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Volume 43- No. 49

December 05, 2013

by lyle e davis

Due to popular demand, we follow up last week’s cover story with the conclusion of the tale:

Across the Plains in '64 is the story of how thirteen-yearold Philura Vanderburgh and her family crossed the continent in a covered wagon as part of the Great Daily Train.

Many years later, when she had children of her own, Philura told them of her experiences on the journey, and her daughter, Anna, wrote them down, especially for young people who will never again have the chance to hear the pioneers tell their own stories. Written in 1953 by Anna Dell Clinkinbeard, Across the Plains in '64 is a book detailing her Great-Grandfather's family crossing the prairies in a covered wagon in 1864.

This is the second part of a twopart series The Paper is excerpting from that book. Fort Laramie

More and more as we went on, we talked of Fort Laramie, the halfway station on the trail, a place where repairs could be made or needed supplies purchased. Here, too, Chris and Tom were to leave us and we were to go on unaided, just our family in three wagons. So many tales we had heard of the Fort, the haven it had been to the pioneers, and the protection it now offered the emigrants, that we awaited eagerly this break in our travel. It never occurred to us to call ourselves pioneers; too many had been over that trail before; too deeply was it worn. When at last we drove up to the Fort, we gazed about with interest. People, people, and more people! It seemed to me like the crowds we had seen in the cities left behind. Soldiers swarmed about, looking each train over, perhaps to see a friend; emigrants were preparing busily for further travel; traders bustled about their business, and Indians and more Indians, all a weaving mass of seeming confusion. The Paper - 760.747.7119

website:www.thecommunitypaper.com

email: thepaper@cox.net

Part of our train left us there and we never saw them again. Many took the California Trail, which branched off at that point. Among these were Chris and Tom. Though so many left us, an equal number joined us and we went on with our train little changed in size. Most of the men went into the

Fort, and I wished that I were a boy so that I might have gone with Father and Winfield. It was very interesting, though, to watch the people while we waited for them to return. We were to stay but a few hours, for we were, as ever, anxious to press on. While we were eating our

lunch, we children almost too busy watching to crowds to eat, I saw a wonderfully dressed Indian coming toward us, followed by a squad of warriors. His face looked familiar. "Haven't we seen him before?" I asked, nodding toward the Indian.

Wagon Train II Continued on Page 2


Page 2 - December 05, 2013 ‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. from Page 1

Win looked at him for a moment. "He's the one who ate all our lunch that day," he said. "What a change!"

We stared at him in amazement. Instead of the dirty trousers and greasy shirt, here was a brilliantly clad Sioux Chief. His creamy-white buckskin suit was ornamented with beads, porcupine quills and fringe. His feather headdress reached to his heels. He was the finest specimen of a wellclad Indian I ever saw.

When he saw that we were eating, he very courteously stopped and with the other Indians, evidently his staff, waited until we were through. As we arose from our meal, he came up to us saying, "How, how," and smiling in such a friendly way that I could not help liking him. I surely liked his clothes. The buckskin was so white; the beads glittered so brightly, and that wonderful headdress! A Sioux Chief's regalia is truly magnificent.

He shook hands with Father and Mother and Winfield and me, then with each of the little boys. Carrie was standing on the wagon tongue putting away some things. She did not

Give Us This Day Our Daily Chuckle This week, a compendium of wit, wisdom and neat stuff you can tell at parties. Enjoy! Only the Irish . . .

An Irishman who had a little too much to drink is driving home from the city one night and, of course, his car is weaving violently all over the road. A cop pulls him over.

"So," says the cop to the driver, "Where have ya been?"

"Why, I've been to the pub of course," Slurs the drunk.

"Well," says the cop, "it looks like you've had quite a few to drink this evening."

"I did all right," the drunk says with a smile.

"Did you know," says the cop, standing straight and folding his arms across his chest, "that

like Indians and did not want to shake his hand. She knew he was waiting and she worked and worked and would not turn around. Patiently he stood there, dignified and friendly-looking, and the line of keen-eyed warriors looked us over and over as if they meant to remember us. At last Carrie knew that he would stay there until she turned, so she sprang down from the wagon tongue and took his hand.

"Other papoose? Little girl?" he asked.

Father remembered that Florence had been with us that other morning, so he pointed to where she was with her family. He walked over, magnificent Chief that he was, followed by his staff, and to the wide-eyed amazement of the Acker family, the rest of whom he ignored entirely, he strode up to Florence and said, "How, little girl." He shook her hand with great formality and politeness, the keen-eyed warriors looking at her as they had looked at us. He came back and said to Father, "Want fresh meat?" Father said, "Yes."

"Go one day." He pointed to the road. "Before sunrise, go one mile to the right." He pointed to

a few intersections back, your wife fell out of your car?"

"Oh, thank heavens," sighs the drunk. "For a minute there, I thought I'd gone deaf." ••••• Brenda O'Malley is home making dinner, as usual, when Tim Finnegan arrives at her door. "Brenda, may I come in?" he asks. "I've somethin' to tell ya."

"Of course you can come in, you're always welcome, Tim, but where's my husband?" "That's what I'm here to be telling ya, Brenda. There was an accident down at the Guinness brewery..." "Oh, God no!" cries Brenda. "Please don't tell me."

"I must, Brenda. Your husband Shamus Is dead and gone. I'm sorry.” Finally, she looked up at Tim. "How did it happen, Tim?"

"It was terrible, Brenda. He fell into a vat Of Guinness Stout and drowned." "Oh my dear Jesus! But you must tell me truth, Tim. Did he at least go quickly?"

"Well, Brenda... No. In fact, He got out three times to pee."

show the direction. "Three gullies meet. Big spring. Elk drink - daylight. Go. Kill elk." He talked partly by signs, partly in English and partly in a dialect that Father knew. After a few minutes he very politely left us followed by the other Indians. Very impressive they looked as they stalked away.

"Entertaining royalty, this time," Win said. "What does it mean?"

"It might mean a good deal," said a soldier who had been standing by looking on with interest "That Sioux Chief is the biggest man in these parts, head of the whole Sioux nation. If they should go on the war path, you might have a worse man for a friend."

When father was preparing to follow the Chief's directions and go for the elk, he met with violent opposition from the other men. "I tell you he is just trying to get you where he can kill you. It won't do. It isn't safe to go." "No," Father said, "that Indian won't injure me. He was playing straight." "You'll never get back," he was told. "Yes, I will, and be pretty apt to

Mary Clancy goes up to Father O'Grady after his Sunday morning service, and she's in tears. He says, "So what's bothering you, Mary my dear?" She says, "Oh, Father, I've got terrible news. My husband passed away last night."

The priest says, "Oh, Mary, that's terrible, tell me did he have any last requests?" She says, Father."

"That

he

did,

The priest says, "What did he ask, Mary?" She says, "He said, 'Please Mary, put down that damn gun...' ••••• AND THE BEST FOR LAST

A drunk staggers into a Catholic Church, enters a confessional booth, sits down, but says nothing. The Priest coughs a few times to get his attention but the drunk continues to sit there. Finally, the Priest pounds three times on the wall.

The drunk mumbles, "Ain't no use knockin, there's no paper on this side either!"

bring some meat with me, too."

With the men still objecting, almost compelling him to stay, Father left the camp. He followed the Indian's directions and at sunrise was hidden in a beautiful spot overlooking a big spring where, as he had been told, three little grassy valleys united. Many animals, antelope, deer and other creatures were stealing down to the watering place.

Finally a drove of elk appeared. Father selected a large one, aimed and fired. The animal fell, a bullet through its heart. Before he could reload his gun, all the other animals had fled. When he came back to the camp there was no difficulty in getting men to go with him for the meat. The Indian had kept faith and they were no longer afraid. An elk is a big animal, but we had very little of that one. There were too many people whose need was greater than ours. The Little Antelope

A few days later when we stopped at noon beside a spring, we found a forlorn

‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. on Page 3

The Urine Sample

One time I got sick and landed in hospital. There was this one nurse that just drove me crazy. Every time she came in, she would talk to me like I was a little child. She would say in a patronizing tone of voice, “and how are we doing this morning? Or “Are we ready for a bath? or Are we hungry?”

I had had enough of this particular nurse. One day at breakfast, I took the apple juice off the tray and put it in my bedside stand. Later I was given a urine sample bottle to fill for testing. So you know where the juice went! The nurse came in a while later, picked up the urine sample bottle, looked at it and said, “My, my, it seems we are a little cloudy today.”

At this, I snatched the bottle out of her hand, popped off the top, and gulped it down, saying, “Well, I'll run it through again. Maybe I can filter it better this time!” The nurse fainted... I just smiled.

‘Chuckles’ Cont. on Page 7


‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. from Page 2

party already there. The outfit consisted of two wagons carrying a man and his wife, his young sister, two children and a hired man. All were sick, too sick to travel, so sick in fact that they had dropped out of a train and stayed behind to die. The girl and the hired man were able to move about a little; the babies were mere skeletons. For three days they had been steadily growing weaker and all hope of reaching Oregon was gone. Dysentery is a terrible thing when it attacks an emigrant party.

Father fed their horses and he and Mother got out our medicine box to try to help them. He filled a saucer with brandy and placed a lump of sugar and a lump of mutton tallow on a fork. Then he set the brandy afire and held the sugar and the mutton tallow in the flame. They both melted and dripped down into the burning brandy. At last nothing was left but a brown syrup-like substance in the saucer. This was the medicine. That and some other remedies and some food were taken to the sick people. Then we left them as comfortable as Father and Mother could make them. Later we learned from one of the scouts who were continually passing from train to train carrying news of the road that the following day they were so much improved that they joined another train. Later still we learned that they reached Oregon safely.

One day as Father was hunting, hoping to get some fresh meat, he found a little antelope fawn crouching in some brush. He petted the tiny spotted creature and it followed him into camp. We were delighted and wanted to keep the little playful thing. Father told us that as we had no milk we could not possibly do so. It must go back to its mother. All the evening we played with it, the pretty little animal following us about, a delightful pet. Every child in the train wanted to pat its head and play with it, for never was there a more winning little creature.

The next morning Father took it out onto the prairie to leave it where its mother would find it. We children were watching it, loath to see it go. Father had told us that the mother had surely followed it to the camp and was probably hiding nearby at the time. In the train was a party of men who kept a pack of hounds. The men and hounds were always eager for a chase. As Father started with the fawn, to our

horror we saw the men collecting their dogs. Father went back for his gun. He put the little creature on the ground some distance from the wagons and left it. As he started away, a hound was turned loose. A wail went up from the children as it started for the little antelope.

Father raised his gun and aimed at the dog, and Uncle Isaac shouted, "Call off your dog, man! He'll kill it!"

"Yes," called Father, "I'll kill every dog I can hit if it is chasing that fawn."

The dogs were called off in a hurry. Father was too sure a shot for chances to be taken. The men grumbled, but the little antelope was not disturbed. I hope it found its mother. The Bushwhackers

A day or two after we passed Fort Laramie there began one of the unpleasant experiences of the journey. After we had camped one evening, a cattle train drove up and passed our camp. Just ahead of us they stopped for the night. "It would have been decent of them to have stayed behind us," Father said. "We will have trouble passing them tomorrow."

"Tough-looking customers," Uncle Isaac said as we watched them pass. "They look like mountaineers." Tall, lanky, uncouth people, swearing, cracking their whips, yelling at their oxen as they ran beside them, they passed us, about fifty wagons.

"It is hard to keep children clean," Mother said, "but they don't need to look like that. Poor little things." The next morning, before we were ready to start, they were up and away, hurrying apparently to get on the road before we started. As we drove behind them, our horses fretted and chafed at their slowness. When our wagons turned out into the sagebrush to try to pass them, they whipped up their oxen and kept us out of the road as long as possible.

"Aren't they mean!" Carrie exclaimed. "Who ever saw people act like that?" She was so angry. It was not easy to drive over the bumpy sagebrush and it seemed we would never get back into the road.

Since the hired men had left us, Win drove one wagon and Carrie drove the four-horse team. Very little she looked, a slim, tiny figure on the high seat, handling the great team. She did it well, too.

Sometimes Mother drove one of the teams or I drove Derby and Prince or Win's team. Carrie's outfit was too big for me, Father said. These changes allowed us to walk at times. One grew very tired driving all day.

That morning when we were at last ahead of the ox train, we hoped we were through with them. They had been so needlessly mean. That night, however, long after we had camped, they drove up with their clamor and noise, their shouts and oaths and barking dogs, and passed us as before. We were so angry; we'd have to pass them again in the morning. Day after day they repeated that performance; again and again we were compelled to drive in the sagebrush, while yelling and beating their oxen, they raced along in the road to keep us from passing.

Why they were so mean has always been a mystery, but their reason for camping near us was plain. The Indians were growing more and more unfriendly, and the bushwhackers, as we called them, were far safer near a big, well-armed train than they were if they camped alone. There was no need, though, for them to muddy the water for our horses, or for them to interfere with us in the least. They could have camped just as comfortably on the road behind us each night and have been very welcome, as their presence added to the apparent strength of the train and the fellowship of the plains was extended to all. Whenever our people objected to their actions they were met by threats. Mr. Daily's orders were that their conduct should be endured rather than openly resented. "It won't do," he said when a group of men wanted to call for a settlement of the difficulties. "They are a bad lot. We'd have some dead men here and we have too many

‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. on Page 6

December 05, 2013 - Page 3

Letter to the Editor

San Marcos Traffic Hazard

I have only been a resident of San Marcos since April of 2013. Each day I exit 78 E at the San Marcos Boulevard and make a left turn. During the day I see the kids cross the street on bicycles and skateboards without paying much attention to the traffic lights .

Fortunately no one has been hit by a driver making a left turn. The problem with this intersection is the overgrown greenery that has grown so large that it obstructs most of the view under the viaduct. At night, it is almost impossible to see anything from your car because of the darkness and the greenery. I stopped at the San Marcos Chamber of Commerce a few weeks ago and expressed my concerns about the intersection and suggested they do something about it. I was told that the "City" would have do something. So far, nothing has changed. The entrance to 78 W has been cleaned up and there are no obstructions to worry about. It would take less than 30 minutes to trim those bushes. What does it take to get someone to cut down the overgrown bushes? Wouldn't it be better to prevent the tragedy of a child being injured or killed by a motorist than to allow the bushes to continue growing. Lorraine E Tschaeche San Marcos, Ca 92069

Our Government

President Reagan was called "The Great Communicator," President Obama may be

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. on Page 4


Page 4 - December 05, 2013

Escondido Police Capture Suspected Car Thief

On November 26th, the owner of a previously reported stolen Toyota Sienna van stated he believed he saw the stolen vehicle in the area of Washington and Broadway. As Escondido Police Officers moved into the area, the driver fled in the stolen van at a high rate of speed east on Washington from the area. The driver began to drive on the wrong side of the road into opposing traffic. The officers did not pursue the vehicle, but followed at a safe speed on the correct side of the road. The van struck a Kia Rio that was being driven by a 60 year old male resident of Escondido westbound on Washington near Date St. After the collision, the driver of the stolen van fled on foot. He was ultimately captured and brought to a local hospital for a minor injury. The driver of the Kia was also taken to a local hospital where he was admitted for serious injuries.

The driver of the stolen vehicle was identified as Richard Berumen, a 38 year old Escondido resident. He will be charged with felony hit and run causing injury, and vehicle theft. Anyone with information concerning this incident is being asked to contact investigating officer Frank Huston at

Man About Town

Dave Geary, that peripatetic guy from Boston, that guy who spends a lot of his own money helping out the less fortunate, that guy that travels all over the world to build churches and schools, feed the hungry, set up computer labs and Internet Cafes as fundraisers for impoverished people . . . well, that guy needs some help.

He leaves in February on a trip to Tanzania to see that more native Tanzanians have food to eat and can learn to work with computers so that they might grow in knowledge and skills that would let them earn a decent income. He’s about $5,000 short to cover expenses. If you’d like to sponsor Dave, no matter how

760-839-4423.

Local News

Carlsbad Assault with a Deadly Weapon

On Friday, November 29th at 12:36 A.M., the City of Carlsbad Police Department received a call of a stabbing that occurred at the Plaza Camino Real Mall located at 2525 El Camino Real. The suspect identified as 18 year old Javier Covarrubias, stabbed the victim in the stomach outside the mall entrance. Covarrubias and his associate then fled the scene on foot towards the Movie Max officers where Theater Covarrubias. detained Covarrubias’ associate was described as a thin male, about 5’9” tall, wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt and dark pants.

The victim was transported and underwent surgery for his injuries. The extent of his injuries are unknown at this time. Covarrubias was arrested and booked into the Vista Detention Facility for assault with a deadly weapon. There is one associate still outstanding.

money.

The Chase Bank on Oceanside Boulevard reported that the holdup occurred around 1:45pm last Saturday. The robber did not display a weapon and police have yet to release a description. Huge Apartment Complex Proposed for San Marcos

A former industrial tract of land may soon house up to 416 apartments on a 12-acre community that is planned and proposed to the San Marcos Planning Commission. The proposal was heard this past Monday but at press time the results had not been announced. The land, located near Palomar College, will not only house a large apartment complex but some retails stores are planned as well. Known as Davia, the complex would be the second large mixed-use project near the

‘Local News’ Cont. on Page 5

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. from Page 3 remembered as "The Great Divider."

He attended Rev. Wright's church for 20 years and was his personal friend. Rev. Wright preached hatred and racism. He said "Not God Bless America" but "God damn America!" The Democratic Platform omitted the word God for the first time. It was inserted only after questionable parliamentary procedure. Obama seems much more supportive of Muslims than Christians.

How can public spirited citizens accept being told what news media NOT to watch? Anyone disagreeing with the president is attacked, ridiculed, and abused.

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. on Page 8

Oceanside Bank Robbery

An Oceanside bank complied with a robber’s demand when he presented a note demanding

large or small, you can drop off donations, or mail them, to: Dave’s Computer Repair and Sales, 112 N Kalmia St, Escondido, CA 92025, or call (760) 432-2095. Be sure to make your check out to FFCC (Family Friends Community Connection) and in the memo portion write “Dave Geary.” That way your donation will be (a) tax deducible and (b) will go towards Dave’s Tanzania trip. ••••• Every so often I get a call from one of my best friends, retired Pastor Richard (Dick) Huls, inviting me to meet for coffee, most often at Major Markets in Escondido. We meet, have a pastry and a cup of coffee and just talk guy talk.

I cherish those moments because I’m with a friend where I can rant, I can pontificate, I can tell a joke, I can moan and complain . . . and in every instance, . . . there’s that movie-star handsome face looking back at me with that fantastic smile. Dick and I usually manage to solve the world’s problems in about 45 minutes to an hour and then we’re both off to other pursuits. I mentioned to Dick that I was fascinated by the fact that even though I am not of the

Christian persuasion I seemed to be drawn to Christian pastors as friends and number several within my circle of friendships. “Do you suppose,” he said, “that some power, some force,” and I interrupted him and said, “yes, I suppose it could be that. Some Greater Power that some of us might call God, intervening to bring us together, but I’m not sure I know what Her intention is,” to which he flashed yet another Dick Huls smile.

I shall probably do a profile on Dick. What a fascinating man. Not only is he one of the world’s best public speakers (I’ve had him as my guest about six times at my Kiwanis Club and I have traveled great distances to hear him speak), but he also is a world class apiarist (beekeeper), very knowledgeable in the art of beekeeping and their life and habits (and gives a superb lecture about it), but he is also a chaplain for the Escondido Police Department, a retired Navy Captain (Chaplain Corps), a resident of Israel for several years, a great outdoorsman and elk hunter, a superb cook and an accomplished gardener. All of these areas he can, and has, talked about at various civic and service clubs. If you want a spell binding speaker, call Dick Hulls (760) 803.4236.

He’s not a pulpit pounding, hell, fire and dmanation speaker . . . he’s a very mellow, down to earth, easy to understand pastor and speaker.

I consider it a privilege to know him and I look forward to our coffees together. ••••• I’ve gotten into the habit lately of programming my days so I am in San Marcos on Wednesdays. Primary reason? I love to stop by the Casa Angelo Restaurant and order the Wednesday special of Spaghetti at just $2.75 a heaping plate with superb meat sauce! Usually, I order two or three orders to go . . . taking one order home for Evelyn, the other one or two for me.

$2.75? For a huge plate of spaghetti? Hard to beat that price.

Tony and wife, Sheila, are always ready to serve with a great big smile. Most all credit cards are accepted and there’s plenty of free parking. San W They’re at 823 Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, CA (760) 471-9725, and, yes, they have other specials on other days, all of which are very tasty and a great bargain. Tell ‘em the Man About Town sent you.

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 5


‘Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 4

Good pal, Bruce Krider, and I founded The Puppy Coalition and have been fighting to save more and more puppies and dogs from needless euthanasia. Bruce, bless his heart, is walking dogs twice a day, consuming about 3 to 4 hours a day; he has also spent over $25,000 of his own money in the last year saving dogs and finding them forever homes. He, and I, need help.

If you love puppies and dogs, if you would like to join us in our efforts, please volunteer. We need volunteers to walk the dogs, to help send emails to folks who want to help, to lobby political people to help get legislation changed that would save dog’s lives, to meet with potential foster parents for dogs, adoptive parents of dogs, to help identify solutions to this problem. If you have the heart and dedication to do good on behalf of Bowser and his/her fellow puppies and dogs, we need to hear from you.

And, yes, we need financial support as well. Though Bruce doesn’t begrudge the $25,000 a year he’s been spending, the task is not all his. You and I need to help out so the burden doesn’t all fall on Bruce. If you

can contribute, or know of someone who can help out financially, it is needed.

If interested, call 760.612 9156 and ask for Bruce Krider, or 760.747.7119 and ask for “The Man About Town.” ••••• Shocked and saddened to learn that Luke, the beautiful Doberman of Tim Cunning and his family, has been diagnosed with bone cancer in one of his legs. That’s the bad news. The good news is that Tim and the family met and decided they would have the vet amputate Luke’s leg. The vet says the blood tests indicate the cancer is restricted to the leg and has not metastisized. It’s a bit of a risk, and an expensive one, but those of you who have pets as part of your family can understand that Tim and his family didn’t hesitate. “Let’s let Luke live and enjoy life a bit longer, and we’ll enjoy Luke’s company a bit longer.” My sources tell me that dogs can learn to manage quite well on three legs. I’ve met Luke. Love the dog. And he knows me. Whenever I visit the Cunning family Luke is right there to greet me and he stays close to me. (He knows I’m a sucker for dogs and he also knows I’m around food and he’s very good at begging. I give in to him. Every time.)

‘Local News’ Cont. from Page 4

Palomar College Sprinter station. The first complex, the 370-unit Palomar Station, is already under construction just to the west of the land proposed for Davia. Davia’s retail space would occupy 15,000 square feet and the area would include a 1.3acre neighborhood park.

About half of the apartments would be one-bedroom units, making the project appealing to students and employees at the college and nearby Cal State San Marcos, city officials said. Suspect in Vista Stabbing Attack Nabbed by Deputies

A 67-year-old man in Vista was stabbed on Thursday, November 28th, at about 7:30 a.m., with no apparent provocation, according to Sheriff’s deputies.

A man suspected in the stabbing attack has been arrested following a domestic violence call. Kristopher Nesmith, 21, is accused of stabbing the Vista man multiple times on Carriage Circle, in a housing development off Hacienda Drive, then running before deputies arrived.

December 05, 2013 - Page 5

Upon responding, deputies found the victim, who lives in a gated community, suffering from life-threatening wounds. He was flown to a hospital. As of press time his condition was not available.

Later, when deputies responded to a domestic violence call on Melrose Drive near Hacienda Drive in Vista, they found Nesmith. Earllier investigation had linked Nesmith to the stabbing and he was arrested at about 6:15 p.m. on Friday, November 29th. Nesmith was booked into the Vista jail on charges of attempted murder, felony domestic violence, resisting arrest and vandalism. Cell Tower in Rancho Bernardo a Dead Issue

A large cell tower planned within the San Dieguito River Park area has been canceled due to the large number of protests by area residents. The tower, which was proposed by AT&T, would have improved cellphone reception near Lake Hodges in southwestern Escondido. It would also have generated about $80,000 a year to the district for maintenance and lease fees. But strong opposition has killed the plan and AT&T will look elsewhere.


Page 6 - December 05, 2013

The

Social Butterfly

when accompanying children. The class fee is $5 for two hours of fun and learning.

jones@altavistagardens.org or call 760.822.6824. Alta Vista Gardens is located at 1270 Vale Terrace Drive, Vista, at the top of the hill inside Brengle Terrace Park. Visit altavistagardens.org. DAR Welcomes Two New Members

Evelyn Madison The Social Butterfly Email Evelyn at: thesocialbutterfly@cox.net

Above, Alden Zanzig, below, Melina Segura, both with examples of their recycled art

Kids in the Garden Class at Alta Vista Gardens

Saturday, December 14, is the next Kids in the Garden class, from 10am to 12noon, and Recycled Art & Sculpture will be the program, using materials from the Children’s Garden: cotton from the plants, seed pods, pine cones, and sticks, along with recycled boxes, strawberry baskets, egg cartons, rolls, and cans, to create your own recycled art or sculpture project. Tape, markers, yarn and glue are provided – you provide the imagination. Bring boxes or other materials to add to the collection. Adults are welcome, and are free

‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. from Page 3

women and children with us to take that risk. We'll have to put up with them; there is too much at stake." So it went on, a continual exasperation that had to be endured. As if we had been a military train and Mr. Daily the commander, his orders to avoid trouble were obeyed.

One morning I was driving Winfield's wagon. Only one team from our train was behind me and that was driven by Henry Acker. We had nearly passed the cattle train, but the leading ox team would not let us into the road. For half an hour we bumped and pitched over the sage bushes, the horses fretting and distressed, but every time I came near to gaining the road the driver lashed his oxen into a run, and on the rough ground I could not get ahead of him.

I called back to Henry, "When I get into the road, I'll let you in." Suddenly I saw a chance and whipped my horses. I gained the road, but in doing so, I forced the leaders of the ox team out of the beaten track. I stopped to let Henry drive ahead of me and looked back. Tangled and twisted and wound in their chain, yokes upside down and crosswise, it looked as if the driver of that

Pictured: Linda Ramos, Melody Kitchens, Brittney Kitchens, Deirdre Marsac, Wanda Prosser, Bonnie Clifton

When you join and buy a family membership in Alta Vista Gardens, the monthly Kids in the Garden class is free for a year. Donations are gratefully accepted. Pre-registration is required; contact farmer-

team could never get them straightened out again. To my horror the man was running toward me with the butt end of a blacksnake ready to strike. "I'll mash your head for this!" he was shouting, and then he saw me, a tiny frightened girl perched on the high wagon seat, quailing before the expected blows. The man's face was suddenly blank; with sagging jaw, he stared a moment, then dropped his head, turned and went back to his cattle. By that time Henry was in the road and we left him to his troubles.

The Santa Margarita Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), welcomed new members. Brittney Kitchens was presented with a “goodie bag” by chapter Registrar, Linda Ramos, and a DAR flag by chapter Regent Wanda Prosser. Chaplain Bonnie Clifton

something moving caught his eye. Hunched over like an Indian in a blanket, someone was slipping toward him. He shouted "Halt!" but the man moved on. Why he did not shoot, Father said he did not know, but even in the darkness something told him the man was not an Indian. A second time he spoke and the man straightened up and asked, "What is the matter?"

"Matter enough!" Father said. "Come with me." It was the man who had been put on guard duty near Father's beat. He had been walking in his sleep.

One night after supper, Father got his gun. "It's my turn for guard duty," he said. "I don't much like the man who is on the beat with me, either. He went to sleep once when on guard. I'll have to do his job and mine too, very likely."

Father marched him through the camp to Mr. Daily's tent and roused Mr. Daily. "This man is not responsible, Mr. Daily," he said. "Don't put him on guard again. If he doesn't get the train into trouble, someone will kill him. He had a mighty close call this time." He told of his sleep-walking.

Father was slowly walking along his beat, his loaded gun in his hands that night, when

Though in a way traveling was not very pleasant those days, it was delightful to leave the Platte River and follow along the Sweetwater where the Oregon Trail now led us. This was one of the loveliest regions I ever saw. The road in places

The Big Sandy

The wagons, of course, were corralled in a big circle with the horses inside. At intervals around the outside were stationed guards, each to watch over a certain section of the stockade formed by the wagons.

"We have plenty of men we can depend upon," Mr. Daily said, "I'll send you another man."

administered the oath of membership. Brittney’s ancestor is Jacob Troxell of Pennsylvania. Her mother Melody was inducted at the last meeting. Also welcomed was Deirdre Marsac, a transfer from the Luiseno Chapter. Deirdre’s ancestor is John Michael Oberlin of Pennsylvania. DAR is open to any female 18 years of age or older who can prove lineal descent from an ancestor who fought or provided aid to the patriots in the fight for independence in the A m e r i c a n Revolution. Contact Linda at lramos1999@aol.com for info. Retirement Ceremony Held for K-9 Officer

Recently, the Escondido Humane Society (EHS) participated in the retirement ceremony for Vince, Cal State University San Marcos’ first K9 officer, a former shelter dog from Northern California. Pictured is EHS Executive Director Sally Costello presenting Vince and his human partner, Sgt. Ray Derouin, with a Certificate of

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 7

touched the edge of high cliffs, where far below the beautiful stream sparkled. In one place Father and I went to the rim of the cliff to look down at the river. Some men from the train were walking through the canyon, and very tiny they looked in the distance. As I ran along the cliff, happy in the beauty of the spot, right on the brink of the gorge I found something that frightened me.

"Father," I called, "someone has been killed here." Father looked at a pool of blood I had found. "No," he said, "it isn't as bad as it looks. Someone has killed an antelope." His explanations often made terrors seem commonplace.

So gradual had been the rise of land as we traveled westward that it was hard to realize that we were in the Rocky Mountains. When we went through South Pass, the greatest elevation we were to reach, the land did not seem high. The country was open, rolling prairies, but in the distance a few peaks showed their snowy heads. Otherwise we might still have been on the lowland plains. At the Big Sandy River we camped in a beautiful spot, a

‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. on Page 9


‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 6

Appreciation for his dedicated service to the community.

Pictured here is EHS Executive Director Sally Costello presenting Vince and his human partner Sgt. Ray Derouin with a Certificate of Appreciation for his dedicated service to our community. During his three years of service at CSUSM, Vince, 8, amassed an impressive record

‘Chuckles’ Cont. from Page 2

Eve's Chat with God

“Lord, I have a problem.” “What is it, Eve?”

“I know that you created me and provided this beautiful garden and all of these wonderful animals, especially that hilarious snake, but I’m just not happy.” “And why is that Eve?”

“Lord, I’m lonely, and I’m sick to death of apples.”

“Well, Eve, in that case I have a solution. I shall create a man for you.” “Man? What is that Lord?”

“A flawed creature with many bad traits. He’ll lie, cheat and be vain. All in all he’ll give you a hard time, but he’ll be bigger and faster and will love to hunt, fish and bring you good things to eat. I’ll create him in such a way that he will satisfy your physical needs. He will revel in childish things like knocking a ball around. And he won’t be as smart as you, so he will also need your advice to think properly.” “Sounds great,” says Eve sar-

on campus and in the community. He responded to reports of suspicious packages on campus and at MiraCosta College, led EOD monitoring at large events including commencement ceremonies, Chargers games, Comic-Con, and performed more than 20 demonstrations for children and local schools. His daily protective sweeps of campus helped CSUSM earn the title as the safest public university in California two years in a row. Vince has been adopted by CSUSM Officer Tony Maraschiello and his family and will happily spend his retirement chasing tennis balls and relaxing on his doggie bed. Meetings/Events Calendar

Aspiring Authors Meet at Public Library – Every Tuesday at 1pm, a group of aspiring authors meet at the San Marcos Public Library. Many award winners have been produced over the last ten years. Don’t be shy. Come and listen or participate; bring something you’ve written to read, no longer than 2000 words, typewritten in proper format, with six copies.

castically, catch?”

”but

what’s

the

“Well,.. you can have him on one condition.”

The group will help you refine your voice and style. Explore your creative side – memoirs, short or flash fiction, poetry, stage plays, novellas, or a novel. Be prepared for candid comments and critiques. For more information, call Richard at 760.752.3111 or email RMDellorfano@gmail.com.

Vista Garden Club Announces Meeting – At 12noon on Friday, December 6, the Vista Garden Club will host a program titled “Creating a California Native Landscape” by Greg Rubin, owner of California’s Own Native Landscape Design. He will present how to create a natural garden, drought-tolerant, low-maintenance, a wonderful habitat for birds and butterflies. The meeting is held at the Gloria McClellan Senior Center, 1400 Vale Terrace Dr, Vista. Guests are always welcome. Holiday Village and Tree Lighting Ceremony Planned in S.M. - The City of San Marcos presents its Annual Santa's Magical Village at the San Marcos Civic Center, 1 Civic Center Drive, on Saturday, December 7 from 3-8 pm and Sunday, December 8 from 10am3 pm. The event will feature an indoor holiday boutique, free activities for children including ornament making, sand art, candle creation, and more! Entertainment bands and choral groups will be featured throughout the weekend. The Full Measure Strolling Carolers will be one of the highlights of the weekend. There will be gourmet food trucks onsite during the Tree Lighting on Saturday and specialty food vendors on Sunday. Santa will be available for visits and photos on both days. The spectacular lighting of the holiday tree will take place on Saturday, December 7 at 6:30pm. Santa Claus will have the honor of climbing to the top of the tree and turning on thou-

Historically Speaking by Tom Morrow

“And what’s that Lord?"

“Well, since he’ll be proud, arrogant and self-admiring, you’ll have to let him believe that I made him first. And it will have to be our little secret... you know, woman to woman.” ••••• Please excuse the four-letter words toward the end of the following story. I would have deleted them, but the story just wouldn't be the same. A young Jewish couple got married and went on their honeymoon. When they got back, the bride immediately called her mother.

"Well," said her mother, "so how was the honeymoon?"

"Oh mama," she replied, "The honeymoon was wonderful! So romantic!" Suddenly she burst out crying. "But, mama, as soon as we returned, Sam started using the most horrible language--- things I'd never heard before! I mean all these awful four-letter words! You've got to take me home! PLEASE MAMA!"

‘Chuckles’ Cont. on Page 14

Pearl Harbor Happened only Yesterday

Saturday is Pearl Harbor Day. As Franklin D. Roosevelt told Congress, it's a day that has lived "in infamy" for America ever since Dec. 7, 1941.

To younger generations, this important day in United States history has about as much significance as Columbus Day – something more or less important that happened long ago. If you're over 60 years of age, this day represents more than just another one of those "war stories" our parents or grandparents may have told us.

December 05, 2013 - Page 7

sands of twinkling lights. Entertainment for the tree lighting ceremony begins at 5:30pm. On Sunday, December 8, the pancake breakfast will be held from 911:30am, in the Community Center. Tickets are $5/adults and $4/children, and may be purchased at the door. For more info, call 760.744.9000 or visit www.san-marcos.net. City Offers Fun Friday Nites and Fun Saturdays for Children – San Marcos Community Services is offering Fun Friday Nites for children, ages 4 to 12 years old, and takes place from 6-10pm on one Friday night each month, December 6th and 14th, January 17, and February 14. The Fun Saturdays are for children aged 4 to 12 years old, and takes place from 8am-2pm on Saturdays, December 7th and 14th. There will be games, crafts, pizza, movies and other activities with friends. Both programs are supervised by trained recreation leaders and take place at the San Marcos Community Center or the San Elijo Recreation Center. Cost for each of the programs is $20/child; a $5 discount is offered for siblings. Parents must register in advance at www.san-marcos.net/funfridays.

EAP Municipal Gallery Exhibitions/Events for December – “Summation 2013” exhibition will run from December 13 to January 4, with the Opening Reception on Saturday, December 14, from 5:308pm. In the Innerspace Gallery, the Photo Arts Group will exhibit “The Color Blue” from December 10th to January 3rd. Poets, Inc. (Inland North County) and The Escondido Arts Partnership will host a Literary Series starting on Sunday, December

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 8

As we go through our lives, we have benchmarks that give us instant recall as to where we were and what we were doing when a dramatic or traumatic incident occurs. Even though I was a very small child, I vividly recall being at my grandparents’ home for Sunday dinner. Everyone suddenly huddled around the radio, then the women started crying. If you will remember May 8, or Aug. 14, 1945, or Nov. 22, 1963, you remember exactly where you were and what you were doing, and, you don't have to be reminded what happened. These are historic benchmarks that stay with us forever. The day the Japanese attacked our Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, was the beginning of the United States becoming the most powerful nation in the world. Until that day, this country was more or less satisfied with its isolationist status. The war raging in Europe wasn't our business, and the Japanese atrocities in Asia were ever so far away. After all, we had

‘Tom Morrow’ Cont. on Page 14


Page 8 - December 05, 2013

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 7

8, from 1-3pm, with an All Open Reading. Reception at 12:30pm with light refreshments. Attendees are invited to bring poems or short written pieces for an all-open reading. Bring your favorite Solstice/holiday poems, rain and snow poems, but best of all . . . dysfunctional family poems. The Gallery is located at 262 E. Grand Avenue, Escondido.

Vista Woman’s Club Announces Holiday Program – When the Woman’s Club of Vista meets on Wednesday, December 11, at the Shadowridge Country Club, 1980 Gateway Drive, Vista, they will have a holiday program and lunch. Visitors are welcome. Cal Nancy at 760.822.6824, and for more information about the club, visit the website at www.womansclubofvista.org.

Elks Invite You to Join the Hoop Shoot Contest – The Elks Hoop Shoot Contest is free to boys and girls who will be between the ages of 8-13 (by April 1, 2014). The contest will be on Friday, December 13, at 6pm, at the Melba Bishop Recreation Center, 5306 North River Road, Oceanside, and hosted by the Elks Lodge: Oceanside 1561. Lodge Hoop Shoot Director is Barry Porter. Contact him for more information at 760.945.9310. The six winners will advance to the District Elks Shoot Contest on January 11, in Chula Vista, CA. Winners advance through district, state, and regional Hoop Shoot contests. Regional winners qualify for a trip to compete at the Hoop Shoot National Finals to be held April 10-13, 2014, in Springfield, Massachusetts. National champions will have their names permanently inscribed on a plaque in the Basketball Hall of Fame. This is an opportunity to spend time with family and friends. This contest helps maintain a healthy relationship with the family through contest and healthy competition. In addition, you have the opportunity to meet and get to know other families and competitors, and getting to know and connect with other Elks volunteers and contestants. Elks invest in their communities through programs that help children grow up healthy and drug-free, by undertaking projects that address unmet need, and by honoring the service and sacrifice of our veterans. Learn more at http://www.elks.org/lodge, and for more information on how to become involved, contact Sandee Murphy at sandeem1@cox.net. San Marcos Theatre West to Present “Babes in Toyland” – The City of San Marcos Theatre West Youth Theater will present the musical production, “Babes in Toyland,” at the San Marcos Community Center, 3 Civic Center Drive, on December 13 -15. Show times are Friday at 7:30pm; Saturday at 2pm and 6pm, and Sunday at 2pm. The show features a cast of local actors aged 7 to 17. Ticket prices are $7 for youth/students/seniors and $10 for adults. Tickets for the 2pm show on Saturday are $7 for all ages. Tickets are available in advance or may be purchased at the door. For more information, go to www.san-marcos.net or call 760.744.9000.

AAUW Meeting Announced at New Location - The Escondido/San Marcos Branch of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) will meet on Saturday, December 14, at 10am, at Dittus Hall at Redwood Terrace, 710 W. 13th Ave, Escondido. David Lewis will present a musical program “Winter Themes in Music.” He has been teaching Music Appreciation for Older Adults for 20 years, is the Organist and Director of Music at Trinity Episcopal Church in Escondido, and is also the Founder

and Director of the San Luis Rey Choral which has been singing together for 35 years. He is often called upon to give lectures on various aspects of music throughout North County. The AAUW focuses on education for and the equality of women in the workplace. This Branch has raised funds to award two scholarships to women studying in the Science, Technology, Electronic and Mechanical fields of work. The recipients have been selected and will be presented with their scholarships after the first of the year. The Branch meets in Dittus Hall at Redwood Terrace at 10am on the 3rd Saturday of the month.

Santa Margarita Chapter of DAR to Meet – The Santa Margarita Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) will meet on Saturday, December 14th, at the El Camino Country Club in Oceanside. A breakfast buffet at 9:30am will be followed by “The Revolutionary War on the Western Front – General George Rogers Clark” presented by Beverlee StuartBorok, Director District XIV. Reservations are required. DAR is open to any female 18 years of age or older who is lineally descended from a patriot who assisted in some way in America’s fight for independence in the Revolutionary War. Contact Linda at lramos1999@aol.com for more information.

Create Holiday Crafts, and More at December’s Second Saturday Workshop – This monthly series offers free arts activities for kids and parents; next session is slated for December 14, from 10am-12noon, at The California Center for the Arts, Escondido (the Center). North County families are invited to join in and create winter-themed crafts with the kids. The one- to two-hour classes, held in Studios 1 and 3, explore are or movement. Materials are provided; attendees just bring their creativity. All ages are welcome. No pre-registration required. Kids typically have two or three craft projects to work on that are usually related to upcoming shows or events at the Center. For more info about Second Saturdays, contact Education Coordinator Kirsten Vega at 760.839.4176 or kvega@artcenter.org, or check the website for updated craft information for a particular workshop at www.artcenter.org/performances. The Center is located at 340 N. Escondido Blvd, Escondido. “A Swinging Holiday Concert” – The Coastal Cities Jazz Band will be presenting “A Swinging Holiday Concert” on Sunday, December 15, at 2pm, at the Calvary Lutheran Church, 424 Via De La Valle, Solana Beach. The concert will be popular holiday music arranged by wellknown composers and arrangers. Vocalist Michael Ruhl, Jo Ann Sharp, and Rick Evans will join the band on several selections. Tickets are $15, or $12 for seniors and students. For tickets or more information, call Gary Adcock at 858.775.1113.

“A Holiday Celebration” Concert – The North Coast Symphony, under direction of Daniel Swem, will present “A Holiday Celebration” concert on Sunday, December 15, at 2:30pm and on Tuesday, December 17, at 7:30pm at the Seacoast Community Church, 1050 Regal Road, Encinitas. This popular concert begins with several familiar classical selections appropriate to the season, and ends with a sing-along of favorite holiday carols. The suggested donation is $10/general; $8/seniors and students; and $25/families of 3 or more. Check the website, www.northcoastsymphony.com for more info.

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 13

Obituary

Barbara D. (Hayter) Olson, (73), a long-time resident of Valley Center, passed away November, 9th, 2013, in the comfort of her own home after over a two year battle with cancer.

Barbara was a loving, devoted wife, a wonderful loving mom and grandmother, a caring and loving sister, sister-in-law, and Aunt. She loved family gatherings, her friends, being a homemaker and her work, and she had a strong love for the Lord. A Memorial of Life will be held at Light of The Valley Lutheran Church on Saturday, December 14th at 11:00 a.m., located at 28330 Lilac Road, Valley Center. with internment following at the Valley Center Cemetery.

‘Letter to the Editor’ Cont. from Page 4

He has divided the Democrats vs. the Republicans, Rich vs. Poor, Women vs. Republicans and now racism.

Barbara was born to very young parents, S. J. and Opal Hayter, on May 10, 1940, in Portales, New Mexico. She was a 1958 graduate of Poly High School in Riverside, California. Barbara had worked for First American Title in Riverside and San Diego as well as working with her father and brother at Hayter Realty in Riverside.

Barbara met the love of her life, Allen J. Olson in 1975, whom she married in 1979. When they married, she became the loving step mom to Allen’s five children, Janice, Dan, Jim, Kari and John. Allen and Barbara owned and operated Olson’s Town and Country Realty in Valley Center until Allen’s death on January 9, 2010. Barbara and Allen had a strong faith in God and attended Light of The Valley Lutheran Church for nearly 20 years where she was active in the choir and served on the Evangelism Committee and Allen served as an Elder.

Barbara’s survivors include her sister, Donna (Fred) Hemborg, of Canyon Lake, California. Step-children Janice (David) Johnson of Dana Point, Ca; Daniel (Anna) Olson of Bonsall, Ca; James (Pam) Olson, of Santa Margarita, Ca; Kari (Mark) Salo, of San Jose,Ca; and John Olson, of Valley Center, Ca., 13 grandchildren... Justine, Sky, Brock, Jordan, Josh, Jacob, Jennifer, Adam, Alexis, Tim, Tyler, Emily and Cole, twenty great grandchildren and nephews Kevin (Jennifer) Hemborg, Travis (Kim) Hemborg, and Steve (Cindy) Scott. Barbara was preceded in death by both parents, her brother Ronald, and her nephew Jeffrey Hayter.

We have problems.

The Benghazi disaster is number one. It set a precedent of a new low for our country, when the order to "Stand Down" was given. Our Ambassador and three men were abandoned and left to die. A year later we are prevented from getting honest answers. Benghazi is too important to let politics interfere with getting answers. It was particularly painful for our Military who never leave their wounded. Most of our Military Medals are awarded for heroism in rescuing their comrades. It is difficult to respect or support either Republicans or Democrats. Our government is disfunctional because of both parties.

Are we wise enough and concerned enough to start correcting things in the next election? /s/ Neal Hook Escondido, CA.

Food

I'm a widower that enjoys tasty food. I find it with the multitude of frozen packages. You've got so many good brands and assortment of dinners, snack and even family size trays. When serving a family or group buy double on the family size. Keep in mind, you pay for what you get. I go for quality and taste. As you get older, your taste buds aren't as good as they used to be. I try to buy different brands, since they vary in price and taste. The best part, their frozen, they can't spoil.

I pick what I want for lunch (main meal of the day) let it thaw in the morning, then micro-wave at noon. For dessert, fresh fruit. Banquet is the lowest priced, with Atkins the highest. Oh yes, my favorite for breakfast, supper or snack Banquet Pop-Pies in variety of tastes. William Hart, Carlsbad, CA.


‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. from Page 6

grassy hollow left green by the waters of melted snows. Fresh grass, willows, flowers, such as we had not seen for many a day, grew in profusion along the stream banks. Overjoyed at the wonder of the lovely place, we children wandered far up the river. We had no thought of danger, though I wonder that we were not afraid. We had passed fresh graves since leaving Fort Laramie, graves that, so scouts told us, had been made by soldiers from the Fort - the graves of people killed by the Indians. Unheeding, careless of what might happen to us, we rambled on that evening until dusk was falling. We were to remember that walk and shiver, fearful to think of what might have happened. The next morning, loath to leave the lovely spot, we forded the river which we children had waded so many times the evening before and went on. Not all of the Oregon Trail was a joy to travel. We were not soon to forget that camp ground; a tragedy was to make it memorable.

The following day a man passed us, riding west. The news he brought was one of those stories that chill the blood of the emigrant. A big train that was following us one day behind, a train of which we had heard frequent reports by the scouts along the trail, had camped in the same spot on the Big Sandy where we had been the previous night. The Indians had fallen upon them and massacred them. Of about three hundred people, the soldiers from the Ford had found two living. One of these, a young girl, had been left by the savages for dead, left lying on her face with an arrow in her back. The other, a boy of eight or ten, had crawled into the sagebrush and hidden from the Indians. We were a serious-faced party after that, nor did we children stray far from camp again until we were far out of the Indian country. Why had our train escaped? Was our turn coming? Our camps were better guarded after that; a more careful lookout was maintained.

Day after day we passed graves freshly dug by the soldiers and weighted with stones to protect them from marauding animals. They were the graves of people killed by the Indians, mute evidence of the red man's anger. Day and night we dreaded an attack. Hastening on, however, we at length left the Sioux country and no attack had come. There had been no hint of trouble for us. Why, though other trains had

suffered so severely, did we escape attack? We wondered much. It seemed a guardian angel watched over us, and if he could be called an angel, I believe one did. The great Sioux Chief who had been so friendly at Fort Laramie was proving his friendship. Father had given him food when he was hungry, and later had taken him at his word, showing no fear. The lesser chiefs had seen him and his family and he had shaken our hands. Now, though other trains were attacked, each leaving its toll along the road, we were unmolested. It was well for us that we had "entertained royalty," when we gave our lunches to that wandering Sioux. The Desert

Long before daylight one morning, we filled every available water carrier not filled the night before, and trailed off through the weird darkness, the only time but one that we broke camp before daylight. We were starting across a desert, seventy miles without water. In two days we were to cross, thirty-five miles a day, fifteen miles farther than our average distance. It was to be two long and terrible drives for horses as worn and thin as ours. Only a bit of grass, mowed and carried with us, we had to feed them those two days. Out upon the lava beds we rumbled, the hollow, echoing, metallic roar sounding as if we were upon a great bridge. At daylight there lay around us a gray and desolate waste.

"Did ever horses go so fast?" Florence gasped as we ran breathlessly along the rocky road trying to overtake the teams. We had tried walking but could not keep up with the horses.

"I don't believe they ever did," I answered. "We never drove like this before." At last a wagon waited for us and Uncle Isaac told us to stay in it. On no other days did they ever drive the horses at a trot.

Many skulls of big-horned sheep lay about on the lava bed. It must have been a good hunting ground, for no place else did we ever see many. Here and there we saw them set on piles of rocks and often names were written on them. They made wild-looking landmarks.

The road, though winding around hummocks, was in the main nearly straight. At noon we stopped but a few minutes for lunch, gave the horses a handful of the dried grass and a swallow of water, and then hastened on. We camped late that night, worn out from the long drive, but were up again before daylight. They were hard days, those two.

The following night, after dark, we reached water. At the foot of a mountain was a little trickling stream. The captain ordered the water vessels filled before the horses drank. It was necessary to hoard that water; there was so little there. The next good spring was 15 miles away. Very carefully the water was guarded to leave the stream clear for the cattle train, the bushwhackers who were following behind us. After our camps were made and the horses watered, the cattle train arrived. We left the spring to them. Instead of using care with the water they immediately turned the oxen loose to drink. Three hundred or more cattle trampled and fought over the water and far into the night their bellowing was hideous. Neither the people nor the cattle had much use of that spring. I don't know what they would have done had not Mr. Daily set a guard over a tiny hill that trickled down the hillside above where the cattle could climb. All the drinking water they had they got there. It was well for us that Mr. Daily had told us to fill our water casks. Fifteen miles of travel the next day took us to another spring. Here we rested for the remainder of the day. The cattle train passed us and we hoped once more that we were rid of them. Bushwhackers Again

As we came in sight of the next camping ground we saw something that did not please us. The bushwhackers were there. Of necessity we camped near them. Always they were a sullen, disagreeable crowd that we avoided as much as possible, but that afternoon they were worse than ever.

Scarcely were our tents pitched when the men of the train slouched into our camp muttering threats of "shooting" and "cleaning out the train." Mr. Daily listened to them awhile, watching them closely and in silence. They grew more and more blustering and threatening. At last he said to some of them, "Just what do you want? What is the matter with you?" The bushwhackers crowded closer and our men, sensing trouble, drew near also. "We're goin' to clean out this train," they blustered, "Someone from this train cut down our (Confederate) flag, ye did! You'll pay fer it. We'll beat the life out o' ye." "We'll git a lot o' ye!" They went on with more talk of killing and shooting up the crowd. Their manner was so ugly and their threats so dreadful that I was thoroughly alarmed. We had many more

December 05, 2013 - Page 9

men than they but I did not want any of our people to be hurt.

Mr. Daily turned to his party. "Get your guns, men, every one. We have had enough of this." Then to the bushwhackers, he added: "We have had all we will take from you. You have gone far enough."

Our men were soon back. Armed and ready they awaited the next move. That move, however, was not the one we expected. The bushwhackers looked at the guns. While we stared in amazement, they turned and slunk back to their wagons. Heads hanging, they sat on the wagon tongues, whipped, beaten. Finally one man whined, "We'd fight if we had any guns."

"Any guns!" For a moment words seemed to fail Mr. Daily. "Any guns!" At last he went on: "You've held onto us all though the Indian country, safe where you could not have defended yourselves. And you! Every mean, contemptible thing you could devise to make life miserable for us! A fine sort you are! Listen to this: From now on, you get behind our train and stay out of our way. We'll have no more smartness from you!" More he said, much more, to the great delight of us all. His speech was a great satisfaction to at least a part of his audience.

The next morning we passed their train, this time silent, and we had no further trouble with them; in fact, we never saw them again. We learned later that they were a band of border ruffians who had carried on guerilla warfare until captured by Union soldiers. They had been set across the Missouri River and disarmed that they might not by joining the Indians cause more trouble. It was well for the South to be rid of them, but they were a poor type of people for the new country to which they were going. The Pontoon Bridge

Our long line of wagons, now brown-topped and dingy, trailing through the sagebrush did not much resemble the shining white train which had stepped off so smartly through the green grass of the Missouri Valley months before. Neither did the ferry which carried us over the Snake River much resemble the big steam ferry which carried us over the Missouri.

‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. on Page 10


Page 10 - November 28, 2013 The Holidays are Approaching Rapidly!

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‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. from Page 9

One day we reached a smaller stream crossed by a pontoon bridge in which logs were used for pontoons. We stopped, planning to spend a day there to rest our horses and give the people a chance to do laundry work and make needed repairs.

"A good chance to wash some bedding," Mother said. It was very hard to keep our bedding nice. Try as we would always to pitch our tents in clean spots and always to air and shake the blankets carefully, they grew more and more dingy. I wonder how the people who traveled in the dust of the later summer managed to care for theirs. While Mother was looking over the bedding, the boys got out some fishing tackle and to our joy were soon catching big beautiful trout from a foot to eighteen inches in length.

Almost before our camp was made, however, we were repacking, preparing to go on. A man who had a sutler's camp beside the river near where we stopped was quarreling with an Indian when we arrived. Suddenly the Indian began to scream. I saw him holding up his arm, from which blood was streaming. The man, who had been drinking, had stuck him with a knife. He jumped on a horse and rode away, still holding up his arm and screaming. As he passed over a mound by the river and away into the sagebrush, the captain sent a message for the train to go on. The affair might cause trouble with the Indians.

Win and Henry put their fish into the wagon. "Drive for me, won't you, Philura?" Win said. "I'll get a few more." Every one was disappointed; we needed those fish so badly. A change in our diet was rare in those days. Bread, beans, dried peas, bacon, ham and dried fruit over and over; no wonder we wanted something new. After what seemed a long time the

Get you copy of The Paper delivered to your door every Thursday! Call 760.747.7119

boys caught up with us. A long chase they had had after the wagons, but they brought a dozen more big trout with them. Boise

Father was anxious to reach Boise. We had one team now that we did not need. Of course the horse feed had been used long since, and as we had used our provisions, the loads had slowly grown lighter.

When at last we reached the town the sight of houses, people, and so many new faces was a real event to us. Boise was a mining town, a town where Father was not anxious to keep his family long. I heard him saying so when a group of miners wanted him to go back along the trail to look for a mine. Near the Big Sandy, Father had broken from a ledge some pieces of ore and dropped them into his pocket. He showed them to some miners and immediately the men were interested. Would he go back and show them the place? It would pay him well. They argued long but Father would not consider leaving us in Boise. As well as he could he described the place where he had found the ore. I remember the party of young men who had joined the train the evening we did; nearly all went back to look for gold. Later we heard of a rich mine located in that neighborhood and wondered if Father had missed a fortune by not going back. As we also heard of groups of miners being killed by the Indians, we did not waste much time in regrets. Many of our party left us in Boise, some to stay there, others to scatter far. From that point on, people continually dropped out of the train. Not all, like us, were seeking the Pacific. Father sold three horses and a wagon at Boise and bought a riding pony. We now had two wagons, one of them drawn by

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three horses, which Win and Carrie took turns at driving. It was fun to have the pony to ride, and as Florence's father allowed her to ride one of his horses sometimes, we felt we had riches. As we were getting out of the country, too, where trouble might be expected from the Indians, when our turns with the horses came we often left the train far behind.

Once when we were riding ahead, I saw something shining in the road. I slid from my horse to pick it up. It was a little polished, sharp-pointed weapon, a Spanish stiletto, Father said when we rode back to show it to the others and to find out what it was. Of course

they laughed at me as usual for seeing everything, but what would be the use of taking a trip like that and not keep one's eyes open? My collection had to be sorted from time to time and many things discarded. There were so many strange and interesting things to be picked up. The men in the train were more interested than I, however, in the viciouslooking little stiletto. On all the hundreds of miles we had traveled from Iowa, there had not been in our train one real accident. The nearest had been the man who was

‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. on Page 15


The Doctor is In!

ing for their health related needs. It was purportedly going to enhance competition and provide us all healthcare coverage.

Happy Holidays from San Marcos Dental Center! Dental Insurance Coverage Alert!

Last September in our article "Health Care Reform in California: What it May Mean to You!" we warned our community that the Affordable Care Act (ACA=Obamacare) only offered children's coverage, that adult dental care benefits are "supplemental" and the exchange does not have to offer them. The California Dental Association, along with the American Dental Association and the Academy of General Dentistry have all been active in encouraging the Board to include the adult population in their coverage. After all, the purpose of this act was to include all our citizens in provid-

That was then but this is now! Regardless of the difficulties our government is having with signing on applicants at their website, the true nature of this (UN)Affordable Care Act is evident. As we write, millions of insured have already lost their insurance coverage, with millions more to follow when 2014 arrives. In order to secure new coverage these families will have to pay much higher premiums... if they can get coverage at all! In addition Insurance Companies are dropping doctors and dentists from their provider lists. Hospitals are laying off doctors, nurses, x-ray and bio-technicians and engineers in order to shave operating costs. Who or where do you go to when your doctor or dentist is no longer a provider for your coverage...if you still have it? The (UN)Affordable Care Act forces Americans to buy - not guaranteed healthcare, but promises for healthcare, which strapped insurance companies and the government will not be able to fulfill. Many employers will opt out of providing insur-

ance for their employees and just pay the lesser penalty. Employees must then apply for their own coverage or apply for the government programs, both at very high rates. Delta Dental, one of the largest insurance providers for dental care in California, is already losing providers for their customers, because of reimbursement cuts to begin in 2014!

No one knows the final outcome of this Act, but it does appear that the age of dental insurance coverage as we've known it, is coming to an end. To this date adult dental coverage is still absent from coverage under the ACA and with insurance premiums going through the roof... it could spell the end of dental coverage for many.

December 05, 2013 - Page 11

Our Alert: For those with dental insurance coverage: "USE YOUR REMAINING INSURANCE FOR DENTAL TREATMENTS NOW!"

This is our recommendation: Finish as much dental treatment as possible while you still have the opportunity to do so!

Soon we all may be solely responsible for our dental costs! Contact us at (760) 734-4311. Ask for our $100 Holiday gift card for dental treatment done

COSMETIC CROWN SPECIAL - brought back literally by our patient’s requests.

We are offering a $150 discount on all cosmetic ceramic (non-metallic) crowns for the month of November.

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This offer will expire on December 31st, 2013!


Page 12 - December 05, 2013

Nome and Paul Van Middlesworth The Computer Factory www.computerfactorysanmarcos.com

Microsoft’s Latest Dirty Trick

When Microsoft licensed the MS-DOS operating system (OS) to IBM in 1981 it started a chain of events that changed the world.

Up to that point, every computer had its own unique operating system. Software developers had to design separate products for each OS. As the MS-DOS operating became the monolithic OS of choice for PCs, applications developers could focus their efforts on a single OS. This led to the computing/communication revolution that gave us the mind-boggling capabilities of today’s PCs, tablets and smart phones.

Lest we all get dewy eyed and

Why I Declined Legislator Salary Increase

There are differing views on how much, or if, legislators should be compensated. Some citizens believe legislators should only work part time, while others believe legislators should serve as volunteers without pay. Conflicting opinions make legislator salary a controversial topic, and December 1, 2013, was no less controversial as it marked the first day of new pay raises for California State Senators and Assemblymembers. I chose not to accept this raise for many reasons, the greatest of which is that I believe I am not entitled to a raise when so many Californians have been unable to earn raises. Many businesses in our

start sending out thank you cards it is important to remember that these companies didn’t create this electronic utopia because they love us. They did it for money. Technology doesn’t spring from the altruistic desire to elevate the human condition. It springs from an individual’s desire to elevate his own condition. The desire for money and power is called ambition. It is important to understand that ambition is not evil. It’s an important and beneficial part of human nature. Ambition becomes greed when it deliberately disregards the well being of others in the singleminded pursuit of its own agenda. Microsoft has crossed that line on more than one occasion and appears to be doing it again.

Long ago, Microsoft announced that product support for XP would end in April of 2014. Microsoft has every right to end support for a product they no longer sell and have more than fulfilled their legal obligation to provide twilight support for XP. It means they will no longer update XP. XP will remain frozen in time. Only the “frozen” update version of XP-SP3 will be available from Microsoft after April.

state are not as successful as they were prior to California’s recession and are unable to increase employee pay. The state government should be similarly limited. After all, California’s government operates with the hardearned money collected from taxpayers who are the very employees that have had to accept fewer hours and smaller salaries. Rather than accepting a raise for 2014, my goal is to support economic growth that triggers business success and new job opportunities.

Senator Mark Wyland represents the people of the 38th Senate District, which includes Rancho Bernardo, Carlsbad, Oceanside, San Marcos, Escondido, and Vista.

Become a Subscriber! Delivered every Thursday to your Mailbox! Just call 760.747.7119 for subscription details.

Microsoft fears that, with 30% of all PCs still using XP, many users will decide that “frozen” XP is better than upgrading, especially since many applications, search engines and browsers have pledged continuing XP support long past Microsoft’s deadline. So what can Microsoft do?

maintained. There is rampant speculation that Microsoft is deliberately sabotaging the XP update site. If true, Microsoft is sticking it to hundreds of millions of users in an attempt to force them to update to an OS they don’t want.

E-Verify is Alive and Well in California

hibits state and local jurisdictions from mandating the use of E-Verify. Despite the fact that employing an illegal immigrant violates federal law, AB 1236 invalidated ordinances passed by California cities such as Temecula and Escondido, which required its use. Consequently, many people don’t realize that E-Verify is up and running for any California business wishing to voluntarily participate.

The XP update utility on Microsoft’s site has worked reliably for over a decade. It is critical for the installation or reinstallation of XP. In the past six months the XP update utility at Microsoft has slowly deteriorated to the point where it now takes hours to complete updates that once took minutes. There are thousands of complaints on the Internet but Microsoft has no constructive response or answer. If the update doesn’t work, XP cannot be installed or

Illegal immigration is a frequent topic of debate at both the state and federal levels. This session, the California Legislature granted driving privileges to illegal immigrants and passed a bill allowing non-citizens to serve on juries (later vetoed by the Governor). At the federal level, discussions have been heated, with “comprehensive immigration reform” an ongoing subject of debate in Congress. California’s illegal immigration problem is largely a result of federal policies lying outside the jurisdiction of the Legislature. However, the E-Verify system, which provides rapid verification of immigration status for potential new employees, could have a major impact on illegal immigration right here in California. In 2011, the Legislature passed AB 1236, which pro-

Has Microsoft found a back door way to snuff XP? It would certainly be unethical but is it illegal? The Microsoft monopoly has gone largely unchallenged in the American judicial system because Microsoft has the finest stable of attorneys in the universe and our Federal Judiciary’s assortment of politically appointed, third magnitude legal hacks are terrified to face them in court. Besides, Microsoft is a huge political contributor. Will they get away with it in America? Probably. In Europe? I doubt it.

Since employment remains the main economic draw for illegal immigrants, widespread use of the E-Verify system will eliminate much of the problem. If you would like to enroll your business in E-Verify, please visit: http://www.uscis.gov/e-verify Through the use of the EVerify system, concerned business owners can take direct action to help our reluctant state and federal governments do their duty to secure our nation’s borders.


A Weekly Message from the Mayor of Your Community published in the belief that it is important for elected leaders to communicate with their constituents and that constituents have a means of hearing from their elected leaders.

Escondido • Mayor Sam Abed Holiday Safety Tips

timely reminders:

Don’t let the spirit of giving extend to criminals! The following are a few

When shopping: • Park in a well-lit space • Don’t carry a lot of cash—use checks/ credit cards • Keep purchases in your trunk, not in plain view • If returning to the store, move your car to another area • Lock your car When at home: • Window coverings should be closed so gifts can’t be seen • Before you go to bed or leave

home, check, close, and lock windows or doors, including the garage door When traveling: • Get an automatic timer for lights • Ask a neighbor to watch your home and to park in the driveway from time to time • Stop delivery of mail/newspaper

And, when Celebrating the New Year: • Don’t drink and drive. Encourage designated drivers and have the number for a taxi service on hand. If hosting a party, make sure non-alcoholic beverages are available. • All fireworks are dangerous and illegal in Escondido. • Ring in the New Year with noisemakers or pots and pans, not with a bang of a gun or the slam of a cell door!

Vista • Mayor Judy Ritter Parks Make Life Better

Our parks are symbols of vitality and character and play an important role in defining our city, our communities and the individuals who live and work throughout the city. Not only do the city parks offer common space for sports, recreation, family gatherings, picnic and other social events, but also sanctuaries for quiet relaxation and the enjoyment of the outdoors.

The City was awarded a $5 million state grant to construct a recreational facility at the Vista Academy of Visual and Performing Arts, and recently, the

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 8

Call to Woodworkers for January’s WOOD: A Furniture Show – The Escondido Arts Partnership Municipal Gallery is putting out a call to submit images of your woodwork with entry fee to the Gallery by December 14th. Wood workers from Southern California are encouraged to submit contemporary, art, traditional, veneering and marquetry, and wood turning furniture for the exhibition. Brian Murphy will be the Juror. He has designed and built furniture for the past 25 years and has won many National Awards. Exhibition dates are from January 10 to February 1, 2014. The opening reception on Saturday, January 11, from 5:308pm provides an opportunity for the public to meet the featured woodworking artists. For more info about the exhibition, visit the website at www.escondidoarts.org. The Gallery is located at 262 E. Grand Avenue, Escondido. Hours are Tuesdays 11am-5pm, and Thursday-Saturday 11am-4pm.

City of Vista and VUSD broke ground on the Linda Rhoades Neighborhood Center. This event is a testament to the collaborative spirit shared by VUSD and the City of Vista in their desire to strengthen the community and in their understanding of the importance that parks are to the health and vitality of a city. This connection between the neighborhood center and the community will become a valuable contributor to youth development, public health and community building. Most importantly, it will provide wonderful opportunities for children of all ages to build the skills and strengths they need to lead full and rewarding lives. For more information on Vista parks check online at vistarecreation.com

eReaders eXplained at Escondido Public Library Seminar - On Tuesday, December 17, from 3:00 to 5:00pm, the Escondido Public Library will offer “eReaders eXplained,” a free seminar on how to download eBooks to eReader devices or computers. The seminar will be held in the Turrentine Room. “eReaders eXplained” will help take the mystery and confusion out of using eReader devices, including tablets. Librarians will explain how to use devices efficiently and demonstrate how to access and download free eBooks from the Library’s catalog and other online sources. Attendees should bring their eReader or tablet to get the most out of hands-on learning and to follow along. Anyone thinking about buying an eReader for their own personal use or as a gift can learn about the features found in different models. This program is free and open to the public. For more info, visit the Library’s website at http://library.escondido.org or call Adult Services at 760.839.4839. The Library is located at 239 S. Kalmia St., Escondido.

San Marcos • Mayor Jim Desmond Holiday Fun Scheduled in San Marcos

San Marcos is kicking off the winter season with several festive events the whole family can enjoy.

The City’s annual “Lighting of the Tree” will take place on Saturday, Dec. 7 at approximately 6:30 pm. Holiday celebrations will continue to Sunday, Dec. 8 at 3 pm with San Marcos’ annual holiday parade presented by the Kiwanis Club of San Marcos. The parade begins at Palomar College, traveling north on Comet Drive, then west on Mission Road to the San Marcos Civic Center. For additional parade route information please visit, www.kiwanisclubofsanmarcos.org.

From Saturday, Dec. 7 to Sunday, Dec. 8, residents can attend Santa’s Magical Village located at 3 Civic Center Drive. The two-day event features visits from Santa and Rudolph, carolers, arts and craft vendors, cookie decorating, gourmet food trucks, a recycled ornament contest, and free outdoor entertainment. Finally, families can enjoy a pancake, sausage and egg breakfast with Santa Claus on Sunday, Dec. 8 from 9 to 11:30 am at Community Services’ Main Hall, 3 Civic Center Drive. No reservations are required and tickets are available at the door for just $4 for adults and $3 for children. For more details about these and other City events, please visit www.san-marcos.net or call (760) 744-9000.

Oceanside • Mayor Jim Wood Spirit of Sharing – 2013 Toy Drive

If you are looking for a way to assist local military families this Holiday Season, please consider getting involved with the “Spirit of Sharing” (SOS). The SOS has been serving military families since 2000 as a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. It collects donations year round in person, by mail and online (including automobile donations and other assets) to help active duty military families throughout the southern California region – especially during this special time of year. All donations are tax deductible – so it’s really a winSpecial Meeting of the Community Services Commission – On Monday, December 9, the Community Services Commission will conduct a Special Meeting beginning at 7:00pm in the City Hall Council Chambers, 201 North Broadway, Escondido. The following two items will be on the agenda: (1) Review an unsolicited proposal and business plan to build and operate a BMX track in Escondido’s Kit Carson Park. (2) Review the proposal to allocate funds from the Housing and Community Development Grant for Community Services projects. Any action taken at the meeting is advisory only and will require Council approval before implementation. The meeting is free and open to the public. For information regarding this meeting, contact Loretta McKinney at 760.839.4871 or email at Lmckinney@escondido.org. Event Benefits the San Marcos Senior Nutrition Program

Knowing that 120,000 grandparents in San Diego County are raising their grandchildren, GFWC Contemporary Women of North County (CWONC)

win for everyone! Whether you want to make a donation or nominate a military family in the area, be sure to get in touch with SOS. For donations, you can drop off or send in your donation to their headquarters located at 3355 Mission Avenue, #111, Oceanside, CA 92058, make an online donation via credit card by visiting their website at www.spiritofsharing.org or contact them directly at (760) 726-8100 / (760) 859-5911. And don’t forget their 2013 Toy Drive that’s now happening! SOS is a 100% volunteer based group, with no overhead costs, so 100% of all donations go directly to our military families. Wishing everyone Happy Holidays!

recently co-sponsored Food, Fun and Fandango. This special event provided a fun opportunity for grandparents and parents to unwind and children to let loose after hours at the San Marcos Senior Center. Proceeds benefit the Senior Nutrition Program. For more information on CWONC, contact Lisa at membership@cwonc.org or visit www.cwonc.org.

Pictured back row, from leftLisa Pratte, Laura Wilson, Maryann Donovan Front row, from left- Linda Bridges, Jenna Reid, Sandy Youngdale, Carollynn Holemo


Page 14 - December 05, 2013 ‘Chuckles’ Cont. from Page 7

"Sarah, Sarah," her mother said, "calm down! You need to stay with your husband and work this out. Now, tell me, what could be so awful? What four-letter words?" "Please don't make me tell you, mama," wept the daughter. "I'm so embarrassed, they're just too awful! JUST COME GET ME, PLEASE!" "Darling, baby, you must tell me what has you so upset. Tell your mother these horrible four-letter words." Sobbing, the bride gasped, "Oh, Mama, he used words like DUST, WASH, IRON, and COOK!"

"I'll pick you up in twenty minutes," said her mother. Louisiana State Police

Louisiana State Police had received numerous reports of illegal cockfights being held in the area around Abbeville and had sent their famous Detective Boudreaux from Thibodeaux to investigate. Boudreaux promptly began his investigation and then reported to his Commander the next morning.

"Dey is tree main groups involve in dis rooster fightin," he began. "Good work! Who are they?" the Commander asked.

Boudreaux replied confidently, "De Texas Aggies, de local Cajuns, and de Mafia from N'awlins." Puzzled, the Commander asked, "Now Boudreaux, how did you find all that out in one night?"

"Well," he replied, "I went down and done seen dat rooster fight in person. And I knowed immedjiately dat dem Aggies was involved when a duck was entered in the fight." The Commander nodded, "I'll buy that. But what about the others?"

Boudreaux nodded knowingly, "Well, I knowed de Cajuns was involved when sum body bet on de duck!" "Ah, I see, I see....." sighed the Commander. "And how did you figure the Mafia was involved?" "De duck won." ••••• A golfer is in a competitive match with a friend, who is ahead by a couple of strokes. "Boy, I'd give anything to sink

this putt," the golfer mumbles to himself.

Just then, a stranger walks up beside him and whispers, "Would you be willing to give up one-fourth of your sex life?"

Thinking the man is crazy and his answer will be meaningless, the golfer also feels that maybe this is a good omen, so he says, "Sure," and sinks the putt. Two holes later, he mumbles to himself again, "Gee, I sure would like to get an eagle on this one."

The same stranger is at his side again and whispers, "Would it be worth giving up another fourth of your sex life?" Shrugging, the golfer replies, "Okay." And he makes an eagle.

On the final hole, the golfer needs another eagle to win.

Without waiting for him to say anything, the stranger quickly moves to his side and says, "Would winning this match be worth giving up sex for the rest of your life?" "Definitely," the golfer replies, and he makes the eagle.

As the golfer is walking to the club house, the stranger walks alongside him and says, "I haven't really been fair with you because you don't know who I am. I'm Satan, and from this day forward you will have no sex life." "Nice to meet you," the golfer replies, "I'm Father O'Malley." From Minnesota

The toilet seat was invented in Minnesota , but twenty years later a North Dakotan invented the hole in it. VE COULDN'T AFFORD MORE

Two Norwegians from Minnesota went fishing in Canada and returned with only one fish. 'The way I figger it, dat fish cost us $400' said the first Norwegian.

'Vell,' said the other one, 'At dat price it's a good ting ve didn't catch any more.' MUSIC SOLUTION

Ole bought Lena a piano for her birthday. A few weeks later, Lars inquired how she was doing with it. 'Oh,' said Ole, 'I persvaded her to svitch to a clarinet.' 'How come?' asked Lars. 'Vell,' Ole answered, 'because vith a clarinet, she can't sing!

Meechie is the pet of the week at your Rancho Coastal Humane Society in Encinitas. He’s a 7 month old, 13 pound, neutered, male, Domestic Short Haired cat. Meechie was surrendered to RCHAS when his family moved to a place that does not allow pets. He’s very friendly, He likes other cats, kids, and even dogs. The only thing he doesn’t like is the vacuum cleaner. The $100 adoption fee for Meechie includes up to date vaccines, veterinary exam, neuter, and microchip. If you can't adopt right now, consider sponsoring a pet until it’s adopted. Meet your new cat, dog, or rabbit at Rancho Coastal Humane Society, 389 Requeza Street in Encinitas. Adoption hours are 11 to 5 Wednesday through Monday. For more information call 760753-6413 or log on to www.sdpets.org.

‘Tom Morrow’ Cont. from Page 7

two great oceans keeping all of that bad news away from us.

We should recognize that the Empire of Japan awakened us to our tremendous vulnerabilities on that fateful day of Dec. 7, 1941. Only the timidity of the Japanese command saved us from hand-to-hand combat in Hawaii and probably here in California. The Japanese High Command hadn't realized just how successful they were when they broke off their attack and returned to Japan.

During that same time over in the Atlantic, if Nazi Germany had been able to launch just 50 additional submarines, our Navy would have been completely cut off from our allies in Europe. England would have most assuredly fallen. It was our tenacity and vital supply ships that kept that stubborn British island afloat.

Saturday morning at 9 a.m., a shrinking group of old survivors will gather as they do every year on this date throughout the nation.

Honey is a 7-year-old spayed female pit bull mix, ID 71073. Don't let Honey's senior status fool you ... this girl has a lot of pep in her step! Her enthusiasm is contagious, and it's impossible not to be inspired to get up and go when you are with her. She has a fun-loving spirit and a friendly, outgoing nature. She meets new people with ease and happily soaks up the compliments she receives about her stunning good looks. Honey is available for adoption at the Escondido Humane Society, 3450 E. Valley Parkway. Her $25 adoption fee in December includes spay, microchip and vet exam. For more information, call (760) 888-2247 or log on to www.escondidohumanesociety.org. The Escondido Humane Society Adoption Center is open 7 days a week.

Locally, those who witnessed, fought, and survived the attack that morning 72 years ago will meet for a brief remembrance ceremony at Oceanside Harbor. The gathering is smaller each year. The club, if you want to call it that, is one that doesn’t have a membership chairman. If you were there, military or civilian, you are a survivor.

If you want to hear real war stories, talk with any survivor, if you can find or know one or two. You'll hear stories you won't think possible. Can you imagine yourself on the night of Dec. 7, 1941, standing watch on the dock of Battleship Row where the USS Arizona went down, and having to listen to pounding on the sunken hull from stillalive sailors trapped inside? There was no way to get them out. After a couple of weeks the pounding stopped. That's just one of many horrific survivor tales that was told to me on one of the many occasions I met with the local Pearl Harbor Survivors Association chapter. It's been nearly 72 years, but for those of us who remember, it happened only yesterday.


‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. from Page 10

stuck in the mud at the foot of the Bannock Mountains. One day, however, we passed a spot at the foot of a hill where on a turn the road sloped sideways. The place was not bad at all; the leading wagons passed it almost without notice. yet when one man made the turn, he rolled his wagon over, completely. Bottom side up it lay, his family underneath. Much frightened, others ran to his assistance. The wagon was righted and the family picked up, entirely unhurt. When the team was untangled they went on quite as well off as before.

While traveling through the Blue Mountains we came upon a never-to-be- forgotten treat. Ripe huckleberries grew in profusion. Never before did fruit taste so good. For nearly four months we had eaten no fresh fruit and now to find those berries growing all about us was something to be remembered. Fresh raw berries, sauce, pies - we could not eat enough to satisfy our craving.

I remember seeing one man take his first bite of huckleberry pie. He made a grand leap from his seat on the ground, cracked his heels together and shouted, "Dipend alive! If I don't be jumped up if that ain't good pie!" One would have to be an emigrant to know how good it was. Indian Ways

The dress of the Indians was a never-ending source of entertainment to us. The familiar costume of the Pawnees of the Kansas Plains, moccasins, breechclouts and blankets, we saw wherever we saw Indians. The wonderful feather headdresses of the Sioux, or the glittering beadwork of the western tribes, were varied at times, often with striking results. Whatever articles of clothing an Indian had, he wore.

Walking in the road ahead of us one day were three Indians. One was dressed in the regulation Indian style, but I'm sure he must have felt envious of the others, one of whom displayed above his moccasins a soldier's long dress coat. Barelegged and shirtless he was a funny figure. The other's costume we liked better yet. On his head was a high top hat; about his neck was a stiff white celluloid collar but no shirt, then a breechclout and moccasins. Very proud and important they looked as they stalked along, unconscious of the laughter they caused. More than one little girl we saw in clothing of strange materials. Big, bright-colored

silk handkerchiefs were very popular. Sewed together they made a costume worthy of any chief's daughter. At one camp we saw a wonderfully clad little girl, a child of perhaps ten years. None of the white man's finery save masses of beads was used to deck this little princess. Around her head was a glittering beaded band. Flashing earrings reached her shoulders. Her fringed dress of creamy buckskin was ornamented in beautiful, strange designs, all of sparkling beads. On her feet were the most exquisite beaded moccasins imaginable, the prettiest little things I had ever seen. Much I longed for a pair like them, though I really didn't envy the little maid. So loaded was she, so weighted with beads, that without help she couldn't carry them. Bead chains graduated in length from her neck to her ankles, the longest chain being a string of sleigh bells. That costume was probably the pride of the tribe. Very careful of the little girl they were too. It was well that she didn't have to carry that weight alone. We were so delighted with her that we were called many times before we heeded and had to run to overtake the wagons. At another Indian camp a mother proudly displayed her two little boys. She had dressed them like white children, had made them some trousers. Evidently she had used a pattern. The trousers were sewed to waistbands and the seams on the outside of the legs were sewed, but that was all. With the other necessary seams neglected, the little trousers flapped gaily. The proud mother did not know how funny they looked.

Some of the Indians left very pleasant memories. One morning while Mother was getting breakfast and the children playing about, I saw an Indian riding toward the camp. Tall and straight he looked on a beautiful horse that gleamed lack in the high yellow grass. One hand he carried across his breast, evidently holding some object with great care. As he came closer he looked about at the different groups of children. At last he rode toward Darius, who had stopped his play to watch him.

The little fellow drew back shyly as he came closer, but the Indian called to him saying, "Here, little boy, take this."

As Darius hesitated, looking at him uncertainly, he leaned far down from his horse and said, "Poor bird. Take it, little boy." Darius started toward him eagerly and took from his hand a robin, a robin with a broken wing. Delightedly the little boy, always the friend of every ani-

mal, cuddled the bird, cooing to it and holding it against his cheek. The big Indian sat back on his horse for a moment, watching him and smiling. Then throwing up his hands as if in a salute, he said, "Good," laughed a little as if well pleased and rode away through grass so high as to reach well up on the sides of his horse. That Indian and his gift were not among the things to be forgotten. Poor little Darius; try as we would to care for the bird we could not save its life, and when it died a few days later, he was heartbroken. The Grande Ronde

In the Grande Ronde Valley we tasted our first green vegetables. I went to a strange-looking house beside the road to buy some peas for mother. It was the first sod house I ever saw. A little girl was there, and while her mother was getting the peas ready I talked to her and looked and looked at the queer house with its brown earth walls and roof and floor. It was all very neat and clean, the inside walls covered as they were with white canvas. I would not have thought a dirt floor could have been so hard and so clean. "It is pretty in the spring," the little girl said. "Then the whole house is covered with bright-green grass. I wish it would stay that way all the time." Those vegetables were so good; one would have to take a journey similar to ours to know how good they tasted.

Mother's hope that I would start growing and Father's prophecy that she would have to start sewing before we reached Oregon were both fulfilled. My dresses became so short and so tight that some of them I could not wear at all. One day Mother opened a chest and from it took a beautiful piece of orange-and-blackchecked gingham. The checks were tiny and so pretty that I was delighted when I learned that I was to have a new dress. She made it evenings, sitting on the ground. We had brought one chair with us for Mother, but only for a short time did she use it. Long after we reached the new country, when we wanted to rest we sat upon the floor.

Clothes were a problem to us traveling. We wore linsey dresses most of the time and I often wore little gingham aprons over mine. The linsey dresses, woven from linen and wool, could hardly be worn out, so they were good for the plains. Keeping them clean was the great problem. Mother's and Carrie's were so long and so wide and so much in the way that I could not understand why they wore

December 05, 2013 - Page 15

that kind.

There was one party at which everyone looked askance. The women did not wear dresses. Their clothes did look strange and funny, but I could never see why all the women did not wear that kind anyway. They wore long basque-like coats and ankle-length trousers and climbed about as easily as I did in my short dresses. But how they shocked the rest of the train! How the poor women were snubbed!

Rarely was there a day during that long trip but something interesting or something alarming happened. When we were leaving the Grande Ronde, Florence and I as we so often did were running ahead of the wagons as they climbed the bluff. Lying in the road, we found a pistol. We were looking at the queer little one-shot weapon to see if it was loaded when suddenly we heard rifle shots, and bullets began singing over our heads. Sure that someone was shooting at us, we scurried behind some big boulders and remained hidden, thoroughly frightened, until the wagons reached us. Father told us some men were having rifle practice and had been careless enough to shoot toward the road. "It wasn't very decent of them," I said. "They'd kill us just as dead as if they shot at us." Here and there we passed Indian camps and ranksmelling places they were. The tanning deerskins, the drying meat, the piles of dried fish, the careless disposal of refuse, all in all their camps were not pleasant places. Even longdeserted camps where the floors of the lodges were grassgrown retained the odor. We children insisted that we could smell an Indian camp a mile. More Mountain Road

We still had some hard stretches of road to travel. The Tigh Valley grade was so steep that it seemed as if the horses would fall over backward. Even the drivers walked. With five horses hitched to each wagon, men ahead with ropes to hold down the wagon tongues, and men behind to thrust blocks of wood under the wheels should the wagons start backward, they struggled up the awful grade. We climbed the hill well to the side of the road so as not to be in the way if anything about the wagons should slip. Glad we were when at last all were at the top. Later we found ourselves winding along the Deschutes Road, a road hewn from solid rock

‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. on Page 18


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Pastor Richard Huls, Retired The Spirit Of Christmas

The Christmas holiday is the most celebrated of all holidays with shopping, spending, eating, and partying. It is the event that many merchants look forward to with the hopes of making a profit for the year. Mixed in with all of this is the Biblical story of the birth of Jesus, the Christ child. The Christian Churches try to capture this event with special programs of music, plays, caroling, outdoor manger scenes, and appeals for funds to help the needy. The Biblical emphasis has the special touch of God

In both the secular and religious there is an attempt to have something of the awesome, miraculous, spiritual, if not supernatural in the celebration of the day. It is as if there is a need to have this in a world of pain, suffering, injustice, and death, whether it be “It’s A Wonderful Life” with Jimmy Stewart, “The Christmas Carol” by Dickens, Santa who travels the world over flying through the sky in a tiny sleigh pulled by tiny reindeer bringing gifts to children, and the wonderous phenomena surrounding the birth of Jesus. What is it that makes it possible to catch this spirit?

I believe the answer can best be found in the Magnificat, the song sung by Mary, the mother of Jesus, when she was told by the angel that she would give a miraculous birth to the Son of God. She said, “May it be done to me according to your word.” It is in this spirit that we can believe God will work miracles in our lives when we give Him the freedom to do that beyond all logic and reason.


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031966

The name of the business: Gloria’s Garden, located at 1777 Pinnacle Court, Vista, Ca. 92081, is hereby registered by the following: Evelyn Tunco 1965 Wellington Lane #3 Vista, Ca. 92081 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 9/22/2008. /s/Evelyn Tunco This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/13/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032292

The name of the business: Ace Dasco USA, located at 1698 Via Hacienda Ct., San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Anne Upao 1698 Via Hacienda Ct. San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/01/2013. /s/Anne Upao This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/15/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 11/12 and 12/19/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032193

The name of the business: Santa Ana Plumbing Wholesale & Supply, located at 1203 S. El Camino Real #101, Oceanside, Ca. 92054, is hereby registered by the following: Milton E. Parada 1203 S. El Camino Real #101 Oceanside, Ca. 92054 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/15/2013. /s/Milton E. Parada This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/15/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 11/12 and 12/19/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032583

The name of the business: 7 Sisters Interiors, located at 988 Starlight Ct., San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Rima Arslanovna Messerschmitt 988 Starlight Ct. San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Rima Arslavovna Messerchmitt This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/19/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 11/12 and 12/19/2013

The name of the business: Browning Construction, located at 1624 Sonata Ln., San Marcos, CA. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Jerry Browning 1624 Sonata Ln. San Marcos, CA. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 10/01/1983. /s/Jerry Broning

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This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/22/2013.

11/28, 12/05, 12/12 & 12/19/2013

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO VISTA DIVISION 325 S. Melrose Vista, Ca. 92081 760.201.8094

SUMMONS CASE NO. 37-2013-00044029CL-CL-NC

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: Dart Testerman and Kelly Testerman; and DOES 1 thought 10, inclusive. You are being sued by Plaintiff, Village Green Escondido Owners Association.

NOTICE: You have been sued. The Court may decide against you without you being heard unless you respond within 30. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find the court form and more information at the California Court OnLine SelfHelp C e n t e r (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your County Law Library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file our response on time, you may lose the case by default and our wages, money and property may be taken without further warning by the court.

There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services, from a non-profit legal services program after. You can locate these non profit groups at the Califonria Legal Services website (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California court online self help center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statuatory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration

award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court liens must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. 1. The name and address of the court are SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, NORTH COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER, 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA. 92081.

2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Patricia M. Beaver, Esq. (Bar # 264153) Wasserman Kornheiser, LLP, 7955 Raytheon Rd., San Diego, CA. 92111 FAX No. 858.505.9511 Phone No. (858) 505.9500 Date: April 15, 2013 by /s/ S. Bedolla, Deputy NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. 11/28, 12/05, 12/12 & 12/19/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032875

The name of the business: Light Gallery Outlet, Light Gallery Plus, located at 861 Rancheros Dr. Ste A, San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Gallery Lighting, Inc. 861 Rancheros Dr. Ste A San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was 11/22/2013. /s/N. Val Teerlink, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/22/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 12/12 & 12/19/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030678

The name of the business: Los Pequenos de Jesus, located at 5006 Isle Royal Ct., Oceanside, Ca. 92057, is hereby registered by the following: Drawing Smiles Foundation 5006 Isle Royal Ct. Oceanside, Ca. 92057 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Irene Morales, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/29/2018. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013

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Death Notices

Ruth Elaine Scheeren, 84, of San Marcos, CA., passed away on November 23, 2013.

Marco Joseph Coccellato, 55, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 25, 2013.

Ruby Lee Ragus, 83, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 22, 2013.

Ronald Lewis Stoddart, 82, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 23, 2013.

Arrangements by Allen Brothers Mortuary, Inc. San Marcos Chapel FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-033079

The name of the business: Pilar Painting & Texture, located at 2040 Matthew Place, Escondido, Ca. 92027, is hereby registered by the following: Angel Pilar Rojas 2040 Matthew Place Escondido, CA. 92027 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Angel Pilar Rojas This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/25/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 12/12 and 12/19/2013

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME #2013-033012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME: TK Nails, located at 633 N. Escondido Blvd, Escondido, CA. 92025. THE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME REFERRED TO ABOVE WAS FILED IN SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 1/31/2012 and assigned File No. 2012-002898 IS ABANDONED BY THE FOLLOWING REGISTRANT(S): Tren Lam 3595 Altadena AVe. San Diego, CA. 92105 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime). /s/ Tren Lam This statement was filed with the County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County on 11/25/2013. 12/05, 12/12, 12/19 & 12/26/2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-033014

The name of the business: TK Nails, located at 633 N. Escondido Blvd., Suite A, Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: Cindy Phan 5425 Faulconer St. San Diego, Ca. 92105 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 01/31/2012. /s/Cindy Phan This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/25/2013. 12/05, 12/12, 12/19 & 12/26/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032845

The name of the business: Bio Insights International, located at 3699 Barnard Dr. #702, Oceanside, CA. 92056, is hereby registered by the following: John Z. Liu 3699 Barnard Dr. #702 Oceanside, Ca. 920561 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/21/2013. /s/John Z. Liu This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/21/2013. 12/05, 12/12, 12/19 & 12/26/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031824

The name of the business: TitleMax, located at 6663 El Cajon Blvd., Suite A, San Diego, Ca. 92115, is hereby registered by the following: TitleMax of California, Inc. 15 Bull Street Suite 200 Savannah, GA. 31401 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Michael Kelleher, Assistant Secretary This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/12/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013

The Paper

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Death Notices

Jimmy Craft, 57, of Escondido, Ca., passed away on November 24, 2013. Brian K. Chlopek, 47, of Escondido, Ca., passed away on November 22, 2013. Lela M. Villarreal, 88, of Escondido, Ca., passed away on November 26, 2013.

Monette Bell, 54, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 20, 2013. Nikolaus Faltinsky, 87, of Carlsbad, Ca., passed away on November 22, 2013.

James W. Strickland, 61, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 25, 2013. David A. Smith, 76, of Escondido, Ca., passed away on November 30, 2013.

Roger L. Konczal, 71, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 26, 2013. J. D. Williams, 87, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 20, 2013. Kenneth W. Morales, 60, of Valley Center, CA., passed away on December 01, 2013.

Arrangements by California Funeral Alternatives Escondido and Poway FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-033057

The name of the business: California Custom Casting, located at 2336 La Mirada #700, Vista, CA. 92081, is hereby registered by the following: Susan L. Kutner 1930 W. San Marcos Blvd. Spc 212 San Marcos, CA. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/20/2013 /s/Susan L. Kitner This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/25/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 12/12 and 12/19/2013


Page 18 - December 05, 2013 ‘Wagon Train II’ Cont. from Page 15

and so narrow that in places there were but four inches outside the wheel track. Father was nearly frantic. Carrie with her three-horse team was ahead, and in no way could he pass the wagon to drive for her. A three-horse team, hitched as these were with two wheel horses and one leader, is a very hard team to handle. The cliff was so steep that he could not climb past her on the upper side and there was no room on the outside over the precipice beneath which the river rushed. The wagon was loaded in such a manner, with bedding, stove, everything, piled high and the cover drawn tightly over all, that no one could climb over it from behind. There was nothing to do but watch her as she drove ahead, hugging the bank. The horses, however, were no more anxious than she to take that dreadful plunge. Far below, so far that they looked like toy people, I remember seeing a band of Indians catching some salmon and drying them about little smoky fires. At last we reached Barlow Bridge, high, high above the rugged river. This was the end of the terrible canyon road. At the gate on the farther side, Father paid the toll and we drove through.

Here for the first time on the journey, our right of way was challenged. As we drove through the gate an old billy goat disputed our right to pass. He looked so absurd, dancing about, his head nodding up and down as he threatened the big horses, that we all had to laugh. Evidently he did not like our appearance. Finally, rather than be driven over, he edged to the side of the road and we left him and his little band of goats behind, and headed for Barlow Pass. We were now nearing our journey's end. Three days at the most and we would reach Salem. Father and Mother would meet friends from whom they had been separated long. We camped that night near the summit of the Cascade Mountains, Mount Hood gleaming near us.

About our camp many of the trees had been felled. The stumps were a puzzling sight to me. Fully twenty feet above the ground they had been chopped off with axes. I asked Father how it could have been done.

He said they must have been cut in the winter when the snow lay on the ground. "Probably it was done by miners or prospectors," he said.

"Wagons could not get through the pass when the snow was deep." That night five men camped near us. When some of them came to our fire, we were glad to hear them talk of the new country. More and more anxious we were growing to hear of the place that was to be home to us. New lands have strange tale to tell and the people in them are often great storytellers. Our meeting with these men was to give us a tale to tell of our own.

In the morning as we were preparing to leave the spot, one of the men went to the back of Father's wagon and from it took his heavy saddlebags. They were very heavy, too. "Why did you put those in there?" Father demanded.

"I put them there so that I would find them this morning," said the man, "I'm hoping to reach Salem alive and with them."

"You had no right to put them there. If they had been stolen, the blame would have fallen on me. You had no right to make me responsible." The man laughed. "I'm not afraid of you," he said, "but for days I haven't dared get separated for one minute from that crowd of men. I'd lose my life if one of those men had the ghost of a chance. I knew he'd never think of your wagon, so I put my gold in there."

Father was very angry. "I have my family here," he said, "and you endanger them in that way."

The man shook his head. "The gold was as safe there as if in a vault, and your family in no more danger. It was the only safe place." We never heard of the man's being robbed, so we always supposed he reached Salem with his gold. The End of the Long Trail

The Barlow Road wound around Mount Hood, then abruptly descended into the Willamette Valley. The eastern slope had been gradual but on the western we found an extreme example of the ruggedness of the country. The road fairly dropped. Of course only the wheel horses were used, as the leaders cannot hold back. Again trees were tied by the tops to the coupling poles and men strained back, holding to long ropes. With the heavier wagons the ropes were snubbed around trees and the wagons eased down. It would be hard to describe the feeling of relief we had when we knew that the last bit of hard road was behind us. Before we reached Salem,

Florence and I were to have one more experience to remember. As we were riding behind the train the next day, busily talking, Florence said, "I wonder how far behind we are? We must hurry." We rode fast but found that all the wagons had forded a river before we reached them. We rode into the stream, but not knowing that the ford slanted across the river, we started straight for the other shore. Almost immediately, our horses were swimming. Florence's big horse swam high, but even so, her feet were wet. My little pony fairly wallowed. Splashed and drenched, not knowing how to manage a swimming horse, I had my hands full. The people on the bank were excitedly trying to point out the ford to us. At last we reached shallower water, and with Uncle Isaac pointing the way, we gained the bank. The next day ended that summer's journey. Until the following year we were to stay in the Willamette Valley. After four long months of travel we were in the new land, a new country, yes, a new world. To us children the journey had seemed an interval of four months of play; then from the familiar life of a long-settled region, we were dropped into the barrenness, and the richness, of the new, the untried. Conclusion

Mother's story was ended, that story we had been so anxious should not be forgotten. I remember well, after it was finished, her wish that we might write another telling of the life they found so new and strange. That, however, was not to be, for only a short time longer did we have her with us.

Yet many tales had she told us of the days that followed that memorable journey. After a winter in the Willamette Valley, Grandfather and his family made their way over mountain trails through the forests of the Coast Range to Coos Bay, their final destination. There for many years

they made their home, a part of the pioneer life of that region.

In their first home they found themselves without schools for the children, for homes must be built before schools. Grandmother opened a private school, teaching her own children and those of her neighbors. Later they moved to a home near a public school, a pioneer school of the day. One teacher there was, however many and varied the pupils, and as for the pupils, they ranged in age from the little five years old, to - in some instances - married men trying to acquire that which an earlier day had denied them. One schoolmate that Mother mentioned had a wife and two children. For textbooks a pupil studied whatever books he owned, regardless of the texts his classmates used. Later they were sent to school in Empire City, then the largest town on Coos Bay, then through the mountains once more to the old Umpqua Academy at Wilbur. Sometimes Mother pictured the bare, bare homes of the Oregon settlers with their homemade furniture and unfinished walls; their uncurtained windows and uncovered floors, for house furnishing had found no place in the wagons that brought the people West, and not many objects of beauty had found their way around Cape Horn. She told of picking wild blackberries on the top of a great pile of logs beneath which a pig grunted and snuffled, only to learn later that the pig had been a bear enjoying the blackberries. We liked the story of the ancient Indian elk pit into which she once had fallen, and the few stories of the kindly Coos Bay Indians. Often she told of the people who had been their neighbors: college men and trappers, European nobility and ox-team loggers, sea captains and coal miners; many were the types of people who made up that little community, and varied and rich the stories that were a part of the life they learned to live among them.


The Paper FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032402

The name of the business: SM Brake Masters, located at 1300 Armorlite Dr., San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Abraham Rodriguez 12311 Marmont Pl. Moreno Valley, CA. 92557 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Abraham Rodriguez This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/18/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032419

The name of the business: Phoenix Scientific, Automatus, located at 789 Poppy Rd., San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Ridge Diversified Holdings LLC 789 Poppy Rd. San Marcos, CA. 92078 This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. First day of business was n/a. /s/James R. Ridge, CEO This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/18/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030010

The name of the business: Better Look Tailoring & Alteraton, located at 577 S. Rancho Santa Fe Rd., San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Manijeh Saidian 577 S. Rancho Santa Fe Rd. San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 8/15/1994. /s/Manijeh Saidian This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/21/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031261

The name of the business: Parkway on Elm, located at 255 N. Elm, Ste 100, 102, 205, Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: Valley Radiology Consultants Medical Group 10225 Austin Dr. Suite 105 Spring Valley, CA. 91978 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Allen B. Nalbandian, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/04/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 & 12/05/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031263

The name of the business: VRC Carlsbad, located at 6185 Paseo Del Norte #110, Carlsbad, CA. 92011, is hereby registered by the following: Valley Radiology Consultants Medical Group 10225 Austin Dr. Suite 105 Spring Valley, CA. 91978 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Allen B. Nalbandian, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/04/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 & 12/05/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031546

The name of the business: Ruby Spa, located at 3910 Vista Way, #103, Oceanside, CA. 92056, is hereby registered by the following: Li Jian, Zhao 329 N. Nicholson Ave #A Monterey Park, CA. 91755 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Li Jian Zhao This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/07/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 & 12/05/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-029958

The name of the business: IDevice Pros, located at 2015 Birch Rd., Chula Vista, Ca. 91915, is hereby registered by the following: Ignacio Curiel 1501 Palomareas Ave. San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 10/6/2013. /s/Ignacio Curiel This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/21/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031860

The name of the business: Mortgage Mentor, The Mortgage Mentor, located at 2750 Las Palmas Avenue, Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: Ray Leone 2750 Las Palmas Avenue Escondido, CA. 92025 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Ray Leone This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/12/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

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LEGAL NOTICES

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO VISTA DIVISION 325 S. Melrose Vista, Ca. 92081 760.201.8094

SUMMONS (Family Law) CASE NO. DN173187

NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: Ismael Zaraga You are being sued.

Petitioner’s name is: Laura Gervacio

You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center. www.courinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association.

NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. NOTE: if a judgment or a support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. 1. The name and address of the court are NORTH COUNTY DIVISION, 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA. 92081. 2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Laura Gervacio, 760.889.1834, 3813 Harding St., Carlsbad, CA., 92008 Date: January 22, 2013by /s/ R. Corona, Deputy

NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. 11/14, 11/21, 12/05/2013

11/28

&

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030643

The name of the business: IGold, located at 4031 Palm Dr., Bonita, Ca. 91902, is hereby registered by the following: Maribel Jullian 4031 Palm Dr. Bonita, Ca. 91902 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Maribel Jullian This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/28/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031914

The name of the business: REIG Construction, REIG Custom Builders, located at 820 Los Vallecitos, Blvd., Ste F., San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: REIG Companies,Inc. 820 Los Vallecitos, Ste F San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was 11/01/2012. /s/Brian Daly, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/13/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031723

The name of the business: Next Level GIS, located at 1274 Avenida Amistad, San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Luis Alejandro Sainz 1274 Avenida Amistad San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Luis Alejandro Sainz This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/08/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031677

The name of the business: Dentistry Simplified, located at 423 Landmark Ct., San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Donna Bellinger 423 Landmark Ct. San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Donna Bellinger This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/08/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032118

The name of the business: Quinonez Income Tax, located at 770-B E. Vista Way, Vista, Ca. 92084, is hereby registered by the following: Jesus R. Quinonez 768-B E. Vista Way Vista, CA. 92084 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/01/2013. /s/Jesus R. Quinonez This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/14/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032116

The name of the business: Mobile Autocool, located at 963 Mendocino Dr. San Marcos, CA. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Timothy Scott Wilde 963 Mendocino Dr. San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 01/18/2000. /s/Timothy Scott Wilde, Owner This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenbur g Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/14/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031132

The name of the business: The Vapor Chase, located at 172 S. Rancho Santa Fe, San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Justin Sarraga and Neil Canlas 683 S Twin Oaks Valley Rd. #387 San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by co-partners. First day of business was n/a. /s/Neil Canlas This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/01/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 12/12 and 12/19/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032822

The name of the business: Alex Mobile Auto Diagnostic & Repair, located at 1650 Grand Ave., San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Alejandro Echevarria 2637 Jefferson St. Carlsbad, CA. 92008 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/20/13. /s/Alejandro Echevarria This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/21/2013. 11/28, 12/05, 12/12 and 12/19/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032686

The name of the business: KR Building Servies, located at 3311 Dorado Place, Carlsbad, CA. 92009, is hereby registered by the following: Karl Reth 3311 Dorado Place Carlsbad, CA. 92009 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 9/30/13. /s/Karl Reth This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/20/2013. 12/05, 12/12, 12/19 and 12/26/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-033549

The name of the business: E-Con Handyman Services, located at 1210 Caren Rd., Vista, Ca. 92083, is hereby registered by the following: Ethan Carnes 1210 Caren Rd. Vista, Ca. 92083 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Ethan Carnes This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 12/03/2013. 12/05, 12/12, 12/19 and 12/26/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032093

The name of the business: Coral 1 Media, located at 749 Arthur Ave., Oceanside, Ca. 92057, is hereby registered by the following: Product Development Marketing, LLC. 749 Arthur Ave. Oceanside, Ca. 92057 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. First day of business was 10/01/2013. /s/Mehran Gerami, CEO This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/14/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-032062

The name of the business: Mattress Surplus, located at 1122 Los Vallecitos Blvd., Ste D., San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Shaun W. Eckler 734 Alta Vista Dr. Vista, Ca. 92084 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Shaun W. Eckler This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/14/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031966

The name of the business: Gloria’s Garden, located at 1777 Pinnacle Court, Vista, Ca. 92081, is hereby registered by the following: Evelyn Tunco 1965 Wellington Lane #3 Vista, Ca. 92081 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 9/22/2008. /s/Evelyn Tunco This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/13/2013. 11/21, 11/28, 12/05 and 12/12/2013

CITY OF SAN MARCOS NOTICE INVITING BIDS

HIGHWAY SAFETY IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS (CIP PROJECT NO. 88233, FEDERAL PROJECT NO. HSIPL 5381-027)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN - that the City of San Marcos, hereinafter referred to as Agency, invites sealed bids for the above stated Project and will receive such bids in the offices of Agency (City Clerk's Office on the second floor), at San Marcos City Hall, 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos, California 92069-2918, up to the hour of 2:00 p.m., on, January 7, 2014 , at which time they will be publicly opened in the “Valley of Discovery” Room at City Hall. A mandatory pre-bid meeting is scheduled at 2:00 p.m. on December 19, 2013 in the “Valley of Discovery” Room at City Hall. The project generally consists of installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Mulberry Drive and Rose Ranch Road, installation of signal interconnect conduit and or conductors along South Santa Fe Road and West Mission Road, between Bosstick Road and San Marcos City Hall, along with all necessary equipment and appurtenances to deliver a function system, and conversion of pedestrian heads to countdown type and conversion of pedestrian push buttons to ADA compliant models, along San Marcos Boulevard and Rancho Santa Fe Road, north and San Marcos, at designated intersections. This project was started by another contractor last year and was stopped unfinished. The goal of this project is to complete the work as shown on the bid documents. The project is funded by Federal HSIP grant with a DBE goal of 6.08 percent. Copies of the Bid and Contract Documents are available for inspection at no cost to the bidder at the front counter of the Development Services Department on the first floor of City Hall, 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos, California 92069-2918. In compliance with California Assembly Bill 2036 complete bid sets will be available electronically, at no cost, on the City’s website at http://www.san-marcos.net. (Click “What’s New”, then “Bids & RFP’s”, then follow the link to www.ciplist.com or go to that site directly). Use the map to navigate to “California” then “San Diego County” then “San Marcos” to view a list of current projects. Address questions related to the contents of the Bid and Contract Documents to Linna Zhang, Associate Civil Engineer, at lzhang@san-marcos.net, 760-744-1050 ext. 3219. s/s Michael Edwards, Public Works Director/City Engineer Phil Scollick, City Clerk, City of San Marcos Dp November 28, 2013 and December 5, 2013

December 05, 2013

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING (Planning Commission)

The Planning Commission of the City of San Marcos will hold the following public hearing in the City Council Chambers, 1 Civic Center Drive at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, December 18, 2013. Case No: P13-0065: TA 13001 (Text Amendment) Application of: City of San Marcos Request: Repeal and replacement of the Te l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s Ordinance (Chapter 20.465 of the San Marcos Municipal Code) with an updated Chapter, and updates as may be needed to other sections of the Zoning Ordinance where sections of the affected Chapter are cited. Location of Property: Citywide E n v i r o n m e n t a l Determination: Adopt Addendum to General Plan/Zoning Ordinance Update Final EIR (SCH 2011071028, adopted February 14, 2012) that has been determined to be the appropriate documentation under Section 15164 of the Guidelines of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). • If you challenge the action(s) listed in this notice (or any of them) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the hearing body at, or prior to, the public hearing. • The City of San Marcos is committed to making its programs, services and activities accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you require accommodation to participate in this public hearing or any other City program, service or activity, please contact the City Clerk’s office at 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos, CA 92069, or call (760) 744-1050. • Appeal rights are available. Contact the Planning Division at Extension 3233. Phil Scollick, City Clerk, City of San Marcos. PD: 12/5/13. ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2013-00076641-CU-PT-CTL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Jennifer Lang on behalf of Brooks Kaelen Lang filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Brooks Kaelen Lang to Proposed name Brooks Beck Lang. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: January 10, 2014, 9:30a.m., Department 52. The address of the court is: Superior Court of California, Hall of Justice, 2200 West Broadway, San Diego, CA. 92101. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 11/21/2013. /s/Robert J. Trentacosta, Judge of the Superior Court 12/05, 12/12, 12/19 & 12/26/2013

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING (City Council)

The San Marcos City Council will hold the following public hearing in the City Council Chambers, San Marcos City Hall, 1 Civic Center Drive, at 10:00 a.m. Tuesday, December 17, 2013. Case No: Director’s Permit (DP 13-015) / Mitigated Negative Declaration (ND 13008) / Appeal (AA 13-002) (P13-0021) Appellant: David Delrahim, Platinum Energy Request: Appeal of the Planning Commission approval of a Director’s Permit and associated environmental review document (Mitigated Negative Declaration) to allow the operation of a 14,000 s.f. DMV office within a 20,061 s.f. building in the Commercial zone. Location of Property: 1706 Descanso Avenue, more particularly described as: Parcel 1, 2 and 3 of Parcel Map 8165, filed in the office of the County Recorder of San Diego County, on December 14, 1978. Assessor’s Parcel No.: 219117-44 & 219-117-45. Planning Commission Action: The Planning Commission approved the request by a 7-0 vote. • The hearing before the City Council is a de novo hearing and any correspondence submitted to the Planning Commission that you wish presented to the City Council must be resubmitted for Council consideration. Contact the City Clerk for resubmittal of any correspondence and/or petition for or against the application. • If you challenge the action(s) listed in this notice (or any of them) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the hearing body at, or prior to, the public hearing. • The City of San Marcos is committed to making its programs, services and activities accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you require accommodation to participate in a public hearing or any other city program, service, or activity, please contact the City Clerk’s office at 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos, CA 92069, or call (760) 744-1050, Extension 3145. Phil Scollick, City Clerk, City of San Marcos. PD: 12/5/13. ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2013-00077860-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Eric Lazalde and Christine Lazalde filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Eric Lazalde Patterson to Proposed name Eric John Lazalde. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: January 28, 2014, 8:30a.m., Department 21. The address of the court is: Superior Court of California, 326 S. Melrose, Vista, CA., 92081, North County Regional Center. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 12/02/2013. /s/K. Michael Kirkman, Judge of the Superior Court 12/05, 12/12, 12/19 & 12/26/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSI-

FICTITIOUS BUSI-

STATEMENT

STATEMENT

The name of the business: ACE

The name of the business: Soirees &

NESS NAME #2013-033553

Tutoring, located at 1144 Ariana Rd.,

San Marcos, CA. 92069, is hereby reg-

istered by the following:

Anhcore, Inc.

This business is conducted by a cor-

poration. First day of business was

4/30/2004.

/s/Stephen C. Eggers, Vice President

Ernest

J.

was

filed

Dronenburg

with Jr.,

County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego

County 12/03/2013.

Showers, located at 3555 Seaward

Circle #354, Oceanside, Ca. 92056, is

hereby registered by the following:

3555 Seaward Circle #354

San Mrcos, CA. 92069

statement

#2013-033352

Kristi Osborn

1144 Ariana Rd.

This

NESS NAME

12/05, 12/12, 12/19 and 12/26/2013

Oceanside, Ca. 92056

This business is conducted by an indi-

vidual. First day of business was n/a.

/s/Kristi Osborn

This

statement

Ernest

J.

was

filed

Dronenburg

with Jr.,

County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego

County 12/02/2013.

12/05, 12/12, 12/19 and 12/26/2013


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