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Volume 43- No. 46

November 14, 2013

by lyle e davis

Ah, if only we could go back to yesteryear and relive the colorful, exciting and glamorous years of the old west! Life was simpler then.

Good guys wore white hats. Bad guys wore black hats.

Good guys were slim, trim, finely muscled. Bad guys had unkempt mustaches or beards, ugly. loose fitting flannel shirts, and rode ugly horses. "When you call me that, smile," the hero said to the bad man in that first of thousands of cowboy novels, Owen Wister's "The Virginian." Even before that book's publication in 1902, the cowboy had become a part of the American psyche. This iconic figure of the old west -- tall in the saddle, alone, facing danger, one man against nature's vast, treeless plains and humanity's outlaws—that appealed to people and made the cowboy a folk hero, a halfreal, half-mythological symbol of the American West. A lone rugged figure swaggers into a saloon, a sneer on his weathered face. This image has thrilled families for generations. From his ten gallon hat to his low-slung gun belt and shiny spurs, the larger-thanlife cowboy owns his status in books and on movie screens as a legend of the American West. However, as with any legend, myth has mixed in with his real and fascinating history. Let's rustle up the truth behind the myth.

Western Novels featuring legendary heroes have been popular for a long time. The precursor to the western paperback was the Dime Novel developed in America during the 1800s. In these stories, the hero was the man of action who rescued innocent maidens in distress and righted wrongs like the knights in the Age of Chivalry. Honor was the most important attribute a man could have. Stanford's Dime Novel and Story Paper Collection flourished in America and England with national circulations greater than any other newsThe Paper - 760.747.7119

website:www.thecommunitypaper.com

email: thepaper@cox.net

paper or magazine, some reaching 400,000 copies sold per issue. Many were Wild West adventures. In America, many of the heroes in Dime Novels were based on real men of the West. James Butler Hickok aka Wild Bill Hickock was featured in a

series of Dime Novels. In real life, he started out as a scout for the Union Army. He later gained a reputation as a marksman from his encounters with outlaws while serving as a frontier marshal at Fort Riley, Hays City, and Abilene, Kansas. He became a legend, especially after he was mur-

“Cowboy!”

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dered, shot from behind by Jack McCall in Deadwood’s Saloon. He was sitting at a poker table at the time. In his hand he held two pairs: aces and eights, which became known as the "Dead Man’s Hand." Kit Carson is another living legend made more famous by


Page 2 - November 14, 2013 ‘Cowboy!’ Cont. from Page 1

being featured in a Dime Novel. Like Bill Hickock, he served in real life as a scout for the Army and as a guide for Fremont when he explored and mapped California and Oregon. Carson’s true life adventures made the Dime Novels sound a little tame in comparison. For example, Kit Carson was hired as a guide in 1849 to track down some Apaches who had attacked a wagon train, killed the men and took a woman and child hostage. He devoted 5 pages in his autobiography to relate how he and two other guides led the search party made up of a detachment of army soldiers. He tracked the Apaches for 12 days over the most difficult trail he had ever followed. The Apaches kept splitting up in groups of two or three, then coming together again at some prearranged spot to camp at night. Kit Carson was in the lead when they finally caught up to them. His instinct was to use the element of surprise and rush in quickly, but he was overruled by the others in his party who thought the Apaches should be given the chance to parley. But that turned out to be a big mistake. With the extra time they were given, the Indians fled in all directions. When Kit Carson finally locat-

Give Us This Day Our Daily Chuckle This week, a compendium of wit, wisdom and neat stuff you can tell at parties. Enjoy! THINGS TO REMEMBER DURING A WAR

1. The only thing more accurate than enemy fire is friendly fire. 2. Try to look unimportant. They may be low on ammo.

3. Teamwork is essential. It give them more targets to shoot at. 4. No inspection-ready unit ever passed combat.

5. No combat-ready unit ever passed inspection.

6. Remember: Your aircraft was made by the lowest bidder. 7. Never draw fire. It will irritate the rest of your formation.

ed the white woman, he was heart-broken to find that she had been shot while trying to make a run for it. The irony of the story is that among her belongings was a Dime Novel entitled, "Kit Carson, the Happy Warrior." In his autobiography, Carson wrote, "We found a book in the camp, the first of the kind I had ever seen, in which I was represented as a great hero, slaying Indians by the hundred. I have often thought that Mrs. White must have read it, and knowing that I lived nearby, must have prayed for my appearance in order that she might be saved. I did come, but I lacked the power to persuade those that were in command over me to follow my plan for her rescue. They would not listen to me and they failed. I will say no more regarding this matter, nor attach any blame to any particular person, for I presume the consciences of those who were the cause of the tragedy have severely punished them ere this." The Dime Novels helped build and perpetuate the image of the glamorous wild, wild west. In the early to mid-1900s, bestselling westerns were written by such authors as Zane Grey, Max Brand, William McLeod Raine, Louis L'Amour and others. Their heroes were men of action, following a strong code of honor. Books by Zane Grey

8. Never share a cockpit with someone braver than you. 9. You are not Tom Cruise.

10. SAMs and AAA have the right of way. 11. If you aren't sure, the SAMs are pointed at you.

12. If hit, landing near the people who just shot you down is not a good idea. 13. Close only counts in horseshoes, nukes, and proximityfused missiles. 14. Smart bombs have bad days too.

15. The best defense is to stay out of range.

16. If you are short on everything except enemy, you are in combat. ••••• Government surveyors came to Ole's farm in the fall and asked if they could do some surveying. Ole agreed, and Lena even served them a nice meal at noon time. The next spring, the two surveyors stopped by and told Ole, "Because you were so kind to us, we wanted to give you this bad news in person instead of by letter." Ole replied, "Vaat’s da bad

and Louis L'Amour never go out of print, and they have what amounts to a cult following. These writers helped set the standards for what a legendary western hero is.

However, there are a few myths about this “glamorous era” we should clear up: Myth 1: Cowboys fought Indians

always

Hollywood has imprinted the image of constantly warring cowboys and Indians on the American psyche. But in the real West, battles between cowboys and American Indians were rare.

"There were conflicts, but this was during a very short time period," says James Nottage, vice president and chief curatorial officer of the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian and Western Art.

Before the ranch times we visualize as classic to the Old West, most American Indians had already been sent to reservations, leaving little room for feuds with cowboys.

"Cowboys didn't even carry guns a lot because they were heavy. They rarely used guns, mostly to kill predator animals. That would suggest that there wasn't much danger from Indians," Nottage says.

In fact, a number of American Indians were cowboys themselves.

Mexican cowboys, known as vaqueros (Spanish for "cow men"), developed many cowhandling methods and tools including livestock branding practices, the lariat ("la riata," the rope), and herding with horses rather than on foot. Myth 2: The cowboy is a figure of the past. Modern life has no place for Old West traditions.

Although barbed-wire fences have put an end to the open range and new technologies have emerged, modern ranching still holds onto traditions of the Old West. Families still grow up taking care of herds in traditional ranch settings.

"A lot of kids still grow up in these settings. They still do branding and other traditional cowhand activities in much the same way," Nottage says.

A 2003 U.S. Bureau of Labor survey revealed that about 1000 people in the United States are employed as "support for animal production." These workers of ranches, stockyards, and rodeo performances implement modern technology of complex veterinary

‘Cowboy!’ Cont. on Page 3

news?"

our time.

Ole looked at them and said, "Dat's the best news I hear in a long time. I yoost told Lena dis mornin dat I don't tink I can take anodder vinter in Minniesoda!" ••••• Lena looked out of the window and saw Ole.

The young family's 4-year-old daughter naturally took an interest in all the activity going on next door and spent much of each day observing the workers.

The surveyors stated, "Well, after our work here, we discovered your farm is not in Minnesota but is actually in Wisconsin!"

He was outside walking back and forth in the front yard pushing his lawn mower in the nude. Lena raised yelled, "OLE."

window

and

He replies, "Ya Lena, what you vant?"

“You better get in da house and put your clothes on, people vill tink I married you for your money." ••••• A 4-Year Old's first Paycheck

Here's a truly heartwarming story about the bond formed between a little 4-year-old girl and some construction workers that will make you believe that we all can make a difference when we give a child the gift of

A young family moved into a house, next to a vacant lot. One day, a construction crew turned up to start building a house on the empty lot.

Eventually the construction crew, all of them "gems-in-therough," more or less, adopted her as a kind of project mascot. They chatted with her, let her sit with them while they had coffee and lunch breaks, and gave her 20 little jobs to do here and there to make her feel important. At the end of the first week, they even presented her with a pay envelope containing ten dollars.

The little girl took this home to her mother who suggested that she take her ten dollars "pay" she'd received to the bank the next day to start a savings account. When the girl and her mom got to the bank, the teller was equally impressed and asked

‘Chuckles’ Cont. on Page 7


‘Cowboy!’ Cont. from Page 2

sciences, pickup trucks, and four-wheeler travel. The workers retain their Old West traditions including horseback riding in areas modern vehicles cannot access. They rope steer with lariats, and still prefer their iconic Western clothing: wide-brimmed hats protect from the sun, sturdy jeans and leather chaps shield the legs from heavy brush, and cowboy boots protect lower legs and keep feet from slipping out of stirrups. Traditions of the Old West are definitely alive and well.

Cattle-raising societies existed long before the Great Plains had been cleared of buffalo. It was in Florida that much of the protocol involving branding evolved. Yet the cattle industry of the Southeast never attracted national attention. The herders never became heroes. They remained little known and were recognized for what they were—illiterate, unmounted trespassers on the public domain, drifting from grazing ground to grazing ground, trailing their beasts to markets at Ohio River towns or to Savannah or Jacksonville. The cowboy life was glamorous. Myth: It was very difficult working 18-hour days and the long trail rides were sometimes boring.

Most cowboys had small or medium physical frames. Truth: Large men were too heavy to ride mustangs.

A cowboy would ride his favorite horse all day. Myth: Cowboys would ride a string of horses depending on what task was at hand. For example, a mild horse would be used at night and a quick horse would be used for cattle roping and tending. Many Texas cowboys were Mexican or African-American. Truth: During the Cowboy Era (1866-1886) one sixth of the cowboys were Mexican, and many others were AfricanAmerican or Native American.

Most Texas cowboys were older, experienced wranglers. Myth: Most cowboys were young men who learned on the job. "They were, on average, pretty young," Nottage says. "Families were pretty large, so kids started working at younger ages. Cowboys were in their late teens or early 20s. Some were 15 or 16 years old." Women could not be cowboys. Myth: Several women owned ranches and ran their own cattle drives, including Amanda Burks and Lizzie Johnson.

The word “cowboy” was invented in Texas. Myth: Actually, the job of a “cowboy” came from the Mexican and Spanish “vaquero.” Many cowboy words and practices come from the Spanish language and Mexican culture. Here are a few examples of Spanish and English words related to ranching: Vaca = Cow Ranchero = Rancher Corro = Corral Mesteños = Mustangs Cocinero = Cook

The cowboy of myth and reality had his beginnings in Texas. There cattle grew wild with few natural enemies; by the end of the Civil War there were an estimated 5 million of them. It was then that the cowboy entered his twenty-year golden age, 1866-1886, the era of the open range and the great cattle drives. The incentive was the high price of beef up North, where Union armies had exhausted the supply and the urbanizing East provided a ready market. One could make millions in the cattle industry. A steer worth five dollars in Texas was worth sixty dollars in the North. The economics did not escape the Texans. Beginning in 1866 they began moving long lines of longhorns northward, with the primary destination being the railhead at Sedalia, Missouri. Indians and farmers who resented cattle trampling their crops and spreading the dreaded Texas fever protested their passage. Outlaws stole the cattle and were not averse to killing the men driving them.

Texans searched for a route with better grass and fewer Indians, farmers, and desperadoes. When railroads inched across the plains, new trails, among them the Chisholm, Western, and Loving, veered westward to intercept them. Cattle towns such as Abilene, Wichita, Ellsworth, Caldwell, and Dodge City enjoyed a brief heyday of prosperity and violence. Later trails headed on north to Ogallala, Cheyenne, Glendive, and Miles City. By 1886 the open-range cattle business had spread throughout the Great Plains and had merged with earlier cattle enterprises in Colorado, Idaho, Washington, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and California.

The men who worked the cattle in the treeless expanses of the West, at least one-fourth of them blacks, became known as cowboys. The image of the courageous, spirited horseman living a dangerous life carried with it an appeal that refuses to disappear. Driving a thousand to two thousand cattle

hundreds of miles to market; facing lightning and cloudbursts and drought, stampedes, rattlesnakes, and outlaws; sleeping under the stars and catching chow at the chuckwagon—the cowboys dominated the American galaxy of folk heroes.

Even their dress inspired envy. The cowboys' hats were highcrowned with wide, floppy rims, practical for protection from the sun's glare, useful as a cup with which to scoop up water or, folded over, as a pillow. The bandana handkerchief tied around the neck could be lifted to cover mouth and nostrils from dust. Originally the collarless shirt and trousers were nondescript, of flannel or wool. A vest was often worn; it gave some protection from cold winds and also had a number of useful pockets, one of which held Bull Durham tobacco and cigarette papers. The boots with heels two inches high, the better to rest in the stirrups or dig into the ground while roping a calf, may have appeared exotic to a dude, but they were absolutely practical. The stock saddle's design traced all the way back to the Moors of North Africa, having come to the American cowboy by way of the Spanish and Mexicans. Chaparejos, or chaps, served a valuable purpose when a cowboy had to chase after a steer into a patch of thorny mesquite. A bridle, a lariat, and, during the cattle drives, probably a well-balanced six-shooter completed the cowboys' outfit. Ranchers staked out homesteads often centered in a cottonwood grove, with ample water nearby; they grazed their cattle over thousands of acres of public domain. Barbed wire, a web of railroads throughout the Great Plains, and enforcement of federal land laws all put an end to the open-range cattle industry and the great trails. By the mid1880s prudent cattlemen realized that the industry was overexpanded, the Great Plains overgrazed, and the price of beef declining. The dry summer of 1886 followed by the terrible winter of 1886-1887 destroyed what remained of the original industry. The open range was ended.

Blooded cattle were brought in to improve the stock. The cowboy who hated to work unmounted was often reduced to riding a haymow, mending fences, and applying medicines to sick cattle. Where once he had herded cattle up the trails to Abilene or Dodge, he now ran the line—the water divide between his ranch and his neighbor's. There was still the

‘Cowboy!’ Cont. on Page 6

November 14, 2013 - Page 3

Letters to the Editor Attribution

In the man about town column on page 5, you state that you were a "Green Beret" at age 19. According to the U.S .Army a soldier has to be a minimum of 20 years old to become a Green Beret. Because that was a long time ago for you . , are you sure that you wern't 20 instead of 19? Thanks for your service. Please advise Sincerely. Miranda Cook San Diego County.

Editor’s Note: Wasn't me. It was a quote of Michael Yon, the brilliant war correspondent.

He was, indeed, a Green Beret at age 19; they changed the rules at a later date.

Am copying Michael Yon. He may wish to answer you directly. (If you haven't read his stuff . . . you should. Brilliant writer!) Response Yon: Lyle,

from

Michael

Thank you for the kind words.

I was 19. I had my 19th birthday during the course. I had a friend who became a SEAL at 17. Many people have said that is impossible ... and every last one of them is wrong. ;) Michael

Editor’s Note: Michael Yon is presently in Turkey, exploring Syria issues. Expect some brilliant reporting in the very near future! KOWN Cover Story

Hi, can’t tell you how much I enjoyed the article on the old KOWN radio station.

Brought back a lot of memories from high school, cruising, the old Esco Village Mall. Do you have any idea what happened to Craig Martin, an old friend of mine who did the evening DJ

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. on Page 4


Local News

Page 4 - November 14, 2013

Escondido Redistricing Map Ready - (Preliminary)

slot in the mid 70s ? Thanks /s/John Romero San Diego County

The Redistrictng Commission has completed the preliminary Redistricting Map (see map at right.) During the thirty (30) day period after filing the designated preliminary districting plan with the City Clerk, the Consent Decree directs the Commission to hold at least three (3) public hearings in various geographic areas of the City before it makes any modifications. The schedule for these public hearings is as follows:

Editor’s Note: Have lost touch with Craig; will make some inquiries. Lyle,

Following these public hearings, the Districting Commission will hold a Public Meeting on Sunday, November 24; 6 p.m. in City Council Chambers, 201 N. Broadway, 92025 for discussion and approval of a Recommended Districting Plan. The approved Plan will be submitted to the City Council for its up or down approval. Carlsbad Armed Robbery

On Friday, November 6 at 4:13 P.M., the city of Carlsbad Police Department received a call of an

Proposed (Preliminary) Escondido Boundary Map for new districts as of 10/31/13 Official preliminary city map at: https://gisapps.escondido.org/districting.html

armed robbery at Palomar Airport Mobil gas station located at 899 Palomar Airport Road.

undisclosed amount of cash. No

would be by to use my gift certificate to celebrate my birthday.

of the ordinary coming to Escondido on November 22nd. Martial arts fans will know that being promoted to 10 degree Grand Master is a BIG deal. It is happening to Charles “Chuck” Hawkins. On Friday, November 22nd, at 5:30 p.m., at Escondido’s City Hall, Chuck will receive his promotion. Later, at 7pm, there is a ceremony at Bethel Baptist Church in Escondido.

The suspect was described as a black male adult, approximately 6’1” tall with an athletic build. He was observed wearing a white long sleeve shirt, black athletic shorts that hang belong his knees, black and white athletic shoes, and a black beanie type cap. The suspect was armed with a small gray handgun. The loss was an

Well!

I know where I’m going for my next birthday!

We walked into the place and everybody wished me “Happy Birthday.” Bartender, wait staff, Ray . . . even got a big ol’ family hug from Ray.

Man About Town

Eldest son, Scott, bought dear old dad a $25 gift certificate for The Jalapeno Grill.

Ray Alto is, and has been, a good friend for years, way back to when he owned the old Fireside Restaurant at Centre City Parkway and Mission in Escondido.

After he sold The Fireside, he built the Jalapeno Grill and Cantina . . . and we moved over with him. Always good food, always good service, and we’ve almost become a fixture there as we’ve been a regular patron for years.

So, the birthday gift was very well received. I had occasion to talk to Ray earlier in the day and told him Evelyn and I

More on KOWN:

I enjoyed reading your article about KOWN, particularly when you focused on the procelebrity tennis tournaments held at the La Costa resort each year.

· Thursday, November 21; 6 p.m. at Hidden Valley Middle School

· Saturday, November 23; 9 a.m. at Mission Middle School · Sunday, November 24; 3 p.m. at Center for the Arts, Escondido

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. from Page 3

Ordered one of my favorite meals, the Rib Eye steak. I even had a Margarita (I seldom drink but it seemed an appropriate occasion.) Evelyn had her favorite, the Salmon dinner . . . and we just relaxed and enjoyed the evening. Appetite satisfied, we were prepared to leave when a horde of Jalapeno staff descended upon us, carrying a double fudge birthday cake, topped with both a candle and a blazing sparkler, shooting into the air like a rocket ship. Wow!

I felt like royalty (which, of course, I am . . . though humble.)

Rather a nice way to celebrate a birthday. You can bet I’ll return next year. ••••• Something really big and out

‘Local News’ Cont. on Page 5

Beginning his training in Tae Kwon Do in 1968, Chuck Hawkins moved up through the various black belt degrees to the present time when he is promoted to 10th Degree Grand Master status. During his martial arts career he trained with Chuck Norris and appeared in several films with him. Those of you who are into martial arts may want to take in these ceremonies. Once in a lifetime event type of activity. ••••• The Holiday Season is upon us and lots of folks you can help to brighten the season.

One example is Izzy Wade, a sweet little girl who was born with an ear deformation known as microtia/atresia. A number of folks in North County are pitching in to cover expense for surgery to help correct this condition. She has a small ear with no canal. She

During the 70's, as a Carlsbad police officer, I supervised law enforcement explorers from Carlsbad Police Department and several other area law enforcement agencies at these week-long tournaments. The explorers conducted crowd and traffic control duties. Toward the end of one of the tourna-

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. on Page 6

will be undergoing this Medpor surgery with Dr Lewin to reconstruct her ear.

The Friday after Thanksgiving there will be a yard sale with proceeds going to help Izzy and her surgery. The yard sale is being staged by Kathy Bee at her home, 726 Springlake Place, Escondido, on November 29th from 7:30 a. m. to 3:30 p. m.

You may want to check a website to see how you might help. Go to: https://www.giveforward.com/fu ndraiser/xgd3/ear-forizzy?utm_source=giveforward&utm_medium=email&ut m_campaign=donation_notify_o ganizer#

Met two more beautiful women

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 5


‘Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 4

last week. Rorie Johnston, Senior Director of Business Operations, and her 19 year old daughter, Kristen.

Evelyn and I met them and scurried on over to The California Avocado Grill on Grand Avenue in downtown Escondido for a tasty lunch. The owner, Alex McLaughlin, stopped by to say hello and that’s when we learned his wife is the culinary expert. She selects the menu and sees to it the food is prepared properly. Rorie had the Lime Shrimp Salad, Kristen had Chicken Torilla Soup, Evelyn had the Grilled Avocado Caprese sandwich, and I had the Thai Chicken Tacos. Superb food in a very relaxing atmosphere and outstanding service. We’ll be back. We found it a great place to carry on a conversation and get acquainted, which was the whole purpose of the lunch . . . just to get to know one another.

You may want to check it out, The California Avocado Grill, 136 West Grand Avenue, Escondido, CA • Phone (760) 291-1040. ••••• There is a blog that I read regularly, (Escondido2014.com) hosted by a lady named Pat Mues.

Good thinker, good writer, lots of ideas. (I’ve already suggested she consider being a candidate for City Council. She declined. Wants to spend time with her hubby.)

Most recently she posted the idea of developing a Public Market in downtown Escondido that would be a seven day a week feature. She had in mind the empty store at 246-248 E. Grand. It’s overpriced at $1.2 million but has the potential. Possibly a public/private venture? I became rather excited about the idea after reading about it . . . remembering that Evelyn and I just returned from Vancouver, British Columbia, where they have a Public Market that is a classy upscale facility with permanent vendors, cafe/restaurant, two or three floors, and is a “must-see-andshop” when in Vancouver. Also, the Public Market in Seattle is legendary and fun to visit. All with permanent vendors.

I think Ms. Mues has hit upon a great idea to help make downtown Escondido a really major destination in San Diego County. The Public Market (perhaps with a rooftop restaurant and concert venue), the Center for the Arts . . . a larger and more diverse assemblage of great restaurants on Grand Avenue. This is an idea the Escondido City Council could really sink its teeth into and generate a great opportunity!

‘Local News’ Cont. from Page 4

vehicle has been identified with this suspect. If you have information reference this armed robbery please call the police department. Carlsbad Knife Assault

On Thursday, November 7th at 7:02 P.M., the City of Carlsbad Police Department received a call of an assault with a deadly weapon that occurred near the trash dumpster behind 7110 Avenida Encinas.

A security guard on routine patrol confronted the suspect near the trash dumpster. The suspect brandished a knife and stabbed the security guard in the head. The security guard was treated for his injuries at a local hospital. His injuries were not life threatening. The suspect was described as a white male adult between 20-30 years old, about 6’ tall with a thin build. The suspect had shoulder length dark brown hair with an unshaven face or short beard. He was shirtless, wearing dark pants, and white tennis shoes. The suspect also had multiple tattoos on his right arm. He fled the scene on foot and witnesses lost sight of him near Poinsettia and Avenida Encinas. If you have any information reference this assault with a deadly

November 14, 2013 - Page 5

weapon please contact the police department. For more information: Sergeant Jade Chase, 760931-2136, jade.chase@carlsbadca.gov. Escondido Police Get 10% Raise

The Escondido City Council has approved a contract giving the Escondido police officers a cumulative pay raise of 10 per cent over the next three years. These raises are over and above the automatic pay raises officers receive bsed on years of service.

Mike Garcia, president of the labor union representing the city’s roughly 160 officers said this brings the Escondido officers to about a median level compared to the rest of the county.

There has been a noticeable talent drain with officers leaving for other agencies; this pay raise contract may help stem that shrinkage, said Garcia, not only for retention but in recruiting. The three-year contract gives officers a 2.5 percent raise in January, another 2.5 percent raise next July, a 2 percent raise in January 2015, a 2 percent raise in January 2016 and a 1 percent raise just as the contract ends in December 2016. The starting pay for an Escondido police officer will increase from $54,564 to $65,652 by the end of the contract.


Page 6 - November 14, 2013

Evelyn Madison The Social Butterfly Email Evelyn at: thesocialbutterfly@cox.net

The

Social Butterfly

Sunrise Vista Kiwanis Club held its 40th Annual installation of officers and directors for 2013/2014. Spouses and guests attended. Listed (l-r) front row: Elizabeth Jaka, Nadine Kaina, Kitti Frietag, Cathy Hodgkinson, Carol Brady, and Pat Bell, Lt. Governor, Division 37 of Cal-of Cal-Nev-Ha District of Kiwanis International. Back row: Steve Rhoades, incoming president Brad Wiscons, and Sarah Davis. The Club meets at the Rancho Grande Restaurant, 825 Williamston, Vista, at 7am each Wednesday. For more info, visit the website at www.kiwanisclubofsunrisevista.org.

Soroptimist of Vista Hosted Veterans Group Speaker

Sandra Fichter, V.P. of Veterans Association of North County, with Soroptimist International of Vista President Thoralinda Soyland

‘Cowboy!’ Cont. from Page 3

semiannual roundup when cowboys representing several ranches rendezvoused and rode great circles, rounding up all the cattle they could find. They were then herded to a central place where cowboys from each ranch cut out its beasts and drove them back to the home range. In 1867, Joseph McCoy tracked a path known as the Chisholm Trail from Texas to Abilene, Kansas. The Texas cowboys drove the cattle the entire distance — 1500 miles. Along the way, the cattle enjoyed all the grass they wanted, at no cost to the ranchers. At Abilene and other railhead towns such as Dodge City and Ellsworth, the cattle would be sold and the cowboys would return to Texas.

Glorified in thousands of novels and hundreds of motion pictures, the American cowboy is so mythologized that the reality and the legend are almost inseparable. Yet the reality is that the cowboy still exists because his work is essential to the industry. In many areas of the American West he still rides a horse, though he may carry it in a horse trailer behind his pickup truck to the point where the road gives out and a horse becomes indispen-

Sandra Fichter, Vice President of Veteran's Association of North County, was the guest speaker at Soroptimist International of Vista’s October meeting at Shadowridge Country Club. VANC is a non-profit umbrella organization representing more than 30 veteran organizations spanning all branches of military service. They serve as a one-stop resource for all veterans and military to assist

sable. He may survey the ranchman's spread in a small airplane that he pilots, and he may help his employer determine with a computer matters of feed, weight, and salability. But he still dresses like a cowboy because the garb is practical; he understands cattle and horses and gazes out upon the treeless expanse just as his predecessors did. His work and his workplace, in spite of encroaching population, are still there. No vision of the American West is complete without the cowboy. The imagery is quintessentially American, but many myths cloud the truth about what life was like on the long drive. Myth vs. Reality

Contrary to legend, the typical cowboy was not a skilled marksman. The lariat, not the gun, was how the cattle drover showed his mastery.

The lone cowboy is an American myth. Cattle were always driven by a group of drovers. The cattle were branded so the owner could distinguish his steer from the rest. Several times per drive, cowboys conducted a roundup where the cattle would be sort-

‘Cowboy!’ Cont. on Page 8

military and their families with jobs, education, finances, health and wellness and family issues. Fichter is also a longtime member of the Vista Soroptimist Club. For more information about Soroptimist of Vista, visit www.soroptimistvista.org or email siv@soroptimistvista.org. For info about VANC, visit their website at www.vancnorth. Meetings/Events Calendar

Pacific Belles Chorus to Host

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. from Page 4

ments, I approached Clint Eastwood and asked him if he would participate in our final meeting for the purpose of presenting the explorers with certificates of appreciation. After telling him the date and time, he accepted my invitation, without hesitation. Clint Eastwood spent at least an hour at our ceremony. This was close to the time that he was starring in the "Dirty Harry" movies and was a real hit with the explorers. I possess a super 8 movie reel memorializing this event. /s/Orv Hale San Diego County Lyle,

Redistricting Plan

As you know, to fend off a law suit by the ACLU, the city (of Escondido) agreed to change their councilmanic elections from an at large system to one in which each council person is elected from newly created districts. The mayor will continue to be elected on an at large basis.

A committee was appointed and charged with the responsibility of crafting the new districts. A good many of the committee members are well qual-

November Open Sing – During November, the Pacific Belles Chorus of Sweet Adelines International continues to host their Open Sing for all women interested in singing. Women of any age are invited to join the Chorus at rehearsals every Monday night at 7pm at Trinity Episcopal Church, 845 Chestnut St., Escondido.

Give a Gift and Grant a Wish - Cox employees are campaigning for Donated Airline Miles for the “Make A Wish” program. Last year, more than 70% of children’s wishes involved travel. To make sure that wishes for kids are fulfilled, Make-AWish San Diego will need 10 million air miles to provide travel for more than 200 kids and their immediate family members. Cox employees kicked off the campaign through the Wishes in Flight program. Donate your airline miles and make wishes come true for local children. Participating airlines include Delta, US Airways and United. What’s great about this program is that once miles are donated, they never expire. You hold the ticket to a child’s wish and help kids reach their wish destinations around the world. This is a simple way to help grant a life-changing wish experience. Contact Cox Communications or the “Make-AWish” San Diego organization.

Soroptimists to Host Comedian to Speak on Crime Awareness – Actor/Comedian Bryon Walls of California Crimefight will speak at the Soroptimist International of Vista (SIV) Friday, November 15th luncheon meeting. “Walls will speak on Crime Safety, in an entertaining and informative way,” said Dee Dee Timmons, VP of SIV, “and has had rave reviews wherever he has appeared.” Mr. Walls’ acting, singing

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 7

ified citizens, and there is heavy representation of Latinos and Latino activists. The obvious, though unstated, objective of the committee was to create one or more Latino districts that would spawn successful Latino candidates for city council and/or Mayor.

The committee has just submitted their 1st draft of the new districts to the city. A copy of that map is now available at the city’s website. There will be a series of public meetings to comment on the new boundaries. However, I am concerned that most residents will simply ignore those and be uninformed of their own district’s geography or demographics. Additionally, who knows how much attention the U.T. will devote to this? Would you mind taking a look at the initial proposed map on the city site? Maybe look it over and see if, in your opinion, it makes sense to anyone other than the Latino community? Perhaps publish a large enough map that folks can see what it means to them personally?

I understand that, with the help of the ACLU, Latinos want to improve their chances

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. on Page 10


‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 6

and comic resume includes performing onstage alongside the likes of Rosemary Clooney, Mort Sahl and Phyllis Diller. Lunch is at 12noon at the Shadowridge Country Club in Vista. For reservations, contact SIV President Thoralinda Soyland at siv@soroptimistvista.org or call 760809-8146.

Singles Group Presents “Oldies But Goodies” Music – Simply The Best Singles dance will include “Oldies but Goodies” with a live band, plus DJ Rhonda with the 80’s to current music, on Saturday, November 16, from 7:30-11:30pm, at the Del Mar Marriott, 11966 El Camino Real, San Diego 92130. Also there will be a psychic, photographer, Lock & Key game and prizes. Upscale classy dress, no jeans/shorts. Parking $5; dance price is $15/prepaid or $20/at the door. Visit www.SimplyTheBestSingles.com or call 818.577.6877 for reservations.

History Center Happenings – On Saturday, November 16, at 10am, join with the Escondido History Center and explore the west side of the Old Escondido Historic District to check out great domestic architecture with Richard and Ann Rothwell. Meet at the SE corner of Broadway and Grand. Then try to figure this out: $25 = $50; $75 = $150. Got it? That’s not crazy math, but it’s true when it come to donations to the History Center through December 31st. Every dollar donated will be matched, making your donation go twice as far. Your donation will help keep your History Center open for another year, continue to provide events, a local history museum, and a research center for the community. Donations can be mailed to P.O.Box 263, Escondido 92033, or stop by the

‘Chuckles’ Cont. from Page 2

the little girl how she had come by her very own pay check at such a young age.

The little girl proudly replied, "I worked last week with a real construction crew building the new house next door to us." "Oh my goodness gracious," said the teller, "and will you be working on the house again this week, too?"

The little girl replied, "I will, if those SOB’s at Home Depot ever deliver the friggin' drywall..." ••••• My wife hosted a dinner party for family far and wide and everyone was encouraged to bring all their children as well. All during dinner my fouryear-old niece stared at me sitting across from her. The girl could hardly eat her food for staring. I checked my shirt for spots, felt my face for food, patted my hair in place but nothing stopped her from staring at me. I tried my best to just ignore her but finally it was too much for me.

office in Grape Day Park. For information, call the office at 760.743.8207.

Assemblywoman Marie Waldron to Speak at TERC Meeting – The guest speaker will be California Assemblywoman Marie Waldron at the monthly meeting of The Escondido Republican Club (TERC) on Monday, November 18. She has been involved in North San Diego County for 20 years, and as a small business owner understands the economic impacts of burdensome government regulation and spending on the taxpayers and small businesses. She will give an update on important state legislation. Also, a representative of “Support the Enlisted Project” (STEP) will attend the meeting to collect NEW, UN-wrapped toys that will be distributed to children of needy, active-duty military members. TERC is pleased to support STEP’s efforts. The meeting will be held at Cocina del Charro restaurant, 890 W. Valley Parkway, Escondido. Checkin at 11:30am with the buffet lunch and meeting beginning promptly at noon and concluding at 1pm. Reservations are necessary. Cost is $14/person. RSVP by calling 442.999.5077. For more info about TERC, visit www.escondidorepublicanclub.org.

Tri-City Tea Party Meeting on November 19 – Fox Business Network Craig Huey will be the guest speaker on “How to Win in 2014,” at the Tri-City Tea Party meeting on Tuesday, November 19, from 6pm-7:30pm, at Boomers in Vista. In addition, TCTP’s webmaster will provide helpful tips on how to keep your email private, and the Action Group Leaders will give latest updates. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early and enjoy food and beverage at Boomers Café, 1525 W. Vista Way, Vista. Contact TCTP at info@tri-cityteaparty.org or call

I finally asked her "Why are you staring at me?" Everyone at the table had noticed her behavior and the table went quiet for her response.

760.600.TCTP (8287).

“Knowledge is Power” Presentation by Palomar College Foundation – The renowned Palomar College Debate Team will present a demonstration of the skills its members have used to win tournaments around the world. This is in addition to a “Knowledge is Power” presentation from leading experts in the financial and estate planning field, from noon to 1pm, on Wednesday, November 20, at the St. Mark Golf Club, 1750 San Pablo Drive, San Marcos. Admission is free and includes a complimentary lunch. For reservations and info, contact Richard Talmo at 760.744.1150, ext. 2733, or italmo@palomar.edu.

Jewelry Sale to Benefit Animals in Need - The Escondido Humane Society’s annual Holiday Jewelry Sale is set for November 21st, from 10am to 5pm, just in time for holiday gift giving. All proceeds will benefit homeless animals at the Escondido Humane Society, so it’s a win-win! One-of-a-kind, handcrafted jewelry by WW Designs will be sold during the event. The artist makes only one of each design, so every piece is special and unique. A variety of styles are available, and there is a range of price options for all budgets. All sale proceeds will be donated to the animals at EHS. Visa, Mastercard, checks, and cash accepted. For more info, call 760.888.2235 or visit www.escondidohumanesociety.org. San Marcos Chamber Happenings – The “After 5:30 Mixer” is Thursday, November 21st at Mike’s B*B*Q, 1356 W. Valley Pkwy, Escondido, just west of I-15 in the BevMo Shopping Center. The next “Breakfast for Success” is Tuesday, November 19th at the Broken Yolk at 7:15am, networking and breakfast, and the next “Fridays at 4” will be on November 22nd at

Historically Speaking by Tom Morrow

My little niece said "I'm just waiting to see how you drink like a fish." ••••• I had a dear old grandmother who was a farm gal. Seldom, if ever, would she see a doctor. Farm folks tend to be hardy folk . . . and pretty much look after themselves.

Finally, the family, noting grandma’s advancing years, suggested she break down and go see the doctor. She reluctantly agreed.

At the doctor’s office, after the doctor had gathered the vitals and took down her history, he said, “Okay, Mrs. Davis, now if you would please undress. Grandma giggled and said, “Oh, doctor . . . you first! •••••

The little boy's parents told him he couldn't go to the picnic because he had been naughty. After a while, they forgave him and told him he could go. He began to cry. They asked him what was wrong and he told them, "It's too late…. I already prayed for rain!"

The Mysterious Nazca Lines of Peru

Those giant figures and designs on the South American desert plains located in the southern coastal region of Peru have fascinated since they were first discovered by pilots flying over them in the 1920s. Visible only from the air, these giant figures consist of a great deal of designs and shapes carved deeply in the ground. Some are in the shape of flowers, trees, birds, and other animals. There's one peculiar figure of a human, referred to as "The Owl Man" because of its giant wide-open eyes. These lines have caused scholars to speculate what they represent and who carved them.

November 14, 2013 - Page 7

Penny Lane. Ribbon Cuttings this month include November 15, Kidzmazing Dental, 327 S. Rancho Santa Fe., Suite G, at 2pm, and November 22 at Perfect Balance Therapeutic Massage, 407 N. Twin Oaks Valley Rd., #108, at 12:30pm. For more information, contact the Chamber at 904 W. San Marcos Blvd., Ste. 10, San Marcos.

DUVCW Meeting on November 26 – Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War (DUVCW) 1861-1865, Nancy Hanks Lincoln Tent #5, will meet at 11am on Tuesday, November 26 in the Veterans Memorial War Building at Zoo Drive and Park Boulevard in Balboa Park, San Diego. The powerpoint presentation given by Barbara Hemmingsen will be a continuation of Lt. Col. Bruff’s letters, this time in Chattanooga. He was in the 125 Ohio Volunteer Infantry. For info, call 619.475.0153.

Oceanside Elks Invite Community for Thanksgiving Dinner – On Thursday, November 28, at 6pm, the Elks Club of Oceanside will serve a full Thanksgiving dinner, including turkey and the trimmings, and has invited the community to enjoy dinner with them. Cost is $12/person. Tickets are available at the Elks Lodge. “We have a very long history of serving the community and this is just one more opportunity for us to give thanks and encourage others to join us in service to the area” states Oceanside Elks President Dan Bourg. “Our wonderful facility in Oceanside is perfectly suited for a function like this where neighbors, families and friends can gather for a traditional holiday dinner.” Elks invest in their communities through

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 11

The fact that none of these characters can be seen from the ground and only the air has left many to believe earth had extra-terrestrial visitors hundreds of years ago. How could they be constructed without a heavenly view?

Other archeologists justify the drawings existence in many other ways. These great figures were drawn between 200 B.C. and 600 A.D. They may have served many functions largely associated with rituals, planting, and the extraction of water from a harsh desert environment. Study of the Nazca people shows them to have been skilled in irrigation, constructing a network of canals that linked the Nazca River with underground waters flowing from the nearby Andes Mountains. Still, how connected these geometric and animal designs are to agriculture or some subterranean water supplies remains unknown. The "extra-terrestrial visitor" theory has dominated people from all around the world for almost a century.

In October 1946, at a medical symposium at the University of Buffalo, scientists suggested the possibility that cigarette

‘Tom Morrow’ Cont. on Page 10


Meetings, weddings, quinceaneras, birthdays, receptions, craft shows, recitals, religious services, concerts, fund raisers, seminars, and other special events and occasions. The Escondido Women’s Club Maximum 170 people Full use of kitchen and stage 24-hour insurance required

Hourly rentals include House Manager for table setups and guards for all weddings and other parties. Call 760.743.9178 for information

‘Cowboy!’ Cont. from Page 6

ed and counted again.

Work was very difficult. The workdays lasted fifteen hours, much of which was spent in the saddle. Occasionally, shots were fired by hostile Indians or farmers. Cattle rustlers sometimes stole their steers.

boys

David Dary, Cowboy Culture: A Saga of Five Centuries (1981); Joe B. Frantz and Julian E. Choate, Jr., The American Cowboy: The Myth and the Reality (1955); Philip Ashton Rollins, The Cowboy (1922; rev. ed., 1936).

One of the greatest fears was the stampede, which could result in lost or dead cattle or cowboys. One method of containing a stampede was to get the cattle to run in a circle, where the steer would eventually tire.

Upon reaching Abilene, the cattle were sold. Then it was time to let loose. Abilene had twenty-five saloons open all hours to service incoming riders of the long drive. Twilight of the Cowboy

The heyday of the long drive was short. By the early 1870s, rail lines reached Texas so the cattle could be shipped directly to the slaughterhouses. Ranchers then began to allow cattle to graze on the open range near rail heads. But even this did not last. The invention of barbed wire by Joseph Glidden ruined the open range. Now farmers could cheaply mark their territory to keep the unwanted steers off their lands. Overproduction caused prices to fall, leading many ranchers out of business. Finally, the winter of 1886-87 was one of the worst in American history. Cattle died by the thousands as temperatures reached fifty below zero in some parts of the West. The era of the open range was over. Sources: www.westernauthors.com/Part _IV.htm www.blantonmuseum.org/elea rning/aac/teacher/cowboy/gam e.html

www.history.com/topics/cow-

Can You Sell?

If So . . . let’s talk.

We love Seniors, Retired Military, Women, most any age or gender . . . if you can sell, you can not only earn a handsome income but be part of a fun paper that delivers special features, great humor, and local commentary by columnists who really know their stuff. If you’re interested . . . send us your resume.’ No phone calls please.

We have a compensation plan where you can write your own ticket to success. Email your resume to: thepaper@cox.net or fax to: 760.741.7800.

If You Can SELL . . . Let’s Talk!

The Paper is looking for experienced newspaper ad sales people. Send your resume’ to: thepaper@cox.net


November 14, 2013 - Page 9

DOUG BEST SWINGS! Saturdays 7AM-11AM

About the show

Ole lovable Doug Best brings you the best in swing music with just a touch of New Orleans jazz. Join Doug every Saturday morning starting at 7AM as he takes out those old phonograph records and takes you on a trip down memory lane with the likes of Glen Miller, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, and Lawrence Welk. And in the final hour of the show it's the "Sweetheart's Corner," where Doug sets the table for you and provides the music while you and your sweetheart do the rest. Phone (during Doug's show only): 760-744-1150 x5576

KKSM 1320 AM

Palomar College Radio

www.palomar/edu/kksm/dougbe st Also on COX Digital Cable 957

About Doug Best Doug Best is a radio legend with over 50 years of broadcasting. He enjoys bringing all the best in swing and jazz to radio listeners. Doug loves music and feels that it can reach out and touch people's lives.

Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong

Benny Goodman

Glenn Miller

If You Can SELL . . . Let’s Talk!

The Paper is looking for experienced newspaper ad sales people. Send your resume’ to: thepaper@cox.net

Boycott

The Paper

One Stop Shopping! Display, Classifieds, Service Directory, Legals760.747.7119

As a public service, The Paper, periodically, will list businesses in North San Diego County that we believe deserve a boycott, and that we will boycott. Whether you choose to boycott them is entirely your decision. The reasons for such a boycott include poor, shoddy, or incompetent service, rudeness to patrons, overcharging, deceit, and/or failure to pay their bills. We are boycotting the following: Dr. Valentina Obradovec, Adriatic Dental, San Marcos, CA. Castrejon’s Hauling and Bobcat Service, Vista, CA. Martha Diaz, Martha’s Housekeeping, Escondido, Ca. Kerry Lane, Boyd Rogers Plumbing, Vista Todd Nelson, Hi-Lo Electric, San Marcos


Page 10 - November 14, 2013 ‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. from Page 6

to be elected. I also read that Escondido’s population now comprises about 49/40% Latinos. However, I also read that only about 25% of the Latino population hold US citizenship and are eligible to vote assuming they bother to register. Absent a better analogy, it seems this may be a “political correctness’ effort to create a “tail wags the dog’ election scheme. Sid Colquitt Escondido, CA.

Editor’s Note: Much of this was addressed in our lead local story for the 11/07/13 issue and was also in The Social Butterfly colum in the 10/17/13 issue. See Page 4 for a map of the proposed districts. I’m generally of the opinion that the Committee did a good job to comply with the court’s order via a consent decree. I see no major problem thus far but there is still time for public comment. The KOWN Story

Hi Lyle,

I was out on a project for a short time with only my cell phone and didn't see the email to call you.

The photo of Alan (Skuba) in the press box looks like he is either a high stakes poker player or a member of the mob !

You did a FANTASTIC job on the story and would bet you a steak dinner that you'll have a lot of readers writing in with their memory of the station. This is the first time I caused a small commotion and then was glad I did! Seeing my name at the end was icing on the cake thanks! I would love to add the paper edition to my KOWN binder. Thank you for this opportunity to re-visit KOWN again. Terry Keane Olympia, WA

Coach Snyder

As a parent of a great stepdaughter, I am so grateful to Coach Snyder for his hard work and leadership to get the Charter schools established. She attended Escondido Charter school when it was still in the office buildings across the street and was on the committee that chose White Tigers as the school mascot. She went on to attend UCSD on a scholarship and graduated and is now a new Mom and a proud and respected employee of a local Escondido firm. She might have been able to accomplish this from the government

schools, but she would not have had the great environment of moral leadership and diligence she got from her nonunion teachers. I wondered about the sour grapes from Mr. Thomas S Cowan Jr. and found out that not only has he not contributed much to the community, unlike Coach Snyder, he is an uber left wing idealogue who doesn't seem to have much grip on reality. David Granum Escondido, CA

More KOWN

HI: Just wanted to congratulate you on the great article on KOWN; I am Dwight Alexander, who worked full and part time there from 69 to 72, and really enjoyed it. I did news, helped Phil Boles as we did traffic in the afternoon and often stayed with him 6 to midnight, and sometimes to a bar downtown til it closed at 2; only to be up and again at work at 6 to sign on with a morning guy.

My most fun promotion was “the Great Honda Hunt” where a key was hidden and clues given and the many people going thru weeds near the station at the end to find that magic key! I remember running into you at Kaiser one day. I am semiretired; still own rentals as I have for 40 years here and also have profitable interests in oil wells in the Bakken that I inherited! Amazingly I live in the Custom Home that the now famous Chick Embry built on the edge of town and later sold because his wife did not drive! He has lived right across the street from the high school ever since.

Great Job on the Article; I was out of town and missed that paper, and have not found one, but read it onliine! Keep up the good work. Dwight Alexander Escondido, CA.

Editor’s Note: Copies of the KOWN edition have been mailed to Mr. Alexander. Affordable Housing

Most of my relatives live in mobile home coaches or manufactured homes. Right now they are still a bargain. The baby boomers are growing in numbers and retiring. Soon they may realize that the only available affordable housing is mobile homes and start buying.

Therefore if you want to sell your big house or are thinking of down-sizing do it before the mobile homes skyrocket in

Jake is the Pet of the Week at your Rancho Coastal Humane Society in Encinitas. He’s a 4 year old, 68 pound, neutered, male, Australian Cattle Dog – Shepherd mix.

Jake was a sick, stray dog when he was picked up and taken to the county animal shelter in Carlsbad. Tests revealed that he had eaten rat poison. Now he’s healthy, gained 12 pounds, and has been transferred to RCHS through the FOCAS program. The $145 adoption fee for Jake includes up to date vaccines, veterinary exam, neuter, and microchip. If you can't adopt right now, consider sponsoring a pet until it’s adopted. Meet your new cat, dog, or rabbit at Rancho Coastal Humane Society, 389 Requeza Street in Encinitas. Adoption hours are 11 to 5 Wednesday through Monday. For more information call 760753-6413 or log on to www.sdpets.org.

price. Many mobile home parks are for seniors, with excellent amenities. They have club houses, swimming pools and lots of activities.

The parks are maintained, so their is very little work on your property to do. The average monthly cost in rental in a resident owned park is about $600. William Hart Carlsbad, CA

Welcome to The Paper

Make Your Entire Year Jolly With a Collection of Jokes from . . .

“Give Us This Day Our Daily Chuckle”

Become a subscriber and we’ll see to it you have your very own personal set of Chuckles every week! To subscribe Just call: 760.747.7119

Julio is a 3-year-old neutered male Chihuahua, ID 74194. Julio is an athletic, energetic, outgoing little guy – a lot of dog in a small package. He's affectionate and will scramble into your lap, but he's a dog with places to go and things to do! He wants to know what's rustling in the bushes and what's going on around the corner. He's smart and very trainable and would thrive in a home where he gets consistency, plenty of exercise and the mental stimulation of positive training. Julio is available for adoption at the Escondido Humane Society, 3450 E. Valley Parkway. His $85 adoption fee includes neuter, microchip, up-to-date vaccinations and vet exam. For more information, call (760) 8882247 or log on to www.escondidohumanesociety.org.

‘Tom Morrow’ Cont. from Page 7

smoking may be hazardous to your health. In fact, they went so far as to suggest it may cause cancer.

Also in October 1946, nine Nazi war criminals were hanged. Those executed were: Joachim von Ribbentrop, Wilhelm Keitel, Julius Streicher, Ernst Keltenbrunner, Alfred Rosenberg, Hans Frank, Fritz Sauckel, Alfred Jodl, and Arthur Seyss-Inquart. A tenth escaped the hangman noose. Hermann Goering, the No. 2 Nazi, and head of the German Luftwaffe (Air Force), committed suicide by taking a cyanide pill. The Holidays are Approaching Rapidly!

Have you thought about giving a subscription to The Paper as a Gift? Santa will smile at you! One year subscription: $57.20 Six months: $28.60

Get you copy of The Paper delivered to your door every Thursday! Call 760.747.7119


A Weekly Message from the Mayor of Your Community published in the belief that it is important for elected leaders to communicate with their constituents and that constituents have a means of hearing from their elected leaders.

Escondido • Mayor Sam Abed 3rd Annual Community in Unity Celebration at City Hall Dome

On November 21, 2013 from 5:31pm to 8:31pm over 500 guests will experience Escondido’s 3rd Annual Premier Holiday Kickoff Party – “Community in Unity” under the dome at City Hall. Why the odd start time? Because City Hall closes at 5:30 and this wonderful holiday event starts as soon as possible!

The City Hall Dome decorations will be provided by the Home Depot East Valley, which will set the mood for this festive event. The food and wine is provided by over 30 local restaurants, craft brewers, and wineries.

Local schools and churches provide music to create the caroling mood, followed by a step into Santa’s Sweet Shop that will promise to end all diets. In the spirit of giving, guests are asked to bring new pajamas for Isabelle’s Foundation for Rady’s Children Hospital and/or a new toy for the Escondido Police Department’s (EPD) annual Children’s Christmas Party which assists child victims of violence, abuse and low income. Last year over 650 pajamas/toys were collected. The Christmas tree and Gingerbread house will be auctioned off and proceeds are also given to the EPD’s child abuse program. Tickets may be purchased for $20.00 prior to the event or $25.00 at the door. For further information and ticket purchase contact the Escondido Chamber of Commerce at 760/745-2125.

Vista • Mayor Judy Ritter Wildfire Season. Be Prepared.

At this time of the year, our fire officials always worry about the dry Santa Ana winds. With high winds and low humidity, the speed of spread and flame length increases greatly. In our region there is always the potential for wild fire and becoming an informed resident is the first step to living safer and smarter. The key is to design a plan for wildfire, prepare your home and surroundings, and practice firesafe activities. Below are steps you can take to better protect your family and home from wildfire.

BE READY:

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 7

programs that help children grow up healthy and drug-free, by undertaking projects that address unmet needs, and by honoring the service and sacrifice of our veterans, and sponsor worthy causes like Boy Scouts, veterans’ organization, local schools, and other organizations. For more information about this and other events, facility use and membership in the Elks is available at the Lodge, 444 Country Club Lane, Oceanside, 92054, or email secretary@1561.sdcoxmail.com or by phone, 760.433.1561. Get Ready for a “Holly Jolly Celebration” – The RB Chorale is celebrating its 40th Anniversary 1973-2013. Get ready for some real excitement in December at the Poway Performing Arts Center when the RB Chorale kicks off its 40th year of bringing the gift of song to the community with a “Holly Jolly Celebration!” The 130-voice, all volunteer, nonprofit organization, is

• Long before fire threatens, plan your evacuation. • Make a list of items to take during an evacuation. • Assemble an Emergency Supply Kit you can take if evacuated. • Learn alternate ways out of your neighborhood, in case one way becomes blocked. • Leave exterior lights on if you evacuate. It helps firefighters find the house in smoke or darkness. • Do not leave garden sprinklers on - as they can waste critical water pressure. • Designate someone as an out-of-area contact through whom family members can relay information. Long distance phone systems often work while local communications are overloaded. • Listen to local news when disaster threatens. If officials instruct you to leave, do so immediately.

currently rehearsing for three performances on Friday and Saturday, December 13-14 at 7pm, and a matinee on Sunday, December 15, at 1pm. The performances will feature music for all ages. There will be traditional holiday music including both Christmas and Hanukkah, newer songs from Holiday Broadway Shows, and a smattering of love songs and carols. An added feature will be several spotlighted numbers by talented soloists within the Chorale. Tickets are now available; go to www.rbchorale.org or call 858.485.7664. Santa will drop by for an appearance, but it’s a secret so don’t tell the kids. The Chorale has awarded over $300,000 in scholarships, and in May 2014 additional scholarships will be given to graduating seniors from high schools in San Diego County. CSUSM Presents Inaugural SD American Indian Film Festival – The California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center (CICSC) at California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) is proud to present the Inaugural 2013 San Diego

San Marcos • Mayor Jim Desmond San Marcos Senior Center to Host Dance Party

On Friday, November 22, from 5:30 to 8 pm, San Marcos community members are invited to attend a classic rock, blues and country dance hosted by the San Marcos Senior Center, 111 Richmar Avenue.

With music by the band FANDANGO, the party features dancing and games for kids along with food vendors like Flippin’ Pizza, Kona Ice Truck, Lil Miss Shortcakes, the Organic Food Truck and Mr. Taco #1 Fresh Mexican Grill. All pro-

ceeds will benefit the senior nutrition program.

Traditionally, senior centers are open during the day with programs and activities geared towards community members over 50 years of age. With more than 120,000 grandparents in San Diego County raising their grandchildren, this special event is designed to provide an inexpensive and fun recreational opportunity for adults and children alike. For more information, please contact the San Marcos Senior Center at (760) 744-5535, ext. 3606 or visit www.san-marcos.net/seniors.

Oceanside • Mayor Jim Wood O’side Turkey Trot

“Move Your Feet Before You Eat,” the perfect slogan for the 8th Annual Oceanside Turkey Trot … and a perfect event to start your Thanksgiving Day morning! This ever popular race (5 Mile / 5K / Combo Run / Kids Runs) will be held on Thursday, November 28, in downtown Oceanside – be sure to check their website and register at www.osideturkeytrot.com to find the right time for your event. In fact, this event is so popular that Kinane Events has placed a limit of 10,000 participants this year! This North County Thanksgiving American Indian Film Festival (SDAIFF), November 21-23 in San Marcos and Temecula. SDAIFF will highlight the best of current films from American Indian filmmakers, producers, directors and actors working throughout Indian Country, and spotlight American Indian lives, interests and issues. Notable guests and screenings include Actress Kimberly Norris Guerrero ("The Cherokee Word for Water"), Actor Danny Glover ("Chasing Shakespeare") and a special presentation of "Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope" in the Navajo language. Opportunities for youth will include a Saturday shorts program facilitated by Artist, Filmmaker and Humanitarian Steven Paul Judd (Kiowa/Choctaw), as well as student films selected from surrounding tribal communities. Festival screenings and activities will take place Thursday and Friday, November 2122, at CSUSM, 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road, San Marcos. For more info including directions, campus map and parking fees, visit the CSUSM Parking Guide at www.csusm.edu. All SDAIFF events

tradition has been providing family and friends with a beautiful race course that starts at the Oceanside Civic Center and finishes at the Oceanside Pier area along the beach. The event even offers a costume contest, largest teams competition, live entertainment everywhere and finisher medals for all participants. And to get you into the mood for this great time, the 8th Annual O’side Turkey Trot Expo will be held from 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM on Tuesday, November 26th, and Wednesday, November 27th, at the Target Shopping Center located at 2401 Vista Way in Oceanside. For questions, contact via email osideturkeytrot@kinaneevents.co m or call (760) 434-5255. are open to the general public, but tickets are required. CSUSM students will be admitted free (tickets available at the CICSC office). The Premiere and VIP reception will be Saturday, November 23 at Pechanga Resort & Casino, 45000 Pechanga Parkway, Temecula. Parking is free. For directions, visit the Pechanga Resort & Casino website. For more info, contact Joely Proudfit, CSUSM, 760.750.3535, jproudfit@csusm.edu; Jack Kohler, On Native Ground, 707,592.9030, jack@onnativeground.org; or Anecita Agustinez, 4 0 8 . 4 2 9 . 5 6 2 9 , anecita.agustinez@gmail.com.

“Summation V” Publication Party and Book Release – The public is invited to the Publication Party for the book release of Summation V: The Merging of Art and Poetry, to be held by the Escondido Arts Partnership Municipal Gallery on Saturday, November 30, from 12noon to 3pm, at 262 E. Grand Avenue, Escondido. Presentations will be at 12:30pm. The exhibit will run from December 8th – January 4th.


Page 12 - November 14, 2013

Nome and Paul Van Middlesworth The Computer Factory www.computerfactorysanmarcos.com What Good are Veterans Anyway?

This week we celebrated Veteran’s Day. Everyone knows the story. On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918, Germany accepted the terms of the armistice that ended WWI. The day was commemorated as Armistice Day to honor WWI’s fallen veterans until Congress amended the law in 1954 changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day, a day to honor all Veterans.

It is important to remember that it is all of Veterans we honor and not just those maimed or killed. In the past one hundred years, fewer than 2% of the veterans who served in America’s Armed Forces were killed or wounded in combat. While it is certainly fitting that we honor those wounded or killed, we owe no less a debt of gratitude to

Thank You to Our Veterans

This week, communities across our nation honored military service members who have sacrificed greatly to protect our freedoms. We reserve Veterans Day to show gratitude and appreciation for those who are retired from, or currently serving in, one of our nation’s military branches.

As our community is called home by many of California’s service men and women, I am humbled to have had the opportunity to meet and recognize some of these courageous individuals. During my time in the legislature, I have been a strong advocate for increasing aid and opportunities for veterans in our state. This year, we passed many

those who served and lived to come home.

The WWII generation has been called “America’s Greatest Generation.” Thank God that 98% of those men and women came home after the war to build the “golden age” of America. Today only 15% of those veterans survive. We owe them our deepest gratitude and respect. When we think of honoring Veterans we tend to think of combat Veterans but we owe as much to the men and women who serve America in support of logistics as well as combat and in peacetime. It is their strength, competence, courage, and vigilance that preserve our freedom and security in peace and in war. In America, compulsory military service for men (the draft) continued for nearly a generation after the end of WWII. The post war draft ended in 1973. It is hard to deny that the draft had a tremendous and largely beneficial effect on American society. It can be argued that America would be a stronger and better nation had we kept some form of compulsory service even to this day.

(Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force or Coast Guard). For an eighteen year-old fresh out of high school, a hitch in the service was a “rite of passage,” an introduction to manhood. Learning discipline, respect, financial responsibility, and the other skills learned in an environment bound by rules and tradition was hugely valuable experience. Judges often waived prison sentences for young offenders on the condition that they enter the military service and become “men.” Employers preferred veterans for good reason. An “honorable discharge” from military service was a recognized accomplishment and universally accepted endorsement of character.

Few realize the importance of America’s “draft” to the Civil Rights Movement of the 60s and 70s. Racial barriers in America’s military services were swept away when President Truman integrated the US military in 1948. During

those years there were no organizations in America as color blind as the five armed services. Imagine the impact on an 18 year-old conscript from Alabama who had never seen a “Negro” in a position of authority, an Iowa farm boy who had never seen a “Mexican” speak English or a ghetto teen learning that his worth came from within and was not bounded by the color of his skin. Racial biases melted away in the military environment where race simply wasn’t important. The experiences of the generation who served in our integrated armed services did more to prick the conscience of America than all the marches, sit-ins and speeches. It has been 44 years since I last wore my uniform, but I’ll always feel a strong kinship with veterans of any age or service. Whether a fresh young face in Navy white or a grizzled WW II Veteran in a VFW piss cutter. In war or peace, Veterans share a bond born of our common experience and service. God bless you my brothers.

While a small percentage of young men “dodged” the draft, the great majority of America’s young men, rich or poor and of every race, religion and background served. The standard enlistment was two years

policies to support veterans in California. We successfully established laws that will improve veterans’ access to education, increase opportunities for employment after military discharge, and build new affordable housing for low-income veterans– a housing project that I have worked on for many years. Veterans’ sacrifices can never truly be repaid, and they deserve much more than any legislation passed to support them. They deserve daily thanks for their choice to be brave so that we may be free.

Senator Mark Wyland represents the people of the 38th Senate District, which includes Rancho Bernardo, Carlsbad, Oceanside, San Marcos, Escondido, and Vista.

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Report Card Time

California now has the highest sales tax, the highest gasoline tax, and the highest marginal income tax rates in the United States. These high rates of taxation are contributing factors to California’s ongoing ranking in the bottom tier of business-friendly states. The people of California have long understood the negative impact of excessive taxation. In 1978, California voters overwhelmingly enacted Proposition 13, which eliminates yearly increases in property taxes based on re-assessed property value.

Recently, the Howard Jarvis Taxpayer’s Associated released its 2013 Legislative Report Card, which monitors votes on legislation impacting taxation as well as attempts to undermine Proposition 13 protections for California’s taxpayers. I am happy to report that I received an “A” rating for my

first year Assembly.

in

the

State

During the upcoming legislative session which begins in early January, I look forward to continuing to fight for California’s overburdened tax payers. A number of bills that would undermine Proposition 13 protections were introduced earlier this year and are likely to be taken up again after the Legislature reconvenes. These bills include a number of constitutional amendments, such as ACA 8, which would lower the threshold to approve infrastructure bonds from two-thirds, currently required under Prop.13, to 55%.

ACA 8 and similar constitutional amendments would ultimately require voter approval should they pass the Legislature. I will do everything within my power as your representative to derail this serious threat to California’s future prosperity.


November 14, 2013 ATTORNEY

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Car Accidents • Slips and Falls

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COUNSELING

RELATIONSHIP IN TROUBLE? Get the help you need now. COUNSELING | MEDIATION CLASSES:ANGER MANAGEMENT PARENTING | RELATIONSHIPS The Optimize Center 350 W. 9th Avenue, Suite 101 Escondido, CA 92025 760.747.8686

Electrical Services

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030383

The name of the business: Into the Vineyard, located at 4119 Avenida De La Plata, Oceanside, CA. 92056, is hereby registered by the following: Daniel Wristen 216 Hillside Terrace Vista, Ca. 92084 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Daniel Wristen This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/24/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

CLUBHOUSE RENTAL Womans Club of Escondido 751 No. Rose St., (corner Mission Ave.) 760.743.9178

Meetings, weddings, quinceaneras, birthdays, receptions, craft shows, recitals, religious services, concerts, fund raisers, seminars, and other special events and occasions Maximum 170 people Full use of kitchen and stage 24-Hr. Insurance required

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Death Notices

Brenda K. Daugherty, 56, of San Marcos, Ca., passed away on November 3rd, 2013. Jesse W. Thompson, Jr., 90, of San Marcos, Ca., passed away on November 3rd, 2013. Albert Anthony Rodriguez, 78, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 11, 2013.

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The Paper

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Death Notices

Alicia R. Cervano, 86, of Murrieta, CA., passed away on November 4, 2013. Josephine Adkisson, 86, of Escondido, CA., passed away on November 7th, 2013.

Parker T. Smith, 13 months old, of San Marcos, Ca., passed away on November 7, 2013. Richard “Dick” Beckstead, 82, of Escondido, Ca., passed away on November 7th, 2013.

Waltraut Petraskevicius, 83, of Escondido, Ca., passed away on November 7, 2013.

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The Paper

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030578

The name of the business: Circle K/Mobil of Tierra Santa, located at 10496 Clairmont Mesa Blvd., San Diego, Ca. 92124, is hereby registered by the following: Black Treasure Enterprises, Inc. 634 Corte Galante San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Senan F. Naoum, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/28/2013. 10/31, 11/07, 11/14 & 11/21/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030767

The name of the business: TD Minerals, LLC, located at 3332 Bajo Ct., Carlsbad, CA., 92009, is hereby registered by the following: TD Minerals, LLC 3332 Bajo Ct. Carlsbad, CA. 92009 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. First day of business was 10/09/2013. /s/John Anderson Davis, CEO This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/29/2013. 10/31, 11/07, 11/14 & 11/21/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-028653

The name of the business: 4 Feet and Feathers Nutrition Center, located at 410 W. Felicita Ave., Ste D, Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: Angelique F. and Michael G. Bennett 2034 Paddy Place Escondido, CA. 92027 This business is conducted by a married couple. First day of business was 9/1/84. /s/Angelique F. Bennett This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/07/2013. 10/31, 11/07, 11/14, & 11/21/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031381

The name of the business: The Golden Egg Omelet House, located at 316 W. Mission Ave., Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: John and Karleen Lovett 10703 Meadow Glen Way East Escondido, CA. 92026 This business is conducted by a married couple. First day of business was 11/6/1980. /s/John Lovett, Owner This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/05/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2013-00073957-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Brandon Lee Chow II filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Brandon Lee Chow II to Proposed name Brandon Lee DonDiego. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: December 17th, 2013, 8:30a.m., Department 26. The address of the court is: 325 S. Melrose, Vista, CA. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 11/04/2013. /s/K. Michael Kirkman, Judge of the Superior Court 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031167

The name of the business: Avina’s Landscaping, located at 353 W. San Marcos Blvd, 229, San Marcos, CA. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Erik Avina 353 W. San Marcos Blvd. 229 San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/4/13. /s/Erik Avina, owner This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/04/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-028485

The name of the business: Brenda’s Lovely Treasures, located at 1074 Grape St., San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Brenda L. and Timothy N. Townsend 1074 Grape St. San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by a Married Couple. First day of business was n/a. /s/Brenda L. Townsend This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/04/2013. 10/24, 10/31, 11/07 and 11/14/2013

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE TO ALL CREDITORS To all creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Bette Martin, 2135 Sunset Drive Escondido, California 92025.

James Hayes has been appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of Bette Martin. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must mail a copy of your claim to the personal representative James Hayes at 970 County Road 421, Fayette MO 65248 You will have 45 days from 11/12/2013 to mail a copy of your claim.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-028880

The name of the business: Flash Junk Removal, located at 3527 De Leone Rd., San Marcos, CA. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Luis Fierros 3527 De Leone Rd. San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Luis Fierros This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/08/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-029831

The name of the business: Around the Clock Nursing & Private Caregiving Agency, located at 1717 Katy Place, Escondido, Ca. 92027, is hereby registered by the following: Benito Encabo 574 Echo Lane San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Benito Encabo This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/18/2013. 10/31, 11/07, 11/14 & 11/21/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030528

The name of the business: Western Outdoor Design & Build, Western Turf, located at 1210 E. Barham Drive, San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Western Pavers, Inc. 1210 E. Barham Drive San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was 10/15/2013. /s/Alejandra Garcia, Secretary This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/25/2013. 10/31, 11/07, 11/14 & 11/21/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030978

The name of the business: Vida Family Dental Care, located at 670 W. San Marcos Blvd, Suite 103, San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Vida Namavar DDS, Inc. 670 W. San Marcos Blvd, Suite 103 San Marcos, CA. 92078 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Vida Namavar, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/31/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030019

The name of the business: Avanti Salon, located at 322 W. El Norte Pkwy Ste C, Escondido, CA. 92026, is hereby registered by the following: Martha Lynn and Lee Allen Powell 1518 Casa Real Lane San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by a Married Couple. First day of business was n/a. /s/Martha Lynn Powell This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/21/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2013-00071835-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Cleofas Vigil Suarez filed a petition for a minor, Flortzel Lopez Vigil, with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Flortzel Lopez Vigil to Proposed name Florizel Vigil Lopez. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: December 3, 2013, 8:30a.m., Department 26. The address of the court is: 325 S. Melrose, Vista, CA. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 10/18/2013. /s/K. Michael Kirkman, Judge of the Superior Court 10/31, 11/07, 11/14 & 11/21/2013

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO VISTA DIVISION 325 S. Melrose Vista, Ca. 92081 760.201.8094

SUMMONS (Family Law) CASE NO. DN173187

NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: Ismael Zaraga You are being sued.

Petitioner’s name is: Laura Gervacio

You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center. www.courinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association.

NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. NOTE: if a judgment or a support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. 1. The name and address of the court are NORTH COUNTY DIVISION, 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA. 92081. 2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Laura Gervacio, 760.889.1834, 3813 Harding St., Carlsbad, CA., 92008 Date: January 22, 2013by /s/ R. Corona, Deputy

NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. 11/14, 11/21, 12/05/2013

11/28

&

NOTICE OF INTENDED DECISION (Administrative)

The Planning Division Director of the City of San Marcos has considered and does intend to APPROVE Director’s Permit 13-017 on November 14, 2013. Project No.: P12-0017 Case No.: DP-13-017 Applicant: Park View San Marcos II, LP Request: Director’s Use Permit to allow the operation of a self-service laundry within a mixed-use development in the Park View Specific Plan Area (SPA). Location of Property: 365 Autumn Drive, more particularly described as: Portion of Lot 23, Block 58 of Map No. 806, Rancho Los Vallecitos de San Marcos. Assessor’s Parcel Number: 220-130-65. NOTICE: Appeal rights are available. Any interested person may appeal the decision of the Planning Division Director, provided the appeal fee is paid and a written appeal is submitted to the Planning Division Secretary within ten (10) days (due no later than 5:30 PM on November 25, 2013). The Planning Commission shall hear the appeal within forty (40) days after the filing of such appeal. Appeal fees shall be paid upon submittal. Said appeal shall be in writing and specify where there was an error in the decision of the Planning Division Director. Contact the Planning Division at 760-744-1050, extension 3233. The City of San Marcos is committed to making its programs, services and activities accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you require accommodation to participate in any City program, service or activity, please contact the City Clerk’s office at 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos CA 92069, or call 760-744-1050, extension 3145. Further information about this notice can be obtained from Norm Pedersen at 760-7441050 extension 3236, or npedersen@san-marcos.net. Phil Scollick, City Clerk, City of San Marcos. PD: 11/14/13. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-029703

The name of the business: Learning Jungle School - San Marcos Campus, located at 1364 E. Mission Road, San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Learning Jungle Schools (San Diego), Inc. 12975 Boston Avenue Chino, CA. 91710 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Frederick Si, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/17/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030598

The name of the business: CTS, Concrete Tool Supply, located at 2746 S. Santa Fe Avenue, San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Bill Rosell 2238 Oak Hill Dr. Escondido, Ca. 92027 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 3/02/06. /s/Bill Rosell This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/28/2013. 10/31, 11/07, 11/14 & 11/21/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-029681

The name of the business: Carlos Gardening and Tree Service, located at 2110 Meadowlark Ranch Circle, San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Carlos Roberto Fabian Lopez 2110 Meadowlark Ranch Circle San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Carlos Roberto Fabian Lopez This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/17/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031261

The name of the business: Parkway on Elm, located at 255 N. Elm, Ste 100, 102, 205, Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: Valley Radiology Consultants Medical Group 10225 Austin Dr. Suite 105 Spring Valley, CA. 91978 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Allen B. Nalbandian, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/04/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 & 11/2812/05

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031263

The name of the business: VRC Carlsbad, located at 6185 Paseo Del Norte #110, Carlsbad, CA. 92011, is hereby registered by the following: Valley Radiology Consultants Medical Group 10225 Austin Dr. Suite 105 Spring Valley, CA. 91978 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Allen B. Nalbandian, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/04/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 & 11/2812/05

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031546

The name of the business: Ruby Spa, located at 3910 Vista Way, #103, Oceanside, CA. 92056, is hereby registered by the following: Li Jian, Zhao 329 N. Nicholson Ave #A Monterey Park, CA. 91755 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Li Jian Zhao This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/07/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 & 11/2812/05

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-029830

The name of the business: A Fabulous Wax, located at 528 S. Coast Hwy, #3, Oceanside, Ca. 92054, is hereby registered by the following: Tracy Haines 3460 Marron Rd. #103-105 Oceanside, CA. 92056 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Tracy Haines This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/18/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030991

The name of the business: RBP Associates, GoToJewelers.com, located at 861 Sixth Ave., Ste 316, San Diego, CA. 92101, is hereby registered by the following: Geoffrey M. Barrett 50 Main Street, #112 Ladera Ranch, CA. 92694 Sean E. Rich 2052 Caracol Court Carlsbad, Ca. 92009 Stephen J. Policastro 1445 Southview Court Chula Vista, Ca. 91910 This business is conducted by a General Partnership. First day of business was n/a. /s/Geoffrey M. Barrett This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/31/2013. 11/07, 11/14, 11/21 & 11/28/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-029779

The name of the business: Chinese Holistic Body Works, located 2111 S. El Camino Real, Suite 100, Oceanside, Ca. 92054, is hereby registered by the following: Hing Yin Chui Russell 201 Los Arbolitos, #184 Oceanside, CA. 92058 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 11/01/2013. /s/Hing Yin Chui Russell This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/18/2013. 10/31, 11/07, 11/14 & 11/21/2013

If you have an item for The Social Butterfly, please email details to: thesocialbutterfly@cox.net

November 14, 2013 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: November 8, 2013 To Whom It May Concern:

The Name of the Applicant is: ST. TROPEZ CA LLC The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 7150 AVENIDA ENCINAS, STE 100 CARLSBAD, CA. 92011 Type of license applied for: 41-ON SALE BEER AND WINE, EATING PLACE 11/14/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031677

The name of the business: Dentistry Simplified, located at 423 Landmark Ct., San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Donna Bellinger 423 Landmark Ct. San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Donna Bellinger This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/08/2013. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-030678

The name of the business: Los Pequenos de Jesus, located at 5006 Isle Royal Ct., Oceanside, Ca. 92057, is hereby registered by the following: Drawing Smiles Foundation 5006 Isle Royal Ct. Oceanside, Ca. 92057 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Irene Morales, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 10/29/2018. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2013-031824

The name of the business: TitleMax, located at 6663 El Cajon Blvd., Suite A, San Diego, Ca. 92115, is hereby registered by the following: TitleMax of California, Inc. 15 Bull Street Suite 200 Savannah, GA. 31401 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Michael Kelleher, Assistant Secretary This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 11/12/2018. 11/14, 11/21, 11/28 and 12/05/2013

Meetings, weddings, quinceaneras, birthdays, receptions, craft shows, recitals, religious services, concerts, fund raisers, seminars, and other special events and occasions.

Maximum 170 people Full use of kitchen and stage 24-hour insurance required Hourly rentals include House Manager for table setups and guards for all weddings and other parties. Women’s Club of Escondido 760.743.9178


The Mighty Mojo Page The

Page 15 - October 17, 2013

Antiques & Art

Auto Repair- European

760.471.0441 225 S. Pacific Street., San Marcos

Bar & Grill

Great Food and Entertainment 316 W. Mission #115 On Facebook: Comstock Bar and Grill

760.746.6188

Chair Repair

Chiropractor The Joint

$19* per adjustment!

North County’s Newest Most Exciting Chiropractic Office! 1250-A Auto Parkway, Escondido

442.999.6464

Walk-ins welcome!

*(offer valid for first visit only. Lower cost plans available)

Coins & Loans

760.745.4816 Escondido Coin & Loan, Inc. 241 E. Grand Avenue

www.escondidocoin.com Coins•Gold•Silver•Vintage Watches

Contractors

FREE ESTIMATE

Bathrooms, Kitchens, remodels Arya Construction lic #997518 619-756-4411 local Super quality, Great prices

Paper

DMV

TriColor Insurance

We’ve Moved - New Location 723 S. Escondido Blvd Instant Auto Registration Same Day Suspension Lifted M-F Free SR22/Filing

760.291.0215

Lic#: 0803847 Ins. 60805 - Reg.

Diner

George Burgers

Stitcher’s Treasures

132 East Grand Ave. 760-737-3113 Cross Stitch Needlepoint Hardanger Fibers Fabrics Canvas Quilting Threads Handpainted Needlepoint & Antiques Classes & Stitch Guides Monday-Saturday 10-5 www.stitcherstreasures.com

Real Estate

760.402.5578 • 619.906.9097 CA. LIc: #973661 C61/D49

Wigs & Hairpieces

"EVERYTHING IS HOMEMADE EXCEPT THE KETCHUP ,MAYO,AND MUSTARD"

350 N. Broadway, Escondido Escondido, Ca.

760.747.5951

mon -sat. 9a-9p sun. 10-8

Food Market

La Sorpresa Barata

Oriential Hispanic Western Chở Vietnam 850 East Valley Parkway 760-735-9650

Now Open!

Phở Chinese Food To Go & Vietnamese Submarines Dine In & Carry out Inside market

Groceries - Discounted NOW OPEN! GROCERY OUTLET

Bargain Market 125 SOUTH SANTA FE RD. SAN MARCOS,CA

Home Based Business

Players, Not Spectators WANTED

All –Natural Health & Wellness Company Be Your Own Boss * Set Your Own Hours Incredible Tax Benefits * No Risk “Hands-on” Training Included SERIOUS Applicants ONLY

Elite Wigs

105 West Grand Ave. Wigs, Hair Replacements, Cleaning & Styling

Restaurants

Tuesday - Friday 10:30-5pm Sat 10am - 2pm

Just great food and great service! 912 S. Redwood St. Escondido

760.739.9265

Shoe Repair DOART SHOE REPAIR FREE SHINE ON 1 PAIR w/ad Tuesday-Friday 9am-5:30pm, Sat. 9am-2pm

103 S. Broadway, Escondido 760.743.5273

760.745.5336

Medical Supplies/Pharmacy Pharmacy & DME Inc. Here, you are family Medical Supplies, Wheelchairs, Walkers

909 E. Valley Parkway 760.480.1082 Need Legal Ads? Call us! 760. 747.7119

Freedom 2 B U Films preserving memories . . . one story at a time. Learn how you can preserve your history and your family history. Call 619.333.0171 for details www.freedom2bu.org

The Pastor Says . . . (760) 747-7119

That’s the real story behind the first Christmas. It was completely unexpected! Add to that a mystical star, three “wise men from the east,” and having a dream that you should skedaddle down to Egypt to rescue your son from government-sanctioned murder. No one would have predicted this! Someone ought to tell the story the way it really was.

760.753.7907 Your local GEICO Office San Marcos

1281 Simpson Way - Escondido, Ca.

Video Memories

For Advertising Information or to subscribe, Call

Insurance

Escondido Mattress Serving North County for 59 years! Randy Taylor

760.747.3030

Westside Cafe

760-233-4949

Mattresses

Be part of the Mighty Mojo Page! Call 760.532.9157 or 747.7119 for details!

Tree Trimming

Needlepoint & Supplies

That’s what New Song Community Church intends to do.

Pastor Hal Seed New Song Community Church, Oceanside,

Unexpected Christmas

The story of Christmas is probably so familiar to you, you could recite it in your sleep. Yet to Mary, Joseph, and the other eyewitnesses, Christmas was completely unexpected, disarming, even disturbing.

Imagine riding a donkey 80 miles during the last stages of pregnancy. Imagine huddling in a cave to deliver your firstborn. Imagine grubby, lower-class night-workers showing up to view your baby before you’ve even had the chance to tell your mom he was born?

This December, New Song will showcase The Unexpected Story with impressive videos, touching songs, and great story-telling. The production will travel to each of New Song’s locations throughout the month:

On December 7 and 8, it will play at New Song Mission Avenue (3985 Mission, Oceanside). On December 15, you can experience it at New Song Seaside (401 Mission Avenue – meets at the Regal Theater). On December 22, you’’ find it at New Song Inland Hills (31505 Old River Rd, Bonsall.) Check www.newsongchurch.com for show times. The Unexpected Story is an experience for the whole family. Why not start a new tradition and join us for the Christmas Season?


Page 16 - November 14, 2013

Would you like a solid, steady income? With room to grow? Expires 12/31/13

Join us at The Paper - the fastest growing weekly in San Diego County. We are looking for three sales executives who know their way around publishing, have creative minds, and enjoy working with people.

We want experienced professionals. Publishing experience is a must.

You’ll receive training, promotional materials, a steady stream of both seasonal and special promotions to sell . . . and you’ll be given a territory with some of the best business people to deal with you could ever hope for. If you qualify, send your resume’ to: thepaper@cox.net No phone calls. We’re too busy reading resume’s!

Work Hard Advertising Sell Lots of ADvertising Earn This

Then you’ll have the time and money for this

Have you sent your resume’ in yet? • If not, Get Busy! Time’s A-Wasttin’!

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