Page 1

DEC ‘12 / JAN ‘13 | sErviNg AmEriCA’s fiNEst bEEr CouNty | sAN DiEgo

Vol. 3 No. 2

Free Copy


LETTER FROM THE publisher

The cold box at West Coast Barbecue & Brew in La Mesa 2012 will be remembered in the beer community as an explosive year of growth. We’ve been diligent about maintaining a list of breweries on our website — just a simple count of who is open and brewing, so you know who to watch. By our record, 18 breweries have opened their doors from January through December - making for 60 total breweries manufacturing beer today. We’ve also been tracking in-the-works or under construction breweries; this number has been hovering around 30 for the entire year. The trend has been that when one brewery opens, others pop up on our radar. A question I get asked frequently is “When will it stop?” There seems to be a growing consensus that one day, more breweries will be closing down than opening up. I believe this bubble-bursting mentality is a bit simplistic. When we speak of the brewing industry, we’re not referring to fly-by-night tech companies producing intangible products in Silicon Valley during the dotcom boom. We are talking about the brick and mortar businesses producing a product as old as history itself. This period of growth won’t last forever. Just how long, I have no clue. Here’s how I look at it: the two greatest assets I see in successful breweries are great beer and passion. It’s true that we’re seeing some breweries in town lacking in either department. Those are the ones I think will be the first to go. As for breweries that produce excellent beer driven by passion? There’s always room, even if it’s not on local taps. For now, my best advice is to enjoy this very incredible time. There is no better place in the world for the beer drinker than San Diego. At West Coaster, it’s been a privilege to cover this bustling industry so far. We’re looking forward to 2013 and beyond. Happy Holidays!

Mike Shess Publisher West Coaster


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders ryan lamb mike shess Publisher mike shess mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor ryan lamb ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director brittany everett brittany@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant tom shess thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers sam tierney sam@westcoastersd.com jeff hammett jeff@westcoastersd.com brandon hernández brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com Copy Editor amy t. granite amy@westcoastersd.com Contributors kristina yamamoto Editorial Intern nickie peña

West Coaster, THE website Web Manager mike shess Web Editor ryan lamb Webmaster josh everett West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2012 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


columnist

beer and now

Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

Jeff Hammett first noticed craft beer early in college when a friend introduced him to Stone Brewing Co.’s Pale Ale. After graduating from UCSD with a degree in Philoso­phy, he moved to Santa Cruz where he frequented Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing and Seabright Brewery. Jeff would journey up to San Francisco to visit Magnolia and Toronado every chance he got. He started blogging about beer in early 2009 while living in Durango, Colorado. For a town of only 20,000 people, Durango boasts an impressive four breweries. Jeff quickly became a part of the brewing scene, and in January 2010 was invited to work with Ska Brewing Co.’s Head Brewer Thomas Larsen to formulate a recipe and brew on Ska’s pilot system. In addition to his love of craft beer, Mr. Hammett is an avid cyclist and can be seen riding on the road or trails most weekends.

plates & pints

columnist

columnist

into the brew

writers

Brandon Hernández hated beer and had never even heard the term “craft beer” until his first trip to O’Brien’s Pub in 1999. There, in a dark yet friendly space rife with the foreign smell of cascade and centennial, he fell into line with the new school of brew enthusiasts courtesy of a pint-sized one-two punch of Sierra Nevada Bigfoot and Stone Arrogant Bastard Ale. Those quaffs changed his perception of all beer could and should be and he’s spent the past decade-plus immersing himself in the local beer culture — living, learning, loving and, of course, drinking craft suds. He’s since taken up homebrewing and specializes in the creation of beer-centric cuisine. A native San Diegan, Brandon is proud to be contributing to a publication that serves a positive purpose for his hometown and its beer loving inhabitants. In addition to West Coaster, he is an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including San Diego Magazine, The Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Riviera, San Diego Home/Garden-Lifestyles and U-T San Diego.

Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube columnist (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with ocThe Carboy casional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he Chronicles attends.


TAbLE OF CONTENTs 10-11

CoLUMNS

Beer and Now Brewery-in-planning Modern Times Beer

24-26

Into the Brew An in-depth look at the world of malt, part 1

28-30

Plates & Pints Writer and vegetarian Randy Clemens dishes out spicy Sriracha recipes

32

The Carboy Chronicles Hop Bursting homebrewing technique requires ample hops

FeATUreD CoNTrIBUTorS 20-21 27 6

Andy Killion #WavesBro: Coastal bars don’t get enough credit for spreading the word Eric O’Connor Thorn St. Brewery brewmaster visits a saison tasting @ Sea Rocket

SpoTLIGHT: SAN DIeGo Beer WeeK Stats from the technology side In this month’s Brews in the News

8&37

SDBW Day 1: One Man’s Journey Contributor Ian Cheesman logs his first day of the big celebration

38-41

SDBW, in pictures See more at facebook.com/westcoastersd

13-18 22-23

pLUS +

West Coaster Holiday Gift & Savings Guide Everything you need to please the beer lover on your list Jerry’s Farewell Imperial Chocolate Coffee Porter Clone recipe and instructions for a Mayor Sanders-inspired brew

31

Featured events A few picks from the months ahead, visit westcoastersd.com for more

34

Lost Abbey Ultimate Box Set Everyone’s a rock star at the project’s culminating event

36

Glossary: B Beer terms from the innovators at CraftBeer.com, plus local breweries

42-45

Craft Beer Directory & Map Add your location by e-mailing directory@westcoastersd.com

oN thE CovEr:

Former Mayor Jerry Sanders taps the cask of Karl Strauss beer to kick off SDBW in style as San Diego beer VIP look on. Photo by Ryan Lamb


BREWS IN THE NEWS

Catching the Wave

Decorated home brewers Paul Sangster and Guy Shobe are making the leap to professional brewing with Rip Current Brewing in San Marcos. Located right off the 78 at Las Posas Road, Rip Current will make use of sophisticated equipment to regulate everything in the brew house; both brewers are self-proclaimed “water aficionados.” Look for Rip Current to announce their soft opening dates soon via Facebook and their blog.

SDBW by the #’s

Courtesy of TapHunter, here are a few statistics from the web side of San Diego Beer Week: 54% increase in mobile visits to sdbw.org over 2011, due in part to the mobile-friendly website that can be viewed on iPads, tablets, etc.; 11% increase in direct traffic (40% from search engines, 36% direct hits and 22% from other sites); 700%, 400% and 140% increase in traffic from New York, Michigan and Arizona, respectively; 8,500+ Facebook fans and 8,000+ Twitter followers, second only to Philly Beer Week. The top 5 events on sdbw.org, by page views: 1. Guild Fest (Broadway Pier), 2. Rare Beer Breakfast (Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens), 3. Million

6 | December 2012 / January 2013

Zillion Speedways (O’Brien’s Pub), 4. 10 Tasty Treats from Alpine (O’Brien’s Pub), 5. Mother Pucker Sour Night (O’Brien’s Pub).

18 in ‘12

Eighteen new breweries have opened in the past year, the biggest tally in San Diego beer history. As of press time they include Amplified Ale Works, Belching Beaver, Fezziwig’s, Helm’s, Hillcrest, Indian Joe, Julian Brewing, Karl Strauss 4S Ranch, Latitude 33, Mad Lab, Offbeat, Poor House, Rough Draft, Societe, Stumblefoot, Thorn St. Brewery, Wet N’ Reckless and White Labs.

San Diego Breweries Look to Distilling

In addition to the spirits division of Ballast Point, San Diego will have two more distilleries in the new year. Manzanita Brewing Company is anticipating a completion of their build out in late December, with plans to produce sugar shine, four different whiskeys, a potato vodka, plus light and dark rum. BNS Brewing & Distilling Co. will also open up shop in Santee with a 50-gallon, American-made still to produce white whiskey, moonshine and vodka to start.

Guy Shobe (left) and Paul Sangster (pointing) show members of the West Coaster crew around their new facility, which has two tasting rooms and can be seen from the freeway. Photo by Ryan Lamb

A Star in Europe

Ballast Point’s Calico Amber Ale took home two medals at European beer competitions in the past month, winning gold at the 2012 European Beer Star and bronze at the inaugural Brussels Beer Challenge.

One Door Closes, Half of Another Opens

Liberty Station’s SOL Markets recently closed up shop, but Chef Brandon Brooks has already found a new home at The Field in downtown. He’ll work there until the owners get their new brewpub, Half Door Brewing Company, up and running in the East Village at Ninth and Island. Look for more developments this summer.


SDBW Day 1 One Man’s Journey

By IAN CHEESMAN 7:05 A.M. I greet most days with a boundless thirst for beer. It’s the kind of admission that is usually met with crooked stares or unsavory accusations, but not today. Today is special. After months of patiently grinding through days that were not 100% dedicated to beer, San Diego Beer Week is upon us. Awesome. On this glorious Friday morn, day 1 of SDBW’s metric 10-day week, I have plotted out a staggering itinerary of drinking opportunities under the guise of proper beer journalism. I expect to tantalize my palate, expand my horizons and probably shave off a few years of worthwhile liver function. This is my quest to see if one man can summon the constitution to endure a single day of SDBW’s bounty and give you the play-by-play along the way. If you’re the type that believes in retroactive prayer, I’d be grateful for it. 7:29 A.M. My daughter, while not actively thwarting my arrival at Daddy Disneyland, is not helping my egress. Either she didn’t get enough sleep or she’s been struck with a mild case of that Waking Dead disease because she’s meeting my prods for urgency with a blank stare and guttural moans. She’s whittled off enough time in the bathroom alone that for the first time in my parenting history I’m compelled to say “Sweetheart, daddy needs you to poop harder.” Soon, SDBW. Soon. 8:05 A.M. I just learned from my wife that we have to attend the monthly “Character Counts” award ceremony because my daughter decided that October would be the perfect time to finally start demonstrating character. It’s sweet and all, but where’s my award for patience in the face of interminable sobriety? 9:07 A.M. After paying the standard downtown luxury tax to give my car a place to

8 | December 2012 / January 2013

rest, I’ve finally crossed the threshold of Karl Strauss. The event is referred to as “BYOB”, an acronym expanding in this case to “Brew Your Own Beer Brunch”. I don’t know whether to be more miffed that the event should rightfully be called “BYOBB” or that I needlessly carried a case of beer to the restaurant. The BYOBB is many events lumped into one. There is, of course, a sumptuous brunch buffet paired with some of Karl Strauss’ beefier quaffs (Parrot in a Palm Tree Baltic Porter & Chocolate Pancakes with Spiced Whipped Cream, anyone?). They further promise to enrich the event with a live brewing demo (making a crowd-sourced Oatmeal Stout recipe) and a presentation on the company itself. This brunch is going to be more productive than most of my work days. 9:13 A.M. Before diving headlong into the repast, Brewmaster Paul Segura stands atop his stainless steel throne to walk us through the some of the technical aspects of the brew being produced before our very eyes. It’s pretty interesting stuff, though it feels like a sinister mechanism to keep me from full throttle binging on breakfast and beer. Thanks for nothing, Learning. 9:35 A.M. Karl Strauss’ CEO/Co-founder Chris Cramer dives into oral history of the company from his perspective. It’s a delightful story, but I’m beginning to wonder if he’s filibustering to cover a french toast-related crisis in the kitchen. That said, listening to Chris referring to the company figurehead as “Uncle Karl” is too endearing for words. 9:42 A.M. Here it is. The gambit. The first beer of the day. It seems so peculiar that inauspicious little tumbler will likely later be recalled as the first in a long series of mistakes. 9:55 A.M. Trays of food are finally zipping

out as quickly as the beer samples that accompany them. Despite my voracious hunger, I merge into the line with a bare minimum of snarling toward those crowding around me. 10:15 A.M. Karl Strauss thoughtfully provided placemats that serve to curate and organize the meal pairings. Unfortunately they didn’t take into account that I’m a rebel that cannot be constrained by The Man and his many tools of creative oppression. On an unrelated note, I’ve just lost track of what beer I’m supposed to be drinking for the 5th time. 10:45 A.M. Food coma...building. Ability to coherently string together sentences...fading. Plan to hit next zeppelin in about 15 turnips after the hour...unlikely. 1:08 P.M. It took a little to shake the the euphoria induced by the SDBW Peanut Butter Porter Cup & Cream Cheese and Plantain Stuffed French Toast, but I’m ready to rally. I’m thinking the dueling casks of Sculpin IPA at Ballast Point will help to shake off any remaining cobwebs. 1:13 P.M. Sculpin is always a treat. Sculpin on cask is a gift. Sculpin on cask with special edition hopping is a godsend. Today we’re experiencing Sculpin with Citra hops versus Soriachi Ace hops. I think I am partial to the Citra if only because it feels like an evolution of Sculpin more than a reinvention of it, but opinions among those on the patio vary widely. Luckily none of those other people have beer columns. The Citra was better. So there. Continued on page 37


beer and now Jacob McKean plays with the first piece of equipment at the “Lomaland Fermentorium”. Photo courtesy of Modern Times Beer

Get With The Times

Brewery-in-planning Modern Times makes innovative moves by Jeff Hammett

T

here was a time when I could keep up with all the brewery openings, either by talking with business owners beforehand, or just stopping in to try some beers once they opened. But those days are long gone, and such is the pace of this industry’s growth with 60 licenced, active brewhouses in the county. 18 of those 60 breweries will have opened by the end of 2012. In my October column, Hillcrest Brewing Company turned out to be a great example of a neighborhood brewpub. Last month, I didn’t particularly enjoy what Poor House Brewing Company in North Park had to offer. The new year has 31 breweries-in-planning and scanning through the list, there are a few that I’m really looking forward to. Bagby Beer is one that doesn’t need much of an introduction. The former Pizza Port Director of Brewery Operations, Jeff Bagby, signed a lease at 601 South Coast Highway in Oceanside last month. Then there’s Tom Nickel, O’Brien’s Pub

10 | December 2012 / January 2013

owner and partner at West Coast BBQ & Brew, who’s getting back into the brewing game with Nickel Beer Co. in Julian. This comes after he and Julian Brewing Company parted ways back in July. Then there’s some decorated homebrewers out to make their mark; Paul Sangster and Kelsey McNair are working on Rip Current Brewing and North Park Beer Co., respectively. But of all the new brewery plans, the one I’m looking forward to most is Modern Times Beer. I’m not sure why I was surprised when Jacob McKean left Stone Brewing Co.’s as its media specialist earlier this year. McKean and I are friendly acquaintances, through media related correspondence, and occasionally running into each other at beer events around town. McKean has long been a craft beer geek, so it’s no wonder that he’d want to open his own brewery. The time he spent working at Stone has certainly helped prepare him for other endeavors in the industry.

“I think almost everybody in the industry, at some level, would like to have their own brewery,” McKean says about opening a place of his own. “I decided to do it when my father committed to helping me raise the money. I didn’t have anywhere near enough to do it on my own, so that bridged the gap between dream and reality.” McKean chronicled the process of raising the money to start Modern Times in an editorial posted on BeerPulse.com, “How I Raised $1.25 Million to Start My Brewery.” Previously, he’d written another post, “Why I Think I’m Mostly Not Crazy for Opening a Brewery.” With a business plan in place, Modern Times needed a brewer. McKean turned to Michael Tonsmeire, otherwise known as The Mad Fermentationist, for assistance. Tonsmeire, who lives on the east coast, won’t be a regular brewer at Modern Times, but he will consult on recipes. He’ll also work on the brewery’s barrel program once it’s up and running.


If you’ve ever looked up any homebrewing or sour beer information on the internet, chances are you’ve stumbled across Tonsmeire’s incredibly detailed blog at some point. When I came across it, I was in awe over the amount of beer that he brewed, his emphasis on sour beers, and the fact that he posted such a large amount of detailed recipes and tasting notes for others to explore. All of the information on the blog is distributed under a Creative Commons license, which allows others (with a few restrictions) to use and adapt the recipes and brewing techniques as they see fit. McKean decided to approach brewing at Modern Times in a similar fashion, something he calls “open source brewing.” “At first, it made me nervous, but the more I thought about it, the more of an asset I could see it becoming. All of our recipes will be posted on the Modern Times blog, and we’ll invite and incentivize constructive critique and feedback from home and professional brewers alike. I think it’ll be one of the defining components of Modern Times’ culture,” McKean says. “It’s also worth noting that Modern Times, the 19th century utopian community the brewery is named after, rejected private property and sought to build a society based on voluntary mutual aid, so it’s fitting.” As part of this process, Modern Times will regularly organize tasting panels in order to gauge interest and get consumer feedback, even when the brewery is open. Two such panels were recently hosted at

local bars, with McKean prefacing one with this disclaimer: “The beers I’m pouring are not even close to final. They are works in progress that represent only the broad brushstrokes of the recipes we plan to use.”

Myself, plus two local brewers, a homebrewer and four craft beer fans (not fullblown geeks) attended the event. The first five beers we tasted were ones that Modern Times might consider packaging in fourpacks of sixteen ounce cans: two variations of a saison, a pale ale, a red ale and a 5.5% ABV oatmeal coffee stout. Some of these beers had some fermentation issues – “I think it’s stressed yeast” was what one of the local brewers said. The last two beers we tried split the table’s opinion. The first was a 100% Brett IPA, with one attendee heard saying, “It’s amazingly tropical,” while someone else quipped, “It’s good. The smell is just stupid!” I took that as a positive reaction, as I too really enjoyed this beer. Others were not as fond of it: “It’s not terrible, I’ve tasted much worse,” was one response from a taster who preferred more mainstream

varieties. The last beer we sampled was a cherry buckwheat sour brown ale that was nothing short of amazing. It provided a perfect example of what Tonsmeire is capable of, and perhaps shed some light on the possibilities of the brewery’s barrel program. Despite the excitement, Modern Times is still months away from opening. In mid-November they signed a lease for a 12,540 square foot building in Point Loma right off the Rosecrans exit of the 8 freeway. You can read more about the location hunt on the Modern Times blog, but here’s a synopsis: “The location criteria I gave my real estate agent was that the building had to be within the bounds of the 8 and 15 freeways, i.e. the core of San Diego,” McKean said. “That’s partly because I’ve always envisioned Modern Times as having a distinctly urban identity, and partly because I didn’t want to work in a soul crushing suburban industrial park.” Now that they’ve secured a location the work on the physical brewery can begin, they’ve ordered a 30 barrel brewing system from local manufacturers Premier Stainless and a search for a head brewer is underway. A lot of construction and licensing variables need to be sorted out before they can start brewing beer and open their doors to the public, but McKean is shooting for the summer of 2013. Check out the Modern Times website to follow along with the process of opening a production brewery and find out about future tasting panels.


2012 Holiday Gift & Savings Guide SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

WestCoasterSD.com | 13


BEST DamN HOmE BREW SHOP & BEST DamN BEER SHOP (Located inside Krisp Beverages + Natural Foods)

N

ow is a great time to visit downtown San Diego’s only home brew supplier, Best Damn Home Brew Shop. Located inside Krisps Beverages + Natural Foods, this store has everything you need to make excellent beer. Shop a variety of specialty grains, hops, brewing books and more. Once you have your ingredients, be sure to browse Best Damn Beer Shop’s insane bottle selection located inside the same store. Between the bottle selection and brew supplies, this is the Best Damn one-stop beer shop in downtown San Diego. Mention West Coaster and receive 10% off all starter kits for the month of December (expires 12/31/12). 1036 7th Ave San Diego, CA 92101 http://krispsd.com

BOTTLECRaFT BEER CLUB

T

he inspiration behind Bottlecraft began with the simple idea of exploring the flavors of well-made beer and sharing that experience with a like-minded community. Out of this same founding spirit, the Bottlecraft Beer Club was born. The goal of the monthly beer club is to not only put together a package of great beer, but also tell the stories behind those beers. To accomplish this, we’ve invited some distinguished members of the San Diego beer community—Beer Curators—to select a few of their favorite beers, and tell us why they love them. A Beer Club membership includes 6 bottles of hand-picked beer each month with the curator’s tasting notes and reflections on the beer. Other perks include members-only events, discounts, first dibs on rare beer and more. Join the Bottlecraft Beer Club today and join us in the continual appreciation of craft beer! The First Six Curators Include: Dr. Bill, Mel Gordon, Scot Blair, Colby Chandler, Chuck Silva, Juan and Kevin from MIHO. 2161 India St, San Diego, CA 92101 http://bottlecraftbeer.com - (619) 487-9493

14 | December 2012 / January 2013

aLE TRaIL amERICa CaLENDaR

2013 San Diego Craft Beer Calendar by Ale Trails America™

L

ooking for the perfect Holiday gift for your craft beer lover? One that keeps on giving for the whole year? No, it’s not a Brewery! The 2013 San Diego Craft Beer Calendar takes you on a monthly pictorial journey to 12 of San Diego County’s best breweries — and at under $15, it’s way more affordable. Including an Ale Trail Map and Craft Beer Timeline of important milestones on San Diego’s way to becoming the “Napa Valley of Craft Beer,” the monthly Ale Trail starts at San Diego’s original Beer Pioneers, Karl Strauss, and then treks over the Bay Bridge to idyllic Coronado where CBC reigns supreme. Turning North along the historic El Camino Real brings us to La Jolla’s Rock Bottom, Sorrento Valley’s New English, Carlsbad’s Pizza Port and the “pride of the ‘side”, Oceanside Ale Works. Heading East through the hotbed North County area leads

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

us to the newest spots on the trail, Iron Fist and Stumblefoot. From here it’s a short hop over to Stone to rest and replenish before the final leg south to Ballast Point, AleSmith and the big finish at Green Flash! So leave your car in the garage and take a brew tour the easy way — with the 2013 San Diego Craft Beer Calendar! This unique gift idea is sure to please any Hop Head on your list! Published by Ale Trails America — a North County San Diego-based company devoted to promoting better craft beer experiences — it’s available at the featured breweries, craft beer bottle shops and other beer-centric outlets around San Diego’s brewing community, or by contacting Steve Mayer at stevem@aletrailsamerica.com or (760) 803-0691. http://aletrailsamerica.com


BREWERy TOURS OF SaN DIEGO

W

ith so many breweries in San Diego county, it’s tough keeping track - let alone physically visiting each one. After just one tasting flight at one brewery, you are probably legally intoxicated. Driving to multiple breweries is a definite risk. While working at the tasting room of Ballast Point in 2006, Brewery Tours of San Diego Co-Founder Mindy Eastman noticed many customers were attempting to taste at multiple breweries - often while noticeably intoxicated. Inspiration struck, and shortly after, San Diego’s original brewery tour company was born. With a fleet consisting of buses, shuttles and vans, Brewery Tours of San Diego puts an emphasis on beer education (rather than just inebriation!). A typical session runs 5 hours, stops at 3 breweries, and includes tastings at each. Also included is a guided tour behindthe-scenes at one brewery with an introduction to commercial beer production. Both private and public tours are offered, seven days a week. Private tours allow you to choose which breweries to see and reserve the vehicle exclusively for your use. Public Tours follow fixed routes and are open-seating - a great way to save a few dollars and make some new friends. Brewery Tours of San Diego also provides transportation to and from beer festivals, concerts, and more! To book your next tour, go to BreweryToursofSanDiego.com! http://brewerytoursofsandiego.com - (619) 961-7999

PUBCaKES

O

nly available in December: Winter Seasonal PubCakes! This year marks the return of the AleSmith yuleSmith Gingerbread PubCake. New for 2012, the special Irish Carbomb PubCake aka “Christmas Carbomb” (pictured) is made with Peppermint Schnapps and candy canes. Simply put, if you’re hunting for gifts for the craft beer drinker with a sweet tooth — there’s nothing better. Perfect for entertaining: purchase PubCakes with their corresponding beers and create an easy and decadent pairing for the holidays. Or, come by and pick up a gift certificate for a great stocking stuffer. In addition to the previously mentioned Winter Seasonal PubCakes, don’t forget the year-round ‘Cakes such as the Irish Carbomb, Stoned Portzilla, Beer Breakfast and Punkin’ Vegan. If you mention West Coaster, you get 10% off your next PubCake purchase! Visit pubcakes.com or the PubCakes storefront at 7229 El Cajon Blvd., San Diego, 92115. Hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 10am6:30pm and on Sunday from 10am-4:30pm. 7229 El Cajon Blvd, San Diego, CA 92115 - http://pubcakes.com - (619) 741-0530

THE HOmEBREWER

8

0+ Grains, 60+ Hops, All White Labs yeast, and a selection of wine & distilling yeast. Starter kits & mucho, mucho mas! Holiday Special: one gallon “Brew In A Box” kit - a perfect gift. Ideal for trying out the hobby for the first time, or experimenting on new recipes. Very little space required! Includes everything you need to brew a one gallon batch of beer: recipe, ingredients (grains, hops, yeast), onegallon Jug, thermometer, air lock, sanitizer, nifty instructions, & tubing. The Homebrewer also offers brew classes for both beginning and experienced brewers. Go online, call to check the schedule, and read our reviews on yelp! 2911 El Cajon Blvd, San Diego, CA 92104 http://thehomebrewersd.com - (619) 450-6165

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


IRON FIST

C

elebrate the season with an Iron Fist! For the month of December, Vista’s Iron Fist Brewing Co. is offering a 15% discount on cases of beer purchased at the brewery. Mix and match bottles of Spice of Life, Hired Hand, or Uprising for your next holiday party. Be sure to check out the brewery’s new apparel, which now includes hoodies and long-sleeve t-shirts. Don’t forget growlers! Now in stock, Iron Fist’s glass growlers are German designed with a sturdy pewter handle and are filled with 2 liters of fresh beer (pictured). Reusable and stylish, a full growler is a great way to not arrive emptyhanded. After the initial cost of the glass, growlers provide an economical way to enjoy a large helping of beer. New expansion in 2012! If you haven’t been by recently, Iron Fist has grown its tasting room into the adjacent industrial suite. The extra space affords more room for beer tasting as well as increased beer production. Expect more draft, bottled, and barreled beer in 2013! 1305 Hot Springs Way, Vista, CA 92081 http://ironfistbrewing.com - (760) 216-6500

BREW HOP

W

ith a fleet of luxury vehicles that includes SUVs, stretch limousines and party buses — let Brew Hop treat you to the ultimate brewery tour offered in town. With guided tours to San Diego’s best breweries, the size of your party determines your ride; vehicles range from Lincolns to Limo Buses. Additionally, every Brew Hop vehicle is permitted so that you can enjoy adult beverages on the road from one brewery to the next. Brew Hop is ready to deliver you and your friends to the world’s best breweries in style. Much more than a pretty face, Brew Hop offers two tour packages: The Beer Connoisseur tour is a 5-hour party experience that stops at 3-4 breweries with tasters at each. The Beer Tasters tour is a 2.5 hour session to 1-2 breweries, including tasters. Each tour group is led by a Brew

Hop tour host, and at each brewery there’s a VIP private tour of the facility, a chance to meet the brewery staff to ask questions about your favorite brews, and, of course, taster flights of beer. Brew Hop was founded in San Diego and also operates in Seattle, with future sights set on Portland, Oregon. Since November 2011, the company has maintained a 5-star average on yelp.com and TripAdvisor.com. Brew Hop was recently featured in Time Magazine UK. Mention West Coaster and receive 10% off your next booking (tour must be booked by 12/31/12, some restrictions apply). Contact Summer for a customized party proposal and browse BrewHop.com for more information. http://brewhop.com - (858) 361-8457

LIGHTNING BREWERy

T

he Lightning Brewery was the ninth brewery in San Diego when it opened in early 2006. With about 60 breweries now around the county today, the brewery continues to maintain a roster of enjoyable beers that are often unfairly overlooked by the overall beer community - despite their uniqueness and quality. Two founding, core beers, Thunderweizen Ale and Elemental Pilsner, are both remarkably popular at bottleshops in San Diego. To meet demand, Lightning has purchased a capable bottling line and will start offering 6-packs of both Thunderweizen & Elemental beginning in early 2013! If you are looking for special holiday brews, you may want to consider the warming Electrostatic Ale or robust Black Lightning Porter. Electrostatic Ale is a high gravity farmhouse ale that pairs very well with all holiday meals. Black Lightning Porter is a great top-off to any evening, particularly ones with chocolate or coffee desserts. Lightning Brewery is open for tasting and growler fills Friday 1:30-5:30PM and Saturday 1:00-5:00PM. 13200 Kirkham Way, Poway, CA 92064 - http://lightningbrewery.com - (858) 513-8070

16 | December 2012 / January 2013

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


CRaFT BEER GEaR

L

SCaVENGERS

L

ooking to try a different kind of brewery experience? Scavengers offers unique tours starting at $89 per person. Ideal for groups of 2-24 people, Scavengers provides guided tours to world class breweries in San Diego by way of the Pinzgauer (pronouced pinz-gow-er). A Swiss Military 6x6 safari vehicle with seating for 12 and an open-air design, this 6 wheel drive BEAST is the perfect mode of transportation when you’re on the road to drink great beer from the source. A company comprised of avid homebrewers, Scavengers has developed a passion for handcrafted beer. This passion has inspired the creation of a quality brewery tour service that highlights San Diego’s scenic beauty, awesome food, and most of all — radical micro-breweries. With free pickup in North County, the tour heads off to three breweries and includes a meal. Tours can be public or private, great for meeting like-minded folks or focusing entirely on your private party. Breweries on the tour map include Stone Brewing Company, Iron Fist Brewing Company, The Lost Abbey, Port Brewing, Ballast Point Brewing Company, and Green Flash Brewing Company, among others. Scavengers also offers mixed beer and wine tours — great for couples split on what beverage reigns supreme. Exclusively for West Coaster readers, mention you heard about Scavengers in this issue and get 10% off your next tour. Some restrictions apply; valid until 12/31/11, limit one per customer.To book your tour, please call (760) 717-2551 or visit brewerytoursandiego.com

ooking to get a gift for the beer geek in your life? Craft Beer Gear offers a variety of fun, creative and affordable options online. For the ladies: earrings made right here in San Diego from the bottle caps of her favorite brewery starting at just $5. And for the gentlemen: a Wild-West style beer bottle holster (handmade in Austin, TX) for his next beer fest — only $25. Visitors to “America’s Finest City” know it is almost impossible to not make at least one brewery stop – a rare few have the opportunity to see all of them. Launched in 2012, Craft Beer Gear carries an increasing number of logo merchandise branded with craft brewery names - making for a perfect keepsake that you can order online anywhere and anytime. To view the growing inventory or to purchase something in time for the holidays, visit craftbeergear.net. See Craft Beer Gear’s Facebook page or website for upcoming events where you can purchase in-person. For West Coaster readers, CBG is offering free shipping through December 31, 2012. Use coupon code FREESHIP at checkout. http://craftbeergear.net

http://brewerytoursandiego.com - (760) 717-2551

SUDS COUNTy USa

C

ourious as to how San Diego became such a booming beer county? It didn’t happen overnight! Director Sheldon Kaplan delves into the rich history of the century-old brewing industry of San Diego in his feature length documentary film Suds County USA. Through exhaustive research and interviews, Suds follows beer in San Diego from the pre-prohibition breweries to the established brands we drink today. Suds features interviews from AleSmith, Alpine, Ballast Point, Coronado, Green Flash, Karl Strauss, Port / The Lost Abbey, Pizza Port, Stone. Suds also documents how the local homebrewing community is responsible for much of the great beer on tap today. Respected homebrew club QUAFF (Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity) is featured; many of the professional brewers in San Diego can trace their roots to this club. Suds doesn’t focus on how beer-crazed our county has become, but rather how it came to be - serving as a reference piece that gives context to the present-day beer boom. More importantly, it shows the faces and names of people who have worked very hard to create San Diego’s brewing industry. This film is a must-view for any serious beer geek in town! Click to sudscountyusa.com to watch a preview, purchase the movie download or buy the DVD. http://sudscountyusa.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

WestCoasterSD.com | 17


LOCaL HaBIT

W

ith a chef uprooted from Louisiana, it’s no surprise that Local Habit’s cuisine is a tad bit more flavorful than other organically-themed restaurants. Traditional California dishes are improved upon with additions pulled from the famously flavorful cooking of the South, and the result is what Local Habit likes to call “Cali-Creole” cuisine. Executive Chef Nick Brune was raised among the spicy culture of Baton Rouge. His first experiences with food involved fishing and hunting for the evening meals of fried whole bream, speckled trout, and duck and turnip gumbo - all prepared by his self-taught Southern family. Chef Brune is constantly whipping up an array of whatever is currently in season and able to be locally sourced. He continues to develop his Cali-Creole cuisine and makes this zesty style the basis of the restaurant’s fare. Once you have your first taste of Local Habit, you will realize that it is much more than your ordinary organic and sustainable eatery. From the strictest of vegans to comfort food lovers alike, Local Habit stands out as a dining option that serves all tastes and preferences. Everyone will appreciate Local Habit’s efforts to prepare and present home-made and local offerings with creative dishes such as House Smoked Pork Loin & Piperade pizza, Roasted Garlic and Tahini Chicken Sausage with Smoked Paprika Oil, and Chef Brune’s authentic Louisiana Gumbos. Beer enthusiasts will delight in Local Habit’s rotating selection of California craft beers. Each tap pours forth a fine craft beer, and as the well runs dry, Local Habit quickly gets to work replacing the dry tap with a new variety to entice an entirely new range of tastebuds. Local Habit is located at 3827 5th Avenue in Uptown Hillcrest and offers two hours of free parking in the lots at 6th and Robinson. Please see a manager for a parking validation ticket. 3827 5th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - http://mylocalhabit.com (619) 795-4770

CHEFS PRESS

T

he craft beer scene continues to explode in San Diego and throughout America. By the end of next year, San Diego county is expected to be home to more than 90 breweries. In recent years, tens of thousands of people all over the county and state have acquired an appreciation and taste for great craft beer. Now that all those people have learned to DRINK craft beer, it’s time for them to learn how to COOK WITH craft beer. Brew Food celebrates the incredible range and versatility of beer and its adaptability to the home kitchen. The recipes in this book have been developed by an impressive collection of professionals, each deeply entrenched in the beer-and-food industry. The book highlights the culinary creativity of San Diego’s best chefs, dessertiers, pro brewers, brewery staffers, restaurateurs, and craft-beer-bar owners. It provides recipes that will inspire home cooks of all skill levels and interests–everything from Hefeweizen-Coriander Baked Sea Bass to Quad-Braised Osso Buco to Spicy IPA Burgers and IPA Mac-n-Cheese. No matter what your tastes are, if you love beer, you’ll love Brew Food! San Diego first gained international notoriety as the new capital of craft beer, and now that the culture of beer has taken firm hold, the city is quickly becoming known for its cutting-edge beer-and-food scene. Special events showcasing local chefs and brewers are held every week all over town, and many kitchens regularly offer diners new and interesting menu items that incorporate and highlight the many beautiful flavors of beer. Brew Food boasts more than 90 recipes collected from pro brewers, craft beer bars, and top San Diego chefs, including Katherine Humphus, Ryan Studebaker, Jeff Rossman, Karl Prohaska, Bernard Guillas, Ron Oliver, Nick Brune, Kyle Bergman, Shane McIntyre, Brandon Brooks, and Matt Gordon. http://chefspress.com

18 | December 2012 / January 2013

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


#WavesBro City’s beaches go from craft beer afterthought to destination By ANDy KILLION

T

here are many possible reasons why San Diegans aren’t cool to the idea of going out for a beer in Mission or Pacific Beach. It could be the gratuitous display of abdominal muscles; the cognitive dissonance of mingling imperial stoutsipping with sunny, outdoor activities; the painful memory of the erstwhile Liars’ Club; the areas’ propensity for attracting snowbirds. However, all these perceptions don’t conform to the current, growing reality of the beaches’ craft beer scene, which is booming and demands notice. “People don’t associate [Mission Beach] with good craft beer, but with domestic macro beers,” Darren Renna says. Renna is manager of the half-century-old Coaster Saloon that underwent an artisanal beer makeover after a kitchen fire in 2007. Recently, Renna increased the taps for a second time — it’s up to 52 — and added a monthly cask night focusing on local brews. Macro brews aren’t out entirely, though, and will still have a presence on the tap list. Renna mentioned that he sees an uptick in the number of craft beer consumers in his establishment, but there’s still a long way to go in changing the neighborhood’s perception. After all, Bud Light keg-stands on the beach are a thing of the recent past. “PB has long been characterized by over-consumption and DUIs, but a lot of that comes from the influx of day visitors on the weekends,” J.C. Hill adds, a long-time Crown Point resident. Hill also owns Cali Kebab, and is co-brewer at the attached Amplified Ale Works in Pacific Beach. “It has a club scene reputation.”

Former Mayor Jerry Sanders taps a cask of Electrocution IPA to kick off Amplified Ale Works during SDBW

“I was the same as any other craft beer drinker; I went to North Park when I wanted a good beer,” Renna says. “But I think the crowd will flip.” “Alex [co-owner] and I would often venture to Ocean Beach or North Park to try beers we couldn’t get in PB,” Hill says.


“Now, there’s more variety in the beach area, and more bar owners are realizing the importance of having craft beer.” Taking inspiration from Blind Lady Ale House, Cali Kebab is using a stainless steel, direct draw system and pouring honest pints — half-liter glasses that allow a two-finger head to on a full 16 oz. pour. Amplified Ale Works opened during San Diego Beer Week 2012 within Cali Kebab, and is now the second brewpub directly along Mission Blvd., with PB AleHouse to the north. This is no small feat for the area, considering real estate prices along the coast and the cost of brewing equipment. “Vince at [PB] AleHouse is a great brewer, and he was really supportive by helping us dial in some of our equipment,” Hill adds. “I wouldn’t mind seeing some bars convert to breweries though; more breweries in the area would definitely draw more craft beer drinkers from around San Diego.” With several beach-side restaurants adding craft tap handles and brewing facilities, the hope is for beer-savvy clientele to begin their walk out of the cornfields of North Park. But Peter Perrecone, beer buyer at San Diego TapRoom in Pacific Beach, says that targeting craft beer devotees isn’t necessarily the best approach. “They have their loyalties already to their bars, to their area,” Perrecone says. “But college kids can come into a craft beerfocused establishment and learn.” “It’s more about educating new drinkers toward better beers than converting devotees away from bars where they have an emotional connection. It’s really hard to get people to step that far outside their comfort zone; it’s easier to create a comfort zone from scratch with new drinkers.” Renna agrees. The college demographic — that cyclically resides and carouses at the beach — is more likely to warm to craft beer, and those in areas with more established venues are less likely to give up their favorite bar stools and head to the beach. But that doesn’t mean it’s not worth trying to sway the growing population of veteran, educated, San Diego beer drinkers and their tastes. In November, Brewery Tours of San Diego collaborated with beachside bars — spearheaded by Bare Back Grill, with TapRoom, Ciro’s Pizzeria, Cali Kebab and The High Dive in Bay Park participating —for a pub crawl aboard Brewery Tours busses, mitigating the ever-present threat of alcohol-related accidents and DUIs. Brewery Tours co-founder Jon McDermott says the number of people on the tour can vary from two people up to 25, but that there’s a burgeoning young demographic growing more aware of the expanse of beer options at the beach. McDermott’s company also tours North Park and Point Loma area pubs for similar crawls. McDermott also noted that while PB is a hotbed for alcoholrelated incidents, the craft beer community is perceived as responsible and not a contributor to those problems. Even longtime locals and beach natives are among the people pushing the beach beer scene forward. “(Business Improvement District) Discover PB is a huge supporter of ours,” Hill says proudly. “The Rotary Club meets here and our locals are very receptive to the format. There’s a market here for laid back places at the beach — no macros, no booze, no blaring Top 40 hits — to drink good beer.”


Jerry’s Farewell Imperial Chocolate Coffee Porter On November 20, Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery released a special ale devoted to former Mayor Jerry Sanders and all the hard work he has done for the San Diego brewing community. 10 barrels of “Jerry’s Farewell” were brewed with assistance from the mayor himself on October 31 using local chocolate, coffee and yeast. At the release party, Sanders was presented with a brewing kit from Home Brew Mart, an honorary membership in the QUAFF homebrew club and a copy of the new documentary film Suds County USA. At time of press, the beer was still flowing from Monkey Paw’s East Village taps. Jerry’s Farewell clone recipe and instructions provided by Colby Chandler, specialty brewer at Ballast Point Home Brew Mart

Jerry’s Farewell Clone OG: 1.070 to 1.075 FG: 1.016 ABV: ~7.4% IBU: 23

Partial mash:

1.5# British Marris Otter malted barley 1.5# Flaked oats 12 oz British chocolate 8 oz 60 L Crystal malt 4 oz German de-husked black malt (Carafa II)

Added to the boil:

.3 oz CTZ hops (17% AA) – 60 min. addition 6# Coopers, plain light, dried malt extract (DME)

After boiled wort is chilled down:

2 vials of White Labs California Ale Yeast 001 (originally Home Brew Mart Ale Yeast)

Added into secondary fermenter (bucket) after fermentation:

5 oz Cacao nibs (ground) 2 oz Caffé Calabria “Love Potion Blend” whole coffee beans (broken into pieces) 3 vanilla beans (one if vanilla bean is fresh)

Partial Mashing and Basic Brewing Instructions:

Mashing is the process of breaking down starch into fermentable and non-fermentable sugars through temperature controlled steeping in water. Rather than just dissolving the existing sugar from the barley kernel as in steeping, you must actually develop the proper conditions for enzymes to break down starch into sugar. To do this, temperature is critical as is the proper time allowed for the conversion to take place. The following is a general outline for the use of grain as a partial total of a recipe and not intended to be used as instructions for all-grain brewing.

General Principles for Partial Mashing:

1. Use about 1 quart of water per pound of grain that you intend to mash.
 2. Remember that temperature is critical, so you must use a thermometer.
 3. These guidelines are for the single temperature infusion method so you will not have to raise temp during the mashing process. You will only heat the water to one level and add grain, and hold it there for 30 minutes.


22 | December 2012 / January 2013

4. Use about 1/2 gallon of water at 170 degrees to sparge each pound of grain. 5. Follow this method for any grain with a starchy white center and for all recipes requiring the use of flaked barley, oats, or wheat etc. 

 6. With any grain combination it is a good idea to use at least 50% 2-row pale malt to ensure enzyme activity and proper conversion during mash.

Procedure:

1. Put 4.5 quarts of water into a pot that is at least 4 gallons and heat until you reach 170 degrees. Use water amount indicated by principle #1 (4.5 quarts) 2. Turn off heat and add grain in mesh bag. 3. Stabilize temperature of water between 150-157 degrees either by adding cold water or adding heat. Your temp should be approximately 150-155 without doing too much, just adding the grain to the heated water usually drops the temp about 15 degrees. 4. You should now try to maintain this temp for a full 30 minutes. If the temp drops you can add heat carefully so as to not over heat the mix (DO NOT BURN THE NYLON BAG TO THE BOTTOM OF THE POT). By raising the temp one degree then turning off heat will usually cause the mix to raise several degrees as the temp reads slow on most thermometers. Just be careful not to heat the grain mix much higher than 158. 5. During the 30 minute mash period you should be heating your rinse water (sparge water) which you will pour over the grain to wash out the sugars and flavor . This water should be heated to 170 degrees. Use water amount indicated by principle #4 (6 quarts). 6. After 30 minutes of mashing and you have your sparge water up to temp, lift the grain bag up so it is dripping into the pot and begin raining the sparge water slowly over the grain allowing the drippings to fall into the pot. Do this until most of the water is run through and then discard grain. Do not wring out grain as this will cause harsh tannins to be extracted. Because you sparged, or rinsed the grain, there will be little flavor or sugar left anyway, so there is no point in worrying about the water absorbed in the grain. The first few minutes back on heat, avoid a “boil over” by continual surveillance. Stirring or skimming the foam on top will help reduce the chances of a “boil over” happening. Continue with a vigorous boil until hops are added. Yeast is required and often provided with beer kits, but always make sure! There’s nothing worse than not having yeast when you need it. Be sure


to check that it is the appropriate yeast for the beer you are trying to create. Remember ale yeast ferments on the surface and does so in warm temperatures (ideally between 65 and 75 degrees F) but it works at higher temps too so don’t worry. The water you will use will vary on what you prefer to drink. If you don’t like tap water don’t use it, and use bottled water. Do not use distilled water, as it lacks necessary minerals for healthy fermentation. The last and best advice is that everything that touches the beer after the boiling stage must be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. The only bacteria you want in your beer is the brewing yeast that you add. 7. Take your yeast vials out of the refrigerator and let rise to room temperature. 8. Once the wort is boiling, remove it from heat to avoid boiling over onto the stove when you add the hops. Add the pellet hops directly to the wort. 9. The first few minutes back on heat, avoid a “boil over” by continual surveillance. Continue with a vigorous boil for 50 minutes. 10. After 50 minutes of a vigorous boil, remove it from heat to avoid boiling over onto the stove when you add the dried malt extract (bag of corn sugar for bottling at a later time). Add 6 pounds of Coopers, Plain Light, Dried Malt Extract (DME) to wort. Be sure to mix and dissolve ingredients completely before returning to heat! Return to heat and bring to boil for 10 minutes. 11. After boiling, some of the heat can be removed from the wort while still in the pot. Put your pot, with the lid on, in a sink or bucket and run tap water around the outside for 5 – 10 minutes. Do not get any tap water in your boiled wort. Continue to cool your wort with cold water in the fermenter. It is a good idea to chill 3-4 gallons of water overnight. If you don’t mind the tap water, it will work fine. If you don’t like the extra chlorine though, just get any type of bottled water at the store (a three gallon container works perfect). Do not use distilled. 12. Into a sanitized primary fermenter (6.5 gallon glass carboy) that you have already made a 5 gallon mark on, add 2 gallons cold water. This water will prevent cracking due to thermal shock when you pour your hot wort in. Now, funnel in your hot wort directly into the cold water taking care not to allow the hot wort to run down the sides as it may crack the carboy. Next, add more cold water up to your 5 gallon mark. Your beer is now highly susceptible to contamination so remember to sanitize all equipment coming into contact with it. If you want to record the gravity of your beer this is the time to use your hydrometer. This mixture should stabilize at room temperature and be ready for pitching your yeast. Place sanitized airlock into rubber stopper and insert into the mouth of the bottle. Remove the top of the airlock and fill half-way with water. This allows CO2 gas to escape without letting in the bad things. 13. To use the hydrometer first cover your fermenter with saran wrap or foil, then shake it to mix the ingredients thoroughly. Often the hotter, thicker wort will settle to the bottom. Make sure the fermenter is at an even temperature throughout to get an accurate reading. Remove saran wrap or foil and pour out a sample into a pint glass. Pour this sample into the hydrometer test jar (the tube the hydrometer came in). Fill test jar to very top. Replace airlock or blow-off tubing and then check the gravity by floating hydrometer in flask. For best results the hydrometer reading should be taken at 60 degrees F. Where the fluid meets the glass rod is where the reading should be taken on the specific gravity scale. 14. When wort has cooled to room temperature, between 85 and 70 degrees, add the yeast by sprinkling (do not rehydrate dried yeast) or pouring the contents of one package over the wort. Make sure the airlock or lid is covering your fermenter securely after pitching yeast. 15. Let it sit and make sure it starts bubbling out the airlock within 24

hours. If it doesn’t your yeast may be ineffective. It should ferment actively for about 2-6 days. After that, the beer will need time to settle and clear. 1012 days total is a good benchmark for the beer to be in the fermenter. Just make sure it has stopped bubbling when you decide to bottle or is bubbling no more than once every thirty seconds. If you are using a hydrometer the reading should be approximately 1.010 to 1.020 . If it is higher but inactive then just make sure it remains at a constant reading over three days. Your beer may ferment in as little as two days due to highly active yeast or warmer temperatures. Just be sure it is finished and wait 8 days even if it looks like it is done. To be sure take a hydrometer reading. 16. After beer is done fermenting the spice “tea” preparation needs to be done. Place 6 cups of water into a pot and bring to a boil. Take off heat and add spice bag containing cocoa nibs, vanilla beans and coffee beans. Let steep in the hot water for 40 minutes. Add the liquid “tea” and bag of ingredients into empty sanitized bucket (the one without a spigot on it). Siphon the beer off the sediment in glass carboy using tubing and racking cane with removable down flow tip (sanitize all equipment) into the sanitized bucket which contains the spice mixture. To start a siphon attach hose to racking cane and hold cane with orange or black tip upwards and tubing in a “U” shape, then hold end of tubing under faucet and fill entire length with water. Now crimp tubing at end to keep water inside and insert racking cane into fermenter with removable tip down. Place bucket with spigot on ground under you fermenter and let water run down through the tube and this should start the siphon. If for any reason you cannot make it work then just gargle with Listerine or Vodka and suck on the hose to start the siphon. This should be your last resort! 17. After six days of conditioning, on spices in plastic bucket, it’s time to bottle. 18. Bottling: Take one pint of water and boil in saucepan and add 3/4 to 1 1/4 cup corn sugar or use 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups dried malt extract. The more primer added the stronger the carbonation. You may wish to start with the lower amount and adjust up on your next batch if you like a heavier carbonation. This is the primer for carbonation, which takes place within the bottle. Pour this into the empty sanitized bucket which you have mounted the spigot on. 19. Siphon the beer off the spices and sediment in bucket using tubing and racking cane with removable down flow tip (sanitize all equipment) into the sanitized priming bucket which contains the primer mixture. 20. The siphon will naturally mix the primer with your flat, warm beer. Place bottling bucket lid on bucket. Your beer is now primed and should be bottled immediately! 21. Now you are ready to bottle using sanitized bottles and caps. Place tubing on installed spigot and attach bottle filler to other end. Turn on spigot and you are ready to bottle. Depress tip on bottle bottom to allow the beer to flow. Fill bottles right to the top and when you remove filler the volume will drop to give you a uniform fill level. Fill bottles and cap with capper. It’s not a bad idea to use your racking cane to stir the primed beer every 6–12 bottles. This will ensure even distribution of sugar resulting in even carbonation. 22. Record bottling date and set aside for at least 2 weeks at room temperature. Aged beer (up to 4 months) can taste better, so try it at different periods of time. If the carbonation level is good after 2 weeks you may want to keep it cool to stall the carbonation at that level. 23. DRINK IT! SHARE IT! GET ANOTHER BATCH GOING! If you have any questions, you can call Home Brew Mart for assistance over the phone (619) 295-2337


into the brew

The Saladin germination box at Weyermann in Bamberg, Germany. Photo by Sam Tierney

Matters

of Malt, Part 1

Hops get a lot of credit, but malt is the soul of beer by Sam Tierney

M

alt is where is all starts when it comes to making beer, providing the sugars that yeast then ferment into our favored beverage. Yes, hops get much of the spotlight these days, but you don’t need hops to make beer. Malt is the soul of beer; without it, we have something entirely different. In the past, most brewers malted their own barley, but today malting is done by a smaller amount of specialized malting companies. To make different styles of beer, a wide variety of malts are used. In any beer recipe, the majority of malt used is a base malt, which is pale in color, and has a sufficient amount of enzymes intact to facilitate full conversion of malt’s starches into fermentable sugars during the mashing process. Base malts come in several different types depending on the region of origin and what type of beers they are meant for. Specialty malts run the whole gamut from extra pale to black as night, with some bringing flavors of smoke,

24 | December 2012 / January 2013

chocolate, or caramel as well. These malts make up smaller amounts of a beer recipe and are added primarily for flavor and not for their starch content. In the US, the typical pale base malt is 1-2 degrees Lovibond, which means it is fairly light in color, and made from a number of cultivars of either 2 or 6-row barley. 2-row is overwhelmingly dominant in smaller breweries, while the big guys use more 6-row malt which has a higher protein content—a beneficial quality if you are mashing with adjuncts like corn or rice which are lower in protein content. The basic process for producing base malt starts with steeping malting-grade barley in a tank to raise the moisture content to 45%, which initiates the germination process. Germination then proceeds for about 4 days, during which the enzymes in the barley are activated and start breaking down the endosperm. The cell walls within are broken down, and the starches within are exposed for conversion

to fermentable sugars during the mashing process. Germination typically takes place in shallow open boxes that are mechanically mixed in order to let heat and carbon dioxide escape. In the past, malt was germinated whilst spread out over a floor in a thin layer and had to be mixed by hand with shovels. This inefficient and labor-intensive “floor malting” process is still used for some English and Czech malts, as it lends a distinctive character that some brewers still desire. After the barley has reached the desired degree of modification (too little modification will require more intensive mashing procedures in the brewhouse, and too much modification wastes starch), it is transferred to a kiln, where temperatures are raised in order to stop enzyme activity (preserving the enzymes for later use in the mash), dry the grain for storage, and develop the characteristic toasty and bready flavors that we associate with malt. Kilning occurs across 3 temperature


steps: free moisture removal, intermediate moisture removal, and bound moisture removal. Free moisture removal takes place at 130-150F with a high air flow through the kiln, in which moisture is reduced to about 20%. Then the temperature is raised to about 160F and air flow is reduced for the intermediate moisture removal step. In the final bound moisture removal step, the temperature is raised to 175-195F and the moisture is reduced to about 4% over 2-3 hours. This final step completes the browning melanoidin reactions which give malt it’s flavor and color. The malt is then cooled and cleaned before being packaged for transport.

[

[

“Yes, hops get much of the spotlight these days, but you don’t need hops to make beer. Malt is the soul of beer; without it, we have something entirely different.”

Pale malt made from North American barley tends to have less character than European malt, and is most often favored for American beer styles like American IPA or pale ale, where the relatively neutral malt flavor lets hop aroma take center stage. American brewers tend to rely heavily on specialty malts in most beer styles in order to add complexity to their beers. In the UK, pale malt is often kilned at higher temperatures to a slightly darker color of 3-4 degrees Lovibond. Malts of this color are often labeled “pale ale malt.” Maris otter is a popular heirloom cultivar that ends up with a rich malty flavor when

A process schematic for Weyermann Malting Company. Photo by Sam Tierney


floor-malted, and is prized in English styles such as bitter, porter and barley wine. For IPA, the classic malt was called “white malt” and was kilned at lower temperatures to be as pale as possible, so that IPAs could attain their prized pale color. Today, some UK maltsters make a “low colour” maris otter malt that is roughly equivalent. Moving up a level, mild ale malt is a couple of degrees darker than pale ale malt and is sometimes used for dark mild ales and any other dark ales. The Czechs, Germans and Belgians specialize in a pale malt of exceptionally light color that is usually labeled “pilsner” or “pilsen” malt. This malt is modeled on the original pale malt of Pilsen, Bohemia, which was instrumental in the creation of the pilsner-style lager, which was the first golden lager in the mid-1800s. Pilsner malt is made from low-protein, continental barley and is kilned at lower temperatures for a pale color of under 2 degrees Lovibond. This pale color corresponds to lighter malt flavors that come across as clean and lightly bready. Pilsner is the obvious beer style to showcase this malt, but it is also used in most other German beer styles, as well as many Belgian ale styles. The Austrians and Germans also developed two types of darker kilned malts that are suitable as base malts and preceded the invention of truly pale pilsner malt. Vienna malt was their first attempt at a paler malt and ranges from about 3-6 degrees Lovibond. When used

100 kg of pilsner malt at Firestone Walker in Paso Robles. Photo by Sam Tierney

26 | December 2012 / January 2013

exclusively, Vienna malt makes an amber beer, as in the signature beer style of its namesake city. Vienna malt is kilned to a higher temperature than pilsner malt and lends a moderately toasty, bread crust flavor. In other styles, it is often used as part of the base malt formulation to enhance malty flavor, such as in Oktoberfest beers and märzens. Munich malt is the original dark base malt, modeled on what Bavarian brewers were using before the invention of pale malt. It is usually about 6-10 degrees Lovibond in color. Higherprotein barley is used because the darker color and toasty flavors are due to increased melanoidin reactions between sugars in the malt and amino acids, which are part of the protein. Munich malt is instrumental in brewing the dark Munich lager style and makes for an amber-brown beer with intense toasty, bready flavors. Munich malt is also used in bock beers and just about any other dark lager style, and is also added in smaller amounts to many American beers to enhance the malty flavor of our more neutral base malts. Once you get darker than Munich malt, the high kilning temperatures destroy the enzymes in the malt. Any darker malt has to be mixed with a base malt in order for the mash to contain sufficient enzyme levels for conversion. In any case, these malts would likely provide too intense of a flavor to brew a balanced beer if they were used as the sole malt. Aromatic and melanoidin malts are essentially extra-dark munich malts and provide plenty of malty aroma and flavor when used in small amounts. These are the darkest malts that can be produced in a kiln due to temperature and heat-application limitations. Kiln-caramel malts are another class of dark malts produced by kilning and mimic some characteristics of roasted caramel malts, which I’ll go into detail on next time. Other specialty kilned malts include smoked malt, acidulated malt, wheat malt, rye malt, and honey malt. These malts all have unique flavors and applications in recipe formulation. Smoked malt is kilned by smoking over aromatic wood such as beech, oak, or cherry, and can even be made with peat smoke, which lends an especially powerful and earthy flavor. Smoked beer necessitates a smoked malt, but these malts vary widely in their smoke levels, so be cautious with recipe formulation. Bamberger rauchbier commonly utilizes beechwood-smoked malt for the entire portion of base malt, as these malts tend to be on the lighter side of smoke character. Overuse peated malt, and you’ll never repeat that mistake. Acidulated malt (sauermalz in German) is a German malt made by spraying lactic acid onto pilsner malt. It is used as one of the ways that German brewers lower their mash pH in accordance with the Reinheitsgebot. 1% acidulated malt in your grain bill will lower mash pH by 0.1. If you don’t have a pH meter, this can be a good way to get in the ballpark of optimal mash pH if you know your water chemistry. Honey malt is a fully-converted malt that is kilned to have an aroma and sweetness similar to honey and can be a nice substitution for caramel malts in paler beers. Wheat and rye malts are made from those respective grains and bring higher protein and beta glucan levels to the table, both of which lead to more difficult brewing, but their flavors are necessary for some beer styles like hefeweizen and roggenbier. In smaller amounts, they can aid in body and head retention, and rye lends an especially distinctive earthy spice as well. Well, thats about it for kilned malts. Next time I’ll explore the two other main families of malt: caramel malts, and dry-roasted malts. Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


Saisons @

Sea Rocket By Eric O’Connor, Brewmaster at Thorn St. Brewery

A

h, San Diego Beer Week. I’d been looking forward to it for months. The anticipation of casked beer, barrel aged special vintages, and pairings dinners from my favorite locals. But then it came, and I was busy, so very busy getting ready to open our new brewery. I guess it was kind of cool, brewing our first ever commercial batches during Beer Week. But we were off the radar, clandestine brewers receiving no accolades for all our hard work. The second weekend rolled around and I spent all Saturday morning and early afternoon conditioning and moving steel tanks into the walk in. I had my eye on a 2 p.m. Saison flight tasting hosted by White Labs at Sea Rocket Bistro and it was 1:55 when I finished my chores. Luckily I live about a 7 minute walk from the brewery and 4 minutes from Sea Rocket. I briefly thought of cruising in wearing my damp cargo pants and scrubby shirt but I thought better since the water seemed to be concentrated around my mid section. After an uber quick shower and change of clothes I got to Sea Rocket around 2:15, and of course the place was packed. There were no free stools or tables and barely any room to stand. I noticed with some consternation that the servers were already dishing out the first pour of the flight and they seemed to only bestow a glass to those that were seated. I gave a quick glance towards the back of the joint and saw my chance. West Coaster editor Ryan Lamb was seated there and I noticed an open seat at the table of four. I walked up and he let me know that the seat was open, and that he had in fact just met Bob, who was the ‘owner’ of said table. It was Bob’s birthday, and his girl-

friend was doing the right thing by driving him down the 30th Street corridor to hit all his favorite spots. Sea Rocket Bistro was just one of their stops, but it’s a good one; the restaurant near the corner of 30th and Upas has a great tap and bottle list, as well as excellent seafood. I had barely made my introductions when Neva Parker, head of laboratory operations for White Labs (and also a judge at this year’s GABF in Colorado) began to discuss the nuances of yeast fermentation and how it relates to flavor profiles in beer. I knew most of what was being discussed, but find that you can always learn something or at least remember something you forgot. We tried four different Saisons that White Labs had made for Beer Week using four different yeasts. I have to say, I love Saisons. The ‘farmhouse’ ales of the Quenast and Hainaut regions are famous summer quenchers, although the ABV must certainly have gone up in recent times to compete with the bigger Trappist ales and Golden Strongs that dominate modern Belgian society. In the olden days though, the Saison was perfect for a day working outside, a modest amount of wheat blended with pilsner malt, a small amount of hops, and of course the Saison yeast flavors, full of spice and wonderful fruit esters. Saison 1 (WLP565) was not dry enough for me, the yeast making this beer in my opinion had stopped a little short of finishing its job and is probably better for lower alcohol Saisons. The lack of dryness made me perceive a sweetness that in reality probably wasn’t there. Saison 2 (WLP566) was very dry and a result had very little perceived sweetness. It also exhibited a won-

derful intense spice that balanced with subtle wheat flavors and something I couldn’t quite put my finger on. Saison 3 (WLP568) was also very good, similar to 2 but for me it didn’t have that mystical flavor that 2 did. Saison 4 (WLP585) for me was very malty, not as spicy, overall a good beer, but not what I think of when I want a Saison. After Neva led us through a discussion of the different flavors of each beer in the flight and asked for comments, it was time to vote. One person voted for Saison 1, and to my surprise only myself and Ryan voted for number 2. One person voted for number 3 and about 30 people voted for number 4. I was sure that number 2 was going to take the day but it goes to show that your tastes are unique, and that’s what I love about beer. After wrapping up the event, Neva along with her husband Glen, and fellow White Labs employee Troels and his wife Laura joined Ryan and I at the soon-to-open Thorn St. Brewery. I was curious to see what the head of lab operations and GABF judge thought of our recipes. They were small batch beers, and we ran through our Amber Ale, American Strong, Imperial IPA, and Oatmeal Stout. Although she didn’t fill out any score sheets, she did comment that she felt our beers were going to stand out, and that our dedication to the quality of the beers showed. I have to admit being a little relieved that the whole crew seemed to enjoy the beers and were happy to have a couple more. I walked lazily home up Thorn Street in a much better mood than I had been when in a rush and dampened by brewery chores a few hours earlier.

WestCoasterSD.com | 27


pLATEs & piNTs

reD

& GreeN

Wordsmith and vegetarian randy Clemens writes himself a new chapter By BRANDON HERNáNDEZ á

I

met Randy Clemens in much the same way and for much the same reason as other food and beer writers. I was the journalist with an interest in craft beer and he was the media and communications linchpin for Escondido’s Stone Brewing Company. Although our interactions were fairly standard early on, from the very beginning, I could tell there was something special about him. When speaking about beer — everybody’s, not just Stone’s — he went into greater depth than most industry marketers. It was clear he had an appreciation for craft ales and lagers that went far beyond vocational mandate. And get the guy talking about food? Forget about it. Those conversations had the potential to get really long…but never dull. Throw in the fact he, like me, loves to write and the guy reached a near-most-interesting-man-inthe-world status for me. Clemens knows how to populate a page with smart prose, examples of which can be spied in the combination historical text and

28 | December 2012 / January 2013

cookbook The Craft of Stone Brewing Co.: Liquid Lore, Epic Recipes, and Unabashed Arrogance as well as my favorite text of his, The Sriracha Cookbook. I’ve pored through the latter and tried my hand at some of the recipes, but it wasn’t until recently, when interviewing him about his stepping down from his position at Stone to focus on his writing and take on a new position as an associate digest editor for LA Magazine’s food blog, that we really delved into his culinary background and the inspiration for dedicating his time and energies to a condiment. When asked, why sriracha?, the graduate of Pasadena’s California School of Culinary Arts (now Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts) answers with a grin, “Because it’s pretty close to perfect. I like the level of spice it has and the fact it adds a nice dimension to dishes whether as a condiment or as an ingredient in cooking. It plays with other flavors; interacts instead of overpowers.” Clemens’ introduction to what is often

referred to as “rooster sauce” came in 1999 when he frequently spent time at the home of a high school friend of Vietnamese descent who was blessed with a mom who was an excellent cook. “I’m as white as Snow White and had never had Southeast Asian food, but I was really blown away by the stuff she was making. I found myself going to their house more and more often to hang out and have more of her cooking,” he said. “One night, I stayed over and the next morning she made Vietnamese fried rice for breakfast. It was one of the most simple yet best things I’ve ever had.” That’s when he saw it—the red bottle with the green cap and stylish rooster logo. Feeling it must have been put on the table for a reason, he squeezed some of the scarlet concoction onto his rice and promptly fell in love. To the point where, despite never having a pronounced affinity for Tabasco or other spice-inducing sauces, it became his go-to as well as the impetus for an extensive,


month-long tour he took of Thailand, Vietnam and Korea, the culmination of which was visiting Si Racha, the Thai town from which sriracha originates. That trip was Clemens’ present to himself, which he paid for using his advance for The Sriracha Cookbook. That work contains 50 recipes illustrating approachable ways to infuse his condiment of choice into a wide array of dishes ranging from reimagined Asian, Hispanic and Indian fare to everyday bites of Americana including honey sriracha glazed Buffalo wings, the first sriracha recipe he made when he found his pantry void of Frank’s Red Hot. It was enough of a success that Clemens is currently at work on a follow-up titled The Veggie-Lover’s Sriracha Cookbook. That book allows him to share something he took up while on his trip to Asia—vegetarianism. “A few years back, I’d been leaning toward experimenting with less meat consumption purely out of curiosity. Then, while on the plane to Asia, I read the first chapter of a book by Jonathan Safran Foer called Eating Animals and I became convinced that I needed to make the change,” said Clemens, who spent his entire vacation “pigging out” without feeling withdrawal. Meat or no meat, the food he was eating was wildly delicious, not to mention interesting and complex. It was enough to incite him to go vegetarian full-time. In book two, Clemens will share the many tricks for maximizing the flavor of vegetarian dishes that he’s picked up over the past several years. Furthermore, he’ll provide lessons for preparing dishes so they’re gluten-free or compatible with vegans’ dietary requirements. Clemens went vegan for six months for reasons part ethical and part health-related, and said it was instrumental in him Charred Broccolini. Reprinted with permission from The VeggieLover’s Sriracha Cookbook by Randy Clemens. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc. Text copyright © 2013 by Randy Clemens. Photographs copyright © 2012 by Leo Gong.

Penne Puttanesca with Charred Broccolini Makes 4 to 6 servings 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 small red onion, halved lengthwise, peeled, and sliced 1 carrot, grated 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 bay leaves 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 (28-ounce) cans whole tomatoes

1/4 cup Sriracha 1 cup pitted Kalamata olives 1 tablespoon nonpareil capers (optional) 1 pound penne pasta 1 pound broccolini 1/2 lemon Salt and freshly ground black pepper Chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

1. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large cast-iron skillet or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the carrot, 3 cloves of minced garlic, and bay leaves, cooking until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add tomato paste and cook for 1 minute. Crush the tomatoes with your hands, adding them to the pot along with the liquid from the cans. Stir in Sriracha, olives, and capers. Bring to a boil and lower the heat immediately. Simmer for 45 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Keep warm. 2. Cook pasta according to package directions. While bringing the water for the pasta to a boil, preheat the grill, indoor grill pan, or broiler to high heat. In a large mixing bowl, toss the broccolini with remaining clove of minced garlic and 2 tablespoons olive oil to coat evenly. Season with salt and pepper. While the pasta cooks, lay the broccolini out in a single layer on the grill or broiler pan. Cook until tender and lightly charred, about 5 to 8 minutes total, flipping once about halfway through. Remove from heat, and squeeze juice from 1/2 lemon over the broccolini. 3. Drain pasta and toss with sauce. Plate the pasta, garnish with parsley, and top with charred broccolini. Serve immediately.


Fire-Roasted Corn Chowder. Reprinted with permission from The Sriracha Cookbook by Randy Clemens. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc. Text copyright © 2011 by Randy Clemens. Photographs copyright © 2010 by Leo Gong.

Fire-Roasted Corn Chowder Makes 6 to 8 servings 8 ears fresh sweet corn, husked 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 red bell peppers, seeded and diced 2 red onions, diced 5 cloves garlic, minced 6 cups vegetable stock 1/2 cup Sriracha, plus more for garnish

3 sprigs fresh thyme 2 bay leaves 1 cup heavy cream Salt and freshly ground black pepper Smoked paprika, for garnish Torn leaves of fresh cilantro or flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

1. Roast 4 ears of corn over a direct flame (on a preheated grill or over a gas burner) until the corn kernels begin to blacken, turning every few minutes until all sides have roasted. After the roasted ears have cooled, scrape the kernels from the cobs, and reserve. 2. Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the bell peppers and onions and cook until softened slightly, 5 to 7 minutes. Meanwhile, scrape the corn kernels from the remaining 4 ears of corn. Add the raw corn kernels and garlic, and cook until the garlic is aromatic, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the stock, Sriracha, thyme, and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 45 minutes.

About 10 minutes before the soup is finished, gently heat the cream over low heat, keeping it just below a simmer. 3. Once the soup has cooked for 45 minutes, discard the thyme and bay leaves. Puree the soup using an immersion blender. (A food processor or blender can be utilized with caution, pureeing the hot liquid in small batches.) Mix in the warm cream and add the reserved roasted corn. Cook for an additional 3 to 5 minutes, until thoroughly heated. 4. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with a few lines of Sriracha, a generous sprinkle of smoked paprika, and torn cilantro or parsley leaves.

Burning Thai Bruschetta Makes 4 to 6 servings 8 ounces cherry tomatoes, halved lengthwise 3 green onions, white and green parts, sliced on the diagonal 2 tablespoons Sriracha 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger 1 teaspoon light brown sugar 8 large leaves Thai basil, chiffonade

Zest and juice of 1 large lime 2 teaspoons Bragg Liquid Aminos, or low-sodium soy sauce 4 large cloves garlic, peeled Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 baguette extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling

1. In a large, non-reactive bowl, mix together the tomatoes, green onions, Sriracha, ginger, brown sugar, basil, lime juice and Liquid Aminos. Mince 3 cloves of the garlic, and add them to the mixture. Season with just a pinch of salt and pepper. Cover and let sit at room temperature while you preheat the oven and prepare the baguette. (This can be prepared up to 1 day ahead and stored in the refrigerator.) 2. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Slice the baguette into 1-inch thick slices on the diagonal. Arrange the slices in a single layer on a baking sheet. Drizzle lightly with

olive oil. Toast in the oven until golden, but not quite brown, about 4 minutes. Remove from the oven, and scrape the remaining clove of garlic across the top of each warm slice of toast. The coarse texture of the just-crisped bread will actually act like a grater, getting little flecks of garlicky glory onto each piece. 3. Season the tomato mixture with additional salt and pepper, to taste. Give an additional stir and transfer to a serving bowl. Serve alongside the toasted baguette, allowing guests to spoon on their own tomato topping, family style.

having new experiences in the kitchen. “It makes you put your brain in science mode and ask, ‘how can I make this taste like blank?’ Get a certain texture like creamy without cream, milk or butter,” he said. “Of course, readers are just as welcomed to throw a chicken breast on top of any of my recipes. The book’s not about labels. It’s about presenting people with options. It’s for people who love vegetables whether they love meat or not.” The Veggie-Lover’s Sriracha Cookbook is scheduled to debut next summer. In the meantime, as a holiday gift to West Coaster’s readers, he’s providing two sneak-peek recipes for Burning Thai Bruschetta and a spiced up penne Putanesca with charred broccolini, plus his favorite recipe from his first book, fire-roasted corn chowder. God bless us everyone! Editor’s note: Brandon Hernández now works for Stone Brewing Co. in Clemens’ former position, but the idea for this column was pitched to me months ago. Burning Thai Bruschetta. Reprinted with permission from The Veggie-Lover’s Sriracha Cookbook by Randy Clemens. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc. Text copyright © 2013 by Randy Clemens. Photographs copyright © 2012 by Leo Gong.


San Diego Beer Events

See more @ westcoastersd.com/event-calendar

12.12.12 Seeing as there’s no 13.13.13, 12.12.12 is a pretty unique day, packed with great beer events around the county.

Stone 12.12.12 Vertical Epic Events Stone Brewing Co.’s 11-beer series finally comes to an end, culminating with a grand event at the brewery and restaurant location in Escondido. Bars and beer-focused restaurants all around the county will also be holding events highlighting the Vertical Epic Ales in the days leading up to, and a few right after, the eye-catching date. The Regal Beagle, Blind Lady Ale House, Small Bar, The Local, O’Brien’s Pub, Ciro’s Pizzeria, Toronado San Diego, Neighborhood, Live Wire, Newport Pizza & Ale House, Burlap, Downtown Johnny Brown’s, Hoffer’s Cigar Bar, The South Park Abbey, The Lumberyard Tavern & Grill, KnB Wine Cellars, Tap Room, Sublime Ale House, Hamilton’s Tavern and URGE Gastropub will all host events with beers from the series; view more details for each spot at stonebrewing. com/ve_epicevents

Westvleteren XII release Some say it’s the best beer in the world, and a few local bottle shops (KRISP, Holiday Wine Cellar and Bine & Vine) will be selling it; contact them to get your name on the list.

Lost Abbey dinner @ The Lodge at Torrey Pines Executive Chef Daniel Boling is pairing some great Belgian-style beers with a menu that looks tantalizing.

AleSmith dinner @ Local Habit 12 beers paired with 12 plates from Chef Nick Brune make this one beltbusting dinner.

Drink the Point Visit 7 bars in Point Loma and Ocean Beach via Brewery Tour busses, for free!

Beer dinners Green Flash Supper Society The Smoking Goat visits Green Flash’s Mira Mesa tasting room in the first of this new series on December 10.

Leroy’s Kitchen + Lounge Executive Chef Gregory Chavez brings winter flavors to pair with winter beers on December 11.

Art & BeER Stumblefoot Local brewing company Stumblefoot is continuing their support of local artists on December 14 and 15 with events featuring five local artists.

Tap Room

Every month this PB spot features a local artist and brewery; see whose installation is next on January 2.

Featured January event AleSmith My Bloody Valentine bottle release For the first time, this seasonal brew is going into bottles and will be released on January 15. The 6.66% ABV beer is deep mahogany with an aromatic hop profile.


The Carboy Chronicles

Hop

Bursting A Different Type Of Hopping Technique BY Ryan Reschan

M

ost homebrew books recommend a 60 minute hop addition for bittering your beer so that you get the most bitterness extracted from the hops due to the isomerization of the alpha acid resins that occur over such a length of boil time. What is isomerization you may ask? Well, that’s the subject of chemistry, but all you really need to know is that the bitterness contained in the hops becomes soluble in wort. But in much smaller levels, isomerization does occur at typical time frames associated with flavoring and finishing/aroma hop additions, enough to add some bitterness to the finished beer. So what happens if we skip the bittering addition and only add flavor and aroma hop addition? Well, that’s the idea behind a brewing technique called “Hop Bursting”. Hop Bursting skips the traditional bittering hop addition and uses large amounts of hops at the end of the boil. The theory is that you can add a massive amount of flavor and aroma additions to your beer while still getting enough bitterness to balance out the beer. Hops have two main types of

32 | December 2012 / January 2013

acids: alpha and beta. When you buy hops, the alpha acid percentage will be listed so calculations can be made to determine the bitterness the hop varietal can impart during boiling. These alpha acids are not very soluble and require boiling for extended periods to be extracted. Beta acids on the other hand are soluble and provide lots of flavor to the finished beer along with a smaller percentage of bitterness. So the goal in Hop Bursting is to add massive amounts of flavor and aroma hops while still getting enough bitterness to balance out the beer. While you will be using much more hop vegetation in your boil than traditional methods, there will be less boiling time of the increased hop vegetation. Typical beers using this technique start with hop additions with 20 minutes to go in the boil. Figuring out how much hops to add is going to require some math or a brewing program. There are a few formulas you can use to calculate bittering units such as Tinseth, Rager, and Garetz. Pick one formula and stick with it for future beers. You can always tweak your recipes based on results.

Start with a recipe you have previous brewed, something like a pale ale would be a good start. Figure out the bittering units from your 60 minute or longer hop addition. Now remove that from your hop schedule and add a 20 minute hop addition, adjusting quantity of hops to get your desired bittering units. Depending on what type of hop you are bittering with, you might want to change the hop varietal. Even though you’re bittering to the same level, the beer is going to taste quite different with a lot more hop flavor and aroma coming from the increased hop addition. Not many professional breweries have produced a “Hop Bursted” beer, but Stone’s Enjoy By IPA uses the technique along with a small amount of hop extract in the boil to produce a very hop forward but not palate wrecking beer. Keep in mind with Hop Bursting you’re going to be using more hops than usual, but after all we are in San Diego, and there’s no such thing as too many hops in a beer. Right?


The Lost Abbey’s Ultimate Box Set

Takes Center Stage Year-long project culminates with red carpet, behind-the-scenes experience November 24 Photos by Ryan Lamb

Above: Track 13 was a surprise “bonus track” inclusion in the set. The beer’s label was inspired by The Police’s “Message in a Bottle”; artist Sean Dominguez recognized that coming up with a new piece of art every month was one of the most difficult components of the project. Below: John Schulz (left) and Sean Dominguez (with hat, holding beer) were in charge of the photography and label artwork, respectively. Here they watch a local beer fan peruse their work.

Right: (L-r): Donna Leask, Sarah Forrest, Sage Olson, David Rains and Chuck Leask are some of San Diego’s foremost beer tasters, and they were treated to a red-carpet experience (literally). Each has special plans for consuming their set.

Left: 700 metal road cases from New York were shipped to San Marcos, with four lucky cases inadvertently having Roadie stickers applied, and one with The Lost Abbey’s cross painted on the bottom as well. Below: Director of Brewery Operations Tomme Arthur (left) signs the metal road case for a big fan. Arthur described feeling as though he’d just graduated, having finally completed such an ambitious project.


B

is for Belching Beaver This glossary of terms comes straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com, with San Diego breweries added by West Coaster (in bold) Back Street Brewery - Great pizza and beer flows from this Vista brewpub. For the winter season they’ll be brewing up an Imperial Oatmeal Stout. Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits - One of the big boys in San Diego, they recently announced that Sculpin IPA, Pale Ale and Longfin Lager are going to be canned in the next few months.

Belching Beaver pours at the San Diego Brewers Guild Festival

Barley - A cereal grain derived from the annual grass Hordeum vulgare. Barley is used as a base malt in the production of beer and certain distilled spirits, as well as a food supply for humans and animals.

Bomber - A 22-ounce bottle of beer.

Barrel - 1. A standard measure in the U.S. that is 31.5 gallons. 2. A wooden

Bottle Conditioning - A process by which beer is naturally carbonated in the

vessel that is used to age/condition/ferment beer. Some brewer’s barrels are brand new and others have been used previously to store wine or spirits.

Belching Beaver Brewery - One of the new kids on the block, their milk stout is getting great reviews. Santa will be visiting the brewery on December 8 from 2-5 p.m.

Beta Acids - One of two primary naturally occurring soft resins in hops (the other is Alpha Acid). Beta acid contributes very little to the bitterness of beer and accounts for some of its preservative quality.

Bitterness - In beer, the bitterness is caused by the tannins and isohumulones of hops. Bitterness of hops is perceived in the taste. The amount of bitterness in a beer is one of the defining characteristics of a beer style.

Bitterness Units (BU) - Same as International Bitterness Units (IBU): The measure of the bittering substances in beer (analytically assessed as milligrams of isomerized alpha acid per liter of beer, in ppm). This measurement depends on the style of beer. Light lagers typically have an IBU rating between 5-10 while big, bitter India Pale Ales can have an IBU rating between 50 and 70.

Blending - The mixing together of different batches of beer to create a final product.

Body - The consistency, thickness, and mouth-filling property of a beer. The sensation of palate fullness in the mouth ranges from thin- to full-bodied. Synonym: Mouthfeel.

Boiling - A critical step during the brewing process during which wort (unfermented beer) is boiled inside the brew kettle. During the boiling, one or more hop additions can occur to achieve bittering, hop flavor, and hop aroma in the finished beer. Boiling also results in the removal of several volatile compounds from wort, especially dimethyl sulfide (see below) and the coagulation of excess or unwanted proteins in the wort (see “hot break”). Boiling also sterilizes a beer as well as ends enzymatic conversion of proteins to sugars.

36 | December 2012 / January 2013

bottle as a result of fermentation of additional wort or sugar intentionally added during packaging.

Bottom Fermentation - One of the two basic fermentation methods characterized by the tendency of yeast cells to sink to the bottom of the fermentation vessel. Lager yeast is considered to be bottom fermenting compared to ale yeast that is top fermenting. Beers brewed in this fashion are commonly called lagers or bottom-fermented beers. Breakwater Brewing Company - This Oceanside brewpub has San Diego Beer Night every Wednesday from 5 - 8 p.m. Check out their cool custom glass tap handles from locals Liquid Glass Co.

Brettanomyces -A type of yeast and more specifically a genus of single-

celled yeasts that ferment sugar and are important to the beer and wine industries due to the sensory flavors they produce. Brettanomyces, or “Brett” colloquially, can cause acidity and other sensory notes often perceived as leather, barnyard, horse blanket and just plain funk. These characteristics can be desirable or undesirable. It is common and desirable in styles such as Lambic, Oud Bruin, several similarly acidic American-derived styles, and many barrel-aged styles.

Brewpub - A restaurant-brewery that sells 25% or more of its beer on site. The beer is brewed primarily for sale in the restaurant and bar. The beer is often dispensed directly from the brewery’s storage tanks. Where allowed by law, brewpubs often sell beer “to-go” and /or distribute to off site accounts. Brew Kettle - One of the vessels used in the brewing process in which the wort (unfermented beer) is boiled.

Bung - A sealing stopper, usually a cylindroconical shaped piece of wood or plastic, fitted into the mouth of a cask or older style kegs such as Hoff-Stevens or Golden Gate. Bung Hole - The round hole in the side of a cask or older style keg, through which the vessel is filled with beer and then sealed with a bung.


1:45 P.M.
The scene over here is wonderful. It’s delicious beers coupled with people very clearly shirking their day jobs. I’ve heard more than one conversation to the effect of “Well, I haven’t gotten any emails yet, so I guess we can stay here.” It’s a slice of humanity who love their beers enough to put their careers in jeopardy. You have to respect that level of commitment. 3:15 P.M.
The next stop has put us in the heart of Rough Draft. I’ve only previously been able to try a couple of the hoppier beers that have leapt from their 15 BBL system, so the barrel aged “Freudian Slip” should be a real treat. The crowd is bustling and lively. I’m honestly beginning to wonder why San Diego just doesn’t declare this a work holiday because with this many people playing hooky no nonbeer commerce could possibly be transpiring today. 3:23 P.M.
The “let me try one of everything flight” is longer than my arm. I can feel my liver cringing. One thing is for sure - I will no longer be a stranger to Rough Draft after this. For those of you hoping to make more a surgical attack on their first Rough Draft brews, let me suggest starting with the Eraser IPA (owner Jeff Silver’s favorite) and their surprisingly full flavored Amber Ale. My favorite by a long margin was their barrel aged Emboozlement Trippel, a creamy and full bodied incar-

nation of the style that really delivered. 4:35 P.M.
Apropos of nothing, I spend about 5 minutes trying to come up with a reason to ask this guy for a picture. I ultimately landed on “Hey, your beard is awesome. Can I take a picture of it?” Worked like a charm. I’m still not entirely sure why I wanted it, but you saw the size of that flight. It made perfect sense at the time. It’s probably time to move on. 5:24 P.M.
Lest you think this article is degenerating into some gonzo beer journalism, I want to make it clear there’s been a fair amount of undocumented rehydration on the agenda as well. It’s not easy to put anything in front of URGE Gastropub’s release of Mother Earth Brewing Company’s SDBW specialty beer, but I managed to. 6:31 P.M.
After a restorative water and cheese fries interlude, we summoned two of the aforementioned Wet Hop Dreams by Mother Earth. It was made with 160 lbs of fresh Citra hops, so you don’t exactly need a forensics team to unearth the bitter citrus and spice notes. To be quite honest, I’m feeling pretty spent at this point. This would ordinarily be when I would pack it in most days, but this isn’t most days. SDBW must be shown no quarter. Luckily, courtesy of Sublime Ale House, I’m about to finish my day as I started it - with pancakes. 7:02 P.M.
Sublime Ale House’s pre fixe dinner with Latitude 33 Brewing features a 3

course meal with equal parts refinement and whimsy. However, I’m not well equipped as a food writer so let me capture a few random observations. The Latitude 33 “Dirty Thirty” Saison makes a pretty fantastic vinaigrette. I will have to remember to pour more beer on my mixed greens at home. 7:18 P.M.
It takes a pretty potent brew to cut through the succulence of a white cheddar and gruyere mac ‘n cheese, but the Wet Hump DIPA is up to the task. That said, this is at least the second time today I’ve felt sexually harassed by a beer’s name and will be seeking restitution for this outrage post haste. 7:41 P.M.
As much as I love breakfast for dinner, breakfast for dessert (chocolate pancakes with vanilla bean ice cream, topped with candied bacon and ground espresso beans plus a side of hot maple syrup) may well trump it since I don’t even have to pretend it’s intended to sustain me. 8:21 P.M.
With the placement of my cloth napkin on the table, I’m signaling more than the end of my meal. I am throwing in the proverbial towel. I’m waving the white flag of surrender, albiet with a bit more chocolate sauce on it than prior to the battle. San Diego Beer Week has wrung me out and it’s not even 24 hours in yet. It’s gonna be a long week. Awesome.


san diego beer week in pictures

View more on the following pages, and at facebook.com/westcoastersd Right: Nina and Simon Lacey serve up beer at the Chefs Celebration Beer Garden at The Lodge at Torrey Pines. Below: The Brewers Guild Festival’s new location on The Broadway Pier was a hit.


Above: Hamilton’s Tavern publican Scot Blair directs traffic during the 4th Fling event at Morley Field. Right: San Diego beer fans enjoy a taster of Societe Brewing Company at the San Diego Brewers Guild Festival. Below: Good times were had by all at the San Diego Brewers Guild festival. Check out that view!


Above: Former Mayor Jerry Sanders pours beer from the Karl Strauss cask to kick off Beer Week. Left: Beer fans enjoy tasters of Societe, Manzanita and Monkey Paw at a Phil’s BBQ tasting event.

40 | December 2012 / January 2013


Right: Neva Parker, Kaitlin Jaime and Misty Birchall pose during the Chefs Press Brew Food release party at Mission Brewery. Below: John Webster and Claudia Faulk from Aztec Brewing Company pour beer at the San Diego Brewers Guild Festival.


Craft Beer Directory & Map

A

LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 2. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 3. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 4. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 5. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 6. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 7. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306 619.857.8023 www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

B

PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 3. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 4. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 5. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 6. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 7. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 8. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 9. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 10. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com

BREW PUBS

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

1. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

C

POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 2. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 3. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 4. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 5. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 7. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 8. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 9. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 10. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 11. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 12. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 13. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com

D

MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.sandiego.edu/dining/lagranterraza 2. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 3. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 4. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 www.RJGrill.com 5. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

42 | December 2012 / January 2013

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.societebrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

E

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

F

MISSION HILLS HILLCREST

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 2. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 3. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 4. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 5. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 6. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 7. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

G

DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com

2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 4. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 5. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 6. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 7. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 8. Proper Gastropub 795 J St. | 619.255.7520 www.ProperGastropub.com 9. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 10. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 11. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 12. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 13. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 14. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 15. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 2. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 401 G St. | 619.231.7000 www.RockBottom.com/San-Diego 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

H

UPTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Bar Eleven 3519 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.4292 www.ElevenSanDiego.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com

5. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 6. El Take It Easy 3926 30th St. | 619.291.1859 www.ElTakeItEasy.com 7. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 8. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 9. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 10. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 11. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 12. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 13. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 14. The Linkery 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.TheLinkery.com 15. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 16. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 17. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 18. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 19. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 20. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 21. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 3. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 4. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

BREWERIES 1. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com


2 1

3

Su ns et

M iss ion

1

Ba yD r

2

Clairemont Mesa Blvd

2 Convoy St

Dr nt mo ire Cla

Tierrasanta Blvd

Balboa Ave

CLAIREMONT

Me sa Blv d

15

F

st S t

3rd St 4th St

In dia

Rd Mission Center

1

MISSION VALLEY

St

1

HILLCREST

3

NORMAL HEIGHTS

1

2 805

10

15

El Cajon Blvd

6 University Ave

Adams Ave

2

35th St

18

d Blv rk Pa

163

1

1

1 7 17

9

University Ave

19 21 20 14

NORTH PARK

Hawthorn

15

1st Ave

5

St thorn Haw

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS

Texas St

5th Ave

St India

y Hw ific Pac

2

W

G

1

Adams Ave

75

Florida St

4

57

1

3

6

El Cajon Blvd

3

1

2

30th St

4

d rs R Fria

11

8

163

University Ave

St

d ta R Vis da Lin

12 3

2

Washington St

6th Ave 5th Ave

4

Park Blvd

M or en a vd Bl

5

1

MISSION HILLS

3

Rd Friars

5

1

n gto hin as WW

3

805

2

CORONADO

1

163

9

21

1

N Harbor Dr

6

1st Ave

Ave ee nes Ge

1

E

12

POINT LOMA

Talbot St

Cla irem ont

2 ve oa A Balb

4

11

St

W

Ca tali na Blv d

8 5 3

52

Po int Lo ma Av e

MISSION BEACH

ve ett A Barn

Ca単o n St

LA JOLLA

s an cr se Ro

Ne wp or tA Na ve rra ga ns ett Av e

3

Ora nge Av e

Pro sp ec tS t

5

La Joll a

1

D

St

4 wy Pk

5 2

Vo lta ire

2

Dr

10

7 3

5

OCEAN BEACH

13

Cli ffs Blv d

10

Blvd Mission

2

Villa ge Dr

8

St ham Ingra

1 3

Su nse tC liffs Bl vd

4

1

Av e

La Jolla

1

Mi dw ay

1

Blvd oma W Point L

Ro se cra ns St

7

d Ave Gran

5

7

Ch att sw or th Blv d

9

et Ave Garn

8

lvd itz B Nim

2

e se ne Ge

Torrey Pines Rd

4

805

2

6 nt St Lamo

1

TORREY PINES

C

PACIFIC BEACH

Ba co nS t

6

B

5

y Hw ific Pac

2

el St Fanu

A

Upas St

5 11

St ndary Bou

LITTLE ITALY

Redwood St

1

Dr

5

Pe rs hin g

A St

13

4 1

Broadway

7

8

Market St

EAST VILLAGE

g hin rs Pe

5

GOLDEN HILL Broadway

1

805

Juniper St

SOUTH PARK

15

8 1

Dr

4

30th St

3

6

Fern St

9

6 15 8 13 16

2

F St

10 11

5th Ave

Ha rbo rD r

14 12

Park Blvd

Market St

10th Ave

1st Ave

Pacific Hwy

3

Broadway

2

DOWNTOWN

E

30th St

Florida Dr

5th Ave

N Harbor Dr

India St

4

Beech St

94

H


Craft Beer Directory & Map

I

NORTH COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 6. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 7. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com 8. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.beeronthewall.com 2. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 3. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com 4. Stone Company Store - Oceanside 301 N Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 5. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 3. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 4. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com 5. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 6. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 3. Fezziwig’s Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.FezziwigsBrewing.com 4. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 5. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Way 101 | 760.216.6500 www.IronFistBrewing.com 6. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. 104 | 760.913.7333 www.Lat33Brew.com 7. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St. | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com

8. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 9. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 10. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real G www.OTTBrew.com 11. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Way 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 12. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 13. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com 2. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St . | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 3. Smokin Beaver Brew Shop 348 State Place | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

J

ENCINITAS DEL MAR

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 2. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Cntry Rd. | 858.481.7883 www.DelMar.Oggis.com 4. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 5. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 6. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 7. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

K

SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bangin’ Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREWERIES 1. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 2. Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com

44 | December 2012 / January 2013

BREW PUBS

3. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 4. Hess Brewing 7955 Silverton Ave. 1201 | 619.887.6453 www.HessBrewing.com 5. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 6. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. 132 | 858.480.9381 www.WetNReckless.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

L

POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 2. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 3. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. | 858.592.7883 www.CMR.Oggis.com

BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. 105 | 858.513.8070 www.LightningBrewery.com

M

ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

N

JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

O

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Henry’s Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

1. The Brew House at Eastlake 871 Showroom Pl. 102 | 619.656.2739 www.BrewHouseEastlake.com

BREWERIES 1. Mad Lab Craft Brewing 6120 Business Ctr. Ct. | 619.254.6478 www.MadLabCraftBrewing.wordpress.com

P

COLLEGE LA MESA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. California Kebab 5157 College Ave. | 619.582.5222 www.Cali-Kebab.com 2. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 3. Cucina Fresca & Sons 6784 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.668.0779 4. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 5. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 6. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 7. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 8. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd.

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

Q

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Fin us on Facebook!

2. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 4. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. Manzanita Brewing Company 9962 Prospect Ave. D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

Want to add your location? Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com


Oc ea ns ide

vd Bl

VISTA

e lag Vil ta Vis

27

1

e Av Fe

OCEANSIDE

SS an ta

S

78

wy tH as Co

1

4

ge Dr lla Vi ad b rls Ca

El Ca min o

Re al

3 10

5

1 5

4

SAN MARCOS

2

WM ission Rd

Palomar Airport Rd

3

Fe

Rd

78 Au to Pa rk

12 9

2

1

4

ar

am

Mir

2

M

3

h ap gr le Te

on ny Ca

Q

St to n

M

hi

ng

ai

W as

n

St

8

1

COLLEGE

Monte zuma Rd

2

3

2

1

8 El Cajon Blvd

125

4

6

Mission Gorge Rd

1

LA MESA

1 4 8

2

1 Main St

EL CAJON

LEMON GROVE

Lem on G rov eA ve

Otay Mesa Rd

Fe de ra lB lvd

OTAY MESA

2

Jamacha Rd

y Rd Valle Otay

94 Broadway

125

8

Broadway

1

Magnolia Ave

ve yA rsit ive Un

Main St

905

LAKESIDE

67

SANTEE

Fletcher Pkwy

d La esa Blv M

St ring Sp

e d Av Thir

125

1

1

3

52

ke La

Orange Ave

5

Poway Rd

1

22

Bl vd

DEL CERRO

College Ave

y kw ic P mp Oly

805

1

Rd

y Pkw tlake Eas

L St

St

POWAY

2nd St

EJ

d

2

Scripps Poway Pkwy

7 5 3

ks R

JULIAN

Dr

Mar

St

t GS

P

3

Pea

Poway Rd

Mu rra y

el

W Victoria

Camino D

1

d

Twin

2

N

R

1

1

EASTLAKE CHULA VISTA

er

1

ALPINE

3

O WJ

8

Alpine Blvd

DEL MAR

1

rm

St

Via De La Valle

Fa

A

m Lo

s Pkwy

am

illi

W

Ted

56

70th S t

1

Fe Dr

15

Pomerado Rd

1

RANCHO BERNARDO

Dr

CARMEL MOUNTAIN

ar Rd

nta

rn

Be

er

nt

Ce

2

Miram Sa as

o ard

Rd

5

01

wy 1

tH

oas

805

te

mun

SC

5

n

or

Com

Bl a n Rd

nyo

Ca

el N

Canyo

1 1

uiz

ira M

ste he

oR

oD

L

Rd

3

Kearny Villa Rd

Carroll

nc

min

min

15

Carroll

Ca

M

es

2

Santa Fe Dr

ENCINITAS

6

vd

5

Ca

1

Bernardo

Cuyamaca St

Encinitas Blvd

MIRA MESA

cho

Ran

1

Rd

o nt rre So

6

1

M

Ma

2 1 7

Mira

3

lvd esa B

2

15

Espola Rd

SORRENTO VALLEY

al

4

Blvd

e Camino Santa F

El Camino Re

e Av an ulc N V 01 y1

t Hw

oas

y lle Va

rA ve

NC

J K

d

lv Leucadia B

Black Mountain Rd

Saxony Rd

1

Pkwy

3

13

ve nA issio WM

ESCONDIDO

3

y Wa

a nt Sa

ho nc Ra

11

2 6 7os Blvd 5 arc M 1 an WS

6

d

lvd dB ba rls Ca

CARLSBAD

ity R

S Melrose Dr

3 5 4

8

WV alle y

ide ns ea Oc

2

8

15

Dr

Real El Camino

M iss io n

Ave

E Vista Way

4

d Blv

se Dr N Melro

1

76

5

ve Fe A anta NS

I

3

SPRING VALLEY 94

4

Rd po Cam


West Coaster  

December 2012 - January 2013 issue. News and events for San Diego's craft beer community

West Coaster  

December 2012 - January 2013 issue. News and events for San Diego's craft beer community