann is a teacher at San Ysidro High. Eddie studied various courses at Mesa College but never graduated. (“His major was Renaissance man,” says Joann with a chuckle.”) After Eddie dropped out he worked in construction with his dad before going to work at an irrigation supply store in 2009. How did you get both into craft beer?

When I sat down with them, I told them of my second visit to Machete about a year ago. When I arrived, I texted my friend Fredd Sanchez to see if he could come over and join me for a pint or two. Fredd is a local high school music teacher, Mariachi band leader, and a fellow craft beer fan. When Fredd joined me at Machete I asked him if he knew the owners, as I thought he would get a kick out of meeting them. His response? “Know them, I married them!” Fredd has been a customer since day one. This story is illustrative of the vibe at Machete, where on certain nights it might well be the case that everyone really does know your name. It has become a true “local,” helping spread the craft beer word to the relatively late-to-the-party South Bay. So who are your customers at Machete?

JC:

“I would say that about 75% are Latinos and the rest… I guess we get a diverse Filipino crowd and also some African-Americans. A lot of our events are targeted towards our customers — we bring in pop culture that our customers know and that we love. Not too long ago we had an event with Modern Times, featuring artists from Monterey, Mexico, with a Filipino pop-

ET:

“I think it's kind of a happy accident of being in San Diego that had a lot to do with it. I grew up in Linda Vista, and Ballast Point’s original location was just down the hill… I also worked at a restaurant where they had Ballast Point on — Yellowtail at the time. I ended up leaving my ‘cushy’ job at the irrigation supply store to get a job specifically in the beer industry. I got hired at Brewery Tours of San Diego as a tour guide and driver, so I would drive people around to breweries and teach them about beer. I also got a job as a sales rep for a small craft beer distributor, California Craft — that was around 2012 and 2013.”

JC:

“It all started for me one day when Eddie took me to O’Brien’s Pub. I was not a beer drinker — definitely more tequila! We landed there on Russian River night, in either 2008 or 2009, and it was quite a nice coincidence. They had all these wonderful sours on, all the ‘-tion’ beers (Consecration, Damnation, Temptation, et cetera). There was no line out the door yet, so it was nice, and Tyson (Blake) was pouring. I think that’s when it happened for me. We had been on a few brewery tours, but it was the Russian River night that really converted me. I got a parttime job at Stone on Kettner pouring beer.

I worked with the opening crew. I definitely became more involved with the beer scene after that.” How did Machete come into existence?

ET:

“I've always been business-oriented to a certain degree, and I really liked the community in the beer industry… but I had to get my own business somehow. I debated different options, like, ‘Should I open a brewery?’ But I'm not a brewer. I have good relationships with the brewers in Baja, and thought about maybe doing some importing…”

JC:

“The funny part is that Eddie has always had business plans; I had heard his business plans over and over again. When he said he wanted to open a bar, I said, ‘You know what, let me know when you've got the keys!’ So one day, I remember he picked me up from Stone and he said, ‘I found the place.’ At first, I didn't want to have anything to do with it, to be honest, but then on December 13, 2014 (12/13/14) he got the keys to this spot, and we went into full-time construction mode.”

ET:

“We saw opportunity and a need… Joann is from here, and it just felt right. It made sense.”

JC:

“My parents still live in National City, and we visit them quite often, but before Machete there wasn't much else in the South Bay for craft beer.”

ET:

“This place has been a bar since the ‘60s. It was originally called the Galloping Inn. We bought the existing business, which at that time was a bar called Mermaid House. There were some really weird stipulations on the alcohol license, like no escort services; we cannot allow our customers to pay us for companionship because of past violations that happened here, kind of shady.” Who curates your beer list?

ET:

“It's really a mix between both of us. We seek out certain things that we are looking for and then go through all the lists to see what fits our needs.”

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JC:

“Right now we have some Arrow Lodge beers which are not really widely distributed at all.” What style of beers do your customers want?

ET:

“It is still IPAs, but it’s shifting.”

JC:

“Yeah, it's shifting… people want more ‘single’ IPAs. Before, customers were really excited about the double IPAs and the triple IPAs. Now they don't sell as fast. Now we are going through kegs of pilsners. We are definitely a reflection of what's happening in the rest of the country. Personally, I was just now drinking a dryhopped lager.”

THE TAP LIST ON THE DAY I VISITED: Alaskan: Amber Ale AleSmith: Groov” Pale Ale with Raspberry & Orange Arrow Lodge: Buzz Cut Dry Hopped Lager Arrow Lodge: Happy Cal Milk Stout Black Market: Sam Axe Berliner Weisse Burgeon: Juice Campbell Pale Ale Burning Beard: Holy The Voyd Stout Fall: Le Pigeon Belgian Pale

Green Cheek: Scattered Cloud Hazy Session IPA Ironfire: Wheat Dealer Pineapple Wheat Beer Karl Strauss: Big Barrel DIPA Karl Strauss: Follow The Sun Pilsner Kern River: Eddy Flowers DIPA King Harbor: Sink With California Pale Ale Mikkeller: Breakfast Kløb Oatmeal Stout with Coffee Mikkeller: Raspberry Blush Berliner Weisse

Modern Times: Barrel Aged Devil’s Teeth Rum & Rye Imp. Stout Modern Times: City of the Dead Stout on Nitro Modern Times: Fruitlands - Rose Edition Gose Modern Times: Monster’s Park (2017) Bourbon Barrel Aged Imp. Stout Modern Times: Monster’s Park (2018) Bourbon Barrel Aged Imp. Stout Modern Times: Transit of Venus Grisette

Pizza Port: Athena’s Beer American Stout Port Brewing: Hop 15 DIPA Pure Project: Murk of the Beast Hazy IPA Societe: The Coachman Session IPA Stone: Delicious IPA Thorn: Tropic Daze Tropical IPA Three Weavers: Kill The Lights Black Lager

Pariah: Mamba DIPA

As publicans, what’s your opinion of brewery satellite tasting rooms?

ET:

“I think for the breweries it is a cool way to get your beer into a spot so that people don't have to go the whole way to the brewery, and the brewery still stays in control. I think it is cool in that respect; I’d be fine with the tasting room next door. I want breweries to open up all over the place.”

JC:

“I think it is different for us. We don't see that saturation yet. 3 Punks is a five-minute drive and we carry their beers on tap. Sometimes we might sell it cheaper than they do at their brewery because we have that flexibility. It is always exciting to have them on tap.

ET:

“And they are local, you know, so it’s always cool to showcase beer from friends.” Where do you guys go for a beer?

ET:

“You know, now that we live down here, we mostly stay around here. 3 Punks are our friends.”

JC:

“And they make a delicious lager. It feels like home there. And Hamilton’s is always a good spot. We love it there, too.”

ET: 30

“Hamilton’s is still like a second home to us.”

SEPTEMBER 2018

JC:

“When we lived in City Heights, we would stop in for a night cap after closing Machete for the night. Now that we have moved we don't go as often, but it is still at the top of our list. We actually spend most of our downtime in Tijuana and Ensenada right now.” What are your plans for the future?

ET:

“We're actually in the works of opening a new spot in City Heights. We haven’t locked in the building yet, but we are pretty much there. We scored a full liquor license, so it's going to have a kitchen and a full bar.”

JC: ET:

“Definitely Mexican-based — simple food rooted in traditional flavors.”

“We’re going to keep it authentic, with a huge focus on mescal and other Mexican spirits.” What do you think you’d be doing if you weren’t running the bar?

ET:

“I did have a short unsuccessful venture in medical marijuana. At the time, it wasn't worth the risk for me. While starting up the business I quickly realized that I didn't want to spend time in jail on a technicality. I think now that it is a lot more stable…”

JC: ET:

(with a laugh) “You would have been really rich!”

(chuckling) “I would probably be retired by now!”

Complete the following thought: 150+ brewhouses in San Diego and…?

JC: ET:

“And it has created a beautiful culture… at least for me!”

“And no end in sight!”


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Bay City head brewer Austin Pinder

Q&A: AUSTIN PINDER NEW HEAD BREWER AT BAY CITY

it’s very satisfying to see positive results and I’m even more excited to see where we can go from here.

What are some of the biggest challenges you foresee and how do you expect to overcome them?

The

team behind Point Loma’s Bay City Brewing met their first head brewer, Chris West, when he was behind the bar at downtown’s Monkey Paw Brewing, where he poured in addition to his assistantbrewer duties. They offered him a job and he carried them through their first three years, until a recent parting of ways. West’s successor is Austin Pinder, a local veteran coming to Bay City by way of Karl Strauss Brewing. We reached out to find out what we can expect from the newcomer under his regime at the sports-arena-adjacent brewery, as Bay City celebrated three years in business in August.

What vocational road led you to your new gig? My first real brewery job was working on the bottling line at the nowdefunct Firehouse Brewing in Mission Valley. I stayed there for almost two years doing pretty much every job around the brewery and trying to soak up as much knowledge as I could. After they closed down in 2011, I was fortunate enough to land at Karl Strauss, and ended up staying there for seven years. I spent most of that time as a brewer, splitting time between the production brewery in Pacific Beach and various Karl brewpubs around Southern California. Over time, I was given more and more freedom to play around with beer styles and create the kind of beer that I wanted to drink. It was awesome spending all that time with the OG San Diego craft brewery and I definitely learned a lot about quality, consistency and how to navigate the business of craft beer.

What are you most excited about with your new position? Before taking the head-brewer position, I was already a fan of Bay City, so I was excited to get in and see how I could help elevate the current beers and put a plan in place to improve quality and consistency across the board. Now that we’re in the middle of putting that plan into place,

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The biggest challenge I see is that the craft-beer market has become so competitive. There are so many breweries in San Diego making really amazing beer right now, which is great for people like me who love drinking local product, but it can be a challenge for a brewery to find their voice in such a crowded market. One of the things I’m looking forward to most is defining that voice for Bay City and solidifying ourselves in the San Diego scene.

How will you put your personal spin on Bay City’s brewing operations? Being able to make beer for a living is the greatest thing ever! I have fun every day I come into work and I want customers to see that we love what we do and have it show in the beer we make. Going along with that, we want to focus on quality and consistency. My personal goal at Bay City is for someone to be able to close their eyes, point to any beer on the board, and know that no matter what style of beer they land on, it’s going to be well-made and super tasty. And if they come back a few months later, that beer will be exactly how they remember it.

What do you expect your beer board to look like once you’re fully settled in? I was born and raised in San Diego, so for me a local brewery really starts with the hoppy beers. That’s still the bar by which we are judged, so they have to be absolutely perfect. For Bay City, the goal is to have a solid stable of IPAs of various strengths (and clarity). We’ll always have a few well-made lagers, a coffee beer, and at least one sour. Beyond that, we’ll be brewing seasonally, so we’ll have some robust dark beers, some Belgian beers, Radlers in the summer, and whatever else seems right for the season. — Brandon Hernández


PROHIBITCHIN'

The One Woman Show Kristine Baker of the Women’s Craft Beer Collective

BY BETH DEMMON

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SEPTEMBER 2018


I'M REPPING FOR THE GIRLS / WHO TAKING OVER THE WORLD - Beyoncé, Run the World (Girls) A

cross the country, inside and outside of craft beer, girls are stepping up. According to the Brewers Association’s 2018 report “Shifting Demographics in Craft Beer Drinkers,” the percentage of women drinking beer keeps ticking upward year over year. We’re still only around one third of the total number of overall independent beer drinkers, but that doesn’t account for the rising numbers of female brewers, maltsters, beertenders, brewpub owners, and other roles in the industry.

educational outings, and even a fair amount of D.I.Y. events. Baker laughs, “I think I’ve gotten the title ‘the crafty craft beer drinker.’” In fact, after our interview, she was hosting a craft event at Culture Brewing Company Solana Beach (where she beertends), where people could “deconstruct and reconstruct a Culture t-shirt, making it more like our own personality than looking like a guy’s t-shirt.” But it’s not just her ideas that get the Collective’s go-ahead.

San Diego beer may be ahead of the the game when it comes to gender inclusion, but that doesn’t mean we’ve closed the gap. Kristine Baker of the Women’s Craft Beer Collective thinks there’s still room for girls to lead the way. In 2013, she launched the Collective with the intent of “educating women in the enjoyment and fine art of craft beer.”

“Any idea anyone approaches me with I’m open to,” promises Baker. That’s good, because despite the name, she’s the sole force behind the Women’s Craft Beer Collective. She’s quick to point out that it’s truly a group initiative — she just happens to be the organizer.

“The primary focus when I first started was to bring women into breweries. What I often heard from brewery owners was ‘how do we get women in?’” she explains. “It doesn’t even come up anymore.” Even with the progress we’ve made, women-only groups like the Collective and the Pink Boots Society still provide tremendous value for women in the beer industry, veterans, and newbies alike. But there are those who disagree with the fundamental concept of separation, arguing that creating safe places aren’t worth self-exclusion. I asked Baker if she ever foresees a day when groups like hers won’t be necessary. “I think we’ll always love having a place we can call our own,” says Baker. “[Plus], if it helps people in other states feel like they’re a part of something and educating men to the fact that women are just as savvy and intelligent about beer, then yeah, I’ll continue.” In the six years since launching the Women’s Craft Beer Collective, the group has evolved from a small group of likeminded women hanging out and going on brewery tours to a full-blown part of the community, hosting lectures, organizing

“I don’t want people to feel like it’s just me. I want them to feel like it’s all of us,” she explains. And she has plenty of support. She lists women like Aleks Kostka (head brewer at Culture), Laura Ulrich (president of the Pink Boots Society and small batch brewer at Stone Brewing Company), Liz Chism (owner of Council Brewing Company), and Liz Bauer (founder of Hopsbauer) as inspirations. “I could go on. There’s so many impressive women… [but] we always encourage men to join us,” says Baker. “The more, the merrier.” There’s no set schedule of Women’s Craft Beer Collective events, but Baker promises that she’s cooking up something special for the upcoming 6 year anniversary this winter. And overall, her future plans for the Collective are simple. “Ultimately, I am here to bring attention to independent craft in San Diego county and to be supportive, especially for the small breweries.” Know someone who deserves to be featured in an upcoming column? Nominate them by emailing beth@bethdemmon.com.

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12OZ.

COLLAB

CAN

RELEASE

SEPTEMBER 15TH MUSIC | PIÑATA | TACOS | GAMES


PLATES & PINTS

Stone Brewing founder Greg Koch applies craft sensibilities to artisanal nut butters I remember my time working at Stone Brewing HQ like it was yesterday. Many

beyond peanuts, salt, sugar, and oil. There were more flavorful and exotic nuts,

great memories were had there, care of lots of good friends and innovative co-

plus hemp and chia seeds, and different spices. The make-up of the condiments

workers. Looking back, there’s a particular moment that stands out for me. On a

was as remarkable as the flavor. I was instantly impressed and made a point to

visit to the break room for a cold beverage (water — contrary to popular belief,

scoop up some of Greg’s home-made offerings whenever he brought them in.

there was no keg for mid-day brewskis), I opened the refrigerator and saw jars labeled “GK’s nut butter.” As the sophomoric twelve-year-old that runs my brain

Though I no longer work for Stone, Koch’s nut butters are still within reach,

giggled, I turned to see “GK” (AKA, Greg Koch, co-founder of Stone and my boss

thanks to Nutista, an entrepreneurial venture he entered into last year with co-

at the time) sitting at a table.

founders Tristen Cross and John Huber. That Carlsbad-based business now has multiple all-natural nut butters on store shelves, including some that are infused

I asked if they were merely his property or if he had made them. To my surprise,

with ingredients selected to mimic the flavor of certain Stone beers.

it was the latter. As someone who enjoys cooking, I always get a little charge when I discover someone’s affinity for culinary pursuits. He invited me to try

“I like the process of making stuff. I don’t tend to cook a lot, but when I do

some and, as I did, I examined hand-written lists of ingredients that went far

stuff in the kitchen, it tends to be project-based, like making chocolate or

Nutista founders Tristen Cross, Greg Koch, and John Huber. Photo by Kristy Walker

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SEPTEMBER 2018


making hot sauces with chili peppers from my garden,” says Koch, who started making nut butters a decade ago after being inspired by a YouTube video. “I started experimenting, mad-scientist style, and after doing it for a while, found that I really loved the results. I could customize the blends any way I wanted, like adding a tiny bit of sea salt or leaving out sweeteners because I don’t like it that way. And I could use really great quality nuts, which bring a lot of sweetness themselves.” Customization is at the core of Nutista’s butters, none of which could be mistaken as basic. There is no “plain” or “standard” variety. The closest to that, “The Nut Job” contains cashews, sprouted almonds, peanuts, raw pecans, and sea salt. Its lack of sugar and preservatives are shared attributes of all Nutista products, including those emulating craft beers. “For the Stone collaborations, I was wondering what a cross between a beer recipe and a nut butter recipe would look like,” says Koch. “We couldn’t add liquid, because that’s not good for a nut butter, but we could add a lot of the ingredients found in the beers, including malt and brewer’s yeast. For the [nut butter based on Drew Curtis / Wil Wheaton / Greg Koch Farking Wheaton] w00tstout, we used coffee and chocolate, while tangerine peel and dried pineapple went into the one based on Stone Tangerine Express IPA.” Raw pecans, bourbon-soaked malt, dry-malt extract, malted rye, roasted barley, coconut, and sea salt round out the w00tstout variety, while blanched almonds, dry-roasted peanuts, golden light dry malt, and sea salt complete the

the eighth-largest craft brewery in the country over the past 22 years. It’s that

Thai Chicken Pizza With IPA Nut Butter Sauce

entrenchment that nearly kept Koch from pursuing a nut-butter venture.

Yield: 1 pizza

latter. It’s not garden-variety by any stretch, and an enjoyable creative outlet for someone who has maintained laser-focus on growing Stone to its status as

“I actually formulated a business plan over several years, jotting down notes of what I might want this to be, but I was too focused on Stone and everything we were doing, and realized it wouldn’t be possible,” says Koch. “A couple of years ago, I was having a conversation with a friend and the subject of nut butters came up. I told him about my plans and he looked at me and said, ‘That sounds awesome. Can I help you start that?’ Just like anything, it takes a good partner; great people who share the passion and the interest.” On that note, Nutista’s founders all agreed to follow a DIY ethos, opening their own facility, purchasing their own equipment, sourcing all of the nuts and other ingredients, then grinding, blending, and packaging everything.

IPA Sauce (recipe follows) 1½ tsp olive oil 5 ounces chicken breast, sliced into 1-inch strips salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 1 ready-made pizza crust 1½ cups mozzarella cheese, shredded ½ red bell pepper, thinly sliced ¼ cup carrots, shredded 2 scallions, chopped 2 Tbsp fresh Thai basil leaves crushed peanuts, for garnish crushed red pepper flakes, for garnish

They work together on every recipe and share the belief each nut butter should be wholesome, healthful, and all-natural. When asked how he likes to utilize his nut butters, Koch takes a very basic approach, likening it to “guilt-free cookie dough.” “I keep them in my refrigerator then just grab a spoon and go in at different parts of the day for a snack.” Of course there are PB&J sandwiches, but the Nutista team has developed some recipes that utilize their nut butters as ingredients. They’ve shared two of those with West Coaster, and say the best places to find their wares, locally, are Stone Company Store locations, Jimbo’s Natural Foods Grocer, and Nutista’s website (nutista.com).

Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Season the chicken with salt and pepper, then place in the skillet and sauté until cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. Place the crust on a pizza pan, sheet pan or pizza stone. Top with desired amount of sauce, followed by 1 cup of cheese. Spread the chicken, bell pepper and carrots atop the pizza, then top with the remaining cheese and scallions. Place in the oven and bake until the cheese is melted and the crust is lightly browned, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and let stand for 5 minutes. To serve, top with basil, peanuts and red pepper flakes, then slice into 4 to 6 equal-sized pieces.

— Brandon Hernández

WESTCOASTERSD.COM

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IPA Nut Butter Sauce Yield: About ½ cup ¼ cup water ¼ cup Nutista Tangerine Express IPA nut butter 1 Tbsp soy sauce 1 tsp rice wine vinegar 1 tsp ginger powder 1 clove garlic, minced ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes Whisk all of the ingredients together until fully incorporated and a smooth consistency has been reached.

Bacon Brussels Sprouts with Maple Nut Butter Sauce Yield: 8 to 12 servings 2 pounds Brussels sprouts, rinsed and halved ¼ cup peanut oil salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 2 Tbsp Nutista The Mountie nut butter 4 tsp champagne vinegar 2 tsp honey water 5 strips cooked bacon, chopped 3 Tbsp dried cranberries Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Toss the Brussels sprouts with peanut oil and season with salt and pepper. Spread the Brussels sprouts onto a baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes. Remove from oven and stir. Return to oven and continue cooking for 10 to 15 minutes. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the nut butter, vinegar and honey until fully incorporated and creamy. Use a few splashes of water to thin the mixture to a salad-dressing consistency. Pour half of the mixture over the Brussels sprouts and bake until browned and crispy, 5 to 10 minutes. Make sure they do not burn. Remove from the oven and transfer the Brussels sprouts to a large bowl. Add the bacon, cranberries and remaining sauce, toss to incorporate, and serve warm or cold.

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Top: The w00tstout nut butter with its namesake beer. Photo by Sandy Huffake | Bottom: Tangerine Express IPA nut butter. Photo by Kristy Walker


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SEPTEMBER 2018

S AT U R D AY 9 / 1 - 7th Anniversary at Aztec Brewing Co. - Pineapple Chica Beer Release at Ebullition Brew

S U N D AY 9 / 2 - Angry Petes Pizza Pairing at Longship Brewery

M O N D AY 9 / 3 - New WOD Episode at WhatsOnDraft.tv

T U E S D AY 9 / 4 - Charity Tuesdays: Suicide Prevention Foundation at Societe Brewing

W E D N E S D AY 9 / 1 2 - Green Flash Dinner Series at Sammy's Pizza Mission Valley - Latitude 33 Brewing Cask & Featured Beers at Regents Pizzeria - Adult Coloring with Beer at Iron Pig Alehouse

F R I D AY 9 / 1 4 - Sorrento Valley Beer Festival at Party Pals - Crossover: Where Comics & Science Meet with Pariah Brewing at Comic Art Gallery Liberty Station - Hops on the Harbor Beer Pairing Dinner Cruise with Green Flash

S AT U R D AY 9 / 1 5

with Green Flash - 9th Anniversary Week at Small Bar & Grill

S AT U R D AY 9 / 2 2 - Parktoberfest Kick Off Party at North Park Beer Co. - 24th Annual San Diego Festival of Beer at Broadway Pier - 9th Anniversary Week at Small Bar & Grill

S U N D AY 9 / 2 3 - 9th Anniversary Week at Small Bar & Grill

T U E S D AY 9 / 2 5 - Charity Tuesdays: Suicide Prevention Foundation at Societe Brewing

- Inferno Pizza and Beer Pairings at Ebullition Brew

W E D N E S D AY 9 / 5 - Green Flash Dinner Series at Sammy's Pizza Del Mar - Mike Hess Brewing Cask & Featured Beers at Regents Pizzeria - Adult Coloring with Beer at Iron Pig Alehouse

T H U R S D AY 9 / 6 F R I D AY 9 / 7 - California Craft Beer Summit at Sacramento Convention Center

F R I D AY 9 / 7 - Hops on the Harbor Beer Pairing Dinner Cruise with Green Flash

S U N D AY 9 / 1 6 - Wet Hop Beer Event with Live Music & MIHO at Nopalito Farm

W E D N E S D AY 9 / 2 6 - BNS Brewing Cask & Featured Beers at Regents Pizzeria - Adult Coloring with Beer at Iron Pig Alehouse

M O N D AY 9 / 1 7

T H U R S D AY 9 / 2 7

- 9th Anniversary Week at Small Bar & Grill - New WOD Episode at WhatsOnDraft.tv

- 5th Annual San Diego Brewers Guild Golf Tournament

T U E S D AY 9 / 1 8

- Brews on the Roof with Modern Times Beer at Upper East Bar (Hotel Solamar) - Hops on the Harbor Beer Pairing Dinner Cruise with Green Flash

- 9th Anniversary Week at Small Bar & Grill - Charity Tuesdays: Suicide Prevention Foundation at Societe Brewing

F R I D AY 9 / 2 8

S AT U R D AY 9 / 8

W E D N E S D AY 9 / 1 9

S AT U R D AY 9 / 2 9

- California Craft Beer Summit Festival at Sacramento Capitol Mall - Sour Fest at Bottlecraft (Little Italy & North Park)

- Green Flash Dinner Series at Sammy's Pizza Scripps Ranch - Karl Strauss Brewing Cask & Featured Beers at Regents Pizzeria - 9th Anniversary Week at Small Bar & Grill - Adult Coloring with Beer at Iron Pig Alehouse

- "Drinking with Matt" Guided Tasting & Tour at Benchmark Brewing - Bayside Brew & Spirits Festival at Pepper Park National City

S U N D AY 9 / 9 - Hoppy Beer Hoppy Life 6 Year Anniversary Party at Lot 8 - Beer Mug Painting Class at Kilowatt Ocean Beach

T U E S D AY 9 / 1 1 - Hops for Heroes Beer Fest at Grand Ole BBQ y Asado - Charity Tuesdays: Suicide Prevention Foundation at Societe Brewing

T H U R S D AY 9 / 2 0 - Brewmaster Dinner Series with Eppig Brewing at Waypoint Public North Park - 9th Anniversary Week at Small Bar & Grill

F R I D AY 9 / 2 1 - Hops on the Harbor Beer Pairing Dinner Cruise

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SEPTEMBER 2018

S U N D AY 9/30 - Treasure Chest Beer + Food Fest at Green Flash Brewing Co. OCTOBER 2018

M O N D AY 1 0 /1 - New WOD Episode at WhatsOnDraft.tv


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F R I D AY 1 0 / 5 - Hops on the Harbor Beer Pairing Dinner Cruise with Second Chance

S AT U R D AY 1 0 / 6 - Hamiltons Oktoberfest at Hamiltons Tavern

S U N D AY 1 0 / 7 - Kimchi Workshop with Local Cider & Food at The Good Seed Food Co.

F R I D AY 1 0 / 1 2 - Hops on the Harbor Beer Pairing Dinner Cruise with Second Chance

S AT U R D AY 1 0 / 1 3 - Home Brew Competition: Saison vs. Trappist Single at The Homebrewer - 12th Anny + 2nd Saturday with Burgeon & Kern River at Hamiltons Tavern

M O N D AY 1 0 / 1 5 - Building A Descriptive Vocabulary at White Labs - Suds & Science: Cyber Security in the Age of the Internet at Wavelength Brewing - New WOD Episode at WhatsOnDraft.tv

T U E S D AY 1 0 / 1 6 - Beer To The Rescue/Beer For Boobs Joint Fundraiser at White Labs

T H U R S D AY 1 0 / 1 8 - Webinar: Brewing Beer The People Ingredient

F R I D AY 1 0 / 1 9 - Hops on the Harbor Beer Pairing Dinner Cruise with Second Chance

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D B E

O V E R T H E N E X T F E W PA G E S , W E ’ L L S H A R E S O M E O F O U R FAV O R I T E P H O T O S F R O M I N S TA G R A M T H AT W E R E U P LO A D E D U S I N G T H E H A S H TA G #SDBEER

WARNING: Thirst for a tasty, locally-brewed beer may occur.

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ANOTHER MEDAL ARRIVED IN THE MAIL THIS WEEK, AND IT GOT US THINKING. WHEN YOU BRING HOME A MEDAL IN EVERY COMPETITION ENTERED, YOU SHOULD HAVE AN EQUALLY DESERVING NAME. MEET MEISTER - SAME AWARD WINNING KOTTBUSSER RECIPE, NEW NAME ("CHAMPION" IN GERMAN). PROST!

- @eppigbrewing

FO L LOW

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O U R FAVO R I T E

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I N YO U R P O ST S !

P H OT O S W I L L A P P E A R I N T H E N E X T I S S U E O F W E ST COA ST E R S A N D I EG O.


THE DOCTOR'S OFFICE

SouthNorte Open in Tijuana I

t was sometime mid-morning when I found myself doublefisting drinks in Tijuana. In my left hand: a pint of a Mosaic hop-driven session IPA, low in ABV as well as IBUs, yet bold and bright. In my right hand: una agua de Jamaica, a sweet, blood red tea endowed with the flavor and aroma of hibiscus flowers, a Mexican staple. Without much effort, and within minutes of arriving at Telefonica, Ryan Brooks had made me feel right at home with a multicultural experience. Sharing a meal or having a drink with someone is a very intimate act. Drinking a beer with the team that brewed it is downright spiritual.

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This type of interaction is what SouthNorte brings to Tijuana every day at Telefonica Gastropark. Established in 2015, Telefonica pioneered the gastropark concept in TJ, growing from a vacant lot to 11,000 square feet. Telefonica now includes fifteen chef-driven, niche food operators, and the 28-tap bar has been expanded into a 10-barrel production brewery operated by SouthNorte. West Coaster headed south to speak with Ryan Brooks, brewmaster of SouthNorte, as well as his business partners from Coronado Brewing, just ahead of the brewery’s August 31 grand opening.


Why was SouthNorte created? Coronado: SouthNorte’s origins began a few years ago. Ryan Brooks was the brewmaster for us, and, at that same time, he was living in Tijuana. Since he’s very active in the homebrew and beer judging scene, Ryan fell in love with Mexican lagers and started to experiment with that style (and other Mexican-influenced beers) at Coronado.

bronze medal at GABF for our Agavemente lager in the specialty beer category. Agavemente took home the same award at this year’s California State Fair, and we have our fingers crossed for GABF 2018! We were also honored to be named one of 2018’s Top 50 New Breweries by Beer Advocate Magazine.

Brooks: A lot of the Mexican brewers knew me, not just in Baja, but throughout Mexico. I was judging competitions nationally, being exposed to different spins on styles. I started making these styles at Coronado for the brewpub. After continual success with these small batch beers, Coronado approached me to create a new brand, not just a sub-brand, but my own brand. This was their chance to invest in me as a person, a person with a real history and reputation on both sides of the border.

Brooks: I want this place to hum. We have 27 taps at the moment. I want them to be ¹/₂ SouthNorte or ¹/₂ collaboration beers eventually. In order to get to that point we will have to make our Telefonica production more efficient. As for future plans, we are looking forward to finding a permanent home in San Diego for our brewery and tasting room experience. We are also looking forward to expanding our distribution into southern California and parts of Arizona. We are also expanding our distribution in Mexico. We look forward to being a part of both the San Diego and Baja brewing scenes.

What's on the horizon?

— Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D.

Coronado: There is so much momentum for SouthNorte! We are getting ready to celebrate our first official year in business. In that short time, we’ve been honored to win a

Read the full interview at WestCoasterSD.com.

WESTCOASTERSD.COM

47


SETTING SUN SAKE BREWING COMPANY: WHERE BREWERS GO TO DRINK

Design Build Services    Project Planning/Budge�ng   Complete Brewery Installa�ons   Tank Addi�ons   Stainless Steel Piping   Steam Systems   Glycol Systems   Grain Handling 

Current Projects   AleSmith Brewing Co.   Golden Road Brewing   Karl Strauss Brewing Co.   Port Brewing Co.   Societe Brewing Co.   Saint Archer Brewing Co.   Stone Brewing Co. 

Gerald Foster, P.E.  gfoster@prmech.com   

www.prmech.com 800.891.4822   

San Diego  858.974.6500  Santa Ana  714.285.2600   

Engineers & Contractors  CA License #814462   

Brewers Associa�on  #900007116 


BEER IN THE HEADLIGHTS

Hot Takes on Cold Beer

Deft Brewing

When I browse my Facebook feed these days, I can reliably count on being greeted by one of two posts: a polarizing take on a polarizing issue, or a desperate plea to identify businesses with air conditioning. As disparate as these posts are, I find that the former really makes me appreciate the latter. No matter how fraught our politics may become, humanity is still willing to unify against the tyranny of swamp ass. I strongly endorse taking time to reward the breweries and bars that supply air conditioning. That said, my reflection on the above ended up seeding a much different idea for this column. This month’s theme is “San Diego breweries that don’t have air conditioning, but that I visited in the dead of summer anyway because of my deeply empathetic nature.” I’m not saying you should call me a hero, but I’m also not saying I would stop you if you did. WESTCOASTERSD.COM 

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Savagewood Brewing

I’d wager that the motto of Deft Brewing — “Deftly Crafted, European Inspired” — has the potential to be regarded as an invitation or a warning. While some craft customers are beginning to embrace more classical brewing sensibilities of late (see: the emergence of pilsners and other lagers), most still yearn for less conventional options (see: $22 four-packs of triple dry-hopped turbid mango IPA). Still, it’s a differentiator that head brewer Morris “Mo” Nuspl hopes will provide a novel consumer experience. “We aim to provide our guests with some truly unique brews that are not often found in tasting rooms around Southern California,” he said. The tasting room has a minimalist palette of black, white, and red tones, paired with a topology that favors basic geometric form. This clearly illustrates an embrace of Dutch neoplasticism. I’d say the application of De Stijl here is meant to amplify the central theme of simplicity and function that is echoed in the beers. It’s also possible those colors were on sale when they went shopping for semi-gloss paint. It’s hard to say for sure. Artistic impressions aside, the Deft Brewing tasting room makes solid use of its square footage. There’s a lovely outdoor patio edged with hop bines, which is pure Instagram fodder. It’s a little cramped around the edges of the picnic tables if you have birthing hips like myself, but otherwise a great area to drink in the sun (when it’s not being an unrelenting melanoma factory at least). The interior likewise has plenty of seating options and even a discrete kiddie play area tucked into the space. As you might expect, the lack of air conditioning is a small detractor, though the room’s orientation somehow harnesses a substantial enough cross-breeze for it to hardly be an issue. Dogs are welcomed along with kids, with some minor stipulations. The tasting room signage specifically welcomes “behaved dogs.” Basically, if you’ve ever gestured to your mutt while uttering, “Sorry, he usually likes other dogs!” or “I didn’t even know he could fit a baby in his mouth! My bad...” you’d do well to leave your canine at home. Not only do I heartily endorse this standard, I’d personally extend it to only allowing well-behaved anything in the tasting room. I don’t care if it’s adults, infants, or that macaw you keep on your shoulder because it’s “a sure-fire conversation starter.” The policy also stipulates that the dogs must remain on leash, which is a standard I’m also happy to apply to other consenting adults on the odd Friday night. But I digress. I was able to cruise through two full flights on my visit, courtesy of generally conservative ABVs and the handy-dandy carriers. It was

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akin to carrying a basket of beer, as it required little or no balancing to transport the snugly-nested glasses. The labels they diligently applied to identify the brews were helpful given the preponderance of goldenhued ales on the menu, and a nice touch. The carriers aren’t perfect, though. Unless you withdraw the tiny tulip glasses perfectly perpendicular to their cubby, they tend to clip the edges, jeopardizing its precious cargo. Basically, they only solve 95% of my First World Taster Problems and I believe I’m entitled to MORE. True to the brewery slogan, they do wonderful work when serving up traditional European fare. I greatly enjoyed the Dawn of the Deft Porter, whose inviting aroma of toasty malts and roasted chestnuts are coupled with beautifully articulated flavors of dates, burnt toast, and light fruitiness. Their Half-a-Weizen Kristal Weizen likewise impressed with its nose of monkey bread, banana, and clove, along with a vibrant, citrus-forward flavor expression. It was a multidimensional take on the style that leaves your senses off-kilter, yet oddly satisfied. The Bay Park Blonde (a Kölsch-style ale) and Austere Abbot (a Belgian single) were solid, flavor-forward expressions of their respective styles that engaged the palate as much as they quenched the thirst. Deftly crafted, indeed. I was unable to summon the same enthusiasm for the two IPAs on the menu. Even when mentally anticipating a less New World-y hop profile, I felt they underwhelmed. The DeftHopt Red’s fruitcake maltiness and floral/piney hops flirted with requisite Red IPA components, but failed to strike a balance that I found enjoyable. Furthermore, the finish was vaguely soapy and lingered longer than I cared for. The Deft FEUsion IPA (an “American-ish IPA”) left me with a similar impression. All things considered, Deft Brewing’s embrace of its motto has resulted in an array of beers that are perfectly suited to combat summer swelter. It’s a great place to reach for an unfamiliar style and see what brewing tradition has left to teach us. By comparison, Savagewood Brewery has little compunction about letting its freak flag fly. They aren’t casting standards to the wind exactly, but their brews are clearly oriented toward a more experimental sentiment. On any given day you are likely to see one or more collaboration brews on tap that harnessed the talents of either a fellow brewery or even an ambitious homebrewer. There’s even talk of putting together a “Homebrewer Incubator” program to further support industrious folks in the community. All of this


contributes to a somewhat eclectic beer board, but brewer and owner Darrel Brown promises that he won’t let this train fly off the stylistic rails. “Clean and balanced will trump any fad or gimmick,” he said. If the volume of collaborations they are doing strikes you as ambitious, you are not ready for Savagewood Brewery’s hustle. There’s always a promotion for a trivia/movie night, a special release, a happy hour, or even free food going on. On the night I popped in they had a free nachos station set up, complete with a variety of fixings. They may not have been the best nachos I’ve ever had, but I don’t need free nachos to be aspirational. I’ll eat asbestos shards if you put enough melted cheese product on them. They were nothing short of a godsend and I appreciated the value-add. The tasting room harbors two very distinct spaces: a couple of dollhouse-sized cafe tables adjacent the main bar, and an array of neatly arranged tables in the belly of the brewery. It packs a good number of folks in without feeling cramped, and has the added bonus of offering small patio spaces on either end. Sadly, it does not harness the same magical cross-breeze that graces Deft Brewing, but their industrial swamp cooler does a yeoman’s job. I doubt the tasting room will ever approach “I should have brought my cardigan” levels of cool, but it’s more than enough to keep the air from getting stifling. The diversity in the beer menu may inspire uncertainty, but there’s nothing like the copious sodium content of free nachos to spur a swift decision. I would recommend opening with the $500 Millionaire, a session IPA identified as one of their core beers. It was surprisingly full-bodied with a quick crescendo of orange and grapefruit bitterness followed by a muted piney finish. That’s quite a journey for a session IPA. One could argue the heft made it less than ideal for actual sessioning, but I deeply appreciate a (deceptively) big IPA with a forgiving ABV. There’s a good deal more to enjoy as well. I was particularly fond of the Gnarly Dude ESB, a coppery brew with a perfumy floral

character and light nectary sweetness to the nose. The first sip exploded with caramel and crackery malts with an impression of red apple sweetness. The House Blackwood, a coffee vanilla cream ale served on nitrogen (a format I seldom embrace) was also a surprise favorite. Its cafe latte aromas were equally undeniable and enjoyable. Despite the expectation that created for a sweet sipper, it offered the essence of creamy vanilla coupled with the restrained bitterness of a dilute drip coffee. In the interest of offering some constructive feedback, I would suggest that both the Exquisite Blonde and Savage City Saison both finished more aggressively than I would typically enjoy for their styles. The blonde did deliver a noteworthy pear and kiwi-like sweetness, but I felt the substantial bitter citrus rind finish was a tad much. Similarly, there’s no way an Old World farmhand would have returned to work after that 8.1% ABV Old World saison without naptime interceding. I appreciated the notes of pepper, wet hay, lemon tart, and floral hops erupting out of the glass, but I probably would have enjoyed a slightly muted version just as much. I also feel obligated to mention they have a key lime milkshake IPA created to support a very worthy, lupus-fighting cause in Beer to the Rescue. It tastes like...a key lime milkshake in an IPA. I don’t know how to feel about that. Angry because the milkshake IPA style continues to exist? Impressed because they pulled it off? Ashamed because I’m drinking it despite actively wishing for the style’s demise? Aroused because that’s just what shame does to me (see: earlier references to leash wearing)? I’ll simply say it’s everything it intends to be and you can process that however you want. Despite the tonal differences between these breweries, their shared embrace of craft and style was apparent. Both would make entirely suitable places to celebrate Oktoberfest at the end of this month, so make sure to follow their social media channels for details. There’s no better way to stick it to the heat than to party through it. — Ian Cheesman


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West Coaster September 2018  

West Coaster September 2018