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march 2013 | serving america’s finest beer county | san Diego Nate’s Garden Grill, City Heights

7 SpotS to CheCk thiS Spring page 20

Vol. 3 No. 4

Free Copy


LETTER FROM THE pubLisHER

WC Staff Writer Jeff Hammett, left, with brother Chris at Societe’s Grand Opening June 30, 2012. Photo by Ryan Lamb

With this March 2013 issue, Jeff Hammett is ending his column Beer & Now. Citing the arrival of his baby boy Harper, he’s finding himself in beer bars less and at home with the family more. In 2010, Jeff was diligently blogging on SanDiegoBeerBlog.com, the must-read source for SD beer news at the time. We knew we had to have him write for us, and thankfully he agreed when asked. While his reasons for signing off are totally understandable, his words in our pages each month will be missed. We wish health and happiness to Jeff & the Hammett family! Salud,

Mike Shess Publisher West Coaster


West Coaster, THE pubLiCATiON Founders ryan lamb mike shess Publisher mike shess mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor ryan lamb ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director brittany everett brittany@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant tom shess thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers sam tierney sam@westcoastersd.com jeff hammett jeff@westcoastersd.com brandon hernández brandon@westcoastersd.com ryan resChan ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com Contributors niCkie peña kristina yamamoto travis hudson

West Coaster, THE wEbsiTE Web Manager mike shess Web Editor ryan lamb Web Master josh everett West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2013 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


ADVERTISEMENT

SoCal BuSineSS of Beer SympoSium Continuing EduCation for Craft BrEwErs

tuesday march 12, 2013

c

8:00am - 4:30pm (plus networking hour)

rafting new and imaginative beers has never been an issue in the beer trade. However, the coordination of the multiple moving parts associated with setting up, managing, and expanding of brewery operations is neither intuitive nor easy. This symposium looks at these other business elements necessary for success when running a brewery. Learn how to build a successful long-term business by increasing your knowledge of the business of beer and meet people who can answer your questions. Join the SoCal BOB Business of Beer Symposium for an intensive day of fact finding and networking with industry professionals. Admission includes light breakfast, lunch, and, of course, beer.

Special lunch SeSSion with tomme arthur of the loSt abbey and Jim crute of lightning brewery MORNING SESSION Government Relations Real Estate Capital Raising Equipment Financing Business Management Accounting

AFTERNOON SESSION

Brewery Safety (Cal OSHA) Insurance, Risk Management, HR Regulatory Issues - ABC, TTB Beer Distribution Tasting Room Management Exit Strategies

Join uS! $195 registration includes light breakfast, lunch, breaks & beer tasting White Labs Training Facility 9495 Candida St. San Diego, CA 92126

for more information:

www.SoCalBoB.com

Speakers to include: russ Gibbon, business development manager of the City of san diego bill reavey, partner of rsr law Group kevin hopkins, hospitality manager of lost abbey / port brewing dan drown, owner of drown Consulting justin kay, Cpa & assurance manager of mcGladrey, llp and more!

see full lineup on www.socalbob.com


wRiTERs

COLuMNisT

COLuMNisT

iNTO THE bREw Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

pLATEs & piNTs Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan proud to be contributing to a publication that serves a positive purpose for his hometown and its beer loving inhabitants. In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including San Diego Magazine, The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast and U-T San Diego.

COLuMNisT

bEER ANd NOw Jeff Hammett first noticed craft beer early in college when a friend introduced him to Stone Brewing Co.’s Pale Ale. After graduating from UCSD with a degree in Philosophy, he moved to Santa Cruz where he frequented Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing and Seabright Brewery. Jeff would journey up to San Francisco to visit Magnolia and Toronado every chance he got. He started blogging about beer in early 2009 while living in Durango, Colorado. For a town of only 20,000 people, Durango boasts an impressive four breweries. Jeff quickly became a part of the brewing scene, and in January 2010 was invited to work with Ska Brewing Co.’s Head Brewer Thomas Larsen to formulate a recipe and brew on Ska’s pilot system. In addition to his love of craft beer, Mr. Hammett is an avid cyclist and can be seen riding on the road or trails most weekends.

COLuMNisT

THE CARbOy CHRONiCLEs Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into allgrain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.


TAbLE OF CONTENTs 10-12

CoLUMNS

The Carboy Chronicles A quick guide to growing your own hops in San Diego

26-27

Beer and Now Italian craft brewers play fast and loose with beer styles

28-30

Into the Brew Adjuncts play an important role in some craft-brewed beers

32-34

Plates & Pints Coffee-infused beers show off the creativity of roaster & brewer

FeATUreD CoNTrIBUTor 17-19, 39 35-36 8 14-15 20 23-25

CraftBeerTasters.com Pizza Port Solana Beach’s Devon Randall talks women in beer Marc Figueroa Growing Pains: Running a brewery isn’t just about brewing beer

pLUS +

Brews in the News Tidbits of beer info you can use as water cooler ammo Plinypalooza Pictures from Pliny the Younger’s arrival at Toronado San Diego The New Crew 7 hip new spots to check out around town Ridealong Jumping aboard the Drink The Point bus with Austin Colby

38

Upcoming Beer Events For more, visit westcoastersd.com/event-calendar

40

On the Move Home Brew Mart’s brewhouse heads to the San Diego History Center

41

Glossary: D Beer terms from the innovators at CraftBeer.com

42-45

Craft Beer Directory & Map Add your location by e-mailing directory@westcoastersd.com

on the cover: Nate’s Garden Grill in City Heights has 21 taps (3 nitro) and a nice menu of seasonal, local food. In the soft opening stages at time of press, their grand opening is scheduled for March 1. Photo: Ryan Lamb


BREWS IN THE NEWS Societe’s Douglas Constantiner and Travis Smith show former City of San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders around their facility last year. Photo by Ryan Lamb

Side note: Societe brewer Travis Smith used to work for Russian River, so it looks as though as

PINK BOOTS SOCIETY ANNOUNCES FIRST SCHOLARSHIP

Any woman who earns income from beer anywhere in the world is eligible to apply for this new scholarship to the WBA webbased concise course in brewing technology at the Siebel Institute that begins on May 5. More information can be viewed at pinkbootssociety.org.

CARLSBAD BUSINESS OWNER IN HOT WATER WITH 38 DEGREES CONCEPT MODERN TIMES/MONKEY PAW FIND BREWERS

Modern Times, a yet-to-open brewery in Point Loma, announced the acquisition of three brewers in an e-mailed newsletter February 18. Matt Walsh, head brewer at Lost Coast; Alex Tweet, brewer and cask czar at Ballast Point; and Derek Freese, head brewer at Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery will officially begin work at Modern Times in April. Monkey Paw owner Scot Blair immediately landed a replacement for Freese in Cosimo Sorrentino, a local home brewer currently working front of the house at Local Habit in Hillcrest. Blair noted that he was very excited to give Sorrentino a shot at pursuing his dream of being a professional brewer, especially given his great palate and expansive knowledge of beer styles. Monkey Paw’s core selections, such as Sweet Georgia Brown and Oatmeal Pale Ale, will stick around with minimal, if any, changes.

8 | March 2013

BELCHING BEAVER COMING TO NORTH PARK

Vista’s Belching Beaver Brewery is looking to open a tasting room at 4223 30th Street, further solidifying North Park as craft beer mecca. Brewer Troy Smith told West Coaster that they will try to push for 10-12 different beer styles on tap, with one line dedicated to beer flowing through a randall. The Beaver will also have a beer engine, but will not be brewing at the location for the time being. They’re shooting for an April 1 opening, with a barrel-aged saison and barrel-aged double IPA ready to go for the occasion.

SOCIETE WINS BIG IN S.F.

Societe Brewing Company’s The Roustabout was chosen Best In Show at the 13th annual Double IPA Festival at the Bistro in Hayward, California during San Francisco Beer Week. Second place went to Firestone Walker Double Jack, and third place was awarded to Russian River Pliny the Elder.

Many people associate the name 38 Degrees with a beer bar in Alhambra, CA, but one Carlsbad restaurant owner is looking to use the same moniker and color scheme for the revamp of his business. West Coaster first learned of this curious decision from TheFullPint.com, who reported that San Diegan Mayur Pavagadhi had looked up the name online, but went ahead with the name anyways. You can find a link to the full article on our Facebook page, facebook.com/ westcoastersd (February 19 post).

ALPINE PLANNING TO GROW PRODUCTION, CAN BEER

According to a report on BeerPulse.com, Alpine Beer Company will produce their beers at an undisclosed craft brewery in the U.S. Their production will go from 1,000 barrels to 6,000 barrels under the terms of the deal, with Nelson IPA, Duet IPA and Hoppy Birthday all going into 16 oz. Alumi-Tek bottles. They will of course keep the original brewery, but plans to develop another location in San Diego County have been put on hold for now.


THE CARbOy CHRONiCLEs

10 | March 2013


grow I

your own

hops San Diego’s climate will work if you take the right steps BY RYAN RESCHAN

t’s that time year when the last of the frost is behind us here in San Diego and we can start to plant our favorite beer ingredient – hops! Local hop farms will start to prepare for the new 2013 crop (see my August 2012 article on our local farms), but you too can plant your own hops. If you have a spot around your residence that gets a good amount of sunlight, you should be able to grow your own. Before we get into planting and caring for your hops, you’ll first need to figure out where to buy them. Almost of all the websites that sell hops will also sell rhizomes, a rootlike subterranean stem that will send roots below and shoots coming from the buds above. Freshops.com and Hopsdirect. com are great sources for direct-from-the-farm rhizomes. Suppliers can have different hop varietals to choose from depending on their source. Just keep in mind that proprietary hops like Citra, Amarillo, and Simcoe are still unavailable to the public. Other sources for rhizomes include brewing supply websites such as Northern Brewer, Midwest Supplies, More Beer, Homebrewing.org, and of course, your local homebrew shop (give them a call to check for availability).

“Hops do take a lot of water but you don’t want to overdo it. Try not to water in the evening or flood them. Just keep the soil moist and they should be happy. In ideal conditions, hops can grow up to 12 inches a day.” Now it’s time to prep the soil. Hops can be planted in large pots above soil but ideally they should be in the ground. Good drainage is needed for them such that the rhizome is not sitting in water, eventually rotting the plant. If the rhizome(s) arrive and you can’t plant them right away, wrap it in a wet paper towel and store it in a sealable bag in your refrigerator until you are ready. When you’re ready to plant, place the rhizome 1 to 2 inches below the surface with the white buds pointing upward. Hops like to grow in slightly acidic soil (around 6 pH) but anything from 6 to 8 pH should work. Nitrogen is something you will want to introduce as


On page 10: patio hop garden takes root in Vista, CA. Photo by Ryan Reschan. On this page, a hop shoot springs from the soil at the nowclosed Home Brews & Gardens last year. Photo by Ryan Lamb

well to help with their growth. Mulch and/or green manure is also recommended. Hops do take a lot of water but you don’t want to overdo it. Try not to water in the evening or flood them. Just keep the soil moist and they should be happy. In ideal conditions, hops can grow up to 12 inches a day. Some varietals are more resistant to certain diseases and pests than others, but there are common enemies against hops that you will need to look out for. On the disease front, the main two are powdery mildew and downy mildew. The major pests include aphids and spider mites. Details on what the diseases and pets look like can be found in books and manuals available on the internet. How do get rid of such diseases will depend on whether you want to keep your hops organic or not. Resources on Homebrewing.org and Freshops.com are a great start along with books like The Complete Guide to Growing Your Own Hops, Malts, and Brewing Herbs. Once your hops start growing upward, you now have the challenge of figuring out where you want them to go. Ideally hops would like to grow vertically, but sometimes that isn’t possible. This is where you will have to get creative based on your location. For my own particular situation, I used my patio cover along with some wood extenders attached to the cover to get around 15 feet of height from the soil. I have a pulley system using some Mason string line so I am able to lower the bines down to harvest the flowers once they are ready. Twine (the classic hop twine is made from coir, coconut fiber), cable, poles, wire, or even a chain link fence could also be used (especially if you cannot grow vertically). Just keep that in mind that hops can grow in the excess of 20 feet when planning your trellis. First-year plants won’t get the best yield but keep in mind you’re not only growing your own brewing ingredients but you’re also adding a great visual presence in your yard. Over the years you should get greater yields with some care and maintenance once your plants have matured. Come harvest time, you’ll have your very own hops to add into your next batch of beer.

12 | March 2013


pLINypALooZA A

BY MIKE SHESS

bove, a close-up of Russian River’s Pliny the Younger. The 10.5% ABV Triple IPA is released but once a year to a handful of elite craft beer bars and restaurants. Large but mostly well-behaved lines like the one at Toronado on 2/14 (pictured right) are common. The beer has a tremendous following that has greatly increased in recent years. In an effort to avoid pandaemonium and reward loyal customers, bar owners have gotten creative. Toronado & O’Brien’s Pub only promoted the tapping to those on their e-mail list, while Urge & Pizza Port quietly released the beer on a weekday afternoon. If you missed this year’s tapping, expect the beer to show up next February. Locally, Alpine Beer Company’s Exponential Hoppiness - also a delicious, boozy IIIPA - is released around the same time.

14 | March 2013


A Pliny the Younger tapping draws both beer lovers and beer industry folk alike. On the left, award-winning brewer Dean Rouleau, formerly of San Diego Brewing Co. and presently working on a undisclosed project, lines up with beer blogger Shawn Tighe, who runs SanDiegoBeerInsider. com. Pictured below, fans document the occasion by striking a pose.


top of her class

Devon Randall’s journey to becoming a head brewer WORDS AND PHOTOS BY DR. Q & JERRY FROM CRAFTBEERTASTERS.COM

G

oogle the phrase “women in beer” and it will autocomplete to “women in beer commercials.” Dig deeper and you will see that the women in these commercials are either used as props to entice male fans in an effort to relate beers to sex, or as comic relief, oftentimes showing traditional male/female role reversals done so for the sake of comedy. In either case, it is clear that women are not the intended customer, nor are they to be taken seriously in regard to beer. These ideas of women in beer, however, are quite out of touch with the reality of women’s taste. A 2012 Gallup Poll asserted that 23% of women preferred beer over liquor or wine. Moreover, the misconceptions and marginalized depictions of women’s role in beer is disjointed from the social and economic position of women in the United States. The gains

women have made in terms of educational attainment have significantly outpaced those of men over the last 40 years. Because of this increase in educational attainment, the participation of women in the workforce has risen dramatically from the early 1970’s through today. Yet in the beer industry, where there are 100,000+ jobs in the U.S., women account for only 10%. The lack of women in brewing has not always been the case though. Once upon a time the role of brewing and selling beer was that of a woman. But as time went on commerce overtook the art, taxes took their share, and women were excluded. Over the years, memories of the past faded and the perception of beer brewing and drinking became more and more tightly bound to masculinity.

When researching women in San Diego’s craft beer scene, for example, it took several industry insiders quite a while to list more than 10 women who play pivotal roles in the San Diego craft beer brewing community, four of which are brewers. Only four women brewers in a county with 60+ breweries boasting literally hundreds of brewers? There is something inherently wrong with that picture. I pressed further and asked if any of these four women brewers were brewmasters or head brewers. Only one: Devon Randall. Randall was recently named Head Brewer of Pizza Port Solana Beach, which is where we caught up with her over a pint of Ponto Pale Ale. At age 10 brewing wasn’t even a thought in young Randall’s mind. She had her sights set on veterinary school. Many years later, while attending UC Berkeley, Randall

WestCoasterSD.com | 17


Devon Randall, head brewer for Pizza Port Solana Beach

found herself in need of work. Raleigh’s, a staple in the Berkeley craft beer scene, was a fortunate part of her path. It was at this bar at age 21 that Randall got her first exposure to craft beer. The beer? Moose Drool. Why this beer? The logo on the bottle and the name enticed her, but the flavor led her to become a fan of brown ales. The flavors intrigued her; prior to this, she’d only bought the cheap, macro stuff. But at Raleigh’s she was working with 20 solid handles hosting the likes of Anchor, Sierra Nevada, and Russian River. Moreover, the management was keen on the idea of teaching staff about the beer brewing process and the history of beer styles. The more she learned, the more she loved the stories behind the beers. Randall reveled in this job until she graduated with her Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication. With a mother and grandmother who were both career real estate moguls, Randall returned to her hometown of L.A. with

18 | March 2013

a freshly minted B.A. and a job in real estate marketing. Finding the job to be lacking in challenges or creativity, with a leadership lacking in these categories as well, Randall got bored and continued her education in an effort to become a real estate agent. Though this path was in her blood, it just wasn’t the right fit for her personality. Luckily she found an outlet for her creative energy at Pacific Gravity, a Los Angeles-based homebrew club. Here she learned more about the process of brewing and created an amber ale which she viewed, at the time and even now, as boring, but drinkable. This boring beer, however, was the catalyst for change in her life. After the first batch Randall began to brew more and more, to the point where every week she was either brewing or packaging. This lasted for a solid three or four months when, on a fateful friday night, her girlfriends asked her to go out on the town. Shunning the fun-filled promises of a Friday night in L.A. Randall

chose to stay home and bottle her beers. That’s when it clicked. She was in a job she didn’t like and in an apartment she couldn’t afford, but she had a passion inside of her. A passion for beer. It was at this time when Randall first approached different breweries she had become familiar with in the hope of landing any role that would allow her to learn more about brewing. Randall was given many “no” responses for various reasons. It was at this time that Randall realized a change of scenery was likely in order. Randall, relying on the kindness of a good friend in San Diego, began looking for real estate jobs in America’s Finest City. She knew the real estate industry here was promising, but she also knew that the craft beer industry was flourishing. Again, Randall visited many breweries in the hope of finding something, anything. She eventually arrived at The Lost Abbey in heels, a skirt, and a blouse: formal real estate busi-


ness attire. She made her pitch to volunteer her time and help in any way that she could. They told her to come back at 6 a.m. the next day in steel toe boots. She immediately went to Wal-Mart and bought her boots, and called her friend with the hope of securing a place on her couch. She spent several months on that couch while volunteering at The Lost Abbey and tending bar part time at Pizza Port Solana Beach. “Day 1 I took out the trash and swept the floor because I knew I could do that,” said Randall. The job may sound menial and the gesture may seem simple, but the initiative shown displayed to those in the brewery that this person was here to work. Slowly but surely brewery workers, cellarmen, and brewers taught her more and more skills, eventually leading Randall to transition from volunteer to employee. She worked in the warehouse where, in time, she began bottling and labeling. Though appreciative of the role, Randall felt far away from brewing and soon saw her days in the warehouse growing from a 9-5 job to being a 9-5 and then a 6-12 midnight gig. This was all in an effort to work under the tutelage of The Lost Abbey’s night shift brewer. In fact, Randall even slept in the brewery on bags of grain from time to time, purely out of necessity. It was her can-do spirit that, fittingly, led to a pivotal Labor Day in her life. At the time The Lost Abbey didn’t have paid holidays, and Labor Day was no exception; however, the powers that be said anyone that wanted to work on Labor Day could. Randall was the only “grunt” who came in on that day, and it paid off. “They taught us how to clean a brite tank properly, so, from that day on I had the opportunity to step up and utilize my newfound skills whenever needed,” Randall stated. This led to her being involved more and more in all aspects of production until one day she was entrusted with The Lost Abbey’s barrel program. She had her chance to be challenged, utilize her creativity, implement an organizational structure of her own design and partake in tastings with Tomme Arthur and Gwen Conley, the Director of Brewery Operations and Quality Assurance Director, respectively. But, despite this opportunity, she still wanted to be by the brewhouse. “How could I properly do my job managing the barrel program if I had not mastered how to brew what goes into those barrels?” she asked herself. It was then that Yiga Miyashiro, former Pizza Port OB Head Brewer who is now heading up their upcoming Bressi Ranch location, tipped Randall off that Pizza Port Solana Beach, the first of the bunch, was looking for a new Head Brewer and that she might fit the bill. Randall understood the implications. “As a Head Brewer you get to see the birth of the beer and watch it grow into its full potential. In the case of Pizza Port, you are allowed to be exponentially creative. Whether barrel aging beers, using coffees, spices, the brewers are trusted to be innovative.” That innovation is not just on the brewing side. “Brewers take great pride in their beers, but you have to try them in various settings to see how they stand up. Fresh. Weeks later. From growlers. To get a true sense of the beer, how it really is, you have to drink it how others might drink it.” I remind Randall that by virtue of being a female brewer, let alone Head Brewer, she is, by nature, an innovation in this day and age. When asked about being a woman brewer in San DiContinued on page 39


THE NEW CREW 7 great spots to check out around town

The taps at Nate’s Garden Grill are meticulously maintained by a veteran homebrewer who built the cold room himself.

If you find yourself in the mood to head somewhere new, we bet that these seven spots won’t disappoint.

FATHOM BISTRO BAIT & TACKLE

BOTTLECRAFT NORTH PARK

NATE’S GARDEN GRILL

Owner Brian Jensen opened the shop’s original Little Italy location in 2011, but the North Park variation will soon be serving fine fare from MIHO Gastrotruck. 3007 University Avenue (North Park)

CHUCKALEK INDEPENDENT BREWERS

Off the beaten path, sure, but a trip to ChuckAlek’s small operation also means a journey back in time, with brewmaster Grant Fraley crafting old-school styles regularly. 2330 Main Street, Suite C (Ramona)

EUREKA! SAN DIEGO

Burgers, whiskey and beer are the calling cards for this operation, the seventh of its kind in California. This establishment is already miles ahead for its neighborhood. 4353 La Jolla Village Drive (UTC)

20 | March 2013

A beer bar/restaurant on a pier with a view of downtown? What’s not to like? Owner Dennis Borlek’s beer industry connections mean a consistently solid tap list awaits you. 1776 Shelter Island Drive (Point Loma)

Just what City Heights needed. Parking’s tough, but once you’re inside it’s worth it: 21 taps with great food and a convivial atmosphere may have you sticking around awhile. 3120 Euclid Avenue (City Heights)

POLITE PROVISIONS

The latest from Consortium Holdings, this corner spot right on Adams Avenue screams nostalgia with its drugstore-style design, and beer is just one facet of the attraction. 4696 30th Street (Normal Heights)

TURqUOISE CELLARS

Open Tuesday through Saturday starting at 5 p.m., this back bar addition to Turquoise Cafe boasts 12 taps, a small but thoughtful selection of bottles and a neat food menu. 5026 Cass Street (Pacific Beach)


riDealong: Drink the Point A shift with seasoned driver Austin Colby BY RYAN LAMB Ridealong is a new monthly section in which we join a local beer industry member on one of their shifts. For the first one we decided to get pretty literal with it by hopping on a Brewery Tours of San Diego bus for February’s Drink The Point tour of Point Loma and Ocean Beach beer spots. If you know someone with an interesting job who wouldn’t mind an inquisitive shadow, or if you’d like to be the author of one of these write-ups, e-mail ryan@ westcoastersd.com.

6:45 We’ve climbed aboard the bus. Austin Colby, holder of a class B license, puts up his tip sign and GPS navigator, which he says is used more as a timekeeper than for directions. He’s been with the company for nearly two years now and also does brewery tours on the weekends as well as the other two free shuttle tours, DRINKABOUT and PB Craft Crawl. 6:47 Music from Austin’s Rolling Stones Pandora station comes on as we turn onto Voltaire Street. He discloses that Drink The Point is his favorite of the three shuttle tours because he lives in OB and can walk to pick up the bus. A few other quick facts I pick up: Austin’s favorite spots in OB/PL include Raglan, Pizza Port and The Pearl, DRINKABOUT is the rowdiest of the tours, and there’s a maximum of 25 people allowed on the bus. 7:00 Pull into Slater’s 50/50 parking lot for our first pick-up.

WestCoasterSD.com | 23


7:05 Leave Slater’s with 0 passengers. Austin mentions it’s possible the other bus may have picked up passengers already since it starts in OB. 7:15 Leave The Pearl with 0 passengers. Ironically Austin mentions that meeting new people is a perk of the job. I start to wonder if we’re in for a slow night because Fat Tuesday was celebrated the night before. 7:17 Action! A Harbor Town Pub employee jumps aboard to grab three schedules. I learn that Austin is originally from Indiana and got into craft beer while at college, bringing six-packs of Sam Adams to parties with macro kegs. 7:28 Leave Sessions Public with two passengers, a couple, who are doing the loop for the first time.

24 | March 2013

7:36 Arrive at Raglan Public House. The couple gets off as one guy and five ladies get on. 7:38 Leave Raglan. Duke from Point Loma notices the festive interior that includes a pole and color-changing mirror shadow boxes. “I didn’t know I was going to be on a party bus tonight,” he says. 7:41 Having passed Newport Pizza & Ale House with zero on or off we get to Pizza Port OB. This is where Austin normally jumps off the bus for a few minutes to stretch his legs. Another couple jumps on in the meantime. 7:52 Arrive at Sessions Public. The bus empties before six more revellers join the fray. Another “party bus” comment is made, not surprisingly.

8:02 Arrive at Slater’s, where it’s time for another stretch break. Austin notes that the night has been pretty typical so far, though we’re still waiting for our first large group. 8:32 We pass a few stops with no takers before arriving at Raglan. Here Pizza Port Solana Beach brewer Sean Farrell along with his wife and four more passengers, including the first couple we picked up at Sessions Public, hop on. 8:40 Arrive at Pizza Port, and the first big group spills out the brewpub doors. It’s Pizza Port OB GM Steve Brown’s birthday today, and he’s crewed up well; the bus is maxed out at 25 passengers. Steve knows Austin well, so he commandeers control of the music and proceeds to put on a song titled “It’s My Birthday” by artist Wallpaper, followed by classic 90’s rap hits. The overall decibel level has definitely risen.


8:53 Arrive at Sessions Public, where a group of fifteen or so crosses the street to board the bus, only to be disappointed that there’s no room. As I look around the windows have fogged up significantly. 9:05 We eventually loop around to The Pearl where the big group departs, likely filling the bar inside. 9:10 Leave The Pearl with zero passengers. The steamy windows slowly start to clear up. It’s eerily quiet until Austin puts on “Hotel California” by The Eagles. What a change of pace. 9:18 Leave Harbor Town Pub with three girls and four guys. We’re back in the rhythm now.

9:55 Austin honks at the other shuttle driver as we head back towards Slater’s. At each stop since Harbor Town we’ve picked up a few and dropped off a few. At Sessions six passengers got on but realized they wanted to travel in the other direction just before the doors closed. 10:01 Arrive at Slater’s and it’s time for another stretch break. The temperature has dropped. Austin asks me if I’m ready for a beer. He mentions that he’s got an Arrogant Bastard Ale waiting for him in the fridge at home; a light at the end of the tunnel. 10:12 The Steve Brown crew jumps back on the bus. Again Steve plays DJ and puts on “Free Fallin’” by Tom Petty, with the group loudly replacing the title lyrics with the birthday boy’s name.

10:16 “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen is up. It’s full-on mobile karaoke now. 10:40 After a few stops we’re back at Pizza Port OB where everyone departs. Austin picks up a few gum wrappers and a lighter that were left behind. 11:10 We’re making our last pick-up at The Pearl. Austin confirms my suspicion that he dreams of driving people around sometimes. 11:20 We reach the bus parking lot in OB. The sound of beep, beep, beep as we back in audibly signifies the end of the journey. We’ve gone 45.4 miles in total, using up around 1/8 tank of gas. Austin gives the bus interior a once-over before we part ways to finally crack a few beers of our own.

WestCoasterSD.com | 25


bEER ANd NOw Cucina Urbana’s selection of Italian craft beers is unique. Photo by Ryan Lamb

Sapore italiano The venerable efforts of Italian brewers are worth a taste BY JEFF HAMMETT

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ntil recently I didn’t give much thought to Italian craft beer. I had heard it mentioned more than once that Italy had an emerging craft beer community, but as with many beers that are produced in low numbers and then shipped halfway across the world, bottle prices tend to be high, and taking a gamble on a beer that you’ve never heard of can be difficult when we have so many other great beers available here in San Diego. That all changed for me when Mike Blanchfield, beer guy at Olive Tree Market in Ocean Beach, recommended that I check out Duchessic from Italy’s Birra del Borgo. A 375ml bottle was about $11, but Mike’s recommendation combined with the fact that Duchessic is a blend of Birra del Borgo’s Duchessa Saison and one

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year old Cantillon Lambic made it an easy purchase. That beer opened my eyes to the fact that Italian brewers are doing some really interesting things. Italy is world famous for wine, but these days their craft beer shouldn’t be overlooked. Sam Calagione and Dogfish Head seem to have long recognized that Italian brewers are on the right track. In 2008 Calagione travelled to Italy to brew My Antonia, an Imperial Pilsner, with Birra del Borgo outside of Rome. A few months later Birra del Borgo’s Leonardo Di Vincenzo came stateside to brew the beer with Dogfish Head and now Dogfish Head produces it with some regularity. In late 2012 Dogfish Head released Birra Etrusca Bronze, a beer based on research that Calagione, Di Vincenzo, Teo

Musso of Italy’s Birrificio Le Baladin and molecular archaeologist Dr. Pat McGovern conducted on drinking vessels found in 2,800-year-old Etruscan tombs. Dogfish Head released Birra Etrusca Bronze in December of 2012, and both Birra del Borgo and Birrificio Le Baladin will also put out versions of the beer fermented with different traditional materials (substituting terra cotta and wood for bronze, respectively). As an aside, Calagione, Musso and Di Vincenzo are partners in the brewpub Birreria located at the Italian market Eataly in New York. Here in San Diego we aren’t limited to American/Italian collaborations; a number of Italian-made beers are relatively easily available. Cucina Urbana near Balboa Park


recently launched an Italian craft beer program offering seven beers by the bottle and I had the chance to sample six of them. One of the first things I noticed after tasting a few of the beers was that they didn’t fit my preconceived notions based on the styles listed on the menu. Cucina Urbana Wine Director Samantha Gabryelski explained that Italian brewers, much like Italian winemakers, play fast and loose with styles. Birrificio Le Baladin’s Baladin Nora was described as an Italian hefeweizen, which, while not a perfect description, seemed fairly apt. Brewed with myrrh, spiced ginger, kumquat and orange peel, Baladin Nora had a honey-like sweetness and a bit of ginger spice with almost no hop bitterness. It wasn’t something I would drink every day, but it was certainly a good beer and would pair well with many cheeses. Super Baladin (also from Birrificio Le Baladin) was the beer that had myself and many others at the media tasting scratching our heads. It was not what we were expecting based on the information we were given: Triple IPA on the sample sheet and Belgian Triple on the full restaurant menu. Beer Advocate and Rate Beer categorize it as a Belgian Strong Pale Ale and a Belgian Strong Ale respectively – much better stylistic descriptions in my opinion. Despite the fact that it was described as having citrus, apricot, banana and toasted almond characteristics, the heavy, sweet malt flavors dominated and I wasn’t able to distinguish much else. Contessa from Birra Amiata was probably the most American-like beer on the menu. Described as an Italian Pale Ale, this would easily hold its own amongst many American Pale Ales. A sugary caramel backbone gave way to a pronounced herbal and citrus hop flavor with a bitter finish. If you’re a fan of American hops you won’t go wrong with Contessa. The last three beers samples were all from Birrificio Bruton. The lightest beer of the lot, Bruton di Bruton had a frothy white head and a hazy body, probably due to the wheat used in the beer. It had a spicy and slightly sweet flavor reminiscent of green apples and honey. This would be a great beer on a hot summer day. Pairing it with food could be difficult as some dishes might overwhelm its delicate flavors. Bruton Stone R, changed in the U.S. from its original Italian name Stoner due to the allusion to marijuana, was a Belgian Strong Ale that was as straight forward as they come. Fruity citrus, spices and bready yeast flavors all came through in this enjoyable beer. Bruton 10 was a malt-heavy dark beer. Described as a Quadrupel by Beer Advocate and a Barleywine by Rate Beer, Cucina Urbana avoids stylistic descriptions on the menu which seemed like the most sensible thing to do in regards to this beer. It had a big, sweet caramel and brown sugar flavor without being cloying, and there was some nice fruitiness as well. Served in a 750mL bottle, 10 needs to be shared among at least a few friends. These beers at Cucina Urbana are only available for onsite consumption, and while they aren’t paired to specific menu items the staff can make pairing recommendations based on the menu of the day. Prices range from $28-$38 for the 750mL bottles and $13.50 for the 330mL bottles.

Russian River Brewpub


iNTO THE bREw

Brewing with adjunCtS Many respectable beer styles use these non-malt sources of fermentable sugar BY SAM TIERNEY

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ver the last couple of issues, I’ve explored the world of malt. Malt is awesome stuff and you really can’t brew beer without it, (ok, you can but that would require exogenous enzymes in the brewing process and no one has done this to my knowledge) but many beers are also brewed with a portion of adjuncts, which are typically defined as any non-malt source of fermentable sugar added to the brewing process. For a long time among small American brewers, brewing exclusively with malt was seen as a sort of badge of honor. All malt beer was “honest” and “real.” Even today, the Brewers Association maintains that a craft brewer is (in part) “A brewer who has either an all malt flagship (the beer which represents the greatest volume among that brewer’s brands) or has at least 50% of its volume in either all malt beers or in beers which use adjuncts to enhance rather than lighten flavor.” I can’t completely disagree with this

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point of view because the extremely bland, high-adjunct content lagers that many brewers were originally taking a stand against are truly an example of how brewers can wield adjuncts to suck the flavor and soul out of a beer. But this lingering attitude, coupled with an over-romanticization of the German Reinheitsgebot’s proscription of using anything but malt, hops, water, and yeast in brewing has in some ways brushed too broad of a black mark over the use of adjuncts in brewing. Simply stated, adjuncts can and are used in many of the most respected, characterful styles of beer by some of the best brewers in the world. Thankfully, the last several years have seen a wider recognition and acceptance of adjuncts as additional tools for the brewing of different styles of beer. The Brewers Association does make an exception for “...beers which use adjuncts to enhance rather than lighten flavor.” but as we’ll see, this isn’t as clear-cut as it might first appear.

Unrefined Grains The least-refined adjuncts that are commonly used in brewing are whole, unmalted grains. Rice has the highest starch content of grains used for brewing and is often used in pale lagers around the world, especially in East Asia, though Budweiser also famously utilizes the grain for the lighter body and flavor that it imparts compared to malt. The Bruery is one of a handful of small brewers who also use rice as an adjunct, adding it to their Tradewinds Tripel as an Asian-themed way to lighten body and dry out the finish. Rice is typically used in a cereal cooker in the brewhouse, where is is cooked at higher temperatures to gelatinize the starches before being added to the main mash for sugar conversion with the malt. This two-mash procedure is called a cereal mash and is how most grain adjuncts were utilized before more processed forms became common. Raw wheat is another whole grain that


is utilized to brew Belgian wheat beers and lambics. For witbier, it creates the pale, white appearance characteristic of the style, and in the complex lambic turbid mash, it lends dextrins, proteins, and starches that wild yeast then get to chomp on over several years of aging in barrels. Unmalted grains can also be processed into flaked or torrified forms. This makes them easier to use in the brewhouse because their starches have already been gelatinized so they can be added directly to the mash where the malt enzymes can then convert them into fermentable sugars. Flaked barley is common in Irish-style stouts and adds a fuller mouthfeel and better foam retention because the glucans and proteins in the grain have not been degraded by the malting process as compared to malted barley. Although I included roasted barley with specialty malts in my last column, it is actually also technically and adjunct because it is made by roasting raw barley. Flaked wheat is a popular substitution for raw wheat as it is easier to brew with and adds a smooth flavor and increased head retention. Torrified wheat is also used in some beers for the slight toasty flavor that it adds, as the kernels have been popped with heat during processing, similar to some breakfast cereals. Oats are also commonly used in flaked form and the popular oatmeal stout showcases the full, creamy mouthfeel that they add to a beer. There is a downside though as oats can get very gummy in the mash and often lead to slow and stuck runoffs. Flaked rye is a bit more esoteric but can add a touch of earthy rye flavor while contributing increased proteins and glucans for body and foam retention similar to flaked wheat. Corn is also used in flaked form, but is more commonly utilized as grits in a cereal cooker, though this is becoming more of an old-school adjunct brewing technique as larger brewers have increasingly moved to more processed and easier-to-handle forms of corn. Corn, along with rice, was the traditional adjunct of choice for early American lager brewers who used it to lighten their beers in the quest to copy the successful pale lagers of Pilsen. It adds a bit more of a “cereal” flavor and aroma and a slight sweetness when compared to the particularly clean, dry rice. Though many drinkers can perceive a “corny” aroma in light

lagers, this is usually from dimethyl sulfide, a malt and fermentation byproduct that can easily stick out in very light beers. Today, some small brewers still use corn when brewing “Pre Prohibition” style lagers such as Craftsman’s 1903 Lager. One group of beers surprisingly still relying on corn at

“Simply stated, adjuncts can and are used in many of the most respected, characterful styles of beer by some of the best brewers in the world. Thankfully, the last several years have seen a wider recognition and acceptance of adjuncts as additional tools for the brewing of different styles of beer.” 10-20% are the sour dark ales of Flanders such as Rodenbach. English ales also sometimes contain a portion of corn (or maize as they call it) and have for many years. Refined Corn Sugars: Corn syrups are very popular these days as a refined, easier-to-handle source of sugar and come in many different sugar profile formulations that vary in fermentability. Some have a sugar profile similar to that of malt and lead to similar degrees of fermentability, while others are processed for high dextrose content and maximum fermentability, which leads to dry, lightbodied beers. These syrups are dosed into the boil kettle and allow brewers to easily brew high-gravity beers which can then be diluted with deaerated, carbonated water after fermentation. This allows the production of more beer with existing brewhouse and cellar capacity. Many of the large brewers in the world now produce beer through this

process. Light lagers typically contain corn and rice derived adjuncts at 25-35% of the total extract, while malt liquors and the beer brewed for flavored malt beverages is often up to 55% adjunct. At these levels, little malt flavor and beer character remains. While refined corn sugar has become the weapon of choice for macro-brewers to create massive quantities of bland lagers, it has also found a home in a local favorite that sits firmly on the opposite side of the beer flavor spectrum. When Vinnie Cilurzo started brewing double IPAs, he found that using dextrose sugar (pure glucose refined from corn) in the boil kettle allowed him to easily hit the higher gravity of the style, dried out the finish of the flavor, and led to a lighter, more drinkable beer that became a better showcase for hop flavor and aroma. Pliny The Elder has become a inspiration for many other double IPAs and dextrose is now a common ingredient in the style. I personally agree with this approach and feel that a proper double IPA needs some dextrose or another simple sugar in order to be dry and light-bodied enough to let the hops properly take center stage. Even regular IPAs can include smaller amounts of sugar if a lighter and drier malt backbone is desired. Dextrose is also sometimes used in other “imperial” beer styles where is makes for higher alcohol beers that are still a bit easier to drink due to less sweetness. Brew Like A Belgian: Refined Sugars and Sugar Syrups The idea of using simple sugars to boost alcohol and lighten the body of strong beers is one that Belgian brewers have long been familiar with. Strong ales like Tripels, Dubbels, Strong Dark Ales, and Golden Ales are almost invariably brewed with refined beet sugar, often in the form of invert sugar syrups called candi sugar. These syrups can be clear, but their flavor really shines in the darker incarnations in which the sugars are caramelized at high temperatures to produce rich caramel and dried fruit flavors that are key to darker Belgian styles. This has for a long time been the secret weapon the separated the generally fuller, sweeter American takes on those Belgian styles from the authentic iterations from brewers like Westvleteren and Duvel. To get the attenuation levels and dryness of those styles, you simply have to use a portion (usually 15-20 or even up to 30%) of simple sugar in place of

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malt, and achieving the authentic profile of caramel and dried fruit in strong dark ales is very difficult using only specialty malts. Refined sugars make these higher-alcohol beers “more digestible” in the words of Belgian brewers, but I like to say “the difference is drinkability.” OK, I think a certain brewery might have beat me to that one. As you can see, brewers around the world really aren’t all that different. Thankfully, several suppliers now offer authentic Belgian invert sugar syrups to American commercial and homebrewers, though some brewers have been cooking up their own versions for some time now. British brewers are also no strangers to invert brewing sugars. Invert syrups of varying degrees of color have been used in almost every British style since adjuncts became legal in the late 1900s. Milds and brown ales in particular have often derived much of their color and character from dark invert sugars. This style of brewing has yet to really catch on with American takes in British styles but now that we can easily get invert sugar syrups over here, I think we’ll be seeing more experimentation in the future. Other forms of sugars have already seen a fair amount of use in more experimental beers by many American brewers. Brown sugar and some raw sugars such as turbinado have been used for the slight molasses flavor they impart, and so has actual molasses for that matter. Honey is also sometimes used for the aromatic quality it imparts, and some brewers add it to finished beers to also contribute some sweetness, though these beers must be filtered or pasteurized to avoid a secondary fermentation. Maple syrup has also come into use by some brewers, especially in the Northeast. Lawson’s Finest Liquids in Vermont has even brewed a beer called Maple Tripple that uses raw maple sap in place of brewing water as another way of introducing maple sugar and flavor. Now that’s a novel way of brewing with adjuncts!

Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park

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On page 28, a corn field grows tall. Here, a pint of Irish stout.


pLATEs & piNTs

Joey Cox of Caffe Calabria. Photo by Brandon Hernández

THAT’S USING YOUR BEAN

Local brewers and roasters employ varying techniques to produce popular coffee-infused brews BY BRANDON HERNáNDEz

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owadays in brewhouses, it’s common to see burlap sacks full of coffee in the same space as bags filled with malted barley. Coffee beers have become extremely popular, opening eyes, minds and palates of imbibers everywhere. Beer drinkers have become both familiar with and fond of javaspiked brews, but the craftsmanship behind them is still a bit of a mystery to most. How do the brewers and roasters work together? How do they select the beans that’s just right for each beer? How does that coffee get in there? To answer these questions, we examined four local examples of this caffeinated model. Easily the most widely known San Diego coffee beer is Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits’ Victory At Sea. First brewed in 2009, this coffee and vanilla-tinged impe-

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rial porter has gone on to win the hearts of many and be remade many times over in casks using everything from scorching hot peppers to kids’ breakfast cereal. But it’s the masterful base beer, a collaboration between Ballast Point specialty brewer Colby Chandler and North Park’s Caffe Calabria, that is the basis for the popularity of this cult favorite. “We initially used Caffe Calabria coffee in our Sextant Oatmeal Stout, but were never blown away with the combination, so we put the coffee combo on the backburner until we decided to make a spiced winter seasonal beer,” says Chandler. “For Victory At Sea, I worked with the roaster to come up with a blend that had minimal acidity without losing too much body. To further minimize the acidity and astringency, while

keeping the most aromas and stabilizing the coffee so it will shine even with aging, we cold brew the coffee then add it postfermentation.” “Ballast Point was our second biggest customer last year. They ordered 6,000 pounds over that 12-month span and use 100 pounds per batch every time they brew Victory at Sea,” says Caffe Calabria production manager Joey Cox. To put the growing popularity of the beer in perspective, Chandler and company only ordered 1,000 pounds of Caffe Calabria beans in 2011. Later this year, Cox, who over the past 17-plus years has held nearly every position at Caffe Calabria, will add another title to his résumé—brewmaster. Equally inspired by the popularity of coffee beers and the


burgeoning Italian craft beer movement, owner Arnie Holt is installing a three-barrel brewhouse and 1,000 square feet of fermentation tanks in his venue’s basement. From there, Cox, who recently returned from a brew-centric tour of Italy, will create the brews of Birrificio Calabria. “Our goal is to create some really drinkable, sessionable beers where you can have three or four. We’re going to do a pilsnerstyle beer, a hefeweizen, a pale ale that will probably be our house beer and a coffee porter or stout,” says Cox. “I’m also playing around with a PB&J porter and a coffee beer that mimics the flavor of coffee with cream and sugar. For the coffee infusions, I’m experimenting with various methods like high-pressurization, forcing water through the beans with an Aeropress, Chemex, French press and cold infusion.” Cold infusion is also the method of choice for Heather Brisson, another Caffe Calabria alum well versed in the marrying of beer and beans. Before moving to her current post as head roaster at Roast Magazine 2012 micro-roaster of the year, Bird Rock Coffee Roasters, she collaborated with Pizza Port brewer Yiga Miyashiro on Return of the Mac, a coffee-infused macadamia nut porter brewed collaboratively with Kim Lutz (who at the time was the lead brewer at Maui Brewing Company’s brewpub, but has since taken the lead brewer role at soon-to-open local operation Saint Archer Brewery), and a coffee imperial porter dubbed Bacon and Eggs. She continues to consult on the latter, a gold medal winner at last year’s World Beer Cup for which the coffee composition changes each time. “I love the extra layers of flavor that the coffee adds to the beer, especially when you start using interesting coffees,” says Miyashiro. “They can lend dried fruit, lemon peel, fresh berry, toffee and a million other flavors that complement the beer.” “Coffees from different growing regions have drastically different flavors and can provide more than just the roastiness to a beer,” says Brisson. In the case of Bacon and Eggs, she and Miyashiro sought a blend that would lend more sweetness and red fruit flavors. “To help us get a good idea of what our end results would be, I would create a few options of blends or a single varietal in small batches of cold brewed toddy, an extraction method where coffee is steeped in cold water for 12 to 24 hours, creating a concentrate that is very potent in flavor and caffeine. We would then sample each with the fermented beer to see what flavor profiles worked best.” “Yiga is super crazy about not letting oxygen touch anything that goes into the beer,” recalls Cox. “For our first brew with him, we did cold extraction, then drained directly into a Corny keg and transported ten gallons of cold coffee straight to Pizza Port Solana Beach and hooked in line with him for infusion on the way to the tap.” Pizza Port recently took production of coffee beers even higher profile, adding Board Meeting, a brown ale infused with coffee from North County company, Ryan Bros. Coffee, to their core line-up of Port Brewing beers. Key to that process was director of production and quality assurance Gwen Conley, who has experience in this area, having crafted one of the most beloved of The Lost Abbey’s recent Ultimate Box Set series, Track 10, a coffee- and chocolate-bolstered mocha java version of Serpent’s Stout. For Board Meeting, Conley’s sampling method differed from her Port contemporary. “We talked to Ryan Bros. about what we were looking for and they recommended several different


coffees for us,” said Conley. “We did aroma and taste testing, both on the beans and the beans brewed into coffee form. We then took that a step further, letting the beans soak in the beer, again checking the aroma and flavor until we narrowed down what coffee brought us the attributes we were looking for.” A short jaunt east on State Route 78, Stone Brewing Co. brewmaster Mitch Steele recently dug into fresh bags of beans with a team of pro and home brewers when brewing a collaborative coffee IPA. The recipe from the beer came from a trio of brewers who go by the collective moniker Aleman. That threesome won the Iron Brew Homebrew Competition that was put on last summer by Chicago’s Two Brothers Brewing Company and judged by Stone CEO Greg Koch. The grand prize Aleman won was the opportunity to brew the winning beer at Stone with Steele, and Two Brothers founders Jim and Jason Ebel. The Ebels recently added a coffee roasting component to their business. In fact, it was their Brew House Blend of Ethiopian, Guatemalan and Sumatran beans that was used to brew Aleman/ Two Brothers/Stone DayMan Coffee IPA. Unlike most coffee beers, while java is a prominent ingredient, the brewers didn’t want it to be the main focus. Instead of a coffee beer, the Aleman guys wanted an IPA with a coffee background. This meant keeping things as light as possible versus uber-roasty. “We knew they wanted a lighter roast, so the Brew House Blend was the best option,” says Jason Ebel. ”The coffee is roasted lighter, and the beans give off deep stonefruit and nutty character. The latter brings on subtle coffee flavors while the former works well with the [Cascade and Citra] hops.” The methods and recipes vary from beer to beer and brewer to brewer, but from brown ales to those that are deceptively golden, there is no limit to the styles of beer that can benefit from smartly conceived infusions of quality coffee.


GROWING Pains It’s not always smooth sailing for burgeoning breweries BY MARC FIGUEROA

Mother Earth Brew Co. owner Dan Love speaks with the crew from Urge Gastropub during the brew day of “Don’t Make It Weird” Peanut Butter Chocolate Imperial Stout. Photo by Ryan Lamb

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lean shaven his entire life, Mike Hess told himself he wasn’t going to shave until his new brewing operation in North Park opened for business. The owner of Hess Brewing first thought the expansive two-story brew house would be open by July. Then he figured October. “Now I just say, ‘Soon,’ ” he said during a recent tour of the 9,700-square foot space on Grim Avenue, which features an imposing 37-foot sky bridge that overlooks the brewing operation and leads to the tasting room. Needless to say, the delays have transformed him from a respectable looking clean-cut ex-military man to a cross between a scruffy hippie and Tom Hanks in “Cast Away.”

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But Hess is by no means alone on a deserted island when it comes to facing the challenges of expansion. As the craft beer craze continues to explode, many breweries are doing everything they can to keep up with increasing demand. And that doesn’t come without overcoming an obstacle or two -- whether it’s dealing with permitting issues, hop shortages, equipment failures, construction delays or cost overruns. The list goes on. “Brewing the beer is the easy part. Running the business is the hard part,” said Dan Love, co-owner of Mother Earth Brew Co. in Vista, which opened a new tasting room last year and recently invested in its own bottling line. Hess is making the jump from his Miramar-based nanobrewery to a 30-barrel operation that he anticipates will pump out 3,000 barrels in its first year. The price tag? About $1.8 million, a considerable amount more than he originally anticipated. “Chris Cramer (co-founder of Karl Strauss Brewing) gave me some great advice when he told me to raise $500,000 more after he looked at our plan,” Hess said. “I’m glad I did because I would have been out of luck if I didn’t.” One aspect Hess didn’t anticipate was the difficulty of bringing in the brewing vessels, which sit on the basement floor. What made it worse is when he saw the befuddled look on the faces of the subcontractors who were tasked with installing them. It ended up costing Hess an extra $30,000 for rigging, a figure he did not plan for in the budget. “I knew it wasn’t going to be zero, but I didn’t think it would cost $30,000 to put the tanks in,” he said. “I thought (this operation) was only going to be slightly more difficult than moving into

a big warehouse. But that’s my naivety I guess.” Paul Sangster, who co-owns Rip Current Brewing in San Marcos with partner Guy Shobe, said he was hoping to open by last summer, but construction delays pushed the opening back to December. “Most breweries we talked to said, ‘Your construction timeline is going to take twice as long and cost at least twice as much,’ and that was certainly true in our case,” Sangster said. Rip Current’s original concept was a nanobrewery, but ultimately upped the ante to a 15-barrel system that required more space. Sangster said the brewery’s customized water treatment system, which allows the brew makers to alter the water’s makeup depending on beer style, also took longer than expected to develop. “There certainly were some eye-openers along the way,” Sangster said. “We spent money in places we weren’t expecting, so we just had to cut back in other areas.” Stone Brewing Co., now the 11th-largest craft brewery in the United States, has come a long way since its humble beginnings in San Marcos 16 years ago. But its meteoric rise hasn’t come without a few setbacks. “You have zoning issues, permitting issues, contractors, weather, equipment failure, a lot of things,” said co-founder and CEO Greg Koch. “It’s not a complaint, it’s just things you have to deal with. What’s that saying, ‘Life is what happens while you are making other plans?’ ” Stone moved into its current home in Escondido in December 2005, about a year later than it had planned. The delay was due to a dispute with the developer. “We grew 13 percent in 2005 -- our slowest year of growth ever -- because we were brewing at maximum capacity (in San Marcos) and we didn’t have any place to go. “We had hit the ceiling brewing 24-7 at Mata Way. That hurt a lot.” More recently, Stone’s longtime plan for opening a brewery in Europe is back at square one after a year-long negotiation for a location in Berlin fell through. And the $26.6 million expansion plan it announced nearly two years hasn’t gone exactly as planned. The new brewery at Point Loma’s Liberty Station has encountered more than a year of delays. As a result, the brewery’s plan for opening a boutique hotel in Escondido is now on hold. And with delays come increased costs. “I’ll tell you it’s not $26 million anymore,” Koch said. “I wish we could do it for $26 million, but we’re looking in excess of double that. “It’s not easy. But then if it was easy everybody would do it.” Of course, these brew makers say it’s all worth it --- the headaches, the unbudgeted costs, the delays, and more delays. In the end, it’s a small price to pay for what they love doing. “There were sleepless nights in here,” Hess said. “It’s a gut check every day, but what I see going on here and I know where it’s going to be and I can see it in my head, where there’s 100 people in the tasting room, everyone is happy and there is beer in the elevator heading out into a truck, I know it’s going to be worth it.” Added Love: “Oh ya, it’s worth it. Ten times over. Before I used to wake up and dream about doing this. Now I wake up and I’m in my dream. No matter how many hours I work, it doesn’t matter because I don’t feel like it’s work. It’s my life and that makes a difference.”


UPCOMING CRAFT BEER EVENTS See more @ westcoastersd.com/event-calendar

BEST DAMN NIGHT OF THE BARRELS 2 - MARCH 2

Sid from Best Damn Beer Shop is pulling out all the shops again to put together an awesome rare beer tasting event at The Beer Company downtown. Tickets are $55 online or $60 at the door for 10 tasters of premium ales, including The Beer Co.’s GABF gold medal-winning Manhattan Project, a scotch ale aged in High West Manhattan barrels with brandied cherries.

ROUGH DRAFT 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY - MARCH 9

Having just signed a big distribution deal with Markstein Beverage, Rough Draft will be hosting two sessions of birthday celebrations. $20 online entrance fee gets you a glass of the anniversary beer, Southern Triangle, along with a commemorative pint glass, refill of the beer of your choice, and a mini-Swiener.

LATITUDE 33 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY - MARCH 9

Decisions, decisions… Latitude 33 is tapping some special kegs, including their anniversary Biere de Mars, to pair with fare from gourmet food trucks. Just like Rough Draft, they’re dividing the party into two sessions for $20 each. Tickets entitle attendees to a 1st anniversary pint glass, eight four-ounce tasters and a Lat 33 T-shirt.

BUSINESS OF BEER CONFERENCE - MARCH 12

This first annual one-day conference, organized by local businessmen Dan Drown (Drown Consulting, LLC), Bill Reavey (RSR Law Group) and Jim Crute (Lightning Brewery) is designed to help breweries-in-planning with navigating the waters of starting a new beer business, by providing guidance on how to be successful while avoiding major pitfalls. Speaker topics include equipment financing, risk management, beer distribution, local government regulations, tasting room development and management, and more. For more information, visit socalbob.com

EPIC BEER FESTIVAL - MARCH 15/16

Held at the San Diego Convention Center, this big two-day event will feature more than 80 craft breweries and 200 beers. Friday’s session goes from 7 - 10 p.m., while Saturday’s sessions are 1 - 4 p.m. and 7 - 10 p.m. Tickets are $40 for unlimited two-ounce tasters.

GREEN FLASH BEER DINNER @ LEROY’S - MARCH 26

Chef Gregory Chavez is at it again with a great beer dinner pairing menu that starts with blistered shishito peppers, jamon and grilled octopus paired with Rayon Vert Belgian Pale Ale. The next courses are paired up with 30th Street Pale Ale, 7th Anniversary Red Ale, Grand Cru Belgian Strong Ale and Candela Rye Barleywine. Tickets are $55 and available at leroyskitchenandlounge.com

STONE GIVE A PINT, GET A PINT BLOOD DRIVE - MARCH 26/27

Just like it sounds, sign up online to donate some blood for the San Diego Blood Bank and you’ll receive an empty Stone pint glass for your efforts. Help save some lives! Visit stonebrew.com for more information.

30TH ON 30TH - MARCH 30

Every 30th of the month, bars and restaurants on 30th Street in North Park come up with cool small plates or great deals on half pours to give you a taste of the neighborhood. Frequent participants include The Linkery, Ritual Tavern, El Take It Easy and Sea Rocket Bistro.

LOVELIKEBEER PRESENTS “CORNUCOPIA” - APRIL 3

12 in ‘12 member LOVELIKEBEER is throwing a Meso-American inspired vegan cuisine and craft beer bash at The Linkery in North Park. No tickets are required; everything is served a la carte. To pair with the dishes that have yet to be announced, AleSmith Brewing Co. is creating custom cask ales with unique twists. 15% of the entire night’s revenue will go to Engineers Without Borders San Diego, a non-profit humanitarian organization that works with developing communities worldwide to improve quality of life.

BUSINESS OF CRAFT BREW @ SDSU - APRIL 17

The San Diego State Business Alumni Network is hosting a panel of leading industry experts to discuss the rise of craft beer in San Diego. Moderated by Chefs Press’ Bruce Glassman, the panel will include Chris Cramer from Karl Strauss, Mike Hinkley from Green Flash, Steve Wagner from Stone Brewing Co., Peter zien from AleSmith, Doug Constantiner from Societe Brewing and Scot Blair from Hamilton’s Tavern. You don’t have to be an SDSU alum to attend; tickets for the general public are $45 for the 5 - 8 p.m. event that includes samples from the breweries as well as bites from Slater’s 50/50. Visit sdsualumni.org/ban for more information.


Continued from page 19 ego she confidently shared this thought: “I have never had the feeling of someone trying to prevent me from entering the brewing industry, but I certainly had to work hard for it.” Randall is an example of what can be accomplished with hard work and effort. Yet she recognizes that there are few female industry professionals and no overt outreach in our com-

munity. When asked what she’d tell a woman that is scared to brew professionally, Randall asserted, “If women are intimidated about getting into the brewing industry, they shouldn’t be.” For a more in-depth analysis of women in the industry please visit CraftBeerTasters.com

Randall chats with Dr. Gonzalo Quintero from CraftBeerTasters.com


On THE MOVE

Home Brew Mart’s retired brewhouse heads to the San Diego History Center

Above: San Diego History Center Marketing Director Matthew Schiff looks a bit nervous as the brewhouse eases its way out of the building for the time in its history. Right: After February 25 you won’t be seeing this floor again for a long time thanks to new equipment coming in from locals Premier Stainless. Photos by Ryan Lamb


D

is for Downtown Johnny Brown’s This glossary of terms comes straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com, with DTJB added by West Coaster (in bold) Decoction Mash - A method of mashing that raises the temperature of the mash by removing a portion, boiling it, and returning it to the mash tun. Often used multiple times in certain mash programs.

Degrees Plato - An empirically derived hydrometer scale to measure density of beer wort in terms of percentage of extract by weight. Dextrin - A group of complex, unfermentable, and tasteless carbohydrates produced by the partial hydrolysis of starch, that contributes to the gravity and body of beer. Some dextrins remain undissolved in the finished beer, giving it a malty sweetness.

Diacetyl - A volatile compound produced by some yeasts which imparts a caramel, nutty, or butterscotch flavor to beer. This compound is acceptable at low levels in several traditional beer styles, including: English and Scottish Ales, Czech Pilsners, and German Oktoberfest. Dimethyl Sulfide (DMS) - At low levels, DMS can impart a favorable sweet aroma in beer. At higher levels DMS can impart a characteristic aroma and taste of cooked vegetables, such as cooked corn or celery. Low levels are acceptable in and characteristic of some Lager beer styles.

Downtown Johnny Brown’s - This 25-year old beer bar tucked away in the Civic Center Concourse always has an impressive tap selection, and the food ain’t bad either. Enjoy the large outdoor patio with skyscrapers all around, or get in a few games of pool and darts. Draught Beer - Beer drawn from kegs, casks or serving tanks rather than from cans, bottles, or other packages. Beer consumed from a growler relatively soon after filling is also sometimes considered draught beer. Dry Hopping - The addition of hops late in the brewing process to increase the hop aroma of a finished beer without significantly affecting its bitterness. Dry hops may be added to the wort in the kettle, whirlpool, hop back, or added to beer during primary or secondary fermentation or even later in the process.

Downtown Johnny Brown’s is a legendary bar in the local beer scene


CRAFT bEER diRECTORy & MAp

a

la Jolla

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

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pacific beach mission beach BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 3. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 4. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 5. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 6. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 7. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 8. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 9. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 10. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 11. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 12. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars

42 | March 2013

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

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point loma ocean beach BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 2. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 3. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 4. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 5. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 7. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 8. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 9. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 10. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 11. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 12. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 13. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com

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mission valley clairemont BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 2. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 3. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 4. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 5. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com

2. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 3. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 4. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

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coronaDo

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

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mission hills hillcrest BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 2. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 3. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 4. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 5. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 6. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 7. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 8. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

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DoWntoWn

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com

3. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 4. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 5. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 6. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 7. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 8. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 9. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 10. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 11. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 12. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 13. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 14. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 15. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

8. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 9. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 10. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 11. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 12. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 13. The Linkery 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.TheLinkery.com 14. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 15. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 16. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 17. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 18. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 19. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 20. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net

BOTTLE SHOPS

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com 3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 6. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 7. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 8. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 401 G St. | 619.231.7000 www.RockBottom.com/San-Diego 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

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uptoWn

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 3. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 4. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 5. El Take It Easy 3926 30th St. | 619.291.1859 www.ElTakeItEasy.com 6. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 7. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

BREWERIES 1. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 2. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com


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CRAFT bEER diRECTORy & MAp

i

north county

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 2. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 3. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 4. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 5. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 6. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 7. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 8. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com 9. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 3. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 4. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 5. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 6. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com 7. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 3. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 4. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com 5. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 6. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 3. Fezziwig’s Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.FezziwigsBrewing.com 4. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 5. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 6. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 7. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com

44 | March 2013

8. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 9. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 10. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com 11. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 12. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 13. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 14. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com 2. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 3. Smokin Beaver 348 State Pl. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

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encinitas Del mar BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 2. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 3. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 4. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 6. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 7. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 8. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

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sorrento valley mira mesa BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com 2. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREWERIES 1. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 2. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 3. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com

4. Hess Brewing 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 5. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 6. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

l

poWay rancho bernarDo BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 2. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 3. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

m

alpine BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

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ramona BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

o

Julian BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

p

south bay

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Henry’s Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com 2. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787

BREW PUBS 1. The Brew House at Eastlake 871 Showroom Pl. Ste 102 | 619.656.2739 www.BrewHouseEastlake.com

BREWERIES 1. Mad Lab Craft Brewing 6120 Business Ctr. Ct. | 619.254.6478 www.MadLabCraftBrewing.Wordpress.com

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college la mesa BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 5. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 6. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd.

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

r

east county

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 2. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com

4. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. Manzanita Brewing Company 9962 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION? Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com


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Profile for Advanced Web Offset

West Coaster  

March 2013 issue. News and events for San Diego's craft beer community

West Coaster  

March 2013 issue. News and events for San Diego's craft beer community