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november 2012 | serving america’s finest beer county | san Diego

San DieganS

Win Big at gabf Pizza Port Solana Beach

aleSmith

green Flash

The Lost abbey/Port Brewing alpine

The Beer Co.

Pizza Port Carlsbad

Vol. 3 No. 1

Free Copy


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

San Diego Beer Week is back, again, and it’s hard to believe that two years ago this month we published the first issue of West Coaster. Pictured above is Mike Shess, snapping a photo of the perfect beer color for our first logo in the spring of 2010. We were living in Madrid, Spain at the time with our friends James and Tyler when the idea to start a San Diego beer magazine was hatched. You could say that a combination of bland lagers and a peek across the pond at a dismal job market was all the motivation we needed. A lot has changed since then: Spanish craft beer culture has started to bloom — right after we left, of course — and we’ve grown from 12 pages in “the old format” to 48 now, thanks to the support of our advertisers, writers, families and friends. West Coaster even got some recognition at the San Diego Press Club awards ceremony this past month: Mike won 1st Place in the Non Daily Newspaper: Public Service/Consumer Advocacy category for his “Festival Failure” story on the America’s Finest Beer Festival debacle in the summer of 2011. Thankfully, positive stories have outweighed negative ones over the past two years; it’s been fun to watch San Diego Beer grow and we hope it continues for a long time. On an unrelated note, February 2013 will be our first real photo issue. Since it’ll be California Craft Beer Month, that’s going to be the theme. We’ll be accepting reader submissions until January 14, 2013 and prizes will be awarded for the best high resolution images. E-mail your best shots of CA bars, beers, breweries and more to photoissue@westcoastersd.com. Thanks for your continued support! Salud,

Ryan Lamb Executive Editor West Coaster


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders ryan lamb mike shess Publisher mike shess mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor ryan lamb ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director brittany everett brittany@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant tom shess thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers sam tierney sam@westcoastersd.com jeff hammett jeff@westcoastersd.com brandon hernández brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com Copy Editor amy t. granite amy@westcoastersd.com Contributors kristina yamamoto Editorial Intern nickie peña

West Coaster, THE website Web Manager mike shess Web Editor ryan lamb Webmaster josh everett West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2012 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


columnist

beer and now

Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

Jeff Hammett first noticed craft beer early in college when a friend introduced him to Stone Brewing Co.’s Pale Ale. After graduating from UCSD with a degree in Philoso­phy, he moved to Santa Cruz where he frequented Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing and Seabright Brewery. Jeff would journey up to San Francisco to visit Magnolia and Toronado every chance he got. He started blogging about beer in early 2009 while living in Durango, Colorado. For a town of only 20,000 people, Durango boasts an impressive four breweries. Jeff quickly became a part of the brewing scene, and in January 2010 was invited to work with Ska Brewing Co.’s Head Brewer Thomas Larsen to formulate a recipe and brew on Ska’s pilot system. In addition to his love of craft beer, Mr. Hammett is an avid cyclist and can be seen riding on the road or trails most weekends.

plates & pints

columnist

columnist

into the brew

writers

Brandon Hernández hated beer and had never even heard the term “craft beer” until his first trip to O’Brien’s Pub in 1999. There, in a dark yet friendly space rife with the foreign smell of cascade and centennial, he fell into line with the new school of brew enthusiasts courtesy of a pint-sized one-two punch of Sierra Nevada Bigfoot and Stone Arrogant Bastard Ale. Those quaffs changed his perception of all beer could and should be and he’s spent the past decade-plus immersing himself in the local beer culture — living, learning, loving and, of course, drinking craft suds. He’s since taken up homebrewing and specializes in the creation of beer-centric cuisine. A native San Diegan, Brandon is proud to be contributing to a publication that serves a positive purpose for his hometown and its beer loving inhabitants. In addition to West Coaster, he is an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including San Diego Magazine, The Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Riviera, San Diego Home/Garden-Lifestyles and U-T San Diego.

Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews columnist on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times The Carboy a week along with occasional homebrew videos Chronicles and footage of beer events he attends.


TABLE OF CONTENTs

12

14-15

CoLUMNS

The Carboy Chronicles a new homebrew column by local writer Ryan Reschan Into the Brew a brewer’s first trip to the great american Beer Festival

18-20

Plates & Pints Featuring Christian graves, renowned chef and homebrewer

24-25

Beer and Now Looking behind Poor House Brewing Co.

FeATUreD CoNTrIBUTorS 26-27

Dr. Q, CraftBeerTasters.com Work in Progress: Hess Brewing, North Park

29-30

Laurie Delk, 100beers30days.com Homebrew Heroes: Interview with Wild Willow Contest Winners

6 35-41

SpoTLIGHT: GreAT AMerICAN Beer FeSTIVAL Local medal winners including our friends in San Clemente

GABF, in pictures See more at facebook.com/westcoastersd

Stone Brewing Co. Creative Director Mike Palmer pours beer at their award-winning end cap booth. Read more about its creation at blog.stonebrew.com (October 18 entry)

8

pLUS +

Making History in 2013 The San Diego History Center’s big beer plans

10-16

Brews in the News Clips of local - and not so local - beer culture

17

Not All Are Thriving One brewery closes, another files Chapter 11

22

Get On The Bus Two (free) monthly bus tours visit Uptown, Point Loma/Ocean Beach

32

A is for Alpine Kicking off a new monthly glossary segment

42-45

Craft Beer Directory & Map add your location by e-mailing directory@westcoastersd.com on the cover: San Diego’s gaBF medalists pose with festival founder Charlie Papazian. Photos by Ryan Lamb


Going Big at GABF

San Diegan brewers take home 15 medals AleSmith Brewing Co.

Pizza Port Carlsbad

The Beer Co.

Category 73 (Belgian-Style Strong Specialty Ale) Bronze: Grand Cru Availability: Year-round release

Category 12 (Session Beer) Gold: Twerp Availability: Should be fermenting again by Thanksgiving

Category 83 (Old Ale or Strong Ale) Bronze: Decadence ‘10 Availability: Good luck finding a bottle!

Category 55 (Imperial Red Ale) Bronze: 547 Haight Availability: Should be fermenting again by Thanksgiving

Category 22 (Wood- and Barrel-Aged Strong Beer) Gold: Manhattan Project Availability: Two kegs will be tapped November 7. After that, TBD.

Alpine Beer Co. Category 52 (American-Style India Pale Ale) Bronze: Duet Availability: Year-round release

Green Flashing Brewing Co. Category 18 (American-Belgo-Style Ale) Gold: Le Freak Availability: Year-round release Category 23 (Wood- and Barrel-Aged Strong Stout) Silver: Silva Stout Availability: January 2013 release in bottles Category 72 (Belgian-Style Abbey Ale) Gold: Tripel Availability: Year-round release

6 | november 2012

Pizza Port San Clemente* Category 78 (American-Style Stout) Gold: Order In The Port Availability: Brewed in late October for a November release Category 82 (Scotch Ale) Gold: Way Heavy Availability: Brewed in late October for a November release

Pizza Port Solana Beach Category 76 (Classic Irish-Style Dry Stout) Gold: Seaside Stout Availability: A new batch is being brewed this month Category 80 (Oatmeal Stout) Gold: Oats Availability: A new batch was brewed late October

The Lost Abbey / Port Brewing Co. Category 14 (Experimental Beer) Bronze: Track 8 Availability: Additional bottles will be made available in 2013 Category 16 (Indigenous Beer) Bronze: Hot Rocks Lager Availability: Seasonal release (Spring) Category 19 (American-Style Sour Ale) Silver: Red Poppy Availability: Seasonal release (Mid-Winter) Category 70 (Belgian and French-Style Ale) Gold: Saint’s Devotion Availability: Scheduled for Spring release *Pizza Port San Clemente, pictured above, is technically not a San Diego brewery, so their medals weren’t counted in the total.


making history

The San Diego History Center has big beer plans for 2013

F

or the past three years, the San Diego History Center (SDHC) in Balboa Park has hosted an event named the Taste of San Diego Craft Brews (TOSDCB) to celebrate the rich history of brewing in our great city. In 2012, 250 attendees were treated to samples of award-winning beers and wellexecuted food pairings. Through ticket purchases and a silent auction, more than $12,000 was raised for various educational programs.   The Taste of San Diego Craft Brews will return February 16, 2013 with an expanded footprint to accommodate more brewers and locals alike.   In addition to TOSDCB, the SDHC will honor the craft brewing industry at its annual Makers of San Diego History gala that includes a live “fireside chat” with industry leaders, a catered dinner and hosted bar. Tickets for the April 27, 2013 event at the Town and Country Resort in Mission Valley are priced at $150 each with a table of 10 for $1500; last year, 700 attendees raised more than $100,000 for the local tuna industry.   Proceeds from the Makers of San Diego History gala will go towards operational support of a new beer exhibit at the SDHC, scheduled to debut on or around May 1, 2013 and run until October or November 2013. Here visitors will be able to learn about the brewing history of San Diego through historic photography, interactive display elements and more.   Stayed tuned to the West Coaster website as more of SDHC’s plans develop.

Top: Beer memorabilia from John Critchfield’s collection includes many pieces from the old Aztec Brewery. Middle: Last year’s TOSDCB was a hit. Left: Brewmasters from Rock Bottom and Ballast Point combined to create a commemorative beer. Photos by Kristina Yamamoto. 8 | november 2012


brews in the

news

BEER AT 35,000 FT An online petition was recently started by SingleMaltMates.com founders Ryan Anderson and Kendon Carrera to bring craft beer to the three major U.S. Airlines: American Airlines, United/Continental and Delta Airlines. “By offering American craft beer on board flights, the big three airlines can show their support for our country’s business ecosystem, while also offering their customers the choices they crave and deserve,” reads the petition. Currently, these airlines only offer beers such as Budweiser, Miller and Heineken, none of which are headquartered in the United States or even owned by American companies, are served on flights. These pale lagers represent a very small percentage of beer styles available to the beer drinker today. The goal of the petition is to reach 50,000 signatures by November 23; visit change.org/petitions/ american-delta-united-airlines-start-offering-american-craft-beers-on-board-flights to sign your name. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CA BEER On October 1 California Craft Brewing Association (CCBA) President Steve Wagner

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of Stone Brewing Co. announced that the state’s craft brewing industry generated approximately $3 billion in total impact to the California economy in 2011, according to a 2012 study completed by the CCBA and the UC Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy. The study also found many other incredible statistics: California’s brewing industry created 22,000 jobs accounting for more than $500 million in wages, $400 million in total local, state and federal taxes were paid, and California produced more craft beer than any other state (2.2 million barrels in 2011). It is no wonder, then, that the 330 craft breweries in the state produce one in every five craft beers in the United States. Craft brewers were also extremely generous, giving approximately $16 million of in-kind contributions to non-profit causes.

is putting together a few blog posts where they ask industry professionals for their SDBW “pro tips”, such as suggestions for preparing one’s liver for a week’s worth of great beer, a preferred snack between beers, and advice for newbies to the 10 days of celebration. At time of press, the posts were scheduled to begin on October 26 at TapHunter.com. - LOVELIKEBEER: This organization, dedicated to promoting vegan cuisine at craft beer establishments, is planning to list their “picks” for SDBW at lovelikebeer.com/sdbw. This will include events in which venues have made a specific point to offer vegan food specials, as well as beer and food pairing suggestions for each day.

BEER WEEK BLOGGING We’re not the only ones who write about beer in this town. Here are three online sources that have some great information coming up for SDBW:

- Brandon Hernández/The Reader: Like last year, this seasoned local writer is posting four picks for each day of Beer Week at sandiegoreader.com/staff/brandon-hernandez. Having started on October 22, Hernández is giving plenty of advance notice for this year’s festivities.

- TapHunter: The team over at TapHunter

continued on page 16


The Carboy Chronicles

ISE

HE R

ON T

Homebrewing continues astounding growth nationwide BY Ryan Reschan

T

he 2012 Great American Beer Festival (GABF) was held in Denver, Colorado last month with a record number of 578 breweries pouring beer at the festival – 110 more than in 2011. In addition to this increase in breweries was the number of entries in the GABF Pro-Am competition, a collaboration of professional brewers and American Homebrewers Association (AHA) members. Of the 95 entries in this year’s competition, three San Diego breweries submitted beers: Ballast Point, who collaborated with San Diego Padres homebrew contest winner Erik Parker to recreate Time To Panic Pale Ale, which was on tap both at Home Brew Mart and their Scripps Ranch production facility tasting room at time of press; Stone Brewing Co., who teamed up with locals Iron Fist Brewing Company and the winner of the AHA-sanctioned March Madness Homebrew Competition Ken Schmidt to produce Mint Chocolate Imperial Stout, which was recently bottled and distributed through Stone’s network; and Karl Strauss, who worked with Jim Roberts to make seven barrels of his South Park Nut Brown Ale. Kegs of this beer were tapped at each brewery restaurant location on the first day of GABF, and they went quickly. Festival goers were lucky enough to sample these and more than 90 others on the floor

12 | november 2012

at GABF this year, which is pretty amazing considering there were only 35 entries in 2006.   The number of people brewing at home also continues to rise, as evidenced by the fact that there are now 1,327 homebrewing clubs in the U.S. and a record number of AHA members – 33,721 – almost double the number from four years ago. U.S. homebrew retailers are also experiencing growth, with 761 shops across the country seeing a 24% spike in revenue in 2011. Another amazing statistic is that 11% of homebrew shops have only been open for a year or less.   Earlier this year at the National Homebrewers Conference (NHC) in Seattle, 1,735 brewers submitted a record 7,823 entries in 28 different style categories and 98 subcategories to be judged by beer experts nationwide. The top five subcategories, in order, were Specialty Beer, American IPA, American Pale Ale, Spice/Herb or Vegetable Beer, and Wood-Aged Beer. While American IPA is still the most-entered category at GABF, homebrewers are getting more experimental with the Specialty Beer category.   But what is the Specialty Beer category? Well, it’s defined by the Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) style guidelines as

“a catch-all category for any beer that does not fit into an existing style category. No beer is ever ‘out of style’ in this category, unless it fits elsewhere.” It goes on to say that “the brewer must specify the ‘experimental nature’ of the beer (e.g., type of special ingredients used, process utilized or historical style being brewed), or why the beer doesn’t fit an established style. The brewer may specify an underlying beer style.” Combine that with the significant number of Wood-Aged and Spice/Herb or Vegetable Beer entries, and you have some very creative styles of beer to go along with the hoppy ales.   Homebrewers continue to push the envelope of craft beer and its styles as seen at this year’s NHC and GABF Pro-Am. Homebrew competitions around San Diego have also increased in recent times and are great for getting feedback on your homebrew. Check the West Coaster website for future competitions around town; you never know when you might have the next great beer. Just ask Home Brew Mart lead brewer Doug Duffield, who combined with Ballast Point in the 2007 GABF Pro-Am competition to win a bronze medal for Sculpin IPA, which is now one of the highest rated IPAs in the world.


into the brew

Gold @

GABF

One brewer’s perspective on beer competitions by Sam Tierney

C

ommercial beer competitions are viewed with varying degrees of interest and/or skepticism by both brewers and beer drinkers. There are actually quite a few out there, from big international competitions like European Beer Star and the World Beer Cup, to smaller ones like county and state fairs. The biggest that we have here in the US is the Great American Beer Festival (GABF) which just took place this past month in Denver. GABF is also the largest beer festival in the country, with 578 breweries pouring on the floor for 49,000 attendees over four separate sessions.   This year, there were 666 breweries that entered the competition side of the festival, and 4,300 beers were judged in 84 categories encompassing 134 styles. 188 judges from 11 countries, representing a who’swho of the brewing industry, chose the winners via blind tasting and judging against the style guidelines published by the Brewers Association. Medals were awarded in

14 | november 2012

each category for gold, silver, and bronze, and all other beers were kept anonymous. No gold was given in the Robust Porter category, to resounding boos from the brewers in attendance.   Every year when the results are announced, you will occasionally hear a collective groan from much of the beer-geek community. “That beer actually won a medal? No way!” is essentially the stock response. “My favorite beer didn’t win anything?” or “That beer sucks!” You get the idea... I’ll admit that sometimes I’m shocked by the results as well. This year, our neighboring Central Coast brewery, Tap It, won the ever-coveted gold medal in the American IPA category, beating out local SD favorite, Duet from Alpine (which was awarded the bronze medal), as well as 201 others in the most competitive category of the festival. Tap It is a great example of what can make these awards puzzling on the surface. The first time I had Tap It IPA

was about a year ago after I moved to the area. They were the new local brewery and I was excited to give their beers a try. Well, the beer was honestly just not very good. They were new, and they were still finding their groove. Fast forward a year and they are putting out some quality stuff. They may not be the model of consistency yet, but this medal shows that when they hit it, they can brew something that the judges feel is the standout beer on the table. I think the main lesson to be learned here is that every batch of a beer has the potential to be a medal winner. The beer that won the medal might be a completely different recipe under the same name as the beer you had in the past. If you aren’t at the judging table, you’ll never know for sure.   Another consideration in competitions like GABF is style. The beers that win aren’t necessarily anyone’s favorite, but the judges deem them to be the best beers that fit the style guidelines for the category that


they are entered in. Beer lovers these days not to get too caught up in who is winning. going for my first time this year because I are often captivated by the high-end stuff Some of the medal winners I tried on Satfelt like I would have to blame myself if we in a style—the biggest, chewiest stout, the urday were beers that I would never order didn’t win anything. We had beers entered hoppiest IPA, or the most mouth-puckering again if given the opportunity, but some in nine categories, and we didn’t win anysour beer out there. Well, in competition, were fantastic beers that I would love to see thing in the first six. By the time the sixth these beers often don’t show as well beagain. was announced (American IPA), my hands cause they are too extreme for the guideIf you have paid attention to the results were clutched so tight on my seat that my lines. Oftentimes, the winner in a category of GABF and other major competitions arms were starting to hurt! Then in the next is a very down-the-middle example of the like World Beer Cup for the past few years, category, we took the Imperial IPA bronze style that was just flawlessly brewed. In a you’ve undoubtedly noticed that there are for Double Jack, and the tension eased out category like IPA, there were probably at some breweries that seem to spend a lot of of my body. We were also lucky enough least a dozen beers that could have conceivtime on stage getting medals year after year. to take golds in the last two that we were ably won a medal. They fit entered in—DBA for Ordithe style, were free of flaws, nary or Special Bitter, and and had that captivating qualWookey Jack for American “in a category like iPa, there were probably ity that makes you reach for Black Ale. Since it was my at least a dozen beers that could have another sip. But they simply first time at the awards, the can’t all win, and the judges guys let me get the medal conceivably won a medal. They fit the style, have the difficult task of splitfor Wookey (also my favorwere free of flaws, and had that captivating ting hairs over hop aroma and ite IPA that we make) and I malt flavor. Is it a little ranhave to say that it was one quality that makes you reach for another sip.” dom? I think you could make of the best moments of my that argument in some cases. brewing career thus far. Ever As a brewer, I’m very insince I decided that I wanted terested in what beers win these awards. Some breweries will have a good year and to brew for a living, getting a gold medal at There is always something to be learned win several, only to fade away, but some GABF was one of my biggest goals. Medfrom tasting them. This year was my first just never seem to go away. If any brewery als are just one of many ways that brewers time actually going to Denver for the festi(or group actually) epitomizes this consiscan measure success, but it feels great to get val, and I made a point of visiting the tables tency of excellent brewing, it’s Pizza Port. up on stage in front of your peers and have of some of the medal winners on Saturday Year after year, they are up there winning one of your beers recognized as one of the to meet the brewers and try their beers. As medal after medal. To me, this is the true best in its style. a drinker, I am somewhat less interested. I mark of a skilled brewer. Across a wide know what I enjoy (though my palate conrange of styles and many separate batches, tinues to evolve), and I know that many these brewers have proven that they can Into the Brew is sponsored by beers that I enjoy will never win medals. consistently craft amazing beers. The High Dive in Bay Park Maybe they don’t fit well into a style, or Firestone Walker also has a strong track maybe they aren’t even entered. It’s best record at GABF, and I was quite nervous

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IN YEAST WE TRUST Local yeast manufacturer White Labs enjoyed a successful week at the Great American Beer Festival between having a booth at the convention center, throwing a party for brewers on opening night, providing three judges for the competition, and co-sponsoring the Brewers Gathering on the Wednesday night before all the mayhem. The icing on the cake came Saturday morning, as 74% of all the gold, silver and bronze medal award winners were brewery clients, according to a recent blog post. ALPHA KING 2012 Named in honor of Three Floyd’s Alpha King Pale Ale, the Alpha King Challenge is an annual competition that has taken place during the Great American Beer Festival each year since 1999. Here, brewers and beer writers seek to find the most highly-hopped ales that are also well-balanced and drinkable. The Lost Abbey Brewmaster Tomme Arthur has won the contest twice, in 2004 and 2008, for his Hop 15 Double IPA recipe. Jeff Bagby, former Pizza Port Brewing Operations Manager, has won three times, twice for Poor Man’s Double IPA (2010 and 2011), and once for Torrey Pines IPA while with Oggi’s Pizza and Brewery in Vista in 2005. This year, Kirk McHale, formerly a San Diego brewer, took top honors out of 168 entries for his 2 x 4 Imperial IPA brewed at Thai Me Up Brewery in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. San Diegans rounded out the top three, with Mitch Steele of Stone Brewing Co. taking second place for Stone Enjoy By 11.09.12 IPA, and Shawn McIlhenney of Alpine Beer Company coming in third with Bad Boy Double IPA.

ANNIVERSARY BASHES Several beer establishments hosted birthday parties in October, ranging from the new (El Cajon Brewing Co. - 1) to the veteran (Live Wire - 20). Two brewing companies, Iron Fist (2) and San Marcos Brewery & Grill (19) also celebrated anniversaries. Arsalun Tafazoli’s Neighborhood (5) shut down 8th Avenue between Market and G Street for a block party with some very rare beers; pictured is Tafazoli (right) with Ballast Point Brewmaster Yuseff Cherney, who brought four varieties of “Black Scorpion”, a blend of Black Marlin Porter and Sculpin IPA. The Lost Abbey contributed a cognacinspired ale, complete with bitters, while Stone Brewing Co.’s “Belong to Where You Are” mixtape beer was also a hit. AleSmith, Green Flash, Russian River, Automatic Brewing Co., Allagash, Avery, Dogfish Head, Bear Republic and Maui rounded out the list with great beers of their own.

BOX SET REACHES COMPLETION Local brewery The Lost Abbey began releasing monthly “tracks” of beers with names inspired by classic rock songs invoking Heaven or Hell in January, 2012. Each release was issued in 375mL corked bottles that included original label artwork and could only be consumed on-site. On November 24, 500 “Ultimate Box Set” metal road cases complete with the 12 special edition beers and a custom-designed album sleeve created by Grammy awardwinning art director Matt Taylor of Varnish Studio in collaboration with John Schulz of StudioSchulz, will be sold for $450 to lottery winners drawn from the pool of people who have purchased tracks (Track 11 goes on sale November 17, Track 12 - November 24).


The Brew House at East Lake Closes, El Cajon Brewing Company Files Bankruptcy by Brandon Hernández

I

t’s easy to see the success of San Diego’s craft brewing industry and mistakenly believe everything’s coming up hop flowers for everybody. In reality, brewing is a business and, just like any industry built on the manufacture of a consumable product, there are businesses that succeed and those that fail.   Over the past 12 months, three brewing companies have gone out of business—Airdale Brewing Company, Five Points Brewing Company and The Brew House at East Lake. The latter (and its in-house beer production operation, Bay Bridge Brewing) is the most recent departure from the local scene. Owner Doug Chase shuddered the brewpub’s doors in early October. When reached for comment and additional information on the closing, he opted not to respond.   Meanwhile, in East County, a brewpub that is just over one year old, recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. That business is El Cajon Brewing Company (110 N. Magnolia Ave., 619.873.0222, elcajonbrewingco.com), the long-awaited addition to El Cajon’s downtown that was such a linchpin for local redevelopment efforts that the City of El Cajon invested a total of $645,000 to help owner Stephan Meadows get the business built and operational.   When reached for comment, Stephan said, “We simply filed a Chapter 11, a reorganization to help relieve our past construction debts. All debts are being paid. We are not closing the business.”   While there is still hope for El Cajon Brewing Company, things are far from optimal. Shortly after getting the doors to the brewpub open, Stephan fired his brother, David Meadows, from the brewmaster position. David says he was forced out and claims the brewing duties were handed over to an inexperienced El Cajon Brewing Company employee who Stephan taught how to brew.   Additionally, Stephan stated that he is working on “expand” the business, though that would seem a challenging venture given the current state of affairs.   Do these examples of struggling brewing companies foretell a shift in what has been a ragingly successful brewing community over the past decade? One that many in the industry have speculated was en route for some time? It’s hard to speculate.   Early on in San Diego’s modern craft brewing era, numerous establishments opened only to close down. However, times have changed significantly since those early days. Craft beer has firmly taken hold and most businesses within it have attained varying levels of success, making these stories out of the norm. Only time will tell if this is the signaling of a new norm.


plates & pints

Who Knew? Turns out, one of San Diego’s best chefs is also adept at crafting quality homebrew by Brandon Hernández

D

apper in his perfectly tailored suit and patrolling the bar area of Hotel Solamar’s farm-to-table restaurant, Jsix, few would tag Christian Graves for a talented gastronome. But that’s just what he is. As Jsix’s executive chef (and a manager, hence the suit), he’s earned a reputation as one of San Diego’s finest culinary talents. Yet, even that glowing description leaves out one of his greatest and least known attributes—he’s also an avid homebrewer. In fact, he’s been brewing nearly as long as he’s been cooking.   “I was 18 and wanted to drink beer, and read somewhere that you could drink beer at any age if you brewed it yourself,” recalls Graves. “My dad has always been the hands-on, do-it-yourselfer type, so, I convinced him it would be much less expensive to do it on our own.”   At first, it was time with his father that made it so rewarding. Graves readily ad-

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mits their first several batches weren’t all that great. But along the way, the father-son team found their way in a big way. Dad is now a BJCP (Beer Judge Certification Program) beer judge and sonny boy has won awards for some of his more recent entries, including a Scottish mild that medaled at the America’s Finest City Homebrew Competition. Still, he counts the fringe benefits of a brew day as being just as important as the quaffable fruits it yields.   “Anyone who has brewed beer knows it takes a lot of time. I love taking the time to brew because I can spend time with my dad,” he says. “I love having my kids fool around in the garage while I brew, and sharing beer with a friend as our kids play together.”   In improving his technique, Graves has sought advice from the staff at Home Brew Mart, friends, members of his dad’s homebrew club in San Francisco and home-

brewers from San Diego’s Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity, better known as QUAFF. He also consults with fellow homebrewer and sous chef, Leland Heaton, as well as some other rather knowledgeable individuals like Tomme Arthur, director of brewery operations for Port Brewing and The Lost Abbey. With the latter, there’s some sudsy reciprocation.   “My relationship with The Lost Abbey and Port Brewing is rad,” he says. “Every time I call Tomme with a crazy idea for an event like our Sausage Fest or whole animal dinners, he is always down to do it. They have a portfolio that can connect on anything.”   Graves and Arthur first met on the rooftop of downtown club Stingaree in 2009, when a choice group of local brewers teamed with San Diego chef consortium Cooks Confab to pair their brews with custom-made gourmet dishes for a pop-up


event that attracted over 300 attendees. After hours, they struck up a conversation and a friendship.   Recently, they collaborated on the debut for Suds County USA, a film from director Sheldon Kaplan documenting the history and rise of San Diego’s craft beer industry, that drew the who’s-who from the local scene and included a rooftop reception at Hotel Solamar’s posh LOUNGEsix.   The next big event Graves and Arthur are working on is called the West Coast Challenge. From 6 to 9 P.M. on November 8, attendees will be able to sample and vote on the best of India pale ales (IPAs) put forth by brewers from AleSmith, Ballast Point Brewing, Green Flash Brewing Company, Mission Brewery, Port Brewing and Stone Brewing Co., all of whom will be on-hand to explain their brews. The $20 price of admission will include house-made sausages Graves will cook up specifically for the event.   Graves will no doubt talk a lot about beer that evening. He’s used to chatting about one of his favorite topics with patrons. On Thursday nights, he suits up and serves up craft beers, taking time to discuss the flavors, brewing techniques and informative information about beer in general with customers. It’s a fun way for him to bring his passion into a restaurant environment and continue to push the brewing renaissance forward in his own way.

Sausage Burgers Yield: 3 servings ½ pound lean ground beef ½ pound ground turkey ½ pound loose mild Italian sausage salt and black pepper to taste 3 hamburger buns or 6 thin slices of rustic bread, toasted 1. Combine the beef, turkey, sausage, salt and pepper to form three equal-sized hamburger patties. Grill until cooked all the way through. Place the burger in a bun or between 2 slices of bread and serve with a glass of IPA.

India Pale Ale Yield: 5½ gallons OG: 1065 FG: 1016 IBU: 73 SRM: 8.4 American 2 Row – 12# Crystal 20l – 1½# Cara-pils – 1½# Crystal 60l – ½# white wheat malt – ½# turbinado sugar – ½# 1½ oz Cascade FWH 1 oz Columbus at 20 minutes 1 oz Cascade at 15 minutes 3 oz Columbus at 15 minutes 1 oz Amarillo at 10 minutes 1 oz Columbus at 10 minutes 1 oz Amarillo at 5 minutes 1 oz Magnum at 5 minutes 1 oz Cascade at 2 minutes 1 oz Chinook at 2 minutes 1 oz Cascade at 0 minutes Mash in at 152° F for 90 minutes. Step up to 168° F. Boil for 90 minutes. Ferment with White Labs California Ale Yeast

WestCoasterSD.com | 19


Hefeweizen Yield: 5½ gallons OG: 1060 FG: 1014 IBU: 15.2 SRM: 4.7 German wheat malt – 7# German pilsner malt – 3# Vienna malt – 1½# Cara-pils – ½# aromatic malt – ¼# rice hulls – 1# ½ oz Hallertau FWH ½ oz Hallertau at 30 minutes ½ oz Saaz at 5 minutes CAWL German Hefeweizen Yeast

  When asked about his personal preferences, Graves says, “I have always loved a classic touch in both food and beer. I would rather have a classic confit duck leg or a spot-on Kölsch. I personally don’t need a Serrano chili pumpkin black IPA. The classics done well are what really get me going.”   When it comes to pairing, he says it’s all about balancing acid, dryness and richness. And weather is always a key concern. Just as he wouldn’t serve a huge, braised hunk of meat in the summer, he won’t go with a big, dark coffee beer during the sunny season.   In keeping with those preferences, Graves has provided a pair of his homebrew recipes—a hefeweizen and an IPA—as well as recipes for some personal dishes he feels pair perfectly. The IPA, which he says is more fruity versus bitter like an AleSmith IPA or Bear Republic Racer 5, gets a classic pairing—a burger made with ground beef, turkey and Italian sausage Graves says it is perfect for a barbecue on a sunny day.   For the hef, he’s chosen a blini (a petite pancake) with smoked salmon and an apple salad. “The esters in the hefeweizen and naturally suspended yeast are awesome with the yeasty pancake, the salmon stands up to the richness of the beer and the apple breaks the whole thing out and makes it yummy.” —Recipes courtesy of Christian Graves, Executive Chef, Jsix

Mash in at 131° F for 15 minutes. Step up to 149° F for 90 minutes. Mash out at 168° F. Boil for 90 minutes. Ferment at 64 ° for 2 days and then slowly heat up to 68° F over 1½ weeks.

Blinis with Smoked Salmon and Apple Salad Yield: 32 hors d’oeuvres servings 5 eggs 4¼ cups milk 1 cup boiling water 2/3 cup clarified unsalted butter* 4 cups all-purpose flour 1 oz dry yeast 2 Tbsp granulated sugar ½ tsp baking soda 1/3 tsp salt 1/8 tsp citric acid powder 3 Tbsp vegetable oil ½ cup sour cream or cream fraîche 1 pound smoked salmon, sliced ½ cup apple, julienned ½ cup picked chervil 1. Whisk the eggs, milk, water and butter together in a mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, yeast, sugar, baking soda, salt and citric acid powder. Thoroughly whisk the wet mixture into the dry mixture until all of the ingredients are completely incorporated and there are no lumps. Let stand for 1½ hours. 2. Heat a griddle or non-stick skillet. Pour a thin layer of oil onto the cooking surface. Ladle the batter, 1 tablespoon at a time, onto the cooking surface and cook like a pancake until golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Remove from the griddle and set aside. Repeat process until all of the batter has been utilized. 3. To serve, smear some sour cream atop a blini and layer smoked salmon on top. Top with apple and chervil and serve with a glass of hefeweizen. * To clarify butter, melt over low heat and, once the butter solids separate, skim them from the top of the mixture.


GET ON THE BUS

The DRINKABOUT beer bus pulls up to Station Tavern in South Park

Two monthly beer bus tours hit hot spots DRINK THE POINT - Every 2nd Wednesday Visit:

DRINKABOUT - Every 3rd Wednesday Visit:

Slater’s 50/50 100+ taps, a new outdoor patio and a bacon-heavy menu.

Blind Lady Ale House A variety of delicious pizzas await you, plus proper glassware.

The Pearl All 10 taps pump out local beer in this swanky hotel bar.

Small Bar Make sure to return for their frequent Beer for Breakfast events.

Harbor Town This hip spot hosts a first anniversary party on the 17th. Sessions Public Drink The Point is the brainchild of Sessions’ owner Abel Kaase. Raglan Public House The latest from the talented guys behind Bare Back Grill. Newport Pizza and Ale House No Crap On Tap is their motto, and they stick to it, period. Pizza Port Ocean Beach This highly-acclaimed brewpub also has a great guest tap list.

Live Wire A classic San Diegan bar, Live Wire just turned 20 last month. Toronado 50 taps and 100s of bottles pair well with the great food menu. Sea Rocket Bistro Not just seafood, this restaurant features many local ingredients. Station Tavern This property sits right on top of an old San Diego streetcar route. Hamiltons Tavern The tap list never stays the same at this iconic South Park venue. Ritual Tavern New chef Kyle Bergman hails from The Lodge at Torrey Pines. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern Look out for Automatic Brewing Co. on tap at Blind Lady’s sister spot. Bar Eleven It’s rock and roll all the time here with live acts several nights a week.

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beer and now

Open House New 30th Street brewery has surprising pedigree by Jeff Hammett

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hristopher Finch, founder of the recently opened 30th Street bar and brewery, Poor House Brewing Co., isn’t new to the San Diego brewing community. A captain with the San Diego Fire Department, he co-founded the now defunct Firehouse Brewing Co. with the financial backing of local firefighters in 2004. By early 2011, Firehouse was struggling and Finch was replaced as President and Chairman of the Board; a little over a month later, under new management, the brewery filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and the company’s assets were sold at auction shortly thereafter.   At the time of the bankruptcy announcement someone who identified himself as Jon Real with MSI Transportation commented on a San Diego Beer Blog post

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about the filing, saying, “I have the dubious distinction of being a trucking vendor of Firehouse Brewing with about 14K being owed. I worked [sic] tirelessly with the original founders/owners, Chris and Jennifer Finch— currently [sic] divorcing and going by Jennifer Alexander— to get paid. Getting the truth out of either of them was a near impossible proposition… If they screw us local vendors and investors, they better move out of town and change their name.”   When I heard about Poor House a few months ago, I reached out to some former Firehouse employees that worked under Finch. I heard stories of displeasure (to put it mildly) with he and his former wife Jennifer, and how they ran the business. None of these people were willing to talk about

their experiences on the record, because some of them are still employed in the San Diego beer industry. However, one former Firehouse brewer was willing to share his experiences, albeit he never met Finch.   Justin Burnsed, who is now Brewmaster at Prospectors Brewing Company in Mariposa, California, was brought on as a brewer at Firehouse after Finch was ousted from the company, but before they filed for bankruptcy. He described the brewery when he was brought on board as being “in complete and utter disarray.” He goes on to say, “The brew system appeared to have never been properly cleaned, the beer had a high level of bacteria in it and I would never drink anything that guy has touched, just from a quality standpoint from all the bad stuff I witnessed there.”


It’s not hard to believe that many investors, Finch included, lost a lot of money when Firehouse went out of business. Less than two years later, he was preparing to open a new brewery.   “After the close of Firehouse I was left with literally pennies in pocket, but I always found a way to have a good beer – hence Poor House Brewing Co,” Finch describes coming up with the name of the new brewery. At Poor House, he brews on a 3-barrel brew system fabricated from scrap metal.   When I stopped in four taps were dedicated to Poor House’s own brews, with guest beers on the other 15 tap handles; Finch plans on adding 21 more taps for a total of 40. Of the four house brews, Poor House IPA Experimental Batch No. 4, Poor House Belgian Ale, Poor House American Strong Ale and Poor House My Bitter Side Imperial IPA, I sampled the Experimental Batch No. 4 IPA and Belgian Ale.   The beers were served in 16 ounce mason jars, which I took as a nod to the name

of the brewery. However, the price wasn’t exactly meant for the destitute; six dollars for a beer certainly isn’t the most expensive you’ll find in town, but for a pint of house-brewed beer I felt I might land in the poor house if I stuck around drinking for too long. Unfortunately, I can’t say that the beer was worth the price, either. Both the IPA and the Belgian Ale tasted like homebrew I made when I first started extract brewing. The Belgian Ale had a big yeasty smell with a huge estery flavor. It was far too sweet with a thin consistency and a slick, oily mouthfeel. The IPA had a muted hop aroma and an astringent bitterness without much hop flavor coming through.   Since they’ve only been open for a few months, it could be the case that Finch is still dialing in the brewing setup at Poor House; he has, after all, been away from professional brewing for close to two years. While the execution might not be perfect, or frankly even all that good for that matter, I do have to give Finch credit

for trying, considering that one of the biggest complaints about Firehouse’s beers that I used to hear was that they were boring. As Peter Rowe of U-T San Diego put it when Firehouse shut down last year, “Ostensibly microbrews, Firehouse beers resembled macrobrews in their bland, let’s-not-offend-anyone style. Firehouse was swimming against the current... In the beer industry, the current is moving towards distinctive, challenging flavors.”   The closing of Firehouse served as a realization for me, during a time of huge growth in the San Diego beer industry, that not all of these businesses will thrive. Since then, we’ve experienced growth at even faster rate, with more breweries and beer bars opening and more stores dedicating shelf space to craft beer than ever before. However, whether it’s bad beer, boring beer, a poorly run business, or other circumstances, there isn’t much room for mediocrity in San Diego.


WORK IN PROGRESS

Big North Park brewery project underway by Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D.

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ess Brewing Company is currently in the process of setting up a 30 barrel brew house, canning line, and tasting room on Grim Avenue in North Park. Why North Park? You would think it’s because of area’s thriving craft beer and gastronomic scene, combined with its central location in the city and vivacious vibe. But Mike Hess, founder and CBO, shared the biggest reason was serendipity, more than anything else.   “The building, the space we needed, we weren’t looking for it in North Park necessarily,” Hess admitted. “Don’t get me wrong - I love North Park. I lived here in 2002, and since that time I have loved seeing the development and progression of the area.” He continued, “When we started looking for space to grow, a friend of ours who is a professional realtor let us know that this building, an old Christian bookstore, was available. Ironically, I was familiar with this bookstore, and we are friends of the family that owned it because we went

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to the same church. In fact, the owner was my pastor!”   Another nice surprise was the size of the building, which includes an expansive basement that will eventually house the large brew house and multiple fermentors spanning more than 6,000 square feet. “For the past several months I’ve been sweating, bringing in industry professionals, engineers, contractors and the like, to vet the building and let me know if it’s structurally sound. Thankfully, it is.”   The ambitious project also entails a “sky bridge” that leads from the entrance of the building to a 3,000 square foot tasting room. This 50-foot stretch will take you right in between the brew house and fermentors,   For all of this to happen, Mike Hess would need some help, which has come in the form of his younger brother, Greg. Much of the equipment used in Hess’ Miramar facility was built in Greg’s machine shop in the Bay Area.   “I’ve lived in The Bay for the last 42

years,” Greg said. “I’m a printer and machinist by trade, working alongside our father who was a second generation printer and machinist himself. I enjoyed my profession, creating and repairing parts for industrial printing presses, but what I loved most about the day-to-day operations was working with our father.”   When he retired, Greg realized that working with family was as rewarding as the work itself. “Going from machinist to beer brewing isn’t necessarily an obvious choice, but when Mike told me was going from nano to micro-brewery, I jumped at the opportunity to join him because of the way I’ve seen people respond to the Hess brand.”   Greg continued, “My wife and kids have been more than supportive with this move, which has meant the world to me. Four days after moving to San Diego this past July, and four days into my role at Hess Brewing Co., we got a shipment of grain that told me I was doing the right thing.” It was then that


this reporter wondered how grain could be so important.   “The grain was from Heidlberg, Germany. Seeing that name conjured up some great memories, because the Heidlberg printing press is one of the biggest and best around. My father and I would travel the world fixing these machines because not many people could. At that moment I really felt like I was following the right path.”   Greg isn’t the only person whose path has brought him to San Diego. Mike Hess recently hired Nate Sampson, formerly of Newport, Oregon’s Rogue Ales. Sampson joined the team in September and will bring his creativity, smarts, and scientific know-how to Hess Brewing; he is a microbiologist, and somewhat of an expert on yeast strains. In fact, yeast is what brought the two together 10 years ago, when they met in an online forum on the tastingroom.com website. Sampson was supposed to post an article on yeast cultures in the forum, but didn’t, so Hess pestered him via e-mail. After that they regularly discussed brewing, and have been friends ever since, though they only met in person for the first time last February.   There is still a lot of work to be done at the new Hess facility, and I for one can’t wait to see the final result in 2013 (more detailed approximations are difficult, but you can bet there will be updates on both the West Coaster website and CraftBeerTasters. com). Above: Mike Hess talks with contractors in the basement of the North Park facility. Below: Greg Hess takes a break to speak with Dr. Q. Photos by Andee Benavides


Homebrew Heroes An interview with local contest winners Marty and Steven By Laurie Delk, Lumberyard Tavern Beverage Director

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n September 29, Wild Willow Farms & Hillcrest restaurant Local Habit hosted a 5K race, Chili Cook-Off, and homebrewing contest. It was a delicious day of culinary experimentation alongside a proud lineup of concocted libations. It was my honor to judge these beers alongside the renowned Peter Zien of AleSmith, Greg Koch of Stone Brewing Co., Cicerone Dave Adams of Green Flash and other BJCP judges. When the results were in, one beer came out on top: Marty Frank & Steven Strupp’s Imperial Red. So what is the story with these homebrew champions?   Marty Frank, a native of Woodstock Georgia, has lived in San Diego for 8 1/2 years.   After moving for graduate school at SDSU, he loved the city and stayed. Now he is on to Denver to manage operations and business development for a pork company named Tender Belly. Marty is excited to be involved in a startup company and continue his love of craft beer and snowboarding.   Steven Strupp has lived a fascinating life of transition. Born in Indiana, he has lived in Dallas, Michigan, and New York City where he graduated from the Culinary Institute of America and worked at the prestigious Aureole. He traveled as a private chef on yachts for almost a decade, and then made the move to San Diego to work as a private chef at the Nixon House, and now works exclusively for a prominent family in San Diego. How did you guys get started in homebrewing? M: My dad was making wine, and my brother started too. Then my brother and I started experimenting with beers to one-up my dad! We even opened up a homebrew store in North Park named “Homebrews & Gardens.” S: It’s only been a year and a half! My fiancé bought me a homebrew kit for Christmas, and it’s so similar to my skill set as a chef. I have a mini brewery in my garage. It’s so much fun, we have parties where we just open the garage door and hang out. Speaking of starting out, what is your first beer memory?   M: Mine wasn’t very memorable. Probably a Rolling Rock out of my dad’s fridge. When I was in college, one of my roommates was

from Oregon, and he brought down a bunch of Deschutes Mirror Pond and Obsidian Stout. At the time we thought it was expensive. It wasn’t until I started brewing that I understood why it was expensive and why it was good. S: I was about 14 or 15 at my parents’ vacation home in Acapulco. My grandmother was drinking a Tecate with lime and salt, and she offered me a sip. It was about 90 degrees outside, and I drank it out of curiosity. It was the perfect combination on a hot day. Those are great stories. I think mine was my dad’s Natural Light! So what is your favorite beer style now as brewers? M: Stouts and porters. Especially imperial porters, so I love Ballast Point’s Victory at Sea. I have a sweet tooth and gravitate towards malty beers. S: Saison, because of the complexity. Usually they are sessionable beers to me, but not so much now. I brew with six other guys, and we filled a 60 gallon Chardonnay barrel from Carruth Cellars with a hoppy saison and brett, which will stay in another 2 months. How did you come up with your winning recipe for the homebrew contest? M: My philosophy was to pick the high-alcohol beer I liked best and then make something similar. I really enjoy AleSmith Winter YuleSmith and Ballast Point Tongue Buckler, but I didn’t want my beer to be overly hoppy. I then met with George Thornton at The Homebrewer shop in North Park, and we came up with a recipe. S: Marty got the recipe and I volunteered my system. I had never made an Imperial Red before, and I wanted to hop the shit out of it, but Marty wanted it to be nice and malty. Who has been your mentor through the homebrewing process? M: My partner Steven. He showed me how you should do it rather than how you can do it. S: The Brewing Network has been my mentor. I heard about local homebrew club QUAFF through the network. I thought about creating my own club, by why recreate the wheel? What is your favorite local brewery? M: AleSmith. S: AleSmith.

Above: Marty Frank enjoys a glass of his award-winning beer, photo by Laurie Delk. Below: Steven Strupp and his brew system, photo by Jeffrey Crane.


The competition’s finalists, photo by Laurie Delk.

Who do you admire in the craft beer world? M: I know it’s the same answer, but I have always been a fan of Peter Zien and AleSmith. Decadence. Evil Dead Red. Horny Devil. Pretty much everything they do I love. S: Hill Farmstead in Vermont. I love that he was a home brewer, and they have a great barrel program. If I were to open a brewery, I would model it after them. They aren’t afraid to go outside of the box. I also love Heady Topper by Alchemist Brewery. In my mind, it is the perfect combination of an IPA. It’s got it all and lives up to its name time and time again. Where is your favorite local place to drink craft beer? M: Pizza Port Solana Beach. S: Encinitas Ale House, and now The Lumberyard Tavern. (Reporter grins.) Do you have a funny homebrewing story? Any disasters? M: During one of our boils, the temperature gauge wasn’t working. Later on, we checked it with another thermometer, and we had boiled off all the sugars, so our 6% beer turned into a 2% beer. The beer was drinkable, as much as Budweiser is drinkable. S: My first Belgian blonde beer. I was so excited, and tasted it through a picnic tap. I wanted it to carbonate really fast. I heard all you had to do was turn it up to 50 overnight. I woke up the next morning, and all the beer was in the bottom of my chest freezer. The beer had found the path of least resistance through that tap. What advice would you give a homebrewing newbie? M: Brew with experienced brewers, join homebrew clubs,  and make friends in the community. Learn from others who have been there. It’s all about process. S: Join a club like I did. It’s really great to find a group of people that are as passionate about something as you are. It’s allowed me to meet people I normally wouldn’t have. Listen to The Brewing Network. Enter contests without expectations, because you’ll get good feedback and learn a lot. What’s next for you? What beer would you like to brew next? M: I’d like to brew a smoked beer. I love smokey meat. I’ve been drinking Aecht Schlenkerla rauchbiers. And I really like Monkey Paw’s Low and Slow. I’ll be doing another Coconut Porter too because my last one went well. Also I’d like to brew an Oatmeal Stout. S: Currently I am brewing through the classic styles, and the next beer I would like to brew is a lager. I want to get together with a homebrew club and do a barrel as well. For the future, I hope one day to combine my love for brewing and food by opening a gastropub/brewery. Stay tuned next month for part two of this story. Cheers!


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is for Alpine This glossary of terms comes straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com, with San Diego breweries added by West Coaster (in bold) Acrospire - The shoot that grows as a barley grain is germinated. Adjunct - Any unmalted grain or other fermentable ingredient used in the brewing process. Adjuncts used are typically either rice or corn, and can also include honey, syrups, and numerous other sources of fermentable carbohydrates. They are common in mass produced light American lager-style beers.

Alpine’s Shawn McIlhenney and Danielle Faught

All-Malt Beer - A beer made entirely from mashed barley malt and without

Aeration - The action of introducing air or oxygen to the wort (unfermented

the addition of adjuncts, sugars or additional fermentables.

beer) at various stages of the brewing process. Proper aeration before primary fermentation is vital to yeast health and vigorous fermentation. Aeration after fermentation is complete can result in beer off-flavors, including cardboard or paper aromas due to oxidation.

Alpha Acid - One of two primary naturally occurring soft resins in hops (the

Alcohol - A synonym for ethyl alcohol or ethanol, the colorless primary alcohol constituent of beer. Alcohol ranges for beer vary from less than 3.2% to greater than 14% ABV. However, the majority of beer styles average around 5% ABV.

Alcohol by Volume (ABV) - A measurement of the alcohol content of a solution in terms of the percentage volume of alcohol per volume of beer. This measurement is always higher than Alcohol by Weight. To calculate the approximate volumetric alcohol content, subtract the final gravity from the original gravity and divide by 0.0075. For example: 1.050 - 1.012 = 0.038/0.0075 = 5% ABV. Alcohol by Weight (ABW) - A measurement of the alcohol content of a solution in terms of the percentage weight of alcohol per volume of beer. For example: 3.2 percent alcohol by weight equals 3.2 grams of alcohol per 100 centiliters of beer. This measure is always lower than Alcohol by Volume. To calculate the approximate alcohol content by weight, subtract the final gravity from the original gravity and divide by 0.0095. For example: 1.050 - 1.012 = 0.038/0.0095 = 4% ABW.

Alcoholic - Warming taste of ethanol and higher alcohols. Can be described as spicy and vinous in character. The higher the ABV of a beer, often the larger the mouthfeel it has. Alcohol can be perceived in aroma, flavor, and as a sensation. A person with a disabling disorder characterized by compulsive uncontrolled consumption of alcoholic beverages. Ale - Ales are beers fermented with top fermenting yeast. Ales typically are fermented at warmer temperatures than lagers, and are often served warmer. The term ale is sometimes incorrectly associated with alcoholic strength.

AleSmith Brewing Company - Founded in 1995, this Miramar-based brewery recently collaborated with Monkey Paw to create Ashes from the Grave, a 6.66% ABV smoked brown ale, just in time for Halloween. All Extract Beer - A beer made with malt extract as opposed to one made from barley malt or from a combination of malt extract and barley malt.

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other is Beta Acid). Alpha acids are converted during wort boiling to iso-alpha acids, which cause the majority of beer bitterness. During aging, alpha acids can oxidize (chemical change) and lessen in bitterness.

Alpine Beer Company - One of the most sought-after breweries on the planet, Alpine produces one great beer after the other. No matter where you live in the county, a short road trip out to the pub for great BBQ is always in order.

Amplified Ale Works - After a few false starts, this three-barrel brewery off Pacific Beach Drive is now brewing and is housed inside the second location of California Kebab.

Apparent Attenuation - A simple measure of the extent of fermentation that wort has undergone in the process of becoming beer. Using gravity units (GU), Balling (B), or Plato (P) units to express gravity, apparent attenuation is equal to the original gravity minus the final gravity divided by the original gravity. The result is expressed as a percentage and equals 65% to 80% for most beers.

Astringency - A characteristic of beer taste mostly caused by tannins, oxidized (phenols), and various aldehydes (in stale beer). Astringency can cause the mouth to pucker and is often perceived as dryness. Attenuation - The reduction in wort specific gravity caused by the yeast consuming wort sugars and converting them into alcohol and carbon dioxide gas through fermentation.

Autolysis - A process in which excess yeast cells feed on each other producing a rubbery or vegetal aroma. Automatic Brewing Company - Brewer Lee Chase is a legend in the San Diego scene, and each of his small-batch creations is gobbled up quickly. Follow Automatic on Facebook to find out when Chase’s beers go on tap at Blind Lady Ale House and Tiger!Tiger!

Aztec Brewing Company - A revamp of an old Mexicali brand, Aztec loves to throw unique events featuring local artists and bands in their Vista tasting room. Try their Chipotle IPA, which is always improving, and don’t forget about Free Taco Thursdays.


The Great American

Beer

Festival

in pictures

L - R: Mike Rodriguez, head brewer at The Lost Abbey; Chuck Silva, brewmaster at Green Flash; Peter Zien, owner at AleSmith, with lead brewer Anthony Chen

View more on the following pages, and at facebook.com/westcoastersd

WestCoasterSD.com | 35


Right: Locals New English poured several varieties of beer at their booth this year. Below: Denver’s oldest brewpub, Wynkoop, promoted their beer down the iconic 16th Street Mall.

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Top: A big San Diego crew meets up Thursday night before the White Labs VIP party. Middle: Each booth had its own bit of flair, including this from Denver Beer Co. Right: Stone Brewing Co. won a GABF Festival Flair Award for its end-cap booth design. Learn a bit more about how it came together at blog.stonebrew.com (October 18 entry).


Porter’s Pride, a collaborative beer created by the Colorado Brewers Guild, was given to medalists in all categories at the awards ceremony. The beer honors Danny Williams, cellar master for the Brewers Association, who passed away in January.

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Prost Brewing’s Bill Eye (far right) discusses his 70 barrel brew house. Watch an 8-minute clip of his thoughts on craft beer at facebook.com/westcoastersd


Top: Renegade’s Chief Beer Officer Brian O’Connell gives the media a tour of his facility. Right: Pizza Port Carlsbad’s Melanie Pierce (left) and Darrah Alvarez pose after the awards ceremony. Below: The Lost Abbey’s brewing team waits to get on stage, with Brewers Association Director Paul Gatza directing traffic.


Top: Craft Beer Program Director at the Brewers Association Julia Herz gives us something to think about. Right: Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper toasts the brewers in attendance at the awards ceremony. Below: Lightning Brewery was one of several to pour at the San Diego Brewers Guild booth.

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Upslope Brewing brings a future brewmaster on stage as they accept a silver medal in the American-Style Brown Ale category.


Craft Beer Directory & Map

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LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 2. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 3. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 4. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 5. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 6. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 7. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306 619.857.8023 www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

B

PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 3. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 4. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 5. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 6. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 7. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 8. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 9. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 10. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com

42 | november 2012

2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

C

POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 2. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 3. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 4. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 5. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 7. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 8. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 9. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 10. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 11. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 12. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 13. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com

D

MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.sandiego.edu/dining/lagranterraza 2. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 3. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 4. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 www.RJGrill.com 5. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com

2. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.societebrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

E

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

F

MISSION HILLS HILLCREST

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 2. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 3. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 4. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 5. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 6. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 7. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

G

DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com

3. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 4. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 5. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 6. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 7. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 8. Proper Gastropub 795 J St. | 619.255.7520 www.ProperGastropub.com 9. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 10. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 11. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 12. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 13. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 14. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 15. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 2. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 401 G St. | 619.231.7000 www.RockBottom.com/San-Diego 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

H

UPTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Bar Eleven 3519 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.4292 www.ElevenSanDiego.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com

5. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 6. El Take It Easy 3926 30th St. | 619.291.1859 www.ElTakeItEasy.com 7. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 8. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 9. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 10. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 11. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 12. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 13. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 14. The Linkery 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.TheLinkery.com 15. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 16. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 17. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 18. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 19. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 20. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 21. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 3. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 4. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

BREWERIES 1. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com


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Craft Beer Directory & Map

I

NORTH COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 6. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 7. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com 8. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.beeronthewall.com 2. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 3. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com 4. Stone Company Store - Oceanside 301 N Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 5. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 3. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 4. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com 5. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 6. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 3. Fezziwig’s Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.FezziwigsBrewing.com 4. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 5. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Way 101 | 760.216.6500 www.IronFistBrewing.com 6. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. 104 | 760.913.7333 www.Lat33Brew.com 7. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St. | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com

44 | november 2012

8. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 9. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 10. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real G www.OTTBrew.com 11. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Way 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 12. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 13. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com 2. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St . | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 3. Smokin Beaver Brew Shop 348 State Place | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

J

ENCINITAS DEL MAR

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 2. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Cntry Rd. | 858.481.7883 www.DelMar.Oggis.com 4. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 5. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 6. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

K

SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bangin’ Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREWERIES 1. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 2. Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 3. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com

BREW PUBS

4. Hess Brewing 7955 Silverton Ave. 1201 | 619.887.6453 www.HessBrewing.com 5. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 6. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. 132 | 858.480.9381 www.WetNReckless.com

1. The Brew House at Eastlake 871 Showroom Pl. 102 | 619.656.2739 www.BrewHouseEastlake.com

BREWERIES 1. Mad Lab Craft Brewing 6120 Business Ctr. Ct. | 619.254.6478 www.MadLabCraftBrewing.wordpress.com

P

COLLEGE LA MESA

HOME BREW SUPPLY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

1. California Kebab 5157 College Ave. | 619.582.5222 www.Cali-Kebab.com 2. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 3. Cucina Fresca & Sons 6784 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.668.0779 4. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 5. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 6. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 7. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 8. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd.

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

L

POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 2. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 3. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. | 858.592.7883 www.CMR.Oggis.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

Q

EAST COUNTY

BREWERIES

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. 105 | 858.513.8070 www.LightningBrewery.com

1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Fin us on Facebook!

M

ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

N

JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

O

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Henry’s Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

2. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 4. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. Manzanita Brewing Company 9962 Prospect Ave. D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

Want to add your location? Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com


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Profile for Advanced Web Offset

West Coaster  

November 2012 issue. News and events for San Diego's craft beer community

West Coaster  

November 2012 issue. News and events for San Diego's craft beer community