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april 2013 | serving america’s finest beer county | san Diego

Vol. 3 No. 5

Free Copy

NOW

POURING:

Carnitas’ Snack Shack


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Workers from R.E. Staite Engineering Inc. bring in Home Brew Mart’s retired brewhouse to the exhibit room at the San Diego History Center

For those new to craft beer, and even for many who aren’t, it can be surprising to learn just how much brewing history San Diego has. One way to gain some knowledge is by watching Suds County, USA, released in 2012. Starting this month, there will be another avenue: “Bottled & Kegged: San Diego’s Craft Brew Culture”, a new exhibit from the San Diego History Center in Balboa Park that will run from April 6 until next January 20. So make a trip down there, and bring a friend! Salud,

Ryan Lamb Executive Editor West Coaster


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders ryan lamb mike shess Publisher mike shess mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor ryan lamb ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director brittany everett brittany@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant tom shess thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers sam tierney sam@westcoastersd.com brandon hernández brandon@westcoastersd.com ryan resChan ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com Contributors niCkie peña kristina yamamoto amy t. Granite

West Coaster, THE wEBsITE Web Manager mike shess Web Editor ryan lamb Web Master josh everett West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2013 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


wRITERs

COLUMNIsT

INTO THE BREw Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified CiceroneÂŽ exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

COLUMNIsT

PLATEs & PINTs

COLUMNIsT

THE CARBOy CHRONICLEs Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

Brandon HernĂĄndez is a native San Diegan proud to be contributing to a publication that serves a positive purpose for his hometown and its beer loving inhabitants. In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including San Diego Magazine, The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast and U-T San Diego.


TABLE OF CONTENTs

16-18

CoLUMNS

Plates & Pints Carnitas’ Snack Shack is a hit in North Park with its new draft system

20-25

The Carboy Chronicles Three local homebrewers show off their unique rigs in Chula Vista

30-32

Into The Brew Spiegelau’s new glass was designed specifically for drinking hoppy beers

15

Beer pHoToS

Culture Brewing Co A look inside San Diego’s newest brewery in the heart of Solana Beach

34

Bottled & Kegged Taste of San Diego Craft Brews event and the install of Home Brew Mart’s system

36

Pizza Port Bressi Ranch Sunrise delivery of Mueller fermentors at the brewing company’s upcoming HQ

37

Business of Beer New symposium focused on Southern California breweries held at White Labs

40

Mission Valley Craft Beer and Food Festival One of SD’s most highly-regarded beer festivals hosted by the Handlery Hotel

8-10

pLUS +

Brews in the News A craft beer beard contest, new stats from the Brewers Association and more

12, 38

Public Service Announcement California Craft Brewers Association clarifies laws pertaining to growler fills

14

Green Flash Heading East San Diego brewery plans to open second facility in Virginia Beach in 2015

26-28 38 42-45

Liberty Station’s Roseville Cozinha Seasoned chef Craig Jimenez enjoys expansive kitchen at 15-tap restaurant Craft Beer Events Plethora of options coming up, view more at westcoastersd.com/event-calendar Craft Beer Directory & Map Add your location by e-mailing directory@westcoastersd.com

on the cover: Chef Hanis Cavin and his pet pig Carnitas enjoy a nice morning at Carnitas’ Snack Shack in North Park. Photo by Ryan Lamb


8 | April 2013

Chili, best beard contest winner


BREWS IN THE NEWS BEST BEARDS OF CRAFT BEER

Out of 73 entries, Travis Smith from Societe, John Hunter from Karl Strauss and Chili from Stone Brewing Co. were chosen as three of twenty finalists in CraftBeer.com’s Best Beards of Craft Beer contest. More than 7,000 fans voted from 25 states and 48 countries, and Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens groundskeeper and gardener Chili took top spot with 1,046 votes, just over 14 percent. Of the win, Chili told CraftBeer. com’s Julia Herz, “I am totally surprised. My beard isn’t that big even though it took me 25 years to grow. Thanks to all the fans who voted for me, it was really fun to participate.” Asked why beards are such a big deal in the beer world, Chili responded, “Brewing beer is one of the oldest crafts around, and I think growing facial hair is another old-fashioned craft. They go hand in hand in this industry because it’s a very cultural, old-school to do.” Second place went to Scott Witsoe from Wit’s End Brewing Company in Denver, Colorado; the third place finisher was Bob Cannon from Samuel Adams in Boston, Massachusetts.

O’BRIEN’S VISITS BEER CAMP

The crew from O’Brien’s Pub in Kearny Mesa spent a few days in March attending Sierra Nevada’s Beer Camp in Chico. There they brewed a roasted rye old ale that will be barrel-aged and released in January 2014 for O’Brien’s 20th anniversary celebrations. Owner Tom Nickel is hoping for four total versions of the beer: non-barrel aged, bourbon barrel-aged, rye whiskey barrel-aged and a blended bourbon and rye whiskey version.

WC WRITER WINS BIG HOMEBREW CONTEST

Homebrew columnist Ryan Reschan and his recipe collaborator Robert Masterson from the Society of Barley Engineers took top honors at Stone’s fifth annual AHA Rally and Homebrew Competition in March. Their beer, a coconut IPA with Citra and Galaxy hops, beat out other finalists that included a vanilla chai-spiced imperial milk stout, a saison, a woodaged California common, a Citra-hopped double IPA, and a chocolate imperial stout flavored with Mayan spices. Reschan and Masterson will produce their beer at Stone along with collaborating brewery Rip Current from San Marcos. The beer will be distributed this summer

before being entered in the Great American Beer Festival Pro-Am competition next fall.

CRAFT BEER GROWS IN 2012

Preliminary numbers from the Brewers Association, the trade association representing small and independent American brewers, released 2012 data on U.S. craft brewing growth on March 19. Craft brewers saw a 15 percent and 17 percent jump in volume and dollar growth, respectively. In terms of total barrels produced, that number increased almost 1.8 million to 13,235,917 in 2012, with craft brewers reaching 6.5 percent volume of the total U.S. beer market, up from 5.7 percent in 2011. Craft dollar share climbed from $8.7 billion in 2011 to $10.2 billion in 2012 – 10.2% of the total U.S. market share. The number of operating U.S. breweries jumped 18 percent to reach a count of 2,403, with 409 new breweries opening and just 43 closing. Small breweries created an estimated 4,857 more jobs in 2012 to equal 108,440 workers. A more extensive analysis will be released during the Craft Brewers Conference in Washington, D.C. towards the end of March.


STONE TO DISTRIBUTE SAINT ARCHER

Having landed talented brewers Ray Astamendi and Kim Lutz, who met while practicing their craft at Maui Brewing Co., Mira Mesa’s Saint Archer will be distributed exclusively by Stone Distributing throughout Southern California starting this month. All three of their core styles — blonde ale, pale ale and IPA — will be packaged and available in 12 oz bottle sixpacks, 22 oz bottles and kegs from Santa Barbara to the U.S./ Mexico border. The brewing company hopes to have their tasting room up and running in May.

L-r: Saint Archer’s Kent Kreutzer, Kim Lutz, Josh Landan, Ray Astamendi and Jeff Hansson on brew day two in mid-March

CRAFT EXPORTS SET RECORD IN 2012

Based on results from an industry survey, the Brewers Association reported that the American craft beer industry set a new record for exports in 2012. Volume increased by 72 percent compared to 2011, with a value estimated at $49.1 million. Canada maintained its position as the largest export market, as shipments jumped 140 percent, up to 68,180 barrels, in 2012. Western Europe accounted for 56,204 barrels valued at $14.2 million in 2012, a 5.6 percent increase over 2011. A 57 percent jump was seen in shipments to Japan, and American craft brewers continued to make headway into Australia, China and Thailand. In response to the survey, Brewers Association chief operating officer Bob Pease said, “The BA is very pleased with the continued growth of American craft beer to markets around the world. Consumers continue to view American craft brewers as leaders in innovation and among the standard bearers for quality. Maintaining that perception is a priority for the craft brewing community.”


PSA

Growler Law Clarification from the California Craft Brewers Association Labeling of Containers (Including Growlers) The Alcoholic Beverage Control Act allows a beer manufacturer (holder of an ABC type 01 or type 23 license) to fill for sale any sealable container as long as specific guidelines are met. There is no mention of “growler” in the ABC Act. Growlers fall under the same category and regulations as any sealable container such as bottles or kegs. As such, they must have affixed a label that has been approved by the ABC and which meet the following requirements: • The information on the container must be submitted to and approved by the California Department of ABC. See details on label approval below. • The container must be sealable (to distinguish it from a glass of beer or other open container). Screw top, cork, flip top, etc. • Any and all information pertaining to another beer manufacturer other than the one filling/selling the container must be obscured. Label Approval Process • California labeling requirements are detailed in Sections 25200-25206 of the ABC Act and Rule 130 of the California Code of Regulations. These can be found online at the ABC website. Scroll to page 311 for sections 2520025205 and page 469 for Rule 130. • For label approval you must file ABC form 412 (Application for Label Approval). This form has specific instructions on how to file. • Growler labeling requirements are the same as for any container sold for off-site sales including bottles and kegs. Information required by the ABC on the label are as follows: » Name and location of the manufacturer (city and state) and bottler (if different). » Name of the beer in the container. » Alcohol content is mandatory if 5.7% abv or greater. It is optional if below. » Net contents of the container. » Although not required by the ABC, the container should include the federally required “Government Warning” even if not shipping out of California. If you ship/sell any container of beer out of California, it must meet TTB required labeling laws. • What is allowed: » You must have label approval for each style and each size container that you sell. » You do not have to file a separate form for each style or each new beer – multiple brands and sizes can be listed on the same form. When you file form 412, it is suggested that you list any and all brands you think you might be selling in the future. » When you submit form 412 for approval, you must include an example of each label for each product and each size listed on the form. » You do not need a unique printed label for each brand. You can write the beer name on the container or use “check mark boxes,” but each brand that you write in or have a check box for must have approval by the ABC. See photo example of neck hanger online at californiacraftbeer. com. » An original label of each brand and size listed on form 412 must be included with the form. Photocopies are not acceptable. If it is an affixed tag or neck hanger, these must be submitted with the form.

12 | April 2013

» If your label is embossed on the container or you handwrite the information on the container, you must provide a photograph of the container and label. » You need label approval for each container size but do not have to file a separate form for each size of container. List all of the container sizes you will be filling on form 412. Filling a container size that is not approved by the ABC is a violation. » “Check mark” boxes are allowed. You can submit one label for approval stating the brewery name and location with a check mark box for each of your brands. You may also have a blank space to write in the brand. Handwritten labels are allowed. See neck hanger example online at californiacraftbeer.com. » Required information on a label is allowed to be handwritten (permanent sharpie recommended) » Written information on a container cap is allowed. Typically there is only room on a growler cap for the beer name and/or alcohol content. A cap with the handwritten example must be included with your form 412. Note: A type 75 license is a retail license and is not allowed, per section 23401 of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, to “label, bottle, package, or refill any package with any alcoholic beverage.” A type 75 may not sell pre-filled growlers and may not refill growlers for sale.

Continued on page 38


EASTWARD BOUND Green Flash unveils plans for $20M Virginia Beach facility

G

reen Flash’s new 58,000 square foot brewery will be located in Virginia Beach, Va. on a nineacre industrial plot just 15 minutes from the beach by car. Key features include the same brewery equipment and footprint as Mira Mesa’s facility, an onsite laboratory for beer analysis, brewery tours, tasting room and outdoor beer garden. There will also be space for private events and educational experiences, offices for staff and ample guest parking. Community programs will also be vital. Green Flash plans to establish credits with White Labs in San Diego for all members of the Virginia Craft Brewers Guild to submit beers for analysis, and use of the new lab will be available to other local breweries upon completion. Green Flash will develop a Virginia Beach local beer series and plans to support Virginia Beach charities. San Diego’s local beer series first benefitted David “Waterman” Ross, seen in the image to the right. Invested Capital: $20 Million Brewing Capacity: 100,000 barrels/year Expected New Hires in Virginia: 40+ upon opening Groundstaking Date: March 14, 2013 Groundbreaking Date: Late 2013 TBD Expected Opening: 2015 TBD

14 | April 2013


Local Brewery #65

CUlTURE BREWiNg CO Solana Beach, CA

Officially open on February 21, Culture Brewing Co is the newest addition to the craft brewing community of San Diego. Their lead brewer, Steve Ragan, is a long-time homebrewer who now crafts his beers on a 10-barrel Premier Stainless system. The tasting room is small, but inviting, and a ramp leads to a back patio where the brewing equipment stands behind roll-up doors. This spot is dog-friendly and just a few doors down from the Belly Up. Words and photos by Ryan Lamb

WestCoasterSD.com | 15


PLATEs & PINTs

THIS

Chef Hanis Cavin, second from left, orchestrates dishes for Supper Club at Green Flash. Photo by Brandon Hernández

y G G I P E L T T I L

Pork, craft beer and the best of intentions are driving serious growth for Carnitas’ Snack Shack BY BRANDON HERNáNDEz

T

his is the story of a guy, a girl, and ironically enough, a miniature pig. Why the irony? All three had a hand or hoof in shaping one of the most popular, casual eateries to open in San Diego in the past couple of years — a thriving central shrine to gorging on all things swine: Carnitas’ Snack Shack. The North Park spot’s success has already led Chef Hanis Cavin and General Manager Sara Stroud to start scouting locations in metro San Diego for future Shack locations, one of which could open as early as mid-summer. Yet the tale begins several years back at Kensington Grill, where Cavin, a San Diego native, was on his second tour of duty manning the kitchen as executive chef. All was well in the back of the house but, unfor-

16 | April 2013

tunately, he was experiencing friction with a spitfire — Stroud — who’d been brought on to manage the front of the house. The nature of their constant head-butting inspired the restaurant’s owner to them on an all expenses paid dinner so they could iron out their differences and effectively coexist at Kensington Grill. Over the course of the meal, Cavin and Stroud learned they had a great deal in common. Cavin talked of food and his career as a chef, while Stroud shared stories of a life spent working in the restaurant industry since she was 15. They began to appreciate what one another brought to the table, but the admiration didn’t stop there: Soon, the two were spending more and more time together off the clock. Now, they’re married with what they

consider their two kids — the aforementioned little piggy, Carnitas, and the porkcentric restaurant he inspired. Both are extremely popular; videos of the four-legged cutie have garnered well over a million views on YouTube, while Carnitas’ Snack Shack averages between 500 and 600 covers during the week and around 1,000 on Saturdays and Sundays. Though admittedly tiny, purposely low on frills and a self-serve kind of cafe, the Shack has amassed a cult following. It’s more than Cavin and Stroud could have ever foreseen when cashing out their retirements, selling their cars and deciding to go into business for themselves. Teamwork and passion, combined with sound, stickto-your-ribs preparations of decadent feasts like the chicken-fried pork sandwich, bacon


jam-adorned Snack Shack Burger, and Cavin’s notorious triple threat sandwich packed with pork schnitzel, pulled pork and bacon have boosted them to incredible heights. There’s more to Cavin and Stroud’s bustling spot than the other white meat; there’s also a great deal of heart and soul. Quality and freshness are paramount and as key to the food as Hanis’ gastronomic touches. Pigs that are never penned and fed with grain grown within several miles of their home are sourced from Hill Family Farms in Pendleton, Oregon. Vegetables and herbs come from Suzie’s Organic Farm, Specialty Produce and, in some cases, Cavin’s planter boxes. Local bakery, Con Pane, delivers the goods three times a week. Their theory is basic: Cavin gets ingredients for items he can make in-house like ketchup, aioli and mayo, and for those that he can’t craft due to space issues, he goes to San Diego institutions known for making them. The environment is also a chief concern. All the companies that deliver utilize paperless systems. Cavin and Stroud had trees planted to create natural shade, and used as much recycled wood as possible (stained without caustic chemicals) when building the Shack. These principles extended to the construction of a new “Pig Pen” bar outfitted with a draft system featuring four beer taps; a pair of wine taps are on the way. The suds lines will always serve local craft beer. Two of those taps are dedicated to Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits and Green Flash Brewing Company, respectively, due to strong ties Cavin has with each.

pork rillette w/ ballast point calico amber ale vinaigrette Yield: 4 servings 3 tablespoons duck fat (or lard to substitute) 1 tablespoon shallot, minced 1 pound pork butt, cooked 1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped salt and freshly ground pepper to taste salad greens Ballast Point Calico Amber Ale Vinaigrette (recipe follows) toast points Heat the fat in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the shallot and cook until the shallots are soft and translucent. Remove from heat. Add the shallots and pork to the bowl of a food processor and puree until smooth. Add the thyme, season with salt and pepper and set aside. Toss the greens in the vinaigrette. Spread the rillette onto toast points, top with greens and serve immediately.

ballast point calico amber ale vinaigrette 1 tablespoon shallots, minced 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 cup Ballast Point Calico Amber Ale ½ cup oil salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Whisk together the shallots, mustard and beer in a bowl. While whisking, slowly drizzle in the oil. Season with salt and pepper.


Carnitas, Cavin and Stroud’s pet pig, helps with recycling duties. Photo by Ryan Lamb

Ballast Point specialty brewer Colby Chandler took Cavin under his wing early on, helping him to get a feel for craft and the local beer community. The two have worked together on several food-and-beer events over the past few years, including the annual San Diego Beer Week closing ceremony put on in conjunction with local non-profit organization, Chefs Celebration. In 2009, he cooked up a whole pig that had been raised on Ballast Point’s spent grain, then paired it with the brewing company’s Black Marlin Porter for that bookend event. Cavin’s other craft beer conspirators include Dave Adams, a certified Cicerone and the tasting room supervisor for Green Flash. Earlier this month, he teamed with Adams — a North Park resident and regular at Carnitas’ — for a five-course pairing dinner held on a weeknight in Green Flash’s Mira Mesa tasting room as part of their quarterly series of Supper Club events. With brewers scaling tanks and forklifts whizzing to and fro, he cooked up pork cheek ravioli with tomato jam to pair with Hop Head Red and pork shanks both paired with and braised in Double Stout. When developing dishes to pair with beer, Cavin recommends getting acquainted with the beer first and foremost — in order to become intimately familiar with the brew’s many taste characteristics. This allows a cook to fully understand the beers they are working with and identify familiar food flavors that will match up best with them. The following recipes (plucked straight from the Snack Shack archives) go well with the beers that serve as their key ingredients. Give them a whirl at home or order up at the Shack and let them pull you a pint from the Pig Pen.

18 | April 2013

alesmith speedway stout chocolate pot au crème Yield: 12 servings 24 ounces AleSmith Speedway Stout 4 cups heavy cream 2 cups whole milk 1 pound dark chocolate 1 cup brown sugar 5 egg yolks Heat a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the beer and bring to a boil. Continue to cook until the beer reduces by 50%. Set aside and let cool. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Heat a double boiler. Add the cream and milk and cook until the mixture comes to a scald (just before the mixture comes to a boil, when bubbles form around the edge of the pan). Stir in the chocolate, beer and sugar. Place the egg yolks in a large bowl. While whisking, slowly pour the cream mixture over the eggs until all of the cream has been added. Strain the mixture and pour into 12 4-ounce ceramic ramekins. Place the ramekins in a shallow baking dish. Pour water into the baking dish until it comes halfway up the side of the ramekin. Place the dish in the oven and cook until the cream is set, about 35 minutes. Remove from the oven, let cool to room temperature and serve.

Recipes continued on page 41


THE CARBOy CHRONICLEs

Not Your

average BREwING SySTEM Local homebrewers get creative with their craft BY RYAN RESCHAN

B

rewing setups vary widely between brewers, so much in fact, that it’s hard to find anyone with the same exact equipment as you. Whether you piece together a system of odds and ends, fabricate it yourself, or order something completely pre-built, it’s always interesting to see what others use to make their beer. This month we will be looking at three do-it-yourself brewing systems from local homebrewers.

Right: Homebrewer Jeff Swem’s 25-gallon electric/ propane hybrid setup is an inspiring sight to behold. Photos by Ryan Lamb


WestCoasterSD.com | 21


First up is Jeff Swem’s massive 25-gallon electric/propane hybrid setup. The rig starts by pre-heating the water with a propane direct-fired water heater which then goes through his water filter and into the 10-gallon HLT (hot liquor tank) and/or mash kettle. Once the strike water is heated to the desired temperature, it’s pumped into the mash tun and mixed with the grain. The brains of Swem’s rig is the massive control box the houses the pumps and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, which calculates the difference between a measured process variable and a desired setpoint. In this case the mash or sparging temperature is chosen and the controller will maintain the set temperature (measured by a thermometer in the HLT). If the temperature falls below the chosen

22 | April 2013

value, an electric heating element in the HLT is activated to push the temperature back to the desired setpoint. The control system is set up on one side for a Heat Exchanged Recirculating Mash System (HERMS), a process where wort is passed through a copper coil heat exchanger inside of the HLT. The other side has a PID controller for mash out and/or sparging the wort, which is then pumped over to his propane direct-fired boil kettle. Using his massive four-coil wort chiller to cool down, Swem then aerates with pure oxygen through his DIY oxygen stone wand. The collected 20 gallons or less of wort is then transferred into a 22-gallon conical fermentor that resides in a temperature-controlled fermentation closet. A PID controller is once again used to con-

L-r: Jeff Swem, George Thornton and Chris Manzi get together to discuss their rigs on a nice Sunday morning in Chula Vista

trol heating and cooling elements inside the closet. The whole setup, including the brewing system and fermentation closest, costs around $2000 – much less than such a system would cost without a DIY approach. George Thornton, owner of The Homebrewer in North Park, has a very cool, allelectric setup using two 10-gallon cylindrical coolers and a converted half-barrel keg for a boil kettle. His electric control box contains two PID controllers, one for the HLT and one for the boil kettle. The HLT cooler has a 2000W heating element installed in the bottom and runs off 110V


Thornton’s all-electric system is great for indoor use or in small spaces

from the control box. The other cooler is a simple mash tun with a mesh tube screen for lautering. Thornton’s converted keg boil kettle, or “keggle,” contains a 5500W heating element hooked up to a 220V outlet on the control box. Switched dual electrical sockets on the control box allow pumps to be used to re-circulate the mash and for pumping wort through a plate chiller after the end of the boil. The system is very compact and great for using indoors or in small spaces. Danny Leaf from Leaf Sales in Chula Vista assembled and wired Thornton’s control box and was also responsible for most of the fabrication on Jeff’s system. On a smaller scale, Chris Manzi, manager at The Homebrewer, has a more manual

but still compact brewing rig featuring two eight-gallon stainless steel kettles on top of a 60,000 BTU dual burner propane fired stove. On a shelf to its left sits a 10-gallon cylindrical cooler mash tun with a mesh tube screen for lautering. The HLT must be lifted off the stove to add the strike water into the mash tun, and the boil kettle has to sit below the mash tun to collect wort before being lifted back onto the burner. While a pump could help out, it’s rather easy doing it manually since everything is compact and he’s only dealing with less than six gallons of wort or water at a time. The coolest part about Manzi’s rig is his water setup up. With an input hose connection he can either go through his water filter and into the HLT, or rout the water around

to where his mash tun normally sits for use as a rinse station once brewing is complete. With a robust two-coil immersion copper chiller, wort for a five-gallon batch can be cooled down to yeast pitching temperature within seven minutes when pumping ice water through the chiller. The rig currently doesn’t have any wheels but the addition of a couple casters would make it even easier to move around. So there you have it, three DIY systems from a larger nano-sized brewing scale all the way down to a more traditional fivegallon homebrewing setup. Hopefully the rigs will inspire those of you looking to take your brewing system to the next level.

WestCoasterSD.com | 23


A few of Swem’s DIY gadgets. Both the whole cone hop basket (far right) and PVC pipe carboy cleaner next to it were created by friend Danny Leaf

Swem’s guest room would make any beer fan feel at home

24 | April 2013


Loyal assistants Sadie (above) and Macy enjoy brewing on weekends, and will work for food


Chef Craig Jimenez samples a flight poured from Roseville Cozinha’s 15 taps. Photos by Ryan Lamb

FUll S CiRClE ChEF

Chef Craig Jimenez has consulted in some of the most successful kitchens in town, and now, back to experimenting BY AMY T. GRANITE 26 | April 2013

parks flew in 2007 when Craig Jimenez—then just 26-years-old—was promoted to his first executive chef role at The Guild, where modern gastronomy met funky plate-ware, all designed by owner and artist, Paul Basile. While guests ate, they could literally look in on Basile’s massive metal and fabrication shop at the experimental restaurant concept in Barrio Logan. Jimenez, a San Diego native, is most known for his executive chef roles at vanguard haunts Neighborhood Ale House and Craft & Commerce—the former is where his love affair with craft beer began. Jimenez and Consortium Holdings’ Arsalun Tafazoli met at The Guild; in between meeting with Basile on custom designs for his newly opened Neighborhood, Tafazoli would stop into the restaurant for Jimenez’s sliders. When the restaurant closed, Tafazoli snagged its chef along with some of Basile’s presentations like the street taco holders, and even the chairs from the bar. Though The Guild had a loyal following of adventurous eaters, it was ahead of its time, especially location-wise. But by the time it closed, Jimenez had fed all the right people, including Michael Alvez, who gave the chef a jingle after the nationally swooned-


over Craft & Commerce grew to unimaginable success, steering Jimenez back to consulting—his passion. “I’ve been on a crazy journey these past few years. Craft is a huge highlight—so was was Henry’s Pub. To me, our city needs as much help as it can get. I don’t discriminate. If it’s a small, dinky shop and someone’s too good for it, I’m not. Food needs to be shared and done right.” Alvez, who was in the market to re-concept his Liberty Station restaurant, Joao’s Tin Fish Bar & Eatery, knew just the guy to do the job. With Jimenez on board to make the Portuguese and Italian-influenced Roseville Cozinha a hit, one of the first things he did was eradicate all the watered-down macros and implement a craft-driven beer program. “I think we’re just going to keep rotating the selection,” explains Jimenez of the plan. “There are so many great beers out there.” Right now, there’s a changing lineup of 15 brews from Cismontane to Iron Fire plus some of San Diego’s Old Guard breweries as well. “With the experiences I had at Neighborhood, I learned a lot about beer and how to diversify it, which is really cool because Mike is listening to my suggestions and getting them in. Everyone’s getting on the same page here.” So what’s next? “Eventually, there will be a lot more one offs, and beer dinners,” Jimenez says. Become a fan of Roseville Cozhina on Facebook for promotions and events updates; though a date hasn’t been set, this month, the restaurant will host a dueling beer dinner between Ballast Point and Iron Fire. Brewers from both camps will present four courses each, with pairings. “During this time of recession, beer was good buffer. There’s so much value and flavor in a pint, and it’s interesting, because Roseville Cozinha’s wood-burning oven is utilized for a wide variety of dishes on the menu

Russian River Brewpub


brewing was like some kind of lost art. Beer is responsible for bringing in that hug the city needed,” Jimenez says. “Looking at where our region was just three years ago—it’s changed a lot. And not just restaurants—with people buying locally. Now farmers are able to provide a more consistent product. The money stays here, which is great.” As for the food offerings at Roseville, Jimenez emphasizes that he wasn’t brought on to reinvent the wheel. With his guidance, Alvez came at him with a first draft menu that Jimenez is refining. “I told Mike a year ago that Craft & Commerce is nothing special: Its food is simple and consistent. You make all five or six ingredients the best you can get, and make it affordable,” he says. “Successful restaurants are doing a few things right, with de-cluttered menus.” Alvez ran with it. He bought a woodburning oven to bake pizzas and roast veggies. It’s also where one of the most popular dishes—whole roasted shrimp with parsley, and garlic—reaches sweetness that sizzles. Rustic, oven-toasted bread comes in handy to sop up all the delectable juices that tender potatoes at the bottom of the skillet

28 | April 2013

haven’t. The expansive kitchen is a playground, Jimenez says, where he can grind meat, make pates and just have fun nailing down the dishes that will stay. “We think of it as auditions. If something doesn’t sell, we take it off the menu.” Jimenez tells West Coaster that the juniper-brined, bone-in pork chop is also a hit—but we already knew that from experience—along with the cioppino. If you go for the pork chop, the creamy mashed potatoes aren’t to be missed. We had to order an extra side. The flavors are clean and distinguishable, portions beyond generous— small plates? Huh?—and the atmosphere is chill, but still undergoing some changes to transform it into more of a communal ale house. There are specials every night of the week but Saturday; on Mondays, there’s a burger and beer combo special and on Tuesdays, if you order a pizza, any craft beer is $3. For an affordable date night, there’s a $20 per person, three-course menu available on Thursdays. Happy hour runs from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and Sundays from 3 p.m. until close. Expect a little something different on each of these nights, as Jimenez stocks his kitchen with seasonal

ingredients from Suzie’s Farm and other local purveyors. Like any artist, Jimenez has a body of work that defines his style and identity. Some of his dishes and concepts reappear— he takes what works and builds on it. “I’m hired to execute others’ visions,” he says. “At the end of the day, if they want to do a hot dog, I’m gonna make the best damn hot dog.” Still, he’s not stopping there. While Jimenez is wearing the executive chef’s coat at Roseville, he’s been working on a project of his own for the past 10 years that is starting off as a soup dumpling stall called KAEN Come Eat Now at the Public Market. It’s back to the Barrio, and full circle for the impassioned chef whose big smile and laughs are contagious. “San Diego is small. You see who respects you, and who keeps their word; it’s a good sense of community in the end,” he says. “Seven years later, and I’m off to a good start.” The bar area at Roseville Cozinha feels right at home in Liberty Station with its nods to Portuguese and Italian culture


WestCoasterSD.com | 29


INTO THE BREw

BEST

glass ever?

Self-proclaimed glass geek tries out Spiegelau’s new product BY SAM TIERNEY

30 | April 2013


N

ot all beer glasses are created equal, or at least that’s what the folks at Spiegelau, Sierra Nevada and Dogfish Head have proclaimed with the recent release of a style-specific IPA glass. The collaborative project between the two breweries and German glass-maker has been in the works for quite some time and has finally made it out into the world to (hopefully) enhance our appreciation of lupulin-heavy beers like IPA. I first got wind of this project last summer while co-hosting a glassware seminar with Matt Rutkowski, Vice President of Spiegelau USA, at the Savor the Central Coast event in Santa Margarita. We tasted four different Firestone Walker beers in the four glasses of the Spiegelau Beer Connoisseur Set, along with each in a standard shaker pint glass, which is the most common beer glass in the United States. Rutkowski told me that he had been working with teams from Sierra and Dogfish to fine-tune the perfect glass for IPA. They felt that as IPA was quickly becoming one of the most popular styles of beer in the U.S., it deserved a glass designed to accentuate its signature hoppy characteristics. My interest was definitely piqued, but he said the release was months away. Coming away from that seminar, I learned a few important things about glassware that even this self-proclaimed glassware geek hadn’t considered. For one, the material matters; lower-quality glass is brittle and breaks easily. To compensate, the glass needs to be thick, with a rounded lip to maintain durability. More glass equals more thermal mass, which causes your beer to warm up unless the glass has been chilled. This warming effect also causes your beer to go flat faster, due to the fact that the solubility of carbon dioxide in beer decreases as temperature increases.

A thicker glass lip also dumps the beer into your mouth, versus the more accurate palate delivery that a thin, cut lip on a higher-quality glass promotes. More glass just gets in the way when it comes down to it. Spiegelau and other similar higher-quality glasses are made of much stronger, blown crystal glass, which allows very thin walls while retaining superior durability. They source their silica from a German quarry near the factory that also provides materials for the fiber optics and medical industries.

“The IPA glass delivered an edgier citrus and fruity aroma, with a good deal more intensity. It really was like sticking your nose in an ‘olfactory cannon’ – to borrow a phrase from Dogfish Head’s Sam Calagione.” Because of this, when you pour a beer into one of their glasses, very little heat gets transferred. As an added bonus, I have been using their glasses 90% of the time when drinking at home for the last eight months, and have yet to break one, while several other glasses have met an early grave in my sink during that time. Knock over a product from Spiegelau and they are more likely to bounce than shatter. My other big take-away was that most branded glassware is just brewery marketing and often made of low-quality glass

that doesn’t do anything particularly good for the beer. The shaker pint is the epitome of this – cheap advertizing meant to help sell beer to people who hopefully don’t know any better. In my previous column on glassware, I celebrated the diversity of glasses around the world for different beer styles, but when it comes down to it, many of them are about branding and appearance over substantive benefit to the beer drinking experience. Even many fancy Belgian chalices are basically thick glass bowls that do more to evoke monastic imagery than to enhance the beer in any way. How much does any of this affect your personal beer drinking experience? That’s really something you have to see for yourself. I decided to test the new IPA glass, which is currently available from Sierra Nevada and Dogfish Head, and will be shortly directly from Spiegelau. Since I had already compared Spiegelau glasses side-by-side with shakers before, I knew it wouldn’t be much of a competition, but we decided to include one anyway as a base-line for the common IPA drinking experience. Then, we added the Spiegelau tulip glass as the third contender, to test the IPA glass next to a glass of equal quality that is also designed to enhance aromatic beers. For our test beer, I chose to go with Pale 31, a dry-hopped West Coast pale ale. I wanted a beer that I am intimately familiar with and could guarantee a good sample. Pale 31 is also on the more delicate side as far as hop character, so any flaw in a glass’ ability to accentuate hop aroma would be noticed. All three clean glasses were filled at the same time from three bottles out of a sixpack, and the tasting session commenced. On the appearance front, the shaker retained a moderate head for several minutes and then left a ring of foam. The tulip initially offered a smallish head with visible


carbonation trails, but had trouble sustaining the head after a few minutes. The IPA glass poured the biggest head which stayed around the longest. More bubble trails were visible as well, likely due to the nucleation point on the bottom of the glass. Upon drinking, the ridges at the base of the glass agitated the beer, also contributing to sustained foam. I had heard others comment on the unorthodox appearance of the IPA glass, but I actually found it rather charming with a full pour in it. The tulip is a classic look but I have to give the edge to the IPA glass here, with the shaker a distant third. The aroma was what it all came down to for me, and the IPA glass delivered in spades. I knew from past experience that the shaker would do poorly, and there were no surprises; it was vague and weak compared with the other two, and even started to show a papery, oxidized quality after a few minutes while the others did not. The tulip delivered a soft, round hop aroma with more emphasis on juicy fruit and flowers. The IPA glass delivered an edgier citrus and

32 | April 2013

fruity aroma, with a good deal more intensity. It really was like sticking your nose into an “olfactory cannon” – to borrow a phrase from Dogfish Head’s Sam Calagione. The bottom ridges of the glass came into play, automatically kicking out more aroma with each sip, an effect the tulip showed only with aggressive swirling. While both the IPA glass and the tulip presented the aroma nicely, I was surprised at how much more I preferred the IPA glass. The flavor/mouthfeel differences between the glasses were most apparent in carbonation levels and delivery onto the palate. The shaker glass warmed faster than the other two as the heat from the thicker glass infused into the beer. This caused a faster carbonation loss, even when compared to the etched IPA glass. I would speculate that the somewhat narrower surface area of the IPA glass helped in this department, balancing the effect of the etching. It was roughly equal to the tulip in this respect. Palate delivery with the IPA glass was somewhat like a pilsner glass in that it was directed more

to the center of your tongue, while the tulip is more to the front. The IPA glass just felt like you get a slightly more balanced flavor, conducive to quaffing instead of sipping. The tulip glass made me want to take smaller sips, but that might just be because I’m used to drinking bigger beers out of tulips. I’d pretty much lost all interest in the shaker at this point but I will say that the delivery was less controlled and didn’t do much for the flavor. Overall, I think I have a new go-to glass for pale ales and IPAs. The aroma delivery is just as good, if not better, than a tulip, while the feel is more like a taller pint/pils glass, which is the perfect combination for me. I know that people will continue to judge it for its unique looks, but I wouldn’t rush to judgement without trying it for yourself. In the land of the IPA, this glass just might be king. Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


BOTTLED KEGGED

&

The Taste of San Diego Craft Brews event, held February 16 in Balboa Park, kicked off the San Diego History Center’s “Year of Craft Beer” in style. About a week later, time and labor were donated by R.E. Staite Engineering Inc. to move Home Brew Mart’s retired brewhouse into the exhibit area after having removed it from its home of 17 years in Linda Vista. The brewhouse will be on display along with more local beer memorabilia and interactive elements starting April 6. Photos by Kristina Yamamoto 34 | April 2013


PIZZA PORT

BRESSI RANCH

In late February Pizza Port’s upcoming headquarters in Bressi Ranch (Carlsbad-inland) received several Mueller tanks trucked in from Missouri. Brewmaster Yiga Miyashiro welcomed three 30 BBL fermentors, one 30 BBL brite, two 150 BBL fermentors and one 150 BBL brite; his 30 BBL, fourvessel Mueller brewhouse should arrive in April along with the impressive Italian canning line. The facility will also house a massive aquarium built into a fermentor and a beautiful outdoor patio. Photos by Ryan Lamb

36 | April 2013


BUSINESS OF BEER

The first SoCal Business of Beer Symposium was held on March 12 at White Labs’ facility in Miramar, organized by Lightning Brewery’s Jim Crute, Drown Consulting’s Dan Drown and RSR Law Group’s Bill Reavey (pictured speaking below). Attendees learned about local government relations, real estate issues, capital raising, beer distribution, regulatory issues, tasting room management and much more. Tomme Arthur, Director of Brewery Operations for Port Brewing / The Lost Abbey (pictured speaking above) spoke about “Brewery Curveballs” and how to deal with them. Photos by Mike Shess


UPCOMING CRAFT BEER EVENTS See more @ westcoastersd.com/event-calendar

LOVELIKEBEER “CORNUCOPIA” @ THE LINKERy - APRIL 3 This one-night only, no cover event features custom AleSmith cask ales paired with corn-inspired vegan dishes from 5:30 - 11:30 p.m. Just to give you a taste, one of the pairings includes wild mushroom tamal, yellow corn pozole broth, local cabbage and radish alongside AleSmith Anvil ESB with smoked hatch chiles. 15% of all sales benefit the San Diego chapter of Engineers Without Borders. Visit lovelikebeer.com to see more menu details.

TUSK & GRAIN LAUNCH @ HAMILTON’S TAVERN - APRIL 5

The new offshoot of Coronado Brewing Company, Tusk & Grain, kicks off a monthlong series of events at the South Park bar. Publican Scot Blair will be pouring Loutish Madras IPA, Black Hatchet Milk Stout (both classic and on nitro), East Kent Bitter ESB, and two casks: dry-hopped Loutish Madras IPA and Black Hatchet Milk Stout with cacao and vanilla bean. Find the rest of the events on the WC online calendar.

SAN DIEGO BREw CLASSIC @ MISSION BAy - APRIL 7

The only event in San Diego where you can drink on the beach, on day two of the San Diego Crew Classic on the east side of Crown Point. Tickets are $30 in advance online for the VIP session, which includes an additional hour of beer tasting starting at 1 p.m. General admission tickets are $20 and include ten four-ounce tastings, a commemorative taster cup and music. Food (Swieners and Woodstock’s Pizza) and full pours will be available for purchase. Breweries scheduled to pour: Karl Strauss, Aztec, Helm’s, Hillcrest, Stone, Ballast Point, Coronado, Lightning, Hess, Pizza Port and Hangar 24, plus Julian Hard Cider. For more information visit crewclassic.org

BUSINESS OF CRAFT BREw @ SDSU - APRIL 17

The San Diego State Business Alumni Network is hosting a panel of leading industry experts to discuss the rise of craft beer in San Diego. Moderated by Chefs Press’ Bruce Glassman, the panel will include Chris Cramer from Karl Strauss, Mike Hinkley from Green Flash, Steve Wagner from Stone Brewing Co., Peter zien from AleSmith, Doug Constantiner from Societe Brewing and Scot Blair from Hamilton’s Tavern. You don’t have to be an SDSU alum to attend; tickets for the general public are $45 for the 5 - 8 p.m. event that includes samples from the breweries as well as bites from Slater’s 50/50. Visit sdsualumni.org/ban for more information.

KARL’S COUNTRy BOIL @ HANDLERy HOTEL - APRIL 21

From the guys who brought you the Mission Valley Craft Beer and Food Festival comes another fun event: Karl’s Country Boil. For $25 online you’ll get a bounty of crawfish, shrimp, baby potatoes, andouille sausage and corn on the cob all cooked in a traditional, spicy sauce and accompanied by Societe Brewing’s Belgian-style ales from 1 - 4 p.m.

HOMEBREw FOR CHARITy @ LOCAL HABIT - APRIL 24

Locals David and Jessica McKean will be offering their homebrews in exchange for a donation to the Emilio Nares Foundation from 5 - 10 p.m. This organization offers programs and services for low-income and underprivileged families who have a child battling cancer in San Diego and Orange County. There will also be a raffle, and Local Habit plans to donate 10% of its sales. This is a great opportunity to try some local beer and support a fantastic cause.

BEST OF THE wEST IPA FEST @ JSIX - MAy 5

Come try out IPAs from Green Flash, Ballast Point, Manzanita, Lightning, Port Brewing, Hillcrest and more from 3 - 6 p.m. Vote on your favorite and see how it compares with the “critic’s choice.” Your $20 ticket also includes food from Jsix Executive Chef Christian Graves. Visit jsixrestaurant.com for more info.

ARTISAN FOOD AND CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL - MAy 5

Benefitting the San Diego Chef Celebration, this event features some of the best chefs in San Diego along with beer pairings by Stone Brewing Co. Craft Beer Ambassador Dr. Bill Sysak. For $55 you get unlimited bites from Alex Carballo (Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens), Karl Prohaska (Handlery Hotel), Nate Soroko (Toronado), Karen Blair (Small Bar, Hamilton’s, Monkey Paw), Greg Frey (BlueFire Grill), Dawn Parks (The Wild Thyme Company), Tommy Fraioli (Sea Rocket Bistro), Leah Di Bernardo (E.A.T. Marketplace), Tyson Blake & Chef Paul (O’Brien’s Pub), Kyle Bergman (Ritual Tavern) and more. Visit stoneworldbistro.com to learn more.

Continued from page 19 Best Practices The following are CCBA recommended Best Practices when refilling a growler supplied by the consumer and previously filled by another brewery: • Any and all information, logos or references to any brewery that previously filled the container should be obscured in a manner that is not readily removable. Placing a paper bag over the container or wrapping it with paper would not meet these criteria. • To obscure label information from a previous brewery, the CCBA recommends a 3” opaque black shrink wrap. This is easy to apply and has a fairly good appearance. It is a much a better alternative to duct tape. One source of this tape is McMaster Carr (catalog pages 1559 and 1560 or online). We recommend that you purchase the handheld wrap dispenser (Item C). Part # for 3” tape is wrap is 2092T616. Part # for dispenser is 2092T21. • Although not required, the label should include the filling date for quality purposes. • Brewers should refuse to fill plastic or paper containers of any kind. These materials cannot be cleaned properly and are likely to harbor bacteria. • “Handling instructions” should be included on your container (see attached neck hanger example online at californiacraftbeer.com). • You should not obliterate or permanently remove a previous breweries logo or brand name or otherwise deface a growler from another brewery. • Do not refill a container size that you do not have label approval for. This is a violation. • The CCBA recommends using a neck hanger as an affixed label. It allows for best appearance, it is versatile for checking off or writing in the brand name, container size and alcohol content and holds up well in moist conditions. • Every brewery should have a policy for refilling growlers. This should be made easily available to the consumer. It is ultimately in the best interest of the consumer to only refill growlers under specific pre-determined conditions. • There are many inexpensive growler options out there. The CCBA recommends you only use growlers which will maintain the integrity of your beer. Colored glass or doublewalled/insulated stainless growlers are highly recommended. When purchasing growlers, consider the ability of the seal to maintain carbonation, glass thickness and universal content sizes. • The health and safety of customers as well as employees should be held in high regard at all times. CONSUMER NOTE: CCBA member breweries take great pride in the products they produce. It is of the utmost importance that the quality and integrity of the beer they produce is maintained from the time it leaves the brewery until it is consumed. The cleanliness, functionality and integrity of the refillable container is critical. Therefore, breweries may choose not to refill certain containers for a wide variety of important reasons. Cleanliness of the container when it is brought in for refill, or the ability of the brewery to clean a container before refilling, is vital. Some breweries are using inexpensive containers that do not seal properly or have questionable glass thickness and these should not be reused. In some cases, brewers may not be able to comply with label requirements of refilling certain sized containers. Please keep in mind that the design of some breweries draft systems or growler filling stations may only be able to accommodate a certain size and type of growler. Refilling of growlers is a great way for consumers to sample beers from different breweries in an affordable way and offers an environmentally favorable method of doing so. For Craft Brewers, maintaining the quality of the beer up to point-of-consumption is, above all else, the most important factor when filling any kind of packaging including growlers.


MISSION VALLEy CRAFT BEER AND FOOD FESTIVAL MVCBF IV was held March 24 at the Handlery Hotel and raised more than $4,000 for Wounded Warrior Homes in the process. Judges, led by avid beer fan Mike Mellow, ranked the top three beers and food items of the day. First place for beer was Societe’s The Pupil IPA, followed by Hess’ Helicon Rye Pale Ale and El Cajon Brewing Company’s Stout. The Handlery’s stuffed mussels took first place in the food category, with R-Gang’s mac and cheese coming in second. Sea Rocket Bistro’s pork belly tacos rounded out the group. Organizers recently announced that this would be the last MVCBF, despite its immense popularity. Say it ain’t so!


Continued from page 18

pork meatballs with green flash hop head red bbQ sauce Yield: 4 servings 2-pound pork but, cut into cubes 4 ounces pork fat back, cut into small cubes 1 large carrot, small diced 1 tablespoon Italian parsley, minced 1 teaspoon garlic, minced salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Green Flash Hop Head Red BBQ Sauce (recipe follows) Use a meat grinder to grind the pork butt and fat.* Transfer the ground meat to a bowl. Add the carrot, parsley and garlic, season with salt and mix together until all of the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated. Form the mixture into 12 balls. Heat a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the meatballs and cook for 6 minutes. Turn the meatballs over and cook for 6 more minutes. Add the sauce and bring to a simmer. Turn off the heat and serve immediately. * Note: If you do not have access to a meat grinder, substitute 2¼ ounces of ground pork.

green flash hop head red bbQ sauce ½ pound bacon, diced ½ cup white onion, small diced 12 ounces Green Flash Hop Head Red 6 ounces brown sugar 2 cups canned whole, peeled tomatoes 2 tablespoons tomato paste salt to taste Heat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook until it begins to crisp up. Add the onions and cook for 5 minutes. Add the beer and cook 1 minute. Add the sugar, tomatoes and tomato paste. Bring to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Use a blender or food processor to puree the mixture. Season with salt.

— Recipes courtesy of Hanis Cavin


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORy & MAP

a

la Jolla

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

b

pacific beach mission beach BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 3. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 4. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 5. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 6. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 7. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 8. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 9. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 10. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 11. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 12. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars

42 | April 2013

13. woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

c

point loma ocean beach BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 3. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 4. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 5. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 6. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 7. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 8. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 9. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 10. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 11. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 12. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 13. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 14. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com

D

mission valley clairemont BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 2. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 3. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 4. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 5. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Mesa Liquor & wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 3. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 4. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

e

coronaDo

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

f

mission hills hillcrest BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 2. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 3. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 4. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 5. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 6. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 7. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 8. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

g

DoWntoWn

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 4. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 5. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 6. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 7. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 8. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 9. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 10. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 11. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 12. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 13. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 14. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 15. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bacchus wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 401 G St. | 619.231.7000 www.RockBottom.com/San-Diego 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

h

uptoWn

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 3. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 4. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com

5. El Take It Easy 3926 30th St. | 619.291.1859 www.ElTakeItEasy.com 6. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 7. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 8. Live wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 9. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 10. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 11. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 12. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 13. The Linkery 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.TheLinkery.com 14. The Rose wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 15. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 16. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 17. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 18. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 19. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 20. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com 3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

BREWERIES 1. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 2. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com


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CRAFT BEER DIRECTORy & MAP

i

north county

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 2. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 3. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 4. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 5. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 6. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 7. Stone Brewing world Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 8. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com 9. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 10. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Holiday wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 3. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 4. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 5. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 6. Texas wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com 7. Vista wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 3. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 4. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com 5. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 6. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 3. Fezziwig’s Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.FezziwigsBrewing.com 4. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 5. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 6. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com

44 | April 2013

7. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 8. Oceanside Ale works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 9. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 10. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com 11. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 12. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 13. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 14. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com

BREWERIES 1. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 2. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 3. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 4. Hess Brewing 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 5. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 6. wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com 2. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 3. Smokin Beaver 348 State Pl. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

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encinitas Del mar BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 2. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 3. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 4. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 6. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 7. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 8. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

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sorrento valley mira mesa BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com 2. woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

1. white Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

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poWay rancho bernarDo BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 2. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 3. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

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alpine BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

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ramona BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

o

Julian BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

p

south bay

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com

2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 2. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 3. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Mad Lab Craft Brewing 6120 Business Ctr. Ct. | 619.254.6478 www.MadLabCraftBrewing.Wordpress.com

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college la mesa BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. KnB wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 5. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 6. west Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 7. woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

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east county

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 2. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 4. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION? Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com


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2nd St

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West Coaster  

April 2013 issue. News for San Diego's craft beer community

West Coaster  

April 2013 issue. News for San Diego's craft beer community