The Paper 11-25-21

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November 25, 2021

Volume 51 - No. 47

By Cecil Scaglione

As a prologue to some of the memories that follow in what could become a series of flashbacks, my newspaper career began way back during World War II on the streets of North Bay, 220 miles (350 kilometers) north of Toronto. It was a busy Northern Ontario railroad town just shy of 18,000 people when I became a newspaperboy selling the North Bay Nugget on the street at time when home delivery was not the norm. I was 8 years old. The Paper - 760.747.7119

website:www.thecommunitypaper.com

email: thepaper@cox.net

My education began then, after being a rural rube all my life. We moved into town on New Year’s Day 1943 and I started selling papers in the spring after the snow and ice finally went south. Or maybe they went north. I would run the dozen blocks downtown from St. Rita’s School. Home was on the way so I dropped off my books and picked up 22 cents to buy 11 papers. We bought them still warm off the presses for 2 cents each and sold them for 3 cents. Paydays were great because a lot of buyers would

flip us a nickel and let us keep the change. The paperboy price later went up to 3 cents and we sold it for 5 cents. Not as many tips then. We fought for first place in the line at the press-room doors on Oak Street behind the Nugget that was housed in what was then the St. Regis Hotel at the west end of downtown where Algonquin Street angled off Main Street. When I got my papers, I’d scramble up one side of Main Street. They usually sold within the first two blocks. (I managed to pick up a few steady cus-

Confessions of a Newspaperboy

tomers among the merchants.) Then I’d scramble back and buy another 11 and scoot into the pubs at the east end of Main and wrap up my sales day. Why I bought them in elevens, I don’t recall. Maybe that was all I could handle at first, but I began buying two dozen at a time before my three-year stint ended when we moved to the east end of town. As I hustled around the eight blocks of downtown commerce peddling my papers, I used to see the Nugget’s reporter Ben Ward (he

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The Paper

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Confessions Cont. from Page 1

grabbed my shirt, punched me in face and took 22 cents out of my pocket.

What turned me to thinking about those glimmering days was a recent medical visit to check a blockage in my nose. It turned out to be minor but the doctor asked me, “When did you break your nose?” I said I never broke my nose but he said I must have because of my deviated septum and other scarring. The thought clung to my skull for several days until I finally figured out when it must have occurred.

Billy Larochelle, who was a little guy like me but a heckuva lot more wiry and quicker and athletic and tougher and had a gravel voice that scared people, gave me enough money to buy my papers that day. I went back for a second and third batch so I could pay him back and still have enough money to show my mother when I got home.

later moved on to a lengthy tenure with Canadian Press) talking with people all over: elected officials outside City Hall (it became a city in 1925), the cop on the corner, owners of the Arcadian Restaurant over a coffee, the postmaster on the steps of the Post Office. THAT’s what I wanted to do when I grew up. As it turned out, I got lucky and did “that” for several decades in such fun towns as Toronto, Sarnia, Kitchener, Windsor, Detroit and San Diego.

It was the third or fourth day after I became a newspaperboy. While we were horsing around waiting for the presses to rumble and roll, a 13year-old burly bully named Maurice (Mo-Mo) Bedard walked up to me and said, “Gimme your money.” I was easy pickings because I was a slight kid, but I said no, not just because it was my money but because my mother would slap me silly if I lost my dough. So he

Give Us This Day Our Daily Chuckle

I recall bawling (don’t know if it was from pain or the loss of the money) but I couldn’t have been injured all that much because the nose didn’t bleed all that badly. I know that because there wasn’t much blood on my clothing — I threw away the hankie I used to soak up most of any mess and the rest didn’t show much because I was wearing a red-checkered flannel shirt — and nothing was said about my appearance when I got home. But that’s the only time my nose was ever smashed.

The episode has an epilogue that bolstered my standing among my paperboy peers. A couple of weeks later, Mo-Mo, who didn’t sell papers but just hung around to steal money from kids, aimed his eyes at me again and started making his approach. I happened to have a packet of matches on me (we used

Confessions Cont. on Page 3

you cannot taste it. Women will be finished reading this by now. Men are still busy checking their thumbs. •••• I went back to a high school reunion not so long ago. Wow!

This week, a compendium of wit, wisdom and neat stuff you can tell at parties. Enjoy!

You drink too much, you cuss too much, you have questionable morals. You’re everything I’ve ever wanted in a friend! •••• The Amazing Human Body

It takes your food seven seconds to get from your mouth to your stomach. One human hair can support 6.6 #. The average man's penis is two times the length of his thumb. Human thighbones are stronger than concrete. A woman's heart beats faster than a man's. There are about one trillion bacteria on each of your feet. Women blink twice as often as men. The average person's skin weighs twice as much as the brain. Your body uses 300 muscles to balance itself when you are standing still. If saliva cannot dissolve something,

Those classmates were so old, wrinkled and bald . . . they didn't even recognize me. •••• Sources in California say that radical Muslims are planning to kill every U.S. citizen in Los Angeles.

Police officials fear the death toll could be as high as 9. •••• Y’all enjoy those 20’s, 30’s and 40’s, because in your 50’s that Check Engine Light is gonna come on. •••• Holiday Warning.....Please, take care of yourself. A recent joint study conducted by the Department of Health and the Department of Motor Vehicles indicates that 23% of traffic accidents are alcohol related. This means that the remaining 77% are caused by jerks who drink bottled water, Starbucks, soda, juice, energy drinks, and crap like that. Therefore, beware of those who do not drink alcohol. They cause three times as many accidents. This message is sent to you by someone who

Dolphins Dance off Clearwater

Everyone scrambled to the back of the boat as the captain gunned the vessel to create a wake he claimed the dolphins can’t resist. More than half a dozen bottlenose dolphins pranced in, out, over, and under the stern swell as the 40-foot tourist-laden tugboat roared through the emerald Gulf of Mexico waters less than a mile off Clearwater. After listening to passenger squeals and squeaks of delight for about 20 minutes, he cut the speed and the cavorting cetaceans with the conworries about your safety. •••• If you identify a UFO as a UFO then it becomes a FO. Unless it has landed, then it is just an O. •••• Teenagers! Tired of being harassed by your stupid parents?

Move out . . . get a job . . .pay your bills . . .while you still know everything. •••• Do you realize that in 40 years we'll have thousands of OLD LADIES running around with TATTOOS, sagging boobs, wrinkled skin . . .and rap music will be the Golden Oldies? •••• Sometimes I laugh so hard that tears run down my leg. •••• A man walked into the produce section of his local supermarket and asked to buy a half head of lettuce. The boy working in that department told him that they only sold whole heads of lettuce. The man was insistent that the boy ask his manager about the matter.

Walking into the back room, the boy said to the manager, "Some idiotwants to buy a half head of lettuce." As he finished his sentence, he turned to find the man standing right behind him, so he added, "And this gentleman kindly offered to buy the other half." The manager approved the deal and the man went on his way. Later themanager said to the boy, "I was

stant grin skittered off.

Dolphins play and prey along this coast of Florida but they also become victims. A celebrated case is Winter, which lost its tail to a crab trap. It was about three months old when found near Cape Canaveral in late 2005 tangled tightly in the trap’s buoy line.

Rescuers took it to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. The mangled flukes fell off but tender loving care restored the mammal to health.

Dancing Dolphins Cont. on Page 3

impressed with the way you got yourself out of that situation earlier. We like people who think on their feet here. Where are you from, son?" "Texas, sir." the boy replied.

"Well, why did you leave Texas?" the manager asked.

The boy said, "Sir, there's nothing but whores and football players there." "Really?" said the manager "My wife is from Texas."

"Get outta here!" the boy said. "Who'd she play for?" •••• Two women were out for a Saturday stroll. One had a Doberman and the other, a Chihuahua . As they walked down the street, the one with the Doberman said to her friend, "Let's go over to that bar for a drink." The lady with the Chihuahua said, "We can't go in there. We've got dogs with us." The one with the Doberman said, "Just watch, and do as I do."

They walked over to the bar and the one with the Doberman put on a pair of dark glasses and started to walk in.

The bouncer at the door said, "Sorry, lady, no pets allowed."

Chuckles Cont. on Page 10


Social Butterfly

The Paper • Page 3 •

The

Honoring & Serving Our Country's Veterans - The Elizabeth Hospice cares deeply about the people who have dedicated their lives to protecting our safety and freedom. We are committed to ensuring that veterans are aware of their healthcare options, feel appreciated and receive the medical support and attention they need and deserve. Here's one family's story:

Evelyn Madison The Social Butterfly Email Evelyn at:

thesocialbutterfly@cox.net

Parkinson’s Support Group Meeting for North County Inland Communities - Free monthly meetings for people with Parkinson’s and their care partners are held on the first Monday of every month from 10:00 a.m. to 12: 00 p.m. at San Rafael Church, 17252 Bernardo Center Drive, Rancho Bernardo, in the Parish Hall. Our featured speaker for the Monday, December 6th meeting is Mickey Burke of Cerebral Motion who will present "How People with Parkinson's Can Maximize Brain and Body Health". Separate breakout sessions for People with Parkinson’s and care partners will follow the presentation to discuss successes and challenges. Please call (760) 749-8234 or (760) 518-1963 if you have any questions.

Confessions Continued from Page 2

to share cigarets while waiting for our papers) and the only thing I could think of was to light a match and throw it at him. As it turned out, the entire packet erupted into flames so I tossed it at him.

The gods were on my side because that fiery package flipped neatly into his shirt pocket. He began hopping around and flailing and slapping at it and cursing and swearing and had to rip off chunks of his shirt, all of which made him look like an idiot in front of the 25 or so kids waiting for papers. He never bothered me again. Nor did anyone else because the word spread not to screw around with that Scaglione kid because “He’s crazy.” Further Confessions Newspaper Boy

of

a

V-E Day prepared me for covering such news events as downtown fires, tumultuous strikes, Detroit riots and similar chaos during my later career as a newspaperman. The prime rule is: Keep Moving. Downtown North Bay became bedlam on Victory in Europe Day. We dodged army tanks, drunken soldiers and whooping civilians as we wiped our eyes of tears induced by the celebratory smoke bombs bursting endlessly all around. It was

Jerome joined the Marine Corps in 1954 at the age of 18, serving as a communications lineman. He was proud of his years of service, displaying the US Marine Corps flag outside his home and continuing to wear his cover at age 85. During his battle with cancer, Jerome received the comprehensive medical and emotional support he needed by accessing his VA benefits. When Jerome and his daughter decided to stop curative treatments, they chose The Elizabeth Hospice to provide his end-of-life care. “Quality of life’ is more important than ‘quantity of life,” said Jerome’s daughter Linda. “I had never been down this road before. Whenever I had concerns or was unsure about what to do for my dad, I reached out to The Elizabeth Hospice. They were available 24/7 to answer my questions, provide equipment and care for his physical needs as well as the emotional needs of our whole family.” “The Elizabeth Hospice also helped us gain access to VA healthcare benefits which made our life better. The combination of The Elizabeth

early afternoon on May 8, 1945 when the bells rang and we scrambled out of school. Someone – I think it was Clare Salidas who lived two houses away – was running and shouting about the war being over and hauling our ass downtown to sell the newspaper Extras that would carry the news.

It was the end of more than five years of headlines scoring the wins and losses of Allied troops (highlighting Canadians) versus Hitler’s hordes overseas. It meant husbands, sons and daughters, sisters and brothers, relatives and neighbors no longer would be fed into the war machine. It meant those in prisoners-of-war camps would be coming home. It meant we would no longer glimpse enemy prisoners of war — their uniform featured a denim jacket/smock with a large bright-red circle on the back — stretching their legs as the trains stopped at the CNR station en-route to camps out in the Prairies. It meant no more rationing. It meant time to party. As the end-of-war news tore through town, soldiers stationed at the local barracks spilled out in tanks and jeeps and, when they ran out of vehicles, ran out themselves. They chewed up the pavement rumbling up and down Main Street. I don’t recall any shots, blank or otherwise, being fired but the town was smothered by the smoke bombs popping everywhere.

All the stores closed. The staff and merchants joined the public party. My indelible first lesson was to

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Hospice and VA benefits provided peace of mind,” continued Linda.

As a local, independent nonprofit, The Elizabeth Hospice relies on the generosity of people like you to make these much-needed services available to Jerome’s family and others in our community. Nov. 30 is #Giving Tuesday, a global day of online giving. Thanks to a generous donor, every gift to The Elizabeth Hospice during this year’s #Giving Tuesday campaign (up to $10,000) will be matched. Please consider making a gift today. The Elizabeth Hospice is at 500 La Terraza Blvd, Ste. 130, Escondido, CA 92025 Counting Down the Days to "Tis the season to Shop Local - For more information about these events, contact MainStreet Oceanside, 760.754.4512 or www.mainstreetoceanside.com.

Sip & Shop Downtown Oceanside; Small Business Saturday, November 27, 1-4pm, downtown Oceanside. Save $5 on advance tickets until Friday at midnight - or we sell out. In just a few days, join us as we kick off the return of ’Tis the Season to Shop Local with this walkable Downtown Oceanside shopping experience. On Small Business Saturday, enjoy 14 tastings from your favorite Oceanside brewers, wineries and craft beverage makers while you explore Downtown shops, enjoy in-store specials, peruse the Merry Makers keep moving in a crowd because you never know what turns it will take. I don’t recall if the Nugget gave us the papers that day but I had about at least a couple of dozen. I still had most of them when I got home even though I had sold them many times over. Everyone was either drunk or acted like it. Soldiers, women, old men were all yelling, “Hey, kid, gimme a paper.” They’d flip a quarter or a dollar at me — a couple of different guys each tossed a $5 bill at me — and rarely took a paper. Soldiers and civilians alike tossed bottles of booze and beer at each other to share. Guys were climbing lampposts to try to see over the smoke. Gals were dancing in and around the moving vehicles. The iconic sailor-kissing-a-girl on the streets of New York on V-J Day some three months later was rather tame compared with what went on during V-E day in downtown North Bay. For example, I saw one couple in kahki and swirling skirt enthusiastically making unabashed love in the front alcove of Fosdick’s Book Store. I don’t recall seeing any pictures of that. To a 10-year-old kid, all this was great fun. It was well after dark when I dumped my papers and headed home. At the kitchen table, I counted my money. My usual tote was around to 50 cents. My V-E Day

Confessions Cont. on Page 5

Fair and listen to live holiday music. Participate in our new Oceanside Holiday Challenge along the way for a chance to win some of our best local prizes yet! $25 in advance or $30 the day of, tickets for Sip & Shop Downtown Oceanside are limited. Come sip, shop and support local!

Additional "Shop Local" programs and events: returning from Small Business Saturday, November 27 through Sunday, December 12, this year's lineup of holiday programs and events will feature a new mobile scavenger hunt program, a craft beer and wine tasting event, a makers fair offering handcrafted goods and a tree lighting celebration - all amid decorared shop windows, the glow of holiday lights and the cheerful sounds of live holiday music and carolers. ‘Tis the season to Shop Local is an annual holiday campaign to support local retail businesses and artisans by encouraging residents and visitors to shop local during the holidy season. The campaign is a partnership between MsinStreet Oceanside, City of Oceanside Economic Development and the Oceanside Chamber of Commerce.

Woman's Club of Escondido to Celebrate the Holiday - On Monday, December 6th, the Escondido Woman's Club will hold their December meeting with a

Social Butterfly Cont. on Page 10

Dancing Dolphins Cont. from Page 2

Winter made history because a coalition of several agencies and experts worked on designing and fitting the dolphin with a prosthetic tail. A movie was made of the entire development. This marine attraction preaches and practices the three Rs: rescue, rehabilitate and release. Dolphins, otters, sea turtles, sharks, and sting rays are returned to the wild. It also monitors sea turtle nests that abound on the barrier islands that protect much of this shoreline. The egg-laying season begins May 1 and the last hatchlings head for the open sea in late August.

Many of these newborns need help to guide them to the water because they use the moonlight to get there but city lights and other illumination can confuse them.

The Author, Cecil Scaglione, now living in Arizona


Local News

The Paper

Lawsuit Against Palomar Health Withdrawn; Judge Dismisses With Prejudice

Attorneys for a corporation known as “Citizens to Save Palomar Health,” have withdrawn thir lawsuit against Palomar Health District. Subsequent to the withdrawal the judge dismissed the case “with prejudice,” which means the plaintiffs may not refile the same case.

According to public filings, through the lawsuit, “Citizens to Save Palomar Health” attempted to prevent doctors from Emergent Associates—who Medical Palomar’s current publicly-elected Board had selected after a competitive bidding process—from staffing Palomar’s Emergency Department.

The lawsuit had been filed in August. According to a spokesperson for Palomar Health District, “Citizens to Save Palomar Health seemed to be comprised of Palomar former aggrieved Directors who had lost their seats in public elections. Originally, alleged the healthcare district violated the Brown Act when it awarded key emergency, hospitalist, and intensivist contracts to Emergent Medical Associates this year for staffing at Palomar’s hospitals in Escondido and Poway. Palomar’s current, publicly-elected board selected EMA after a competitive bidding process. According to a statement from

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Palomar Health District, the move to install Emergent Medical Associates has already resulted in significant improvements at Palomar Health, including a reduction in Emergency Department patient wait times of over 30%, a reduction in patient complaints, and improved health and safety metrics across the board.

“Palomar Health is relieved to move past this frivolous lawsuit, so that it can focus on its primary mission: providing the highest quality healthcare to the community of San Diego and beyond,” said Diane Hansen, President and CEO of Palomar Health.

Named by Newsweek as one of the World’s Best Hospitals in 2021, Palomar Health is anchored by two medical center campuses which provide an array of acute care services, obstetrics, rehabilitation, behavioral health, pediatrics, and neonatal intensive care. For more information on Palomar Health, please visit PalomarHealth.org. Strong Turnout for Daley Ranch Open House

An Open House for Daley Ranch was staged by Friends of Daley Ranch on Saturday, November 13th. Approximately 100 supporters and public members attended.

Daley Ranch is about 3000 acres worth of back country land, loaded with beautiful oak trees, wild animals, horse trails, hiking trails . . . The longer story is a bit more complicated. Why do we oppose the proposal?

One, we don’t trust SANDAG. A powerful government agency knowingly misled the public. And that’s worth understanding. SANDAG has lied to us before in an attempt to get a bond issue passed.

Man About Town

There’s an old Arabic saying, “if a camel is allowed to get its nose inside of a tent, it will be impossible to prevent the rest of it from entering.

That’s kind of the lingering feeling among a lot of taxpayers when it comes to taking a close look at the SANDAG proposed Regional Transportation Plan which anticipates collecting more than $34 billion in these per-mile fees through 2050 which would only partially fund the more than $160-billion proposal to expand rail, bus and other transportation services throughout the region.

SANDAG’s plan to collect a per-mile fee from drivers would piggyback on a little-known state program still under design. The San Diego agency expects the state to levy a tax on drivers of roughly 2 cents a mile, onto which it would tack a regional 2-cent charge for a total of 4 cents per mile driven.

The short story: The Paper is totally opposed to the proposed “road tax.”

Once passed, the revenues derived from that bond issue were NOT used for the purposes stated in the bond issue but diverted elsewhere. SANDAG claims the funds were used to cover a “shortfall” from anticipated, but not realized, funding. That has happened repeatedly. Prior to the election, voters were not told the funds might be diverted elsewhere. Back in October of 2016, Voice of San Diego discovered a big problem involving SANDAG. That problem has mushroomed into a full-blown scandal.

It might be an obscure agency, but it controls a staggering amount of money and its leaders make big decisions that impact every San Diegan – like where new roads and trolley stops will go.

In October (2016), Voice of San Diego’s Andrew Keatts uncovered a major problem with SANDAG’s economic forecast – the formula it uses to predict how much money will come in to pay for big projects. That problem at the time had huge implications for an existing sales tax passed by voters more than a decade ago, and a separate sales tax that SANDAG at the time was campaigning for voters to approve.

November 25, 2021

and a great big old ancient ranch house that has been modernized and serves as a centerpiece for the overall ranch.

Shuttle buses transport guests from the Dixon Lake parking lot up to the ranch house. Guests were served a free picnic lunch and were able to tour the ranchhouse as well as the ground. Mayor Paul McNamara, former Mayor Jerry Harmon, and Council Member Tina Inscoe all welcomed guests and commented on the great success of Daley Ranch in preserving local history and grounds. Jerry Harmon was Mayor back in the 1970’s and was largely responsible for Daley Ranch being acquired by the city as a major environmental asset that would always be preserved and nurtured and no development would ever be allowed.

Guests all seemed to agree that it was a different and interesting way to spend a Saturday morning and early afternoon. Former head of Carlsbad military school pleads guilty to molestation, avoids retrial

Jeffrey Barton, the former headmaster of the Army and Navy Academy pleaded guilty last Wednesday to molesting a cadet in 1999. He is likely to be released after 8 years in custody. He must register as a sex offender for life. The prosecution agreed to dismiss the remaining four charges. The existing sales tax is called Transnet, and the money goes to pay for a slate of major transportation projects. Here’s how Keatts described what the problem means for Transnet:

So far, SANDAG has collected 25 percent less revenue under TransNet than it promised voters on the ballot. If sales tax revenue grows at the rate it has grown since the end of the recession, TransNet would end up bringing in around $9 billion for transportation projects – or $5 billion less than voters were told.

Since SANDAG used the same formula to come up with the numbers for Measure A, the sales tax measure put before voters in November, Keatts’ revelation meant that the numbers voters were weighing in on could be wrong, too. SANDAG said Measure A would bring in $18 billion to fund a new slate of transportation projects – everything from freeway widenings to a new trolley line. But the error meant it had the potential to bring in far less than that. On top of the big question mark hanging over the $18 billion numbers, SANDAG did not tell voters that there was also a chance some of the money from Measure A could have gone to backfill the Transnet shortfall.

At the time of the story, SANDAG officials insisted that if Measure A passed, the agency would be able to fulfill the list of projects it promised to voters. Measure A ultimately failed. Weeks after voters rejected the measure,

Letters to the Editor Like the Moon Landing, Our Lives Have Changed!

To Lyle E. Davis, Editor in Chief. Mr. Davis, your cover story on Dementia was like the Moon Landing!

It changed our lives. Reading those emotional stories of people who suffered and died of various forms of dementia has made our family and many of our personal friends and coworkers all decide to become actively involved in supporting the National Alzheimer's & Dementia Research organization, both financially and in keeping awareness alive so many people can seek early intervention and treatment to help slow the process.

Letters to the Editor Cont. on Page 6

SANDAG quietly admitted that our findings were right. In a report to its board members, “staff from the regional planning agency conceded that to finish all the highway expansion, new transit lines and other transportation projects promised in a 2004 sales tax extension, it will need to find as much as $17.5 billion from federal and state sources,” Keatts reported. And that’s how Keatts got to his second bombshell: SANDAG knew Measure A would not raise $18 billion more than a year before the November election. And it put that number on the ballot anyway, knowing it would entice voters to say yes. (More than 50 percent of voters did say yes, but tax measures that go toward a specific purpose need two-thirds support in order to pass.)

SANDAG officials lied to the public, and that major violation of voters’ trust deserves to be aired and addressed. SANDAG, or other smaller government agencies, are almost certainly going to have to take another shot at asking voters to spend money to fund those projects.

And now voters, who are already reluctant to part with more money, will go in to that vote knowing SANDAG has been dishonest in the past about how much money a new tax would bring in, and how many projects it could realistically fund. In 2016, the San Diego Association of Governments placed another half-cent

Man About Town Cont. on Page 13


The Paper

Confessions Continued from Page 3

income was almost $45, which was more than my father made in a week as an Ontario Northland Railway section hand. Confessions of a Newspaprboy III

Growing up in metropolises like New York, London, Chicago, Toronto, Los Angeles, Houston or Sydney is more challenging than maturing in a small town. But prowling the streets of a little city like North Bay offers the lessons of gotham without the concomitant perils. And my times were different. Downtown dangers were not as brutal as in the Big City. There were plenty of guns in town, but they all huddled at home greased up for hunting season. Get into a scrape and the cop kicked your butt – hard. If a shop owner caught you shoplifting, he or she slapped you silly and then the cop kicked your butt – hard. If you got into enough of these, you were dragged home – dragged – and the cop kicked your butt – hard – before you got a licking from your parents. But the things that went on in the alleys behind Main Street were a microcosm of – they just didn’t happen as often as — what occurred in the after-dark recesses of Hong Kong, Shanghai and Tijuana. It was exciting and exhilarating for a nine- and 10-year-old kid running loose along these streets. Billy Larochelle and I used to get free gawdawful soup to warm us up during sub-zero midwinter from the elderly Chinese couple that ran a sleazy and smell-of-vomit restaurant on Oak Street, North Bay’s slums draped around the edges of the Canadian Pacific Railroad station that was just a block and a half off Main Street..

I have no idea what kind of soup it was. I didn’t even like soup, and I never asked because it probably would have made me sick. The chairs and stools in that place were stickier than the floor with grease, grime and layers of dirt. But the old couple were as comforting as their lumpy soup was tasty as we sipped it slowly to let the freeze leave our fingers while the frost on the window kept the dark outside. Keep in mind, the winter sun goes down real early that far north.

One summer afternoon I heard a muffled boom from the CPR station and ran down when I saw some smoke coming out of everywhere. When I got there, I saw the men’s washroom smelled odd and looked like it had been stepped on, so I poked myself in. There was blood, bone and gore splashed all along the walls and packed solidly into the corners and crevices that worked their way up to the ceiling. I was the first person on the scene, which earned me a hard kick in the butt by cop who got there right after me. I read in the paper the next day, a guy had sat down on a toilet, lighted

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a stick of dynamite and held it to his chest to blow the top half of himself all over the walls and ceiling. His bottom half was still left sitting on the can. I saw his boots sticking out under the battered bottom of the toilet stall. That was exciting.

In the alley beside the Chinese couple’s restaurant, I watched Big Mary put on a show one evening. Her name was Mary Commanda and she was a large – over six feet six inches – raw boned Indian who just drank a lot. She could have been 20, 30, 40 or 50, had a gravel voice that was unmistakably hers and a glistening heart of gold. She always told me that if she ever got money to buy a paper, she’d buy it from me. One late afternoon, during the beer-parlor closing hour, she was seated against a wall beside a pile of garbage behind the Chinese couple’s restaurant and using a beer bottle as a dildo while laughing raucously and merrily challenging any and all of the bums around her if they could match that. That was funny.

There was the time we were almost on site when a guy we knew – everybody knew everybody in the Bay — pulled off something I could never have done. He was a clerk of some sort (timekeeper, I think) with the CPR and was walking through the morass of tracks when his boot got stuck in one of the frogs (a frog is an X-shaped chunk of rail that’s used in switching yards). As is always going on, locomotives were shunting tanker, freight and flat cars here, there and everywhere to assemble them into trains heading to the proper destinations. And a couple of the multi-ton cars had been shunted right at this guy. All he could do was lean over and let the loose-running freight cars run over his ankle and amputate his foot. We – co-newspaperboy Eddie Walker and I – didn’t see that nor did we hear him scream but we did see him being carried to safety. His face was a white color I hadn’t seen before. That was chilling.

Confessions of a Newspaperboy IV

School was never my best subject. My real education is rooted in my time peddling papers on the streets of North Bay. It branched in earnest about a decade later when I became a young reporter asking everyone and anyone question after question after question.

While I only sold papers for about three years, what I saw and heard shaped me into a pavement kid and honed survival instincts that served me well during my eight-plus decades. Among the memorable moments was a piece of advice given me by Nate Rivelis, owner of a Main Street ladies’-wear shop, one of the many Jewish merchants lining the ‘Bay’s eight-block commercial core. He became one of my

first regular customers along that commercial strip. He told me later it was because I was reliable. That is, I always used to enter his store about the same time of day every day and ask him if he wanted to buy a paper. None of the other paperboys had done that before. It taught me to ask for the business. It served me well in picking up several other downtown customers. (An aside: It also helped me as a reporter, too, because I would drop by regularly to talk with the police chief and city clerk and desk-duty sergeant and mayor on my rounds because, for whatever reason, most other reporters didn’t take the time for such a nicety. As a result, I established reliable upper-level contacts and sources.)

Anyhow, among the memories that pop into mind when I picture Mr. Rivelis is a question he tossed at me one afternoon. “How much money do you have in your pocket, Cecil?” I told him I had about 20 cents. He shook his said and said, “No, no, exactly how much money do you have in your pocket.” I said I didn’t know. And he said: “Cecil, if you don’t know how much money you have in your pocket, you’ll never be rich.” Well, I never became rich but, to this day, I always know how much cash I have in my pocket. Shortly after retiring from selling papers on the street, I launched my Main Street shoeshine venture. I quit peddling papers because we moved to the east end of town, which put me several blocks farther from the Nugget that was at the west end of downtown and I would have wound up getting my papers after most of the prime selling section was saturated by a swarm of two to three dozen other paperboys. And home delivery was beginning to take hold.

There were a few shoeshine shops in dry cleaners and pool rooms and barber shops along the main drag but I could under-price them because my overhead was low: no employees, no rent to pay, no equipment to maintain. I carried three cans of shoe polish – black, brown and oxblood – two brushes and several soft rags in an empty wooden butter box that also served as a foot stand so I could burnish the brogues. My competition was a half-dozen or so other street shoeshine boys cluttering the entrances and exits of the handful of beer parlors sprinkled around the commercial core. Pubs were divided back then: men on one side and another side for women. Men could only enter the women’s doors accompanied by a female. They opened at noon, closed at 5:30 (to make sure men went home for supper), reopened at 7 p.m. and closed at 1 a.m. weekdays and 11:30 p.m. Saturdays. All those blue laws crumbled in the late ‘50s. The best shoe-shining times were payday, Friday and Saturday afternoons and early evenings because we’d catch guys going into the pubs – especially if they were with a lady – and coming out to head for a night on the town. I kept

a copy of the Nugget for the customers to read while standing there getting his – or her, because a few women did stop now and then — shoes buffed. I also had a halfdozen papers to sell to shoeshine customers. I always stopped to ask Mr. Rivelis if he wanted a paper and I’d pick up one for him.

On these stops early on, I noticed people would look into the windows of his store and nearby shoe stores and then glance at their shoes to see if they looked as nice as the ones in the window. A lot of the times, a guy would wait outside while his wife or girlfriend was shopping in Mr. Rivelis’ store. So I set up my sidewalk shoeshine shop in front of his shop. Business boomed. While foot traffic was good at the beer parlors, many of the guys were usually in a hurry to get in for a couple of cool ones or rushing out to get somewhere and didn’t take time for a shine. When my father saw that I was heading downtown regularly to make a few nickels, he made me a compact wooden shoe-shine box. It was about the size of a lunch pail. He fashioned a couple of blocks of wood to look like a footprint where the customer placed his (or her) foot while its shoe was being shined. Very professional. And he added a shoulder strap so I could carry it more easily.

One day, Mr. Rivelis, who used to get his shoes shined regularly, looked at me and said, “Cecil, if you’re going to keep on coming back here, why don’t you leave your shoe-shine box in the store.” And that’s how I got to maintain a downtown shoeshine venture for another couple of years that grew out of networking while I was selling papers on the street. On the way downtown, I would put together a couple of bunches of radishes or onions or beets from our garden and knock on a few doors to sell them before I got to my shoeshine stand. There were also mornings when I rode with the local milkman and his horse-drawn wagon or the bread man on his route to earn a buck or two before attending to my downtown business. Other gigs garnered during my shoe-shining career included parttime phone-answerer and dispatcher for a cab stand, a parking-lot attendant (I just sat in the entry/exit booth to hand out tickets when cars arrived and collect money when they departed) and a behind-thecounter server at a downtown diner. The folks would come to my shoeshine stand to get me when they needed me. I kept the shoeshine business going for a couple of years until I reached my midteens and was old enough to get summertime work on the railroad. I broke away from hard labor after a couple of summers when I got a full-time job as day manager for a lunch counter followed by a lucrative summer as a hotel bellhop. These all stemmed from my stint as

Confessions Cont. on Page 6


The Paper

Letters to the Editor Cont. from Page 4 The story of the Australian couple who found a unique way to rediscover a "bridge" to stay connected did an "emotional number" on all of us. And the great men and women in history who begged us to learn from their own heartache by heightening awareness moved us to tears. For all that you've done in that story, Mr. Davis, can never, ever be truly measured on any scale. And your writer Friedrich Gomez, as a Dementia Caregiver for your ex-wife Mary and his other charitable acts has shamed many of us to now step forward and become involved. For all The Paper has done, past to present, can never have a value placed on it. You're priceless, Mr. Davis. You're truly priceless! Anthony Logan family & friends. Valley Center/Escondido

Comments on CRT Cover Story

Hi.

I was hoping to read where Critical Race Theory started from, where it's actually been taught ... but you just skipped over that. I really thought with the pictures on front page you were being honest about America's past influencing current laws ... only recently being challenged.

There are plenty of black families who have parents who lived through Jim Crow laws and severe racism ... Threats of violence ... and actual mob violence destroying whole black towns out of jealousy .. or a bonus case of a black boy doing something trivially wrong. Go watch Rosewood movie...and read about the other Midwestern city recently highlighted in news. This isn't Ancient history.

I'm a white lady from Pa. but lived in Ca for most of life. Racism is rampant in small towns.

And today's trials about shootings of unarmed citizens, black and white, really highlights unfairness, and the racism in small cities. If you think Abmaud Arbary would've been chased and shot while jogging Ok ... and if the instances of unarmed black men being killed over trivial infractions .. .too many to name ... but how about being choked to death cause your son was selling loose cigarrettes. Or shot in the back while running away... If Kyle Rittenhouse were a black young man, police would’ve shot him. This country's white population has Got to get Honest with themselves. So tired.

Letters to the Editor Cont. on Page 10

Page 6

November 25, 2021

Confessions Cont. from Page 5 a newspaperboy.

Confessions of a Newspaperboy V

Billy Larochelle and I rarely bumped into each other after I relinquished my spot in the waiting line for Nuggets to rumble off the presses six days a week in downtown North Bay. I moved to the other end of town and we went to different high schools. He also matured into an excellent multi-sport athlete. He wasn’t much bigger than I, but he had many times more talent, athletic skill and toughness. But we spent a lot of time together for a couple of years pounding the downtown pavement selling papers and conning passersby.

The conning began rather innocently. While scurrying into and out restaurants, shops and saloons peddling our papers – he and I leapfrogged each other in our chase for customers – I managed to lose my money one day through a hole that developed in my pants’ pocket. (When I started newspaperboying, my mother gave me a little change purse but it wasn’t designed to use for gathering coins and providing change while maintaining control of an armful of papers so I did like my colleagues, I banked on – and in – my pants pocket.) I lost more than usual because it was a payday Saturday and I was near the end of my second batch of papers. I’d bought 20 papers to start and ran back for another armful. The papers cost 2 cents each and we sold them for 3 cents. On paydays, we’d get quite a few nickels “and keep the change.” So I’d lost about a buck.

I told Billy my problem — and that I’d probably get what-for going home without any money. We were sitting on the curb in downtown Main Street and Billy thought for a minute. Then he said, “Cry.” I said, “What?” And he repeated, “Cry.” So I put my hands to my face and started “sobbing.” A couple of people stopped to see what was wrong and Billy told them I’d lost my money and that I’d get a licking if I went home without any dough. And he added some eloquent embroidery by adding that I’d been beaten up by bigger kids and my family was poor, and whatever else came to his mind.

It wasn’t long before a lady gave us — me – a quarter to buy one of my remaining papers and a couple dropped a couple of extra nickels to buy the remainder. Then a guy who’d been drinking a bit stopped to listen and he popped a $1 bill – A $1 BILL! — out of his pocket and said, “Here, kid.” Hallelujah! Billy had saved my skin. But he wasn’t through. He said, “Keep going.” So I did and after a few more encounters, I – we – wound up with almost five dollars.

Confessions Cont. on Page 8

Native American Heritage Month

On November 15th, I was proud to participate in Pechanga Pu'éska Mountain Day, celebrated by the Pechanga Tribe and the City of Temecula since 2012. During an 8-year battle to save their birth place and sacred mountain from an open-pit gravel operation, the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians and the City joined in common cause to oppose environmental and cultural devastation from what would have been one of the largest aggregate quarry operations in the country.

The negative regional impacts included 1,600 daily gravel truck trips, boulder blasts, noise and dust which would have permanently damaged sensitive biological, cultural and hydrological resources, including a wildlife corridor, sensitive species habitat, Southern California’s last free-flowing river, and of course, Pu'éska Mountain, sacred to the Pechanga Tribe.

On November 15, 2012, Pechanga purchased their sacred mountain, preserving it forever, and marking that day as one of the most important in history for Temecula and Pechanga. November

is

also

American Heritage Month, recognizing tribal sovereignty, a commemoration that has special significance for me. The 75th Assembly District, which I proudly represent in Sacramento, contains 7 Indian reservations, and San Diego County, with 18, has more than any other county in the nation.

History has not been easy on Native Americans, yet their contributions are irreplaceable. These include their service to our country through the military, including Code Talkers of both World Wars, and thousands who serve today. On a per-capita basis, Native Americans have served in the military in greater numbers than any other ethnic group.

Locally, tribal economies generate thousands of jobs, along with basic infrastructure including roads, bridges, law enforcement, fire protection and environmental stewardship for tribal lands.

Going forward, the common cause demonstrated during the struggle to save Pu'éska Mountain is a wonderful example of cooperation between native peoples and surrounding communities. It’s also another example of why we celebrate Native American Heritage Month.

Native

5th District Supervisor

Jim Desmond

Civil Discourse and Free Speech

Words matter. Civility and reasoned discussion and debate are fundamental to the success of American legislative outcomes. Collaboration and compromise, too often lost in local, state and federal politics, create better results for the people we serve. In San Diego County, as in America, we need to encourage and reinforce civil discourse while accepting that others will not agree, perhaps vehemently. Disagreement can be a healthy means to achieve the best outcomes.

We should be encouraging public participation, not limiting it. Of course, it must be done with respect to allow every voice and all sides of an issue to be heard. Rough criticism is in-bounds, and it is part of the job for elected County Supervisors and other elected officials. America’s Founding Fathers were vicious to one another and insulting talk has long existed in U.S. politics. And, that’s a sign of vibrant democracy, because citizens able to publicly criticize the positions and actions of elected officials signals that they are unafraid of those with decision-making power. It’s become increasingly fashion-

able to be dismissive of our First Amendment rights. Yes, free speech will cross the line and become offensive at points. But, the alternative is worse. In countries such as China and Russia, even soft criticism of the ruling elites is dealt with harshly and can result in prison time. We cannot start down a path at any level of government that suppresses the expression of thoughts and opinions.

We cannot be distracted by an extreme few. And, most importantly, we cannot allow politicians and government to capitalize on the extremes to quiet dissenting voices. Words matter. We must insist on a level of decorum at our public hearings and then, we should follow the words of the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America, and allow San Diegans to petition their Government for a redress of grievances. To contact

North County Office – by appointment only 325 S. Melrose Ave., Suite 5200 Vista, CA 92081 Mon.-Fri., 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Website: www.supervisorjimdesmond.com Email: Jim.Desmond@sdcounty.ca.gov


The Paper

PROBLEM SOLVED BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT

Q: My wife and I have been trying to get a refund from Scenic River Cruises for more than eight months. We paid $14,910 for a Danube River cruise from Bucharest to Budapest scheduled for May 2020. That included airfare and an upgrade. We also bought a travel insurance policy. Scenic River Cruises canceled the cruise in early May of 2020. We received an option via email for a cruise credit or refund from Member Travel Privileges, our travel agency. We have this email.

In a follow-up email, our travel agent advised us we would receive a refund of $13,338 for the cruise and an additional $1,572 travel credit. However, they also advised that the refund may take up to 90 days. After 90 days, we filed a claim with our insurance company. Our claim was denied. The reason for the denial was that COVID-19 was not a covered reason for cancellation.

Since then, we have gone back and forth with Scenic Cruises in our efforts to get a refund. We get cut off each time we call. In one of the emails from Scenic Cruises, they wrote that we would have to work with the booking agent. We would like to get the promised refund. Can you help? -- Winston Bateman, Roseville, Minn. A: So much went wrong with your cruise, it's hard to know where to begin. But maybe we should start here: If your travel agent promised you a refund, you should get one. Period.

But there were other unfortunate circumstances, and I'm not just talking about COVID. You booked a trip with a reputable cruise line and took out a travel insurance policy. When a travel company cancels a tour, a cruise -- really, anything -- it should offer either a full refund or a credit. Your travel agent said you could get a credit or refund. You chose the refund. But when the money wasn't forthcoming, you filed a travel insurance claim. I would have contacted your travel insurance company as soon as your cruise line canceled your trip. Ask if you are covered at that point. You probably aren't, since most travel insurance assumes you'll receive a full refund if your cruise line cancels. But it's worth asking.

You kept a great paper trail between yourself, your travel agent, and Scenic River Cruises. You could have also escalated your complaint to a company executive. I publish the names, numbers and email addresses of the <a href="https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/scenic-rivercruises/">Scenic River Cruises executives</a> on my nonprofit consumer advocacy site, Elliott.org. I contacted Scenic River Cruises on

Problem Solved Cont. on Page 14

Page 7

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT

Q: I had a confirmed round trip flight from San Francisco to New York on Delta Air Lines. The flight was scheduled to depart at 8:30 a.m. A couple of days ago, I received a notice from Delta that Delta changed the flight departure time to 7 in the morning. Seven in the morning? That's ridiculous!

I live in Oakland, and my transportation to San Francisco is via BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit). BART trains do not begin service until 6 a.m. on the weekends, making it impossible for me to get to the airport in time to make this flight.

The next available flight from San Francisco to New York via Delta is not until after 11 a.m. arriving in New York at 8:30 p.m., which is useless to me as I need to arrive in New York earlier than this 8:30 pm arrival time.

I needed a nonstop flight because of COVID concerns. The cost of any alternatives -- taxi or staying at an airport hotel the night before -is cost-prohibitive for me. I am a senior and the sole caretaker for my partner, who would be staying at home here in Oakland, has Parkinson's, so I run on a pretty tight schedule. The original departure time was perfect for my needs. I understand that the ticket I purchased is "nonrefundable." However, I filed a claim with Delta asking for my money back - in any other business, this would be called "bait and switch." Not surprisingly, they denied my request and are offering me an e-credit. With my partner's progressive disease, my traveling days are coming to an end, and I have no use for any credit on Delta. I want my money refunded. Can you please advise me as to what recourse I may have in this situation? -- Terry Kulka, Oakland, Calif. A: I'm sorry to hear about your personal circumstances. Airlines should be sensitive to the needs of their customers. After all, we taxpayers were sensitive to their needs during the pandemic, lavishing them with more than $60 billion in federal aid. How about a little reciprocity?

But your situation is different. Delta changed your departure time by 1 ½ hours. The Department of Transportation (DOT), which regulates U.S. air carriers, says you are entitled to a refund if there's a "significant" schedule change. But there's a catch. DOT doesn't define what constitutes a “significant" change.

Travel Troubleshooter Cont. on Page 14

November 25, 2021

Historically Speaking by Tom Morrow

The Forgotten Man: Aaron Burr

If asked who the third man to hold the vice presidency of the United States was, few would know it was Aaron Burr who was noted for one historical event – a duel killing U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton

Hamilton has taken his place prominently in history as founder of what today is the Federal Reserve, the U.S. Mint – as such he gets his picture on the $10 bill. Conversely, Burr’s bio is found in very few history books, primarily because of their 1807 duel. Hamilton remains historically well-known, especially since a recent Broadway musical “loosely” depicts his character. Burr was a serving officer during the Revolutionary War under another controversial character: Gen. Benedict Arnold during the Quebec, Canada, expedition. Burr distinguished himself in that battle earning a place on Gen. George Washington’s command staff. But, after only two weeks, Burr asked for a transfer back to the battlefield.

During the ensuing battle when the British landed on New York’s Manhattan Island, Burr saved an entire brigade from capture, including a young Alexander Hamilton. Evidently miffed because Burr had resigned from his command staff, Washington did not commend Burr for his heroic actions on Manhattan. The snub by Washington led to an eventual estrangement between the two men. Nonetheless, Burr distinguished himself with a number of daring and heroic exploits during the Revolutionary War.

In 1777, Washington “buried the hatchet” and promoted Burr to lieutenant colonel and given command of a regiment. During the harsh winter at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania Burr led a small unit guarding an isolated pass. He and his men drove back an attempted mutiny by American troops who tried to escape the miserable Valley Forge winter. In 1779, Burr had to leave the Army due to bad health, but he remained active when assigned by Washington to perform occasional intelligencegathering missions. During his days as a spy, Burr rallied a group of Yale students in New Haven, Conn., aiding a small group of Yankee soldiers in a skirmish with the British. This action repelled the enemy’s advance, forcing the British to retreat.

In 1792, Burr was admitted to the bar of New York. As an attorney, Burr later entered politics and was twiceelected to the New York state legislature. He was appointed State

Attorney General, then he was chosen as a U.S. Senator.

In those days, the office of President was elected by the Senate. While in the Senate Burr ran for President against Thomas Jefferson, but lost by one vote, relegating him to the office of Vice President, where secondplace finishers automatically landed. Burr blamed Hamilton for his defeat. The two men were pillars in New York social, political and business circles and had become bitter enemies. As the story goes, during the selection for president, Hamilton rallied several senators to vote against Burr – even a few who were enemies of Hamilton hated Burr even more. Thomas Jefferson, who had his own rivals, was looked upon as “the lesser of two evils.” This was another important point in history. In business Burr was highly successful. He established the Bank of Manhattan, which continues today as JP Morgan-Chase. Near the same time, Hamilton founded the competing Bank of New York, deepening even more their political and business rivalry. Ironically, it’s their famous duel that has caused Burr to be banished to historical obscurity. What caused the duel is a matter of conjecture. One of the reasons could be traced to Hamilton’s vicious rumors against business and political rivals he spread in various newspaper columns.

During those years as business competitors, Burr was widowed and lived with his daughter and her husband. Hamilton reportedly suggested to a newspaper columnist Burr was committing incest with his own daughter. Enraged, Vice President Burr challenged Treasury Secretary Hamilton to a duel in Weehawken, N.J. Dueling was illegal in New York, which caused them to cross the Hudson River. As a result, Hamilton was mortally wounded, dying a day later. Hamilton’s death destroyed Burr’s political and business career and put him into social disgrace. Years later, Burr traveled west to embark upon what was an alleged attempt to form a new country. He was charged with treason by the federal government, but later acquitted. Still, his reputation as a less-than honorable man persists despite his many deeds during the Revolutionary War.

Burr spent the remainder of his life in relative obscurity. He died in 1836. The many achievements of Aaron Burr have been forgotten except for that famous conflict between him and Hamilton. That event is about the only point of history students of today learn about Burr. It is simply referred to as “The Duel” and usually needs no further explanation.

Some 30 years ago Aaron Burr’s life was loosely portrayed by author Gore Vidal in his historical novel, “Burr.” I recommend it. SCAG SEZ: “Politicians get sick when they have only one foot in the gravy.” – Cecil Scaglione, Mature Life Features.


The Paper

Page 8

November 25, 2021

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Confessions

Continue from Page 6 Billy wasn’t concerned about getting a fair share or an even split, he was just going to enjoy what we had. So we hopped to a nearby restaurant and got ourselves each a tin roof sundae (a scoop of vanilla ice cream topped heavily with chocolate sauce and handsful of salted peanuts). Then we went to a movie and got ourselves each a candy bar and a Coke. And we stopped for another tin roof after the theater. I still had about $3 left and offered to give him one dollar but he said, “Never mind.” What he did do was have me run the same scam a few more times before we parted ways when I no longer sold papers. None but he and I ever knew about our venture. And it was certainly fun while it lasted. When we did bump into each other on occasion around town as we grew up, one of us would just say “Cry” and we’d both break out big grins. Confessions of a newspaperboy VI

One of the most utilitarian tools I ever had in all my years was a canvas bag for my newspapers made for me by my godfather.

He was Augie Cicci, a close friend of the family who owned and operated a shoe-repair shop on Algonquin Avenue for several

decades. It was closed a few years after I left North Bay when he was rushed to St. Joseph’s Hospital in critical condition when a robber failed in his attempt to kill Augie with one of his own cobbler hammers. (Augie eventually became lucid enough to greet visitors from his hospital bed and the cowardly crook caught and jailed for a time.) But back to the bag.

I’d been peddling the North Bay Nugget for about a year and was picking up more and more to, of course, make more money. I would pick up 20 or a couple of dozen that were the maximum I could armcarry comfortably while footpadding around downtown and in and out of restaurants, shops, and beer parlors. On good days – payday, Friday and Saturday — I usually rushed back to the Nugget for a second load.

Augie’s shop was on Algonquin Avenue (it was Klock Avenue then) next door to what would become my high-school hang out – Demarco’s Confectionary (the family-owned-and-operated shop finally closed down a few weeks ago after some eight decades of accumulating customers). It was across the street from the Pro-Cathedral of the Assumption a couple of blocks off the western end of downtown. About once a week, usually the quiet Wednesday afternoons when retailers shut their shops to stock their shelves for the upcoming weekend, I would trot down and

visit with Augie for a bit. This was long before I realized Demarco’s was a hangout. We always saw each other at Christmas, Easter, Italian weddings and several weekends in between when our folks exchanged visits. That’s how he came to be my godfather for my confirmation when I was 12 or 13 at St. Rita’s Church, so he wasn’t yet my godfather when he made my newspaper bag.

My mother had a piece of canvas big enough to turn into a pouch large enough to hold as many papers as I could carry without my knees buckling. She gave it to Augie and he worked it through his heavy-duty sewing machines and produced a bag with a leather strap that allowed me to carry 30-plus papers with ease. I learned quickly that it made several downtown merchants uneasy. You see, it was also large enough for a wily little street rat to tuck stolen candy bars, toys, cigarettes or most anything you could think of into that bag without being seen.

When I found that out, I enjoyed several of the sweetest moments on my forays downtown.

A fellow named Maroosis, owned a sports-equipment store about midtown. His window display included baseballs and hockey pucks and catcher’s mitts and team sweaters and so on. And so did the shelves in his store. I used to drop in occasionally and putter with a fielder’s glove

or a pair of skates or other piece of sports equipment I would dream of owning. He never bought a paper from me and rarely talked to me but was always exceedingly friendly to most of the other customers who were either jocks or, of course, bought stuff. He supplied both local high schools with their team jerseys and jackets as well as equipment and for most of the fastball and hockey teams in town. He was the main game in town. (When I was older and got more involved in sports, I bought my equipment — skates, gloves, pads, hockey sticks, ball mitts, etc. at Mr. Lefebvre’s, who was much friendlier and allowed me to make purchases with some money down and regular payments.) To Mr. Maroosis, I was just a nobody kid – and he taught me how to have fun with that.

When I entered his store and no one else was in there, Mr. Maroosis would head into the back and leave me out there alone. Dicey, wouldn’t you think, to leave me out there with all that stuff and my great big newspaper bag? I would have thought so if I hadn’t spotted very early on that he had a peep-hole through the wall dividing his sales counter from his stockroom. So I knew he was watching me – and probably hoping I’d do something stupid so he could collar me and kick my ass into the arms of the

Confessions Continued on Page 10


The Paper

Page 9

November 25, 2021

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The Paper

Letters to the Editor Cont. from Page 6

PS: I forgot my point .. Tom Morrow: CRT was only being taught in college for pre law ..... No facts in your story.

/s/ Lela Locke San Diego County, CA.

Social Butterfly Cont. from Page 3

Holiday program of Christmas music presented by the North County Players. In addition, they will have a Christmas Bazaar with ten tables of gifts for sale by various groups. The Bazaar always has a variety of gifts, such as jewelry, homemade items, holiday decorations, candy, jams & jelly, plants, etc. Something for everyone; do your Christmas shopping here.

The Bazaar will be available from 9:30am to 10:30am, when the meeting starts. The program will start approximately 11:30am, followed by lunch and more time to shop the Bazaar. Cost for lunch is $15/person; Guests and women interested in joining the Woman's Club are invited. Reservations are required by Friday, December 3rd, by calling the Woman's Club at 760.743.9178 and leaving a message. Someone will return your call. The Woman's Club clubhouse is located at 751 No. Rose Street (corner of Mission Avenue).

Call to Artists for Upcoming Art Exhibition - The Escondido Arts Partnership Municipal Gallery is putting out a call to artists for "Your True Colors". The exhibition will be from February 5 to March 18 in the Expressions Gallery. This is a juried exhibition open to artists based in California. For "Your True Colors" we ask you to explore your own journey with self-acceptance, the triumphs, and pitfalls, your authentic expression, show us in color or the absence of. Submit paintings in any medium or photography. The Juror is Nicholas Wilton; Art awards of up to $500. CAFE On-line Submissions deadline November 28, 11pm PST. https://artist.callforentry.org/. For questions, email to info@amandasaintclaire.com. Hosted by the Artist Mentor Project, a portion of the proceeds benefit The Art of Autism; sponsored by the Negri Foundation.

The Municipal Gallery is located at 262 E. Grand Ave., Escondido, CA 92025; 760.480.4101; mail@escondidoarts.org. Gallery Hours: Tues. 11am-6pm; Thurs. to Sat. 11am-4pm.

You Can Make Their Holidays TWICE as Bright! - With our Holiday Drive to Save Lives! Friends like you make it possible

Social Butterfly Continued on page 13

Page 10 • • November 25, 2021

Chuckles Cont. from Page 2

The woman with the Doberman said, "You don't understand. This is my seeing-eye dog." The bouncer said, "A Doberman?"

The woman said, "Yes, they're using them now. They're very good." The bouncer said, "OK, come on in."

The lady with the Chihuahua thought that convincing him that a Chihuahua was a seeing-eye dog may be a bit more difficult, but thought,"What the heck," so she put on her dark glasses and started to walk in. Once again the bouncer said, "Sorry, lady, no pets allowed." The woman said, "You don't understand. This is my seeing-eye dog" The bouncer said, "A Chihuahua?"

The woman with the Chihuahua said, ........ "A Chihuahua ? They gave me a friggin’ Chihuahua?!" •••• If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed. •••• Seniors at brunch

A group of seniors were sitting around talking about all their ailments. "My arms have gotten so weak I can hardly lift this cup of coffee," said one. "Yes, I know," said another. "My cataracts are so bad; I can't even see my coffee." "I couldn't even mark an "X" at election time, my hands are so crippled," volunteered a third. What? Speak up! What? I can't hear you!" "I can't turn my head because of the arthritis in my neck," said a fourth, to which several nodded weakly in agreement. "My blood pressure pills make me so dizzy!"exclaimed another. "I forget where I am, and where I'm going," said another "I guess that's the price we pay for getting old," winced an old man as he slowly shook his head. The others nodded in agreement.

"Well, count your Blessings," said a woman cheerfully "thank God we can all still drive."

Confessions Cont. from Page 8

nearest cop. So I would pick up a ball glove and punch my other hand into it making believe I was playing ball and then pick up a handy ball and pop it in and out of the glove and then put the glove down and try on another one and, every once in a while, look over my shoulder without glancing at the peep-hole. I’d do this for probably only 10 minutes or so because that’s a long time for a kid. And then I’d sorta sigh and drop whatever I had wherever I was at the time and slip silently out the door pretending I was unaware he was watching. I’d scoot into the entrance-way of the shop next door from where I could see his reflection in his store windows as he came right out to collect whatever I had been toying with and put it where it belonged — and to make sure nothing was missing. I’d drop in and visit his store again the next afternoon — I always (ALWAYS) asked if he would buy a paper and he never (NEVER) did — and the evening after that and then the following afternoon and – well, you get the idea.

daily Nugget during the mid-‘40s were wide-ranging and the lessons long-lasting.

As I cited earlier, it developed street smarts in a 9-, 10- and 11year-old who’d just moved into town from the bucolic burg of Feronia that was about an hour’s dirt-road drive away. We had no electricity (our substitute was coal-oil lamp) indoor plumbing (an outhouse, of course, and washtub for once-a-week baths) central heating (piling and chopping wood and kindling for the stove was a daily chore) nor storm windows. Our main connection with sidewalk civilization was our twice-a-month (1st and 15th were paydays) rides – we used the bus in winter because my father put the old ’30 Nash coupe on blocks – for groceries and quick visits with friends, and our battery radio that was turned on only for the nightly news.

Confessions of a newspaper boy VI

So diving into the ‘Bay’s commercial core and culture was fantastically eye opening and educational. Without realizing it, I got to know many of the movers and shakers in the city of 18,000. I’d run in and out of the soon-to-be mayor’s jewelry store and sell him a paper if someone hadn’t beat me to him. I’d crash highly animated political (I didn’t know then that’s what they

Pet Parade

Pet Parade

If for no other reason, I’ve thanked Augie hundreds of times for that bag. The perks of roaming the streets of downtown North Bay peddling the

Meet Cher! She is a wonderful guinea pig looking for a home to call her own. Cher enjoys snacks, her comfy house and play time with her favorite humans! Guinea pigs need a lot of ground space to run around and stay healthy. Two guinea pigs will need a minimum of 10 sq. feet of space (the more the better!) to call home. Guinea pigs need lots of daily timothy hay to munch on and toys to keep them active and enriched! Healthy greens and veggies are also an essential part of their diet, as well as a daily dose of vitamin C in the form of a supplement or a slice of orange! Cher is available for adoption at San Diego Humane Society’s Escondido Campus at 3500 Burnet Drive. To learn more about making her part of your family, please visit sdhumane.org/adopt or call 619299-7012. Online profile: https://adopt.adopets.com/pet/504d4f1 For Advertising 1-27a7-4a07-b58d-c35bffe8b86f Information

or to subscribe, Call (760) 747-7119

Confessions Continued on page 11

Betty Boop is pet of the week at your Rancho Coastal Humane Society. She’s a 2-year-old, 10pound, female, Domestic Short Hair cat with a Blue and white coat. She was transferred to R a n c h o C o a s t a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y through the F O C A S (Friends of C o u n t y Animal Shelters) program. Betty Boop is a relaxed cat. Nothing seems to bother her. Her coat is very soft and so is her personality.

The $100 adoption fee for Betty Boop includes medical exam, spay, up to date vaccinations, and registered microchip. For information about adoption or to become a Virtual Foster visit Rancho Coastal Humane Society at 389 Requeza Street in Encinitas, call 760-7536413, or log on to www.SDpets.org.


The Paper

• Page 11 • November 25, 2021

A Weekly Message from the Mayor of Your Community published in the belief that it is important for elected leaders to communicate with their constituents and that constituents have a means of hearing from their elected leaders.

San Marcos • Mayor Rebecca Jones

Get involved in the General Plan Update

Join the City of San Marcos for an interactive workshop on the General Plan Update.

To get involved and share your input, we invite you to attend our next workshop focusing on mobility on Thursday, Dec. 2 from 6-8 p.m. at the San Marcos Community Center, 3 Civic Center Drive.

The General Plan serves as the guiding document for achieving the community’s vision, and the General Plan Update process will provide residents and businesses with the opportunity to help shape the future of our City.

The City is pleased to restart the General Plan Update process after temporarily suspending the update from early-2020 through mid-2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As we emerge from the pandemic, it’s more important than ever to plan carefully for the future of our City. For more information, visit the project website at: www.SanMarcos.GeneralPlan.org.

Vista • Mayor Judy Ritter

Celebrati ng the Holiday Season

Thanksgiving is a cherished American holiday filled with time-honored traditions. On this special day, we unite in gratitude to give thanks for our shared blessings for the great city we live in, our local economy, and our quality of life. I am thankful to live in a city where people care about their neighbors, businesses, and visitors, and those who are less fortunate. I am also thankful, that as a city, we are fulfilling a shared vision to create a vibrant, diverse, inclusive, and sustainable community. As we move through the holidays, I encourage you to shop in Vista because it supports local jobs and the sales tax helps the City fund public safety, our parks, youth and senior activities, as well as other services that keep the city operating. Happy Thanksgiving!

News from Pala Casino

Pala Casino just continues to add to its reputation as a top venue for great entertainment! Coming soon! Some of the great tribute artists to Elton John and Billy Joel, to Pink Floyd, to Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and much, much more!

All events will be held at the Events Center, with reduced capacity, increased cleaning, and additional safety measures.

Tickets are on sale now, with no service charge, at the Pala Box Office, www.palacasino.com and 1-877-WINPALA

Confessions Cont. from Page 3

were about) debates in several of the sports and shoe shine shops along Main Street.

And I’d see Mr. Smith sneaking some suds in the Continental Hotel with a paramour Mrs. Smith ostensibly knew nothing about. These encounters usually resulted in a sale because it seemed like the cheating husband felt buying a paper sealed my lips. I never intended to hunt down his wife and tattle, but I was pleased that he thought I might if he didn’t buy a paper.

We unwittingly made life-long connections because everyone remembered you as the kid who once sold papers. In some cases, that wasn’t so good. Among the things I learned was how you could sneak into the theaters to watch movies. A fellow paperboy said his older brother, who was an usher at one of the cinemas, told him to buy some confections once you slipped by the ticket taker. The theater made more money on the candy bars and Cokes, he said.

Escondido • Mayor Paul “Mac” McNamara Greetings Escondido,

There is a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding about what is going on regarding SANDAG. As a SANDAG Board member, let me offer some clarity. The two main concerns are how to fund the maintenance of our roads, and how to pay for an improved Public Transportation System. This is part 2 of the series.

In 2015 the SANDAG Board unanimously approved to consider an alternate to the gas sales tax. It is called the Road Usage Charge (RUC). You may have heard it called “track and tax” and that it is an additional tax which is false. It is simply an alternate way to collect the same monies. The RUC replaces the Gas Sales tax which goes away. There is no increase. The gas sales tax pays for maintaining the current road infrastructure. It is a regressive tax, meaning the lower your income the more it impacts you. The problem is that the income generated by the gas sales tax is declining. The reason is that we have more and more electric vehicles on the road who pay nothing to support the infrastructure as well as hybrids and fuel efficient cars that use less gas. The proposed RTP recognizes that there will need to be a replacement of the gas sales tax and follows the state’s lead by using a RUC which would include electric vehicles. How this would be accomplished still needs to be figured out. This methodology would set as a goal to raise the same monies as the current gas sales tax. It would be fairer to everyone and would allow us to make sure that low-income and other underserved populations are not disproportionately impacted. And it allows us to decide if someone who uses their vehicle for business, works in the remote areas of the county, etc. should pay less. Right now, there is no flexibility in the gas sales tax. It is important to remember that the detailed plan on a potential road usage charge doesn’t exist yet. So, conclusions of possible disaster are based on conjecture and not facts. SANDAG is monitoring what the state is doing, including potential legislation that may be passed, and will work closely with the Board, stakeholders, and the community to develop a program that is fair, flexible, and sustainable. The start date for any change is 2030. And the public will have lots of opportunity to give input.

And there were immediately-satisfying events. Like the time I found a crumpled-up $5 bill right in front of the check-out counter at the Arcadian Grill. FIVE DOLLARS! That was about what I made in a month of newspaper sales. I showed it to the restaurant manager, and he said no one reported a loss, and then ran across the street to show it to Hector Bentley (he operated a magazine stand in front of the Post office and used crutches to get around but was always dressed in a hat, suit, shirt and tie with shoes shined at all times) and he said no one had mentioned a loss to him. It was a remunerative as well as memorable day.

Another sweet memory is stopping by Central Bakery on the way home. It was right on the bend where Main Street angled north into Klock Avenue (later Algonquin Avenue) that turned into the twolane highway reaching north to the precious-metals mining towns of Kirkland Lake and Timmins. On most days, there would be a couple of sugar-dipped doughnuts still soaking in the sweetness at the bottom of the tray slanted in the window for display. Because it was

Pick up

near closing time, I would get them for half price. Even thinking of them now, they surpassed their weight in gold. When I joined a local senior softball league a few years ago, the first team I played with was sponsored by a local doughnut shop. Their array was sweet-toothsome, but no match for those Central Bakery “leftovers” from so long ago. About the Author: Cecil Scaglione, the “paperboy” in this story, went on to become a distinguished newspaper reporter, editor and columnist for newspapers in Candad, the US, and before retiring, with the San Diego Union Tribune.

Now retired in Arizona he will be a frequent contributor to The Paper with many, many more tales.

Our resident historian, Tom Morrow, put us in touch with Cecil. They have been friends and colleagues for years.

Restaurant Guide Delivery In Room Dining

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Escondido Mike’s BBQ

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Fri/Sat from 11am to 8pm


The Paper

Page 12 • • November 25, 2021

onym, “One size fits all” is an antonym. Our home, car, clothing, hair style, spouse and favorite movie star are all expressions of how we fit ourselves into our own unique worldview.

Paul & Nome Van Middlesworth, The Computer Factory www. thecomputerfactory.net

different strokes for different folks.

In November of 1966 while being interviewed prior to his fight with Cleveland Williams, Muhammed Ali was asked about his boxing style. “I don’t have any big punch. I just hit a man so many times that he wished I had a big punch.” When the reporter asked him to explain his knock-out of Sonny Liston and Floyd Patterson Ali said, “I got different strokes for different Folks.”

Little did Ali know that this off-hand poetic response would become a TV series, a hit song and a permanent part of America’s lexicon. There are many different interpretations and definitions for this phrase, but in general it simply expresses the notion that we all have different needs, wants, desires and degrees of response to any stimulus. “Whatever floats your boat” is a syn-

In the last 20 years the Internet has become an important part of our World. We use it to communicate shop, bank and gather knowledge. Like electric power, the automobile and television in the 20th century, for better or worse, the Internet has profoundly changed how we transact our lives and spend our time. Until 2005 nearly 100% of Internet traffic was done on computers. With the rise in popularity of mobiles (smart phones and tablets), Internet usage today, in terms of access minutes, has stabilized at 40% for mobiles and 60% for PCs. Today 90% of Americans access the Internet at least some of the time.

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the youngest of the three major sports in the United States. Baseball started in the 1800s, football in the 1930s, but basketball came a little bit later.

There were several basketball leagues that were formed in the New York and Boston areas in particular, but these leagues were not powerful enough to make any impact on fans. Often, a game would be played before an ice skating exhibition, or other event. However, things changed when two associations, the National Basketball League and the American Basketball League merged to become the National Basketball Association. The year was 1946.

Many of the rules that fans take for granted today were years from being implemented. For example, the 24-second clock was not implemented until the mid-1950s. There were still jump balls at the beginning of each quarter. However, the NBA appealed to fans, and persevered. Sometimes, there were doubleheaders. I

you need to be able to stick your PC in a drawer when not in use. You want to take it with you to visit your brother in Tennessee. Bingo! We have a notebook refurb with Windows 10, a solid state drive, a web cam, and an 18 and half inch screen for $275.

better way to honor the golden anniversary of one of the premier sports leagues in the world than to publish a lithograph depicting the faces of the 50 greatest players in the first 50 years, along with their autograph. The lithograph would be limited. A poll had to be taken to determine the top 50 players.

Some of the most recognizable players on the lithograph are Michael Jordan, Shaquille O’Neal, Bill Russell, Julius Erving, Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Magic Johnson, Jerry West and Bob Pettit.

Let’s say you want to be able to email your relatives, access Fox news, play solitaire and Zoom with your sister in Atlanta once a week. Your eyes aren’t as good as they used to be and

Over the past 26 years we’ve become pretty good at helping match hardware to customer needs and environmental limitations. Whether a repair, upgrade, refurb or a new system we can usually help our customers make the optimal decisions for their particular situation.

The devices we use are another example of “different strokes.” Depending on a lengthy list of factors, user choice of Internet access devices can be complex. Mobile devices like iPhones, Android phones and tablets are basically “dumb terminals.” Color, size and price are the major decision points. The selection of an ideal PC to fit a user’s specific situation requires a lot more thought. In addition to Internet access most PCs have other responsibilities that force users to consider options like CPU, RAM, storage, video, screen size, audio options, footprint, power, security, portability, applications compatibility, I/O devices and peripherals etc. In addition to the purely functional

The Appraiser’s Corner NBAs 50 Greatest Players 1946-1996 Lithograph

and mechanical factors, individual human characteristics also play a role in selecting a workstation. How much space do you wish to allocate in your home or business, how good are your eyes (screen), your hearing (speakers), do you need portability so you can take it with you (travel, hospital ). What form factor works best for your particular situation? An ALL-in-One, desktop, notebook or micro?

remember going to Kiel Auditorium in St. Louis, and watching the Hawks play the New York Knicks play the second game of a twin bill, often seeing the Celtics play the Syracuse Nationals in the opening game. In fact, when Wilt Chamberlain scored his record 100 points in a 169-147 Philadelphia victory over New York on March 4, 1962, in, of all places, Hershey, Pennsylvania, it was the second game of a doubleheader. Who played in the first game that night? Players from the Baltimore Colts and the Philadelphia Eagles football teams.

How times have changed. So have the attendance figures and the ticket prices for that matter. There is not too much memorabilia from those early days of George Mikan, Dolph Schayes, Bob Cousy, Bill Sharman, and Paul Arizin.

However, thanks to the collective effort of the NBA and the Field of Dreams Company, a piece commemorating the early days of the NBA was devised. The year 1996 marked the 50th anniversary of the NBA. What

As it so happened, the top 50 players were still alive at the time, except for one. One of the all-time greatest dribblers and shooters, “Pistol” Pete Maravich had passed in 1988, ironically playing basketball.

It was decided that the lithograph would be limited to 250 individually numbered pieces. There would be 50 that went directly to the players. Of the remaining 200 signed prints, there were 100 “NBA Editions”, 50 “Legends Editions”, and 50 “Field of Dreams Editions”. A few more were offered to the public. The print is considered by many to be the most valuable, and highly desirable signed sports art. As time goes on, several of the players depicted in the lithograph have passed, including Wilt Chamberlain, Paul Arizin, Dave DeBusschere, and Bill Sharman. As a result, the value of the print continues to escalate, as the sport, as well, grows in popularity across the world.

It is very difficult to find an NBA 50 Greatest Players lithograph. Most of the owners of the piece hold onto them. The original price to the public of the print was $25,000. The piece has gone for as much as $100,000 in private sales

In auctions the lithograph has sold from anywhere from $38,000 - $58,000 in the last few years. In a 2012 auction Nate Archibald’s personal piece went for nearly $42,000, while Hakeem Olajuwon’s went for $58,000 in a different auction. The piece will continue to increase in value, so if you have a chance, buy the item. You will not be disappointed. For all fans and collectors of the early days of the NBA this piece is the best way to remember those glory times. Jeff Figler is a professional certified appraiser. His latest book The Picker’s Pocket Guide to Baseball Memorabilia has been #1 on Amazon. He can be reached at Becky.CollectingWithJe ff@outlook.coor at 877-472-3087.


SERVICE DIRECTORY The Paper • Page 13 • November 25, 2021 The Paper Page 13 • • July 01, 2021

Man About Town Cont. from Page 4

transportation sales tax on the ballot. That measure and SANDAG came under fire after the Voice of San Diego revealed that the projected transportation revenues had been vastly overstated. SANDAG’s executive director stepped down the following year.

In June of this year Joshua Emerson Smith reported the goal of state leaders is to replace its waning gas tax before electric and increasingly fuel-efficient vehicles make it all but obsolete.

The idea of a per-mile fee has frustrated some local Republicans, who’ve said that SANDAG’s vision would unfairly tax motorists to pay for expensive transit projects. The plan’s marquee venture is a 200-mile regional rail system with a dozen new train stations and a price tag of more than $43 billion. “Usually, when you pay a user fee, it’s to pay for what you’re actually using,” said San Marcos Mayor Rebecca Jones. “What’s being proposed by SANDAG is using the fee to pay for a new mass transit system.”

“It’s OK to take an optimistic view of the future,” said Colin Parent, executive director of the nonprofit think tank Circulate San Diego, “but it’s also important to ensure that current revenues are dedicated toward transit that we can afford to build today.”

Still, SANDAG can’t do much until it secures new funding sources. The agency continues to grapple with a cash crunch as its only sales tax, Transnet, is expected to bring in roughly half of the $39 billion initially projected over its 40-year lifespan. Beyond revenue from road charges, the agency’s draft plan anticipates collecting funding from two future sales tax increases totaling approximately $17 billion over the next three decades. Such levies would require approval at the ballot box and could be before voters as soon as next year. But it appears SANDAG already has plans for “two future sales tax increases” – remember that old saying about not letting the camel get its nose inside the tent? It appears to us that the camel is nudging our tent pretty aggressively. And we don’t like it.

How about if we design our transportation system that matches up with our available funds? And with reasonable expected funding from city, county and state sources? In other words, “let’s not spend money we don’t have and not certain we will have.”

San Diego County Supervisor Jim Desmond said the proposal was intended to “force everyone on to trolleys and buses” by pricing people out of their cars.

“This proposal should never see the light of day,” Desmond said. “San Diegans already pay some of the highest prices to drive in the country. From the current gas taxes to a vehicle registration tax, San Diegans feel the effects, in their wallets, every day.“Adding another tax, to fund public transportation, is a slap in the face,” he said. “I will not support any new taxes or fees upon San Diegans until the promised projects are completed.” The Paper agrees with Supervisor Desmond.

Social Butterfly Cont. from Page 3

for homeless animals at San Diego Humane Society to find their new families! This holiday season, your Holiday Fund Drive gift will be DOUBLED, thanks to an incredible $500,000 match from the Resource Partners Foundation. You can offer a bright new beginning for the thousands of pets who are still waiting for help this holiday season. Phone # 619-2997012; sdhumane.org.

Hidden Valley Vista Council of Beta Sigma Phi Christmas Party The Hidden Valley Vista Council of Beta Sigma Phi International will hold its' annual Christmas dinner meeting, "Shine Christmas Shine" on Tuesday, December 14th, beginning at 1:00pm at Di Cicco's Restaurant in Escondido. Cost is $30.00/person. Hidden Valley Vista Council, Beta Sigma Phi members - active, inactive, on leave, and transferees are invited to make a reservation and select a menu choice by calling Peggy at 760.743.2610 by December 8th.

In the spirit of giving, members and guests are asked to bring a nonperishable food item to give to the Interfaith Council. Beta Sigma Phi is a social, cultural and philanthropic International Sorority, headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri, with chapters throughout the world. If you are interested in belonging to a special organization and make many new friends, call Peggy at 760-7432610. North County Players to Present a Christmas Production, “Hope Springs, Eternal", in December The award-winning San Diego North County Players brings this exciting stage play to the stage this holiday season. This Christmas explore those questions and more when the theatrical production, "Hope Springs, Eternal," is performed in Escondido to benefit the Woman's Club.

"Hope Springs, Eternal" tells the story of a post-WWII Midwestern town caught up in a web of lies, corruption, and ultimate redemption. Told in the tradition of beloved classics like "A Christmas Carol," "Miracle on 34th Street," and "It's a Wonderful Life," "Hope Springs, Eternal" is just the thing to get you into the holiday spirit.

Additionally, "Hope Springs, Eternal" will be performed in-theround, an exciting way for audiences to get as close to the action as they wish.

The venue is situated at the intersection of E. Mission Ave. and N. Rose St. right in the heart of Escondido. Evening and matinee shows take place Dec. 9, 10, 12 and 16, 17, 19. Tickets are set at movie theater prices so the entire community can experience excellent live theater. For tickets, directions, and further info visit northcountyplayers.com.

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OH, WHAT A BEAUTIFUL MORNING If you have a friend or family member who, like you, would benefit from a singing experience created and designed for people with Parkinson's, invite them to join you at the next rehearsal, whether in person or on Zoom. Click on www.trembleclefs.com for detailed information on Tremble Clefs, and a way to sign up.

DAR Welcomed New Member Laura Horn, Regent, Santa Margarita Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), welcomed new member, Bonnie Engle. Chaplain, Pam Fetzer, conducted the installation with the assistance of Registrar, Julie Calvario. Bonnie was admitted through service of her 5th great grandfather, Conrad Rader. Rader enlisted as a private in 1776 under Captain Hetterling in Windsor Twp, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He served in a regiment of the Pennsylvania line under a few commanding officers over a six month period. He was taken prisoner at Fort Washington and held for eight weeks. After his release he was discharged. Shortly afterward he re-enlisted and served in the 5th Regiment of the Pennsylvania line. After the battles of Germantown and Monmouth he was engaged in burying the dead. Rader was born in Europe and migrated to America in 1772. He is buried in Summer Hill (ST. Paul’s) Cemetery, Auburn, PA as Conrad Roeder, the original family spelling. The DAR is a volunteer service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history and securing America’s future through better education. It is open to any female

eighteen years of age or older who is lineally descended from an ancestor who participated in some way in America’s fight for independence in the American Revolutionary War. Visit Http://www.santamargarita.californiadar.org

L-R - Pam Fetzer, Bonnie Engel, Laura Horn, Julie Calvario

DAR Welcomed Speaker Tonya Danielly from Ivey Ranch Park Association - The Santa Margarita Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), welcomed Tonya Danielly, Executive Director, Ivey Ranch Park Association Inc. She spoke passionately about the Equestrian Center and how the Ranch has served children and adults with, or without, disabilities. The Ranch currently has 24 horses for the equine program. The Ranch serves over 200 individuals a month in other programs, also. The Ranch has 800 volunteers, passionate about what they do and the clientele that they do it for. Danielly was presented with a certificate of appreciation and an honorarium by 1st vice regent, Kellie Stafford and Regent, Laura Horn.


The Mighty Mojo Page The Paper • Page 14 • November 25, 2021

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your behalf. It said that its policy after the pandemic was to offer a credit, not a refund. "It seems their agency gave out incorrect information regarding refunds," a spokesman for Scenic River Cruises told me. "If the agency offered a refund, it falls on the agency to make such a refund."

I contacted your agency, which reviewed your case. "We sent out a communication to you asking if you preferred a cash refund or a future cruise credit for your canceled booking, only to later find out that Scenic would only be able to offer future cruise credits to its passengers," your agency said in a letter to you. Your agency agreed to issue a full refund of $14,910. That's the total of the refund and credit you were offered in the follow-up email. Christopher Elliott is the chief advocacy officer for Elliott Advocacy. Email him at chris@elliott.org or get help with any consumer problem by contacting him at http://www.elliott.org/help © 2021 Christopher Elliott.

Travel Trouleshooter Cont. from Page 7

"Whether you are entitled to a refund depends on many factors – including the length of the delay, the length of the flight, and your particular circumstances," it notes. "DOT determines whether you are entitled

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In other words, Delta probably owed you a refund for your changed flight, especially in light of BART's weekend schedule. It should have offered you a choice of an e-credit or a full refund. It didn't.

I recommended that you send a brief, polite appeal to Delta Air Lines. I publish the names, number and email addresses of <a href="https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/delta-air-lines-customer-service-contacts/">Delta's customer service executives</a> on my nonprofit consumer advocacy site, Elliott.org. You could have also sent a complaint to the Department of Transportation, but I would only recommend doing that if Delta continues to refuse your refund request.

It didn't. After you sent Delta's executives a note, they offered to refund your airfare. I wish you all the best and hope you'll be able to make the trip to New York soon.

Christopher Elliott's latest book is “How To Be The World’s Smartest Traveler” (National Geographic). Get help by contacting him at http://www.elliott.org/help © 2021 Christopher Elliott.

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO VISTA DIVISION 325 S. Melrose Vista, Ca. 92081 760.201.8094

YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: Navita Credit Corp.

(760) 471-1006

to a refund following a significant delay on a case-by-case basis."

SUMMONS CASE NO. 37-2021-00030780-CL-BC-NC

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: Antonio Laguna, Jr. aka Antonio Laguna aka Tony Laguna dba 42 Films, and Does 1 through 10, inclusive.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024571 The name of the busines: Urban Spark, located at 16066 Green Valley Truck Trail, Ramona, CA. 92065. Registrant Information: Shannon Drew Thomas 16066 Green Valley Truck Trail Ramona, Ca. 92065 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 11/01/21 /s/ Shannon Thomas Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/02/2021

11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024560 The name of the busines: Always Ready Equipment Rentals, located at 1462 Devin Dr., Fallbrook, CA. 92028. Registrant Information: Covetous, Inc. 1462 Devin Dr. Fallbrook, Ca. 92028 This business is operated by a corporation. First day of business n/a. /s/ Joseph B. Volk, President Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/02/2021

11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025315 The name of the busines: California Dental Certifications Institute, California Dental Certifications, located at 1059 First Ave., San Digo, CA. 92101. Registrant Information: California Dental Certifications, LLC 1059 First AVe., San Diego, CA. 92101 This business is operated by a Limited Liability Compa ny. First day of business: 11/12/21 /s/ Adele Baca, CEO Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/12/2021

11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025473 The name of the busines: Pete’s Tax Service, located at 650 S. Rancho Santa Fe Rd. #100, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Registrant Information: Peter John Eiden, Jr. 60 S. Rancho Santa Fe Rd. #200 San Marcos, CA. 92078 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business: 02/01/2021 /s/ Peter John Eiden, Jr. Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/15 +/2021

11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025539 The name of the busines: Dulce Vida Natural, located at 1011 S. Santa Fe Ave., Ste B, Vista, Ca. 92083 Registrant Information: Immunocali Natural Health LLc 1234 N. Santa Fe Ave., #118-166 Vista, Ca. 92083 This business is operated by Limited Liability Company First day of business: n/a. /s/ Oscar Rene Redondo, Managing Member Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/16/2021

11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

NOTICE! You are being sued. The court may decide against you wihtout you being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response but be in proper legal form is you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) your county law library, or the county courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask he court clerk for a fee waiver form; if you do not file your respnse on time, you may lose the case by default,and your wages, money, and preperty may be takent without further warning from the courr. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an atorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Service Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org). the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.cortinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar associataion. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: San Diego County Superior Court 325 So. Melrose Drive Vista, CA. 92081 North County Division

The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff wihtout an attorney is: Barry W. Ferns, Esq. Ferns, Adams & Associates 2815 Mitchell Drive, Suite 210, Walnut Creek, CA. 94598 925.927.3401 Dated: 7/28/2021 Clerk By; A. Carini, Deputy 11/18, 11/25, 12/02 & 12/09/2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2021-00047793-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Phillip Walter Simon Jr. filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Phillip Walter Simon Jr. to Proposed name Phillip Walter Simon El. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: December 28, 2021. 8:30a.m., Department 25. NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON ABOVE DATE; SEE ATTACHMENT. The address of the court is: 325 S. Melrose, Vista, CA. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated November 12, 2021. /s/ Pamela M. Parker, Judge of the Superior Court 11/18, 11/25, 12/02 & 12/09/2021


LEGALS

The Page • July 01, 2021 ThePaper Paper • Page 1515• November 25, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023807 The name of the business: A Center for Hope, located at 100 E. San Marcos Blvd, Suite 400, San Marcos, CA. 92069. Registrant Information: Samuel A. Brumit 1095 Tesoro Avenue San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 10/03/2011. /s/ Samuel A. Brumit Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/21/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023673 The name of the business: Endless Summer Pool Care, located at 2062 Balboa Circle, Vista, CA. 92081 Registrant Information: North County Pool Service LLC 2062 Balboa Circle Vista,CA. 92081 This business is operated by a Limited Liability Company. First day of business 10/20/2021 /s/ John Sourc, President Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/20/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024505 The name of the business: D&R Cactus Succulents, located at 1850 Warmland AVe., Vista, CA. 92081. Registrant Information: David Fredi Carrasco and Rocio Antonio 3461 Royal Road Vista, CA. 92084 This business is operated by a Married Couple. First day of business 9/14/2014. /s/ David Fredi Carrasco Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/01/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025141 The name of the business: H2O Bros, located at 2241 La Mirada Drive, Vista, CA. 92081 Registrant Information: Yanchewski & Wardell Enerprises, Inc. 2241 La Mirada Drive Vista, Ca. 92081 This business is operated by a corporation. First day of business n/a. /s/ Ryan Q. Wardell, President. Filed with Ernest Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/09/2021 11/18, 11/25, 12/02 & 12/09/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023633 The name of the business: Plaza Del Oro Cleaners, located at 4140 Oceanside Blvd., #149, Oceanside, CA. 92056 Registrant Information: Oro1979 Inc. 4140 Oceanside Blvd., #149 Oceanside, CA. 92056 This business is operated by a corporation. First day of business 10/15/2021. /s/ Kim, Jae Hwan, Secretary Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/20/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2021-00045952-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Richard Garcia filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Richard Garcia to Proposed name Richard Gibson. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: December 14, 2021. 8:30a.m., Department 25. NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON ABOVE DATE; SEE ATTACHMENT. The address of the court is: 325 S. Melrose, Vista, CA. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated October 28, 2021. /s/ Pamela M. Parker, Judge of the Superior Court 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024623 The name of the business: One West Realty Group, located at 3753 Mission Ave., Ste 108, Oceanside, CA. 92058. Registrant Information: Travis Yaldo 3753 Mission Ave. Ste 108 Oceanside, Ca. 92058. This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 1/27/2016. /s/Travis Yaldo Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/02/2021 11/11, 11/18, 11/25 & 12/02/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9022562 The name of the business: Vivall Group, located at 410 W. San Marcos Blv, #121, San Marcos, Ca. 92069. Registrant Information: A & T Consulting LLC 410 W. San Marcos Blvd. #121 San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is operated by a corporation. First day of business August 1, 2018. /s/Alex Klott, President Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/07/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18, & 11/25/2021

SUMMONS CASE NO. 37-202100044996-CU-OR-NC

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO VISTA DIVISION 325 S. Melrose Vista, Ca. 92081 760.201.8094

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: San Diego Area Housing & Finance Agency Corporation; All Persons Unknown DOES 1-20, et al.

YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: Dora Schumacher

NOTICE! You are being sued. The court may decide against you without you being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form is you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) your county law library, or the county courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form; if you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default,and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the courr.

There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Service Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org). the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.cortinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar associataion. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: San Diego County Superior Court 325 So. Melrose Drive Vista, CA. 92081 North County Division The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney is: Law offices of Charles D. Nachand 500 La Terraza Blvd., #150, Esc. CA. 92025 760.741.2665 Dated: 10/22/2021 Clerk by V. Navarro, Deputy 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/21

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024155 The name of the business: Dragonfly Picnic Co., located at 2913 S. Santa Fe Ave., San Marcos, CA. 92069 Registrant Information: Stephanie White 2913 S. Santa Fe Ave. San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business n/a.. /s/ Stephanie White Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/26/2021 11/11, 11/18, 11/25 & 12/2/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023974 The name of the business: Culture Impact, located at 1910 Arroyo Avenue, Oceanside, CA. 92056. Registrant Information: David V. Daubenspeck 1910 Arroyo Avenue Oceanside, CA. 92056 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business n/a.. /s/ David V. Daubenspeck Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/23/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

SUMMONS CASE NO. 37-202000045259-CL-BCR-NC

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO VISTA DIVISION 325 S. Melrose Vista, Ca. 92081 760.201.8094

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: PHOTOGRAPHY OUTLET, INC., a California corporation; SANJAY GUPTA, an individual, and DOES 1 to 25.

YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: TBF FINANCIAL I. LLC A California limited liability company

NOTICE! You are being sued. The court may decide against you without you being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form is you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) your county law library, or the county courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form; if you do not file your respnse on time, you may lose the case by default,and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the courr.

There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Service Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org). the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.cortinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar associataion. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: San Diego County Superior Court 325 So. Melrose Drive Vista, CA. 92081 North County Division The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney is: Michael W. Battin, Navigato & Battin, LLP 755 West A Street, Suite 150 San Diego, CA. 92101 619-233-5365 Dated: 12/28/20 By Clerk A. Carini, Deputy 11/18, 11/25, 12/02 & 12/09/2021 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023798 The name of the business: Kids Unlimited, located at 1095 Tesoro Avenue, San Marcos, Ca. 92069. Registrant Information: Mission Ministries of San Diego, Inc. 1095 Tesoro Avenue San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is operated by a corporation First day of business 10/25/2016. /s/ Samuel A. Brumit, President Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/21/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024950 The name of the business: Opal Owl Design, located at 191 Cerro Rosado, San Marcos, Ca. 92069. Registrant Information: Gina Burriesci This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 3/01/2021 /s/ Samantha Johnson Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/06/2021 11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024575 The name of the business: Prism Electric, located at 3549 Lookout Court #428, Oceanside, CA. 92056. Registrant Information: Kyle David Hendry 3549 Lookout Court #428 Oceanside, CA. 92056 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 11/01/2021. /s/ Kyle David Hendry Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/02/2021 11/18, 11/25, 12/2 & 12/9/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025019 The name of the business: California RDA Institute; RDA Institute of California, located at 1059 First Ave., San Diego, Ca. 92101 Registrant Information: California Dental Certification LLC 1059 First Ave. San Diego, CA. 92101 This business is operated by Limited Liability Company. First day of business 10/29/2004. /s/ Adele Baca, Owner, CEO Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/08/2021 11/18, 11/25, 12/2 & 12/9/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025020 The name of the business: California Dental Certifications Institute; California Dental Certifications, located at 1059 First Ave., San Diego, Ca. 92101 Registrant Information: Adele Baca 1059 First Ave. San Diego, CA. 92101 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 10/26/2004. /s/ Adele Baca Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/08/2021 11/18, 11/25, 12/2 & 12/9/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024776 The name of the business: Kyle Tetz Chiropractic Inc., located at 410 S. Melrose Dr. Ste 209, Vista, CA. 92081. Registrant Information: Kyle Tetz Chiropratic Inc. 410 S. Melrose Dr., Ste 209 Vista, Ca. 92081 This business is operated by a corporation. First day of business 11/4/2021. /s/ Kyle Tetz, CEO Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/04/2021 11/18, 11/25, 12/2 & 12/9/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023486 The name of the business: Fluid; Fluid Plumbing; Little Plumber Girl; The Little Plumber Girl, located at 5240 Hubbert St., Oceanside, CA. 92056. Registrant Information: Katie Marie Corcoran 5240 Hubbert St. Oceanside, CA. 92056 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 4/05/2011. /s/ Katie Corcoran Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/19/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023274 The name of the business: Rosas Cleaning Service, located at 180 Los Flores Drive #6, San Marcos, CA. 92069. Registrant Information: Rebeca Y. Rosas Ramirez 180 Las Flores Drive #6 San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business n/a. /s/ Rebeca Y. Rosas Ramirez Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/18/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023423 The name of the business: Moonlight Coffee & Tea, Moonlight Coffee, located at 345 S. Coast Hiway 101, Suite J, Encinitas, CA. 92024. Registrant Information: Anthony Jordon Silva 953 Robley Way Cardiff, CA. 92007 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 10/15/21 /s/ Anthony Jordan Silva Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/19/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023849 The name of the business: Alkaline Solutions located at 1243 E. Vista Way, Vista, CA. 92084. Registrant Information: Torrey Moores 367 North Melrose Dr. #H Vista, CA. 92083 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 12/16/20 /s/ Torrey Moores Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/22/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9024986 The name of the business: GB & Co., located at 5550 Carmel Mountain Rd., San Diego, CA. 92130. Registrant Information: Gina Burriesci This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 4/01/2021 /s/ Gina Burriesci Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/08/2021 11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023797 The name of the business: City Mission, located at 1095 Tesoro Avenue, San Marcos, Ca. 92069. Registrant Information: Mission Ministries of San Diego, Inc. 1095 Tesoro Avenue San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is operated by a corporation First day of business 10/21/2021. /s/ Samuel A. Brumit, President Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/21/2021 11/04, 11/11, 11/18 & 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9023732 The name of the business: Made For You Flower Shop, San Elijo Flower Shop, locaed at 2237 Indus Way, San Marcos, CA. 92078. Registrant Information: Deanna Rivera Ornelas and Roley Guimaroes Vianna DeOliveira 2237 Indus Way San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is operated by a Married Couple. First day of business 9/15/2021. /s/ Deanna Rivera Ornelas Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 10/21/2021/ 11/18, 11/25, 12/2 & 12/09/2021 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025539 The name of the business: Dulce Vida Natural, located at 1011 S. Santa Fe Ave., Ste B, Viosta, Ca. 92083. Registrant Information: Immunocali Naural Health LLC 1234 N. Santa Fe Ave., #118-166 Vista, CA. 92083 This business is operated by a Limited Liability Co. First day of business n/a. /s/ Oscar Rene Redondo Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/16/2021/ 11/18, 11/25, 12/2 & 12/09/2021

SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE ADOPTED ORDINANCE NO. 2021-1506

Ordinance No. 2021-1506 – an ordinance of the City Council of the City of San Marcos, California, amending San Marcos Municipal Code Chapter 8.68 (Garbage and Refuse Collection) to implement relevant provisions of the SB 1383 organic waste disposal reduction regulations. Ordinance No. 2021-1506 was introduced on October 12, 2021, and adopted by the City Council of San Marcos, California, on October 26, 2021, by the following roll call vote: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: JENKINS, MUSGROVE, NUÑEZ, WALTON, JONES. NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE. ABESENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE. A certified copy is posted in the office of the City Clerk at 1 Civic Center Dr, San Marcos, CA. Julia Moss, Deputy City Clerk, City of San Marcos. PD: 11/25/2021 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE ADOPTED ORDINANCE NO. 2021-1507

SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE ADOPTED ORDINANCE NO. 2021-1499

Ordinance No. 2021-1499 – an ordinance of the City Council of the City of San Marcos, California, approving an amendment of the Heart of the City Specific Plan. Ordinance No. 2021-1499 was introduced on October 26, 2021, and adopted by the City Council of San Marcos, California, on November 9, 2021, by the following roll call vote: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: JENKINS, MUSGROVE, NUÑEZ, WALTON, JONES. NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE. ABESENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE. A certified copy is posted in the office of the City Clerk at 1 Civic Center Dr, San Marcos, CA. Julia Moss, Deputy City Clerk, City of San Marcos. PD: 11/25/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025501 The name of the business: Notary by T, located at 3793 Via Cabrillo, Oceanside, CA. 92056 Registrant Information: Tanya Ware 3793 Via Cabrillo Oceanside, CA. 92056 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 11/16/2021 /s/ Tanya Ware Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/16/2021/ 11/18, 11/25, 12/2 & 12/09/2021

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME #2021-90023794 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME:

Steaming Arrow Records, located at 3210 Greyhawk Court Carlsbad, CA. 92010. The Fictitious

Business Name referred to above was filed in San Diego County on 10/21/2016 and assigneed file no. 2016-027406. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IS BEING ABANDONED BY: Brandon Anthony Foley 3270 Westwood Drive Carlsbad, Ca. 92008

This business is conducted by an individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1000). /s/ Brandon Foley This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County on 10/21/2021 11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025576 The name of the business: Solano Maintenance, located at 1045 E. Vista Way, Space 7, Vista, CA. 92084. Registrant Information: Cristobal Gomez 1045 E. Vista Way, Space 7 Vista, CA. 92084 This business is operated by an individual. First day of business 01/01/2014 /s/ Cristobal Gomez Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/15/2021

Ordinance No. 2021-1507 – an ordinance of the City Council of the City of San Marcos, 11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & 12/16/2021 California, amending Title 5 of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS the San Marcos Municipal NAME STATEMENT 2021-9025075 Code to provide for the rules The name of the busines: Robert and regulations governing the William Ent.; Cool Beads; Cali located at 14251D Garden distribution, sale, and use of Bristo, Rd., Poway, CA. 92064. Information: single use plastic food service Registrant Robert Nethery ware and other plastic prod- 14251D Garden Rd. Poway, CA. 92064. ucts as specified. Ordinance This business is operated by an No. 2021-1507 was introduced individual. First day of business 11/01/2021 Robert Nethery on October 12, 2021, and /s/ Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg adopted by the City Council of Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/09/2021 San Marcos, California, on 11/25, 12/02, 12/09 & October 26, 2021, by the fol- 12/16/2021 lowing roll call vote: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS JENKFICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT INS, MUSGROVE, NUÑEZ, 2021-9024608 WALTON, JONES. NOES: The name of the busines: The COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE. Punchlist, located at 1544 Indian ABESENT: COUNCILMEM- Summer Road, San Marcos, CA. BERS: NONE. A certified copy 92069. is posted in the office of the Registrant Information: Tyler James Collett City Clerk at 1 Civic Center Dr, 1544 Indian Summer Road San Marcos, CA. Julia Moss, San Marcos, CA. 92069 Deputy City Clerk, City of San This business is operated by an individual. Marcos. First day of business n/a. PD: 11/25/2021 /s/ Tyler Collett

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Filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego on 11/02/2021

11/25, 12/02, 12/16/2021

12/09

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