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Volume 44 - No. 24

June 12, 2014

by lyle e davis

“And it came to pass that he would die. Who would attend to him? Who would see that he was buried properly? With honor? With dignity? With compassion?”

Several years ago a scheduled speaker failed to show up at our Hidden Valley Kiwanis Club of Escondido meeting. We drafted one of our members, Richard Jungas, owner of the California Funeral Alternatives as our speaker.

It was one of best, most interesting programs we’ve ever had. Dick Jungas told us all about the funeral profession; he answered any questions posed and no questions were off limits. We got an education about a subject that most of us don’t talk a lot about ..., and that’s a shame because, in fact, it is a fascinating and important subject.

At some point in time each of us will have to face that point in time when we, or one of our loved ones, passes away. What then?

What happens? And why?

We have learned that funeral rites are as old as the human race itself. Every culture and civilization has attended to the proper care of their dead. Every human culture ever studied has three common threads for death and the disposition of their dead: 1) Some type of ceremony, funeral rite, or ritual. 2) A sacred place for the dead. 3) Memorials for the dead.

Researchers have found burial grounds of Neanderthal man dating to 60,000 BC with animal antlers on the body and flower fragments next to the corpse indicating some type of ritual and gifts to the deceased. One of the first examples of this was unearthed in the Shanidar cave in Iraq; Neanderthal skeletons were discovered with a layer of pollen.

With no great intellect or cusThe Paper - 760.747.7119

website:www.thecommunitypaper.com

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toms, the Neanderthal man instinctively buried their dead with ritual and ceremony. This may suggest that Neanderthals believed in an afterlife, but were at least capable of mourning, and were likely aware of their own mortality.

The most ancient and universal of funeral monuments were simple and natural, consisting of a mound of earth, or a heap of stones, raised over the ashes or body of the deceased. Some primitive people exposed corpses in the open, in trees or on platforms. Taking a look at funeral rites

over time we see that in 5000 BC - the oldest known tomb was built around this time - little more than two upright stones with a flat stone horizontally fitted on top.

In 4000 BC - The art of embalming was originated by the Egyptians.

Tears and Tributes Continued on Page 2


The Paper • Page 2 • June 12, 2014

‘Tears and Tributes’ Cont. from Page 1

In 3300 BC - It was learned that Egyptian mummies’ levels of mummification differed according to rank and cost. More expensive techniques resulted in a better looking corpse. In 353 BC - The first true Mausoleum was built, for the Carian ruler Mausolus. Begun before his death in 353 B.C., construction of the Mausoleum was continued by his wife. It ranked as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

BC - Hokenoyama In 230 tomb, the oldest know burial chamber in Japan was disscovered. In 100 AD - The Romans in the first and second centuries used “columbarium” as a name for a structure containing multiple funerary urns because the stacked urns resembled stacked cages.

In 900 AD - Elaborate Viking funerals often involved ritual sacrifice of peasants, who were given large amounts of strong drink before their “roles.” The graves, ship shaped mounds, were outlined with stone markers.

In 1578 - The Roman Catacombs were rediscovered.

Give Us This Day Our Daily Chuckle This week, a compendium of wit, wisdom and neat stuff you can tell at parties. Enjoy!

Dangerous First Impressions

After finishing her shift as a nurse a wife comes home late at night and quietly opens the door to her bedroom. From under the blanket she sees four legs instead of two! She reaches for a baseball bat and starts hitting the blanket as hard as she can. Once she's done, she goes to the kitchen to have a drink.

As she enters, she sees her husband there, reading a magazine.

"Hi sweetheart," he says, "your parents have come to visit us, so I let them stay in our bedroom. Did you say hello to them?”

In the 1860's - U.S. embalming began during the Civil War.

In 1864 - Arlington became a military cemetery.

In 1884 - Cremation became legal in England.

In 1887 - The Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science was established.

In 1963 - Nov 22 - JFK was buried at Arlington National Jessica Mitford Cemetery. Releases- "American Way of Death" and the Catholics began to accept cremation

In 1984FTC's "Trade Regulations on the Funeral Industry Practices" went into full effect.

In 2000 - Ecopods made of biodegradable paper and other fibers evolved. The sleek ecopods can be customized just like caskets, but are designed to be used in “green” cemeteries.

Funerals in the 1900's were very different than they are nowadays. They weren't held in a funeral home; they were held in a parlor in someone's house. The parlor was the fanciest room of the house, and it was only used for special occasions. For instance, it would be used when special visitors like the minister or priest came

over, or for weddings or funerals.

When there was a funeral, the body was taken to the parlor and the coffin was placed on a table. Afterwards, the body would be taken to the cemetery for burial.

Most people died at home during this period, and funerals and burials were handled by the immediate family and neighbors. After the death, women in the family would wash, dress, and prepare the body for burial. Men were responsible for making the plain wood coffin or securing it from the local carpenter. Male survivors dug the grave, and in some cases carved the grave stone. The wake was typically held at home, followed by a committal service at graveside. One funeral custom back then was that everyone wore all black. The women wore black taffeta dresses, and the men wore black suits and a black hat. During the funeral, it would be very quiet, and serious. Deaths were very common because back then they didn't have very many medicines that could help cure diseases.

Instead of having fancy cars to carry the body, they would use a hearse pulled by two horses. The body would be placed

Philosophy of Ambiguity

SELF, IS IT CONSIDERED A HOSTAGE SITUATION?

2. ONE TEQUILA, TWO TEQUILA, THREE TEQUILA, FLOOR.

11. WHERE DO FOREST RANGERS GO TO "GET AWAY FROM IT ALL?"

1. DON'T SWEAT THE PETTY THINGS AND DON'T PET THE SWEATY THINGS.

3. ATHEISM IS A NONPROPHET ORGANIZATION.

4. IF MAN EVOLVED FROM MONKEYS AND APES, WHY DO WE STILL HAVE MONKEYS AND APES?

5. THE MAIN REASON THAT SANTA IS SO JOLLY IS BECAUSE HE KNOWS WHERE ALL THE BAD GIRLS LIVE.

6. I WENT TO A BOOKSTORE AND ASKED THE SALESWOMAN, "WHERE'S THE SELF- HELP SECTION?" SHE SAID IF SHE TOLD ME, IT WOULD DEFEAT THE PURPOSE.. 7. WHAT IF THERE WERE NO HYPOTHETICAL QUESTIONS?

8. IF A DEAF CHILD SIGNS SWEAR WORDS, DOES HIS MOTHER WASH HIS HANDS WITH SOAP?

9. IF SOMEONE WITH MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES THREATENS TO KILL HIM-

10. IS THERE ANOTHER WORD FOR SYNONYM?

12. WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU SEE AN ENDANGERED ANIMAL EATING AN ENDANGERED PLANT? 13. IF A PARSLEY FARMER IS SUED, CAN THEY GARNISH HIS WAGES?

14. WOULD A FLY WITHOUT WINGS BE CALLED A WALK?

15. WHY DO THEY LOCK GAS STATION BATHROOMS? ARE THEY AFRAID SOMEONE WILL CLEAN THEM?

16. IF A TURTLE DOESN'T HAVE A SHELL, IS HE HOMELESS OR NAKED?

17. CAN VEGETARIANS EAT ANIMAL CRACKERS?

18. IF THE POLICE ARREST A MIME, DO THEY TELL HIM HE HAS THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT?

19. WHY DO THEY PUT BRAILLE ON THE DRIVETHROUGH BANK

inside the back of the hearse. There were glass windows in it with curtains over them. If the curtains were up, people would know not to pull their horse over, and if they were down, people would know that they had to pull over to show respect. Back then, since they didn't have funeral homes, the hearse would take the body to the house (parlor). In the late 1800's and the early 1900's people used funeral registers to record a person's death. The sheet shows the people's place of death, their name, age, when they died, their occupation, the residence, where they were buried, the date of the funeral, the casket that was used, and the hearse that was used.

In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s families would often prepare the body themselves, particularly in rural areas. Preparing the body involved a bucket of water, a wash cloth, shaving razor and a comb. You would simply do the best you could cleaning the body and fixing the hair. Caskets were usually homemade. Hardware for caskets could be purchased at any general mercantile.

‘Tears and Tributes’ Cont. on Page 3

MACHINES?

20. HOW DO THEY GET DEER TO CROSS THE ROAD ONLY AT THOSE YELLOW ROAD SIGNS?

21. WHAT WAS THE BEST THING BEFORE SLICED BREAD?

22. ONE NICE THING ABOUT EGOTISTS: THEY DON'T TALK ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE. 23. DOES THE LITTLE MERMAID WEAR AN ALGEBRA?

24. HOW IS IT POSSIBLE TO HAVE A CIVIL WAR?

25. IF ONE SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMER DROWNS, DO THE REST DROWN TOO?

26. IF YOU ATE BOTH PASTA AND ANTIPASTO, WOULD YOU STILL BE HUNGRY?

27. IF YOU TRY TO FAIL, AND SUCCEED, WHICH HAVE YOU DONE?

28. WHOSE CRUEL IDEA WAS IT FOR THE WORD 'LISP' TO HAVE 'S' IN IT? 29. WHY ARE HEMORRHOIDS CALLED "HEMOR-

‘Chuckles’ Cont. on Page 7


The Paper • Page 3 • June 12, 2014

‘Tears and Tributes’ Cont. from Page 2

Once the body was prepared it would be displayed by a window for obvious reasons. Friends and family members graced the casket with flowers and cedar, not as offerings so much, but more to conceal the odor.

During the 1800's, it became fashionable to use headstones sold by dealers. Many of the early headstone markers found in our local cemeteries were purchased mail-order from Sears & Roebuck. The standard 12 X 12 X 4 headstone from Sears cost $5.10 and their large 16 X 16 X6 cost $26.70 . . a lot of money in 1880!

Fairly often, in rural communities, the body would simply be buried on the farm. We have several of our ancestors buried on what used to be my Grandma’s farm in southwestern Minnesota. They were hard to find, but we found them. The farm itself is no longer in the family. Eventually every pioneer family was faced with the inevitable death of a friend, a loved one or a neighbor. Death rates were especially high among the young. Today, however, three-fourths of annual deaths in the United States occur to persons over the age of sixty-five. The people gave of themselves to those needing sympathy, respect and understanding.

This practice was followed in every town and crossroads settlement in the county. When a death occurred, friends and neighbors immediately began to console the bereaved and help bury the dead.

Many of the tasks involved in the grieving and burial process are considered tradition but developed years ago out of necessity.

Funeral homes or parlors were not common and death remained a family affair.

The original purpose of sitting up with the dead was to watch for a sign of life. People in the community would take turns sitting with the body to watch for any signs. Later this became a tradition instead of a necessity.

Embalming and burial services were not available or too expensive for most poor rural families and the burden of preparing the body for burial was placed upon family and friends, who were already faced with the death of a loved one.

Death and preparing the body for burial was a pretty tedious process. We take this for grant-

ed today because now we have others to do these tasks for us. Decedents were usually buried no more than two days following death because of the lack of embalming.

When it came time for the funeral the casket would be removed from the house by friends and neighbors and placed in a wagon, or in later times on a flat-bed truck, and carried to the church and cemetery. The grave would have been dug earlier by family or friends.

This difficult job was considered a special privilege and a solemn occasion for those involved. In most cases the funerals were simple and unassuming and were sometimes attended by only a few people.

Although store-bought caskets were available by the early 1900s they were considered a luxury. Most early families in the country built their own or found a good carpenter. You could buy a ready-made casket for $30-$40 if you had it.

Some hardware stores at the time sold casket hardware and you could make the casket yourself or they would build it for you. They would also come to your house and embalm the body for you. They brought their own table called a cooling table that they used to lay the body on for preparation. The table folded up into a little satchel that they could carry from place to place. After the body was prepared, a relative would view the body for approval. While they were there, the people at the hardware store would offer to sell you a casket and transport the body for you to the church or cemetery. All these things formerly had to be performed by family members or friends and for the people that could afford it this was quite a service.

Because there were no embalmers back then, funerals had to be held not too many hours after death, at most, within two days of death, if at all possible. Around 1930 you began to see the advent of funeral homes, even in smaller, rural areas. Quite often, this was an expansion of an existing hardware store.

Once funeral homes came into being people gave a sigh of relief. Earlier, it didn’t cost you anything monetarily but your effort to prepare and bury your dead. Now it costs you, sometimes quite a bit depending on the selections made by the family, but it is a price just about everyone is willing to pay.

Obituaries of earlier local people were not regularly printed

except privately on mourning or remembrance cards. The cards, keepsakes usually made of black paper, contained information about the deceased and were mailed or handed out to friends and relatives. The first obituaries printed in local papers in the 1880s and 1890s were brief paragraphs, usually only a line or two. Later they became more detailed.

Several years ago a well known and loved Escondido resident, Vivian Doering, passed away. Her family published an obituary in The Paper that was almost one full page in length. Vivian was a woman of many accomplishments, belonged to many organizations, and was well known within the community. It took almost a full page to outline all that she accomplished in life.

We have since published a number of other obituaries. Some are a few inches in length, others a quarter to half page in length.

Every week we publish Death Notices, a service offered free of charge to area funeral homes and/or families.

The cemeteries scattered around the country today were usually established on high ground near a home site or at any convenient place along a traveler’s route.

The earliest graves were marked with bricks, stones or boards. .Sometimes the markers were carved only with the initials of the deceased. During the 1800s it became fashionable to used headstones sold by dealers.

Residents in the community would prepare food for the bereaved family and the crowd of expected guests. Others would compile a list of persons to sit up with the corpse until the time for the funeral, a task usually performed by friends of the deceased or members of his or her church. If the local church had a bell it would be tolled in honor of the deceased.

The modern burial services are important but those early burial customs and services should not be forgotten. Burial was such an effort for people years ago. It’s a big business, death and dying. It was a big chore to put all together in the past. It’s so much a part of life but not pleasant to think about. Today there are people to handle it all for you, but you can’t ignore death and the way it was handled in the past. It was a reflection of the time. A visit to the cemetery can be used not only to pay respects to the deceased but also an opportunity to ponder the procedure itself and the changes that have been made through the years.

This demographic shift in the age at death, along with urbanization, migration, secularization, and consumerism, have contributed to dramatic changes in funeral and memorial practices in the United States over the past century.

American cities grew more crowded, and living spaces became smaller. When death occurred, many families did not have the physical space for a wake in the home.

D. C. Sloane (1991) cites three other reasons for the expanding roles of undertakers in the late nineteenth century: (1) the rise in popularity of embalming; (2) a longer distance from the home to the cemetery necessitated someone to organize the procession; and (3) families were concerned about ensuring that all the formalities were followed.

The National Funeral Directors Association was established in 1882. The group decided to use the term funeral directors, rather than undertakers, in an effort to portray a more professional image. During the twentieth century, the role of the funeral director continued to expand into areas previously held by the family and the clergy.

Three central decisions remain for individuals responsible for final arrangements: 1) what to do with the deceased body?; 2) what type of ceremony will take place to acknowledge the death?; and 3) how shall this person be remembered?

Factors affecting final disposition practices include religious beliefs, climate, geography, available space, ethnicity, economics, social customs, and environmental concerns.

Religious beliefs concerning final disposition are influenced by conceptions of what follows death, as well as the role of the physical body. Hinduism and Buddhism require cremation, while Lutherans have no formal position for or against it. The Roman Catholic Church opposed cremation until the latter part of the twentieth century, at which time cremation became permitted, but not encouraged.

For both religious and cultural reasons, most Jewish people are buried and not cremated. Many Jews believe in the resurrection, "the return of the soul to the resuscitated body." Several First Nation (American Indian) tribes have the tradition of wrapping the corpse in hides or blankets and setting it out in the air for a year or more. Habenstein &

‘Tears and Tributes’ Cont. on Page 9


The Paper • Page 4 • June 12, 2014 Covert Leaves PPH, Heads for Texas

Michael Covert, CEO for Palomar Health hospital district, is leaving for Houston, Texas, where he’ll run a network of six hospitals owned by multistate health system Catholic Health Initiatives.

Covert has a number of supporters locally, including his board of directors, who tripled his salary over the last 10 years, making him one of California’s highest paid executives.

But he also has a large number of critics who point to facts that show Palomar Health’s hospitals and clinics runing at a loss; operating margin was minus 4.2 percent in the first half of fiscal year 2014, an improvement from minus 12.2 percent in the same period in 2013.

In a column by the U-T’s Dan McSwain, he points out that Covert is leaving PPH with Debt and Little Cash

He points out that the district has cash problems. While improving, it’s still violating a bond covenant to keep enough cash for 80 days.

He points out that Moody’s Investors Service, the bond rating agency has warned

Local News

twice in two years of Palomar’s declining financial health, most recently in March. “PH’s debt measures are among the weakest in Moody’s portfolio of rated public and not-for-profit health care organizations (debt measures exclude GO debt),” the agency said.

Palomar’s market share fell from 55 percent to 49 percent in 2012, when its new Escondido hospital was opening. It’s back to 55 percent. But that’s zero growth, by Moody’s reckoning.

McSwain asks if Covert has sacrificed profit to move upscale? Nope; 63 percent of Palomar’s patients (above the national average) are on MediCal or Medicare, government programs with downward profitability trajectories.

This suggests that well-heeled patients are driving past Palomar’s hospitals in Escondido and Poway to get their new knees, tummy tucks and pricey nonelective surgeries at competing hospitals on the coast. Ordinarily, such operating challenges can be manageable. But Palomar is hobbled by debt. Today Palomar owes $1.13 bil-

‘Local News’ Cont. on Page 7

civil and courteous in his responses.

One long-winded gal from TERC (The Escondido Republican Club) tried to ask a question with a lengthy preamble praising Mayor Sam and the city . . . and, to his credit, Hizzoner politely cut her off, asking if she had a question.

Man About Town

We were quite proud of the campaign waged by Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood in his bid to upset County Supervisor Bill Horn.

He almost made a miracle happen! Going up against Bill Horn, with all his developer money, and his political network . . . and to lose by two percentage points. Quite an accomplishment.

Speaking of Mayors, Hizzoner, Sam Abed, had probably one of his best Town Hall Meetings ever last Wednesday at Escondido’s City Hall.

A well balanced and well behaved crowd that were civil in the questions and/or criticisms and Hizooner was just as

I particularly enjoyed Hizzoner employing the use of a standard hand-held microphone. I could actually HEAR what he had to say. The earlier lapel microphone made his statements so garbled it sounded like I was listening to Elmer Fudd. Great improvement on sound quality and “listenability.” (And if that ain’t a word . . . it is now.) ••••• Delighted to see the all new McDonalds is almost ready to open (when this edition goes to print they will have already opened). Met the owner, Leslie Mannes, and she is a delightful lady with a great big smile. She owns six McDonald’s franchises in North County and this is sure to become one of the shining jewels! ••••• Also delighted to see that George Weir and his George W. Weir Asphalt Construction Company has been named California Small Business of the Year by Assembly Member Marie Waldron.

Letters to the Editor The Russian Firefighting Planes

Hello Lyle,

I followed up on the article about the Russian airplane to try to get more information. CalFire is aware of the Russian airplane and say they could use it in the future but they feel it has several drawbacks, one apparently being that it must scoop water out of lakes which could spread invasive species to other bodies of water where they don’t yet exist. He also referenced the drought and current water levels in our lakes as limiting factors.

/s/Tom Stinson Principal Field Representative Assemblymember Marie Waldron, AD 75

George is a long-time community and business leader and has financially supported a number of community projects.

George Weir

Assembly Member Waldron will present the award to Weir June 16 in Sacramento.

The award recognizes Weir’s ongoing involvement in local civic and community causes as well as the growth of the George W. Weir Asphalt Construction Co. which he founded 35 years ago with, according to him, “little more than a shovel, my father’s truck and a commitment to a lot of hard work ahead.” Since then, his business has expanded to include the Escondido Asphalt production facility, the Inland Valley Materials aggregate producer, and Escondido Sand & Gravel distribution outlet.

Light Rail A Joke

Like most issues in the public discourse nowadays there are folks out there who, in an almost reflex reaction, want to take the issue of light rail and public transit in general and divide the argument along ideological lines, i.e., public vs. private, working class vs. privileged, etc. Let's forget about public vs. private, liberal vs. conservative; neither has a monopoly on virtue. Let's instead address some cold, hard, and sometimes uncomfortable facts about light rail as a 19th Century solution to a 21st Century problem. In just about every metropolitan area where light rail has been deployed, fare box recovery accounts for roughly 20% of the cost of constructing and operating the system. The other 80% comes from taxpayers in one form or another. So the 93% of taxpayers who don't ride light rail for whatever reason are subsidizing four-fifths of the cost for the 7% who do use it. If any other business ran under such a skewed business model they'd be laughed out of business.

I live across the river from Portand, Oregon, where the

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. on Page 5

In addition to supporting several faith-based and community charities over the years, Weir has provided his employees and equipment free of charge to repair street potholes, haul away rock and other debris during the construction of the Palomar Medical Center, and help build the Heritage Garden mini park in downtown Escondido.

We are proud to call George Weir a friend. ••••• to visit another Paid Escondido’s Saturday Market this past weekend . . . and, as usual, I made a beeline for the produce vendor headed up by Jacinta and Juanita, two sisters who have top produce and, my favorites, huge, fresh, juicy, sweet strawberries! Normally, I buy the three-pack at $8. This week I bought two. Why? Because a three-pack is usually gone by Monday . . . Tuesday at the latest. This six pack should last me till Thursday, maybe Friday. Then back for more Saturday Market! While shopping I bumped into long time friend and retired Superior Court Judge, David Ryan and his lovely wife, Marcia. They, too, had purchased a 3-pack of luscious

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 5


The Paper • Page 5 • June 12, 2014

‘Letters to the Editor’ Cont. from Page 4

light rail system is known as Tri-Met. The TriMet system is broke.

To help defray the cost of building more and more lengths of rail line and running the trains, they have resorted to siphoning money from the bus system, raising bus fares and curtailing routes and frequency, and as a result have eliminated some people's best and only connection to the MAX line. The chief reason TriMet is in the red is a union contract under which their employees receive $1.52 in benefits for every $1.00 in salary. Their unfunded liabilities have surpassed $1.1 billion. That's with a “B.”

Light rail is a fiscal white elephant whose prodigious cost has been propped up by the willful ignorance of its proponents, most of whom don't own a stake in its usefulness or solvency beyond the $2.50 they pay for a train ticket. For the $200 million per mile it costs to lay down a light rail track, my home town could repave and upgrade 360 miles of its city streets, making vehicle throughput (including a public bus system) even more efficient over light rail than it already is; and for my part

that's where I'd rather see the money being spent. /s/Brian Effinger Vancouver, WA

11 High Cost Home Inspection Pitfalls to be Aware of Before Listing Your Home For Sale

San Marcos - According to industry experts, there are over 33 physical problems that will come under scrutiny during a home inspection when your home is for sale. A new report has been prepared which identifies the eleven most common of these problems, and what you should know about them before you list your home for sale.

Whether you own an old home or a brand new one, there are a number of things that can fall short of requirements during a home inspection. If not identified and dealt with, any of these 11 items could cost you dearly in terms of repair. That's why it's critical that you read this report before you list your home. If you wait until the building inspector flags these issues for you, you will almost certainly experience costly delays in the close of your home sale or, worse, turn prospective buyers away altogether. In most cases, you can make a reasonable pre-inspection yourself if you know what you're looking for, and

knowing what you're looking for can help you prevent little problems from growing into big costly ones.

To help homesellers deal with this issue before their homes are listed, a free report entitled "11 Things You Need to Know to Pass Your Home Inspection" has been compiled which explains the issues involved. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call 1-800-4679064and enter 2503. Courtesy of Real Estate Info San Diego,CA01057701.

Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently listed with other brokers. Copyright © 2014

‘Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 4

strawberries.

The Saturday Market is open from 9am to 1pm, located on Kalmia between Grand Avenue and Second Avenue. ••••• Sunday morning Evelyn and I headed for the Westside Cafe at 9th & Redwood in Escondido for the Early Bird Special. We each had the Belgian Waffle with one egg and two strips of bacon. $3.99. Hard to beat that price! They have three breakfast specials priced at $3.99, $4.99 and $5.99. Best breakfast deals we’ve found in

town. While having breakfast, look who shows up! Rorie Johnston, CEO of the Escondido Chamber of Commerce, along with her husband, Mark, and daughter “Peanut.” Rorie told us she and her family have come to Westside Cafe for breakfast many times. Always good to see good people. ••••• Speaking of food, restaurants, and the enjoyment of dining, I visited my favorite Professor of Tonsorial Talent, Ciro, of Unisex Salon, 410 W. Second Avenue, Escondido (they’re open on Sundays!) While have my locks trimmed Ciro suggested to me that The Paper ought to have a restaurant review section.

“Ciro,” sez me, “we’ve done restaurant reviews from time to time. We only review restaurants where the food and service is worthy of patronage of our readers. If folks read The Paper, they know where the good restaurants are. If we find a bad restaurant we simply don’t write about them. I don’t think that’s my role in life, to go out looking for a restaurant to slam.” Quite a talented man, this Ciro fella. As I write this I’m listening to his CD as he sings hits

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 8


The

Evelyn Madison The Social Butterfly Email Evelyn at:

thesocialbutterfly@cox.net

Dear Readers: The Escondido Humane Society has an over-abundance of small dogs at the present time; many Chihuahua mixes, etc. If you are looking for a special friend, check ‘em out! I have two Chihuahua mixes and love ‘em both! The Social Butterfly Orchid Society’s Sale Was Very Successful

The Palomar Orchid Society’s (POS) annual orchid auction, their largest fundraising event of the year, was held recently at Lake San Marcos and featured over 400 orchid plants.

Californians Support Housing for Veterans

Last week, California voters made clear that our veterans should be one of our state’s top priorities. By passing Proposition 41, the Veterans Housing and Prevention Homeless Bond, Californians established new affordable housing options for veterans.

Proposition 41 was placed on the ballot by legislation that I co-authored with my legislative colleagues. We identified that prior veterans bond money of 2008 had not been widely used. As the author of the original bill that established the 2008 proposition, I was proud to work to improve the veterans housing bond again this year.

Social Butterfly The Paper • Page 6 • June 12, 2014

Kathy Wellman of Carlsbad (left) and Marsha Solomon of Lake San Marcos, pose with plants won at the auction. The Society meets at the Lake Pavilion on the first Wednesday of the month from 6:30-9pm. Membership is open to anyone who loves orchids. For more info, visit the website at palomarorchid.org or POS on Facebook. Pictured are Kathy Wellman of Carlsbad (left) and Marsha Solomon of Lake San Marcos, posing with plants won at the auction. “As Time Goes By” – CSUSM’s Annual Gala on June 21st

“As Time Goes By” is the theme of this year’s California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) gala, hosted by President Haynes and the CSUSM Foundation Board. The event is scheduled from 6pm -11pm on Saturday, June 21, in the University Student

We modified how funding could be used to not only allow veterans to receive home loans but to also allow builders to earn loans for the construction of low-income rental housing for veterans. More than 65% of Californians supported Proposition 41 and agreed that all veterans deserve any housing aide we can provide through this bond money.

Every day, young men and women continue to courageously join our armed services, and I am grateful that California is working to support those who have selflessly served our country.

Senator Mark Wyland represents the people of the 38th Senate District, which includes Rancho Bernardo, Carlsbad, Oceanside, San Marcos, Escondido, and Vista.

Become a Subscriber! Delivered every Thursday to your Mailbox! Just call 760.747.7119 for subscription details.

The CSUSM campus was lit up in lights for the nearly 300 attendees of the 2013 gala.

Union Ballroom, 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road, San Marcos. At this unique event, guests will be whisked away to the glamorous world of Casablanca, inspired by the famous 1942 film starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, for dinner, dancing and entertainment. Each year hundreds of CSUSM friends and donors, regional business and civic leaders, alumni, faculty, students and staff attend the annual gala. Proceeds from the event support innovative research, student programming and the professional development of faculty. "Together we have made tremendous progress over the last decade,” said CSUSM Foundation Board Chairman. “We look forward to partnering with you to turn dreams into opportunities for the lives of our students and

The Assault on Business Continues

May 30 was a major milestone in Sacramento. It was the last day for bills to pass their “house of origin” and move on to the other house for final legislative approval. Assembly Bill 1897 (AB 1897), one of the bills that passed before the deadline, deserves special mention.

AB 1897 would create a joint civil liability between a business and a labor contractor hired by that business. The added liabilities for the business would include responsibility for the contractor’s failure to pay wages to workers employed by the contractor, and the failure to report and pay worker contributions such as personal income tax withholdings and worker’s compensation. In other words, AB 1897 would impose liabilities on innocent businesses by forc-

the future of our region."

Online registration is open. The public is invited to register to reserve a spot. Tickets to the gala are $250 per person, and sponsorships are currently available. For more information and ticket sales, visit: www.csusm.edu/gala. Team CWONC Participates in Walk MS

l-r: Beryl Price, Kathy Packard, Diane Modjeski, Jean Smithers & Kathy Michaels

Members of Contemporary

the GFWC Women of

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 7

ing them to pay twice for work if the company that actually employed the workers fails to meet all its obligations. This liability would be imposed even though the business exerted no control over any violations that may have occurred as a result of the malfeasance of the sub-contractor. AB 1897 would expand the threat of lawsuits against any business that employs contractors and would greatly increase the cost of doing business in California.

California’s unemployment rate stands at 7.8 percent, one of the nation’s highest. Unfortunately, if this bill becomes law, the state’s reputation for being unfriendly to business will be enhanced. Simply put, people will lose their jobs. This is the last thing we need as we try to recover from the Great Recession.


The Paper • Page 7 • June 12, 2014

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 6

North County (CWONC) participated in the annual Walk MS recently at LegolandCarlsbad. The Walk gave the community a chance to stand together, and raise funds to help people with multiple sclerosis. It’s not too late to help fund research, advocate for change, or help the National MS Society provide education and programs for those with MS and their families. Contemporary Women believe in this cause. If you would like to make a donation, go to http://www.nationalmssociety.org/Donate. For info about CWONC, visit the website at www.cwonc.org. Calendar Meetings/Events

DAR to Meet June 14th – The Santa Margarita Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), will meet on Saturday, June 14, at the El Camino Country Club, 3202 Vista Way, Oceanside, starting with a brunch at 9:30am, program and business meeting, the last before a

two month summer break. Sue Stehle, resident of Carlsbad and chapter member, will present a program “American Celebrations.” DAR is open to any female 18 years of age or older who is lineally descended from a patriot who aided in some way in America’s fight for independence in the Revolutionary War. Contact Linda at lramos1999@aol.com or http://santamargarita.californiadar.o rg.

EAP Events for June – Celebrate the talented and fun members of the EAP this month as each individual member’s style and technique is highlighted. Dress as your favorite artist at the reception for all exhibitions on Saturday, June 14, from 5:30-8pm. Also this month find “Driven to Distraction” w/PhotoArts Group, “Transitions” w/Melinda Finn, “a Special Journey” w/Marjorie Weaver, and “Nature Redefined” w/Marsha Boston. In the artist studios find the Escondido Library “Families for Literacy” as well as the “Hispanic Heritage Translation” project. The “EAP Members” Exhibition runs from June 13-July 5. Escondido Municipal Gallery is located at 262 E. Grand Avenue, Escondido. For information, contact Wendy Wilson, Executive Director.

‘Chuckles’ Cont. from Page 2

RHOIDS" INSTEAD OF "ASSTEROIDS"?

30. WHY IS IT CALLED TOURIST SEASON IF WE CAN'T SHOOT AT THEM?

31. WHY IS THERE AN EXPIRATION DATE ON SOUR CREAM?

32. IF YOU SPIN AN ORIENTAL PERSON IN A CIRCLE THREE TIMES, DO THEY BECOME DISORIENTED?

33. CAN AN ATHEIST GET INSURANCE AGAINST ACTS OF GOD?

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 13

‘Local News’ Cont. from Page 4

lion in bond debt. Roughly half consists of general obligation bonds, which are “backed by an unlimited property tax pledge,” as Moody’s puts it. The other half is backed by revenues.

Moody’s has downgraded both types of bonds. However unlikely, in a default a judge could conceivably raise taxes to secure half the debt, and sell hospitals and clinics until creditors were satisfied.

The numbers suggest this dire situation arose from construction of the Escondido hospital, which opened in 2012. The text of Proposition BB in 2004 described a $531 million hospital with 453 beds. Covert delivered a Palomar Medical Center costing $956 million with 288 beds, with room to expand to 390. Meanwhile, Sharp Healthcare built its Kearny Mesa hospital tower for $195 million with 334 beds.

The Paper has run three cover stories dealing with Mr. Covert, all of which were critical. Readers can find them at:

Kirk’s Column by Kirk Effinger

Can an Independent Candidate win?

Last week I gave my reasons for changing my voter registration to “No Party Preference” and hypothesized that voters like me, a growing portion of the electorate, really have little choice in who we can vote for. Despite the growing numbers, there’s little likelihood an independent candidate for any office would get elected.

The primary reason for this is the actions taken by the very parties so many of us are rushing to abandon.

I have friends and acquaintances who hold or have held office, as well as central committee members from both par-

‘Local News’ Cont. on Page 9

Marilyn Shea Attorney

ties, cite specific examples of themselves or others being threatened because they dared consider supporting someone who is either a member of an opposing party or an independent. A common thread is that, if they want the support of their political party—or at least stave off active campaigns to remove them from office—they must not deviate from their party’s dogma. This extends to simple candidate endorsements.

Historically Speaking by Tom Morrow

Woe betide any Republican or Democrat office holder who chooses to violate this rule, even for so-called non-partisan races.

Political parties exist for a variety of reasons. The simple fact, however, is that they principally derive their power from voters because it is so much easier for them to vote for people with whom they think they can identify because of their party’s endorsement, without having to do the heavy lifting of studying up on the candidates themselves. We all do it. I once ran for a so-called nonpartisan office and one of the most common questions I got when campaigning was, “Are you a Republican/Democrat?”

‘Kirk Effinger’ Cont. on Page 11

‘The Fox’ Had The British On The Run

During the Revolutionary War, the British were perplexed and confused by a new style of combat: guerilla warfare. At the heart of what the British called “ungentlemanly” combat was South Carolinian farmerturned-military officer Francis Marion.

Serving with the Continental Army as a South Carolina militia officer, he was a persistent adversary of the British in South Carolina. He is considered the father of modern guerrilla warfare, and is credited in the lineage of the United

States Army Rangers. He is known in history as the “Swamp Fox.”

In 1775, Marion was commissioned a captain in the 2nd South Carolina Regiment under the command of William Moultrie. He rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel. Marion became known for his leadership abilities and was sent to join the command of Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates just before the Battle of Camden. Gates was less than impressed and promptly sent Marion to take command of the Williamsburg militia in Virginia. Thinking Marion would be kept out of the way, Gates assigned him to scouting missions. Marion showed himself to be an able leader of irregular militiamen and ruthless tactics in terrorizing of British loyalists.

Unlike George Washington’s Continental troops, “Marion's Men,” as they were known, served without pay, supplied their own horses, arms and often their food.

Marion rarely committed his men to a frontal attack style of warfare, but repeatedly surprised larger bodies of Loyalists or British regulars

‘Tom Morrow’ Cont. on Page 10


The Paper • Page 8 • June 12, 2014

Tiny Tots Tennis anyone?

At this Wednesday’s City Council meeting there will be final discussion and approval on the General Operating Budget for 2014/15. Included in it will be the Tiny Tots program, which is supposedly $20,000 “short” of recovering its cost. To make up that difference, Mayor Abed has said there needs to be an “adjustment” in the fees for what most agree is an excellent pre-K educational program for some of the City’s “tiny” residents. I have learned from parents of Tiny Tot students that this program fills an important community need for those who are not poor, not well off — working middle class folks who want to give their kids a good start in education. This is a program conservative Councilwoman Marie Waldron regularly praised, noting that teachers knew which kids had gone to Tiny Tots because they were so far ahead.

1. The Mayor has noted that San Marcos charges $15/day for their Tiny Tots but he has not explained why that bears any relationship to what Escondido

should charge. I certainly have not heard of legions of San Marcos residents ferrying their tots over to Escondido. If they were, I would assume the City would either charge them an appropriate non-resident fee (that’s when the $15/day would come into play) or simply make residence in Escondido a prerequisite to enrollment. What we charge for services is supposed to be based upon OUR costs, not any other city’s. Once we reach Full Cost Recovery we cannot, in fact, raise the fees any further — no matter what they are elsewhere.

2. Tennis in Escondido continues to be free for regular play — for both residents and non-residents. As I have written before, I don’t understand why everyday players – most of them full grown adults with money in their pockets and purses — are not required to pay to play. (When I contacted the Director of Community Services late last year, she responded in part by writing I cannot tell you why there are no fees charged [for tennis], but you have my assurance that I will ask and consider your suggestion. Most interesting! Our budget season has now begun and it is a perfect time for us to review these matters and prepare the changes for Council consideration.) I cannot break out the numbers for Tennis in the Recreation budget, but if it collected more fees I would

expect that to pay part of the overhead for Rec which should lower the amount other Rec programs have to pay.

If fees for tennis are not possible, I have one other suggestion.

3. Kid-tennis The Recreation Department could start holding Tiny Tots classes on the City tennis courts, which would certainly reduce their facility and utility charges. Of course that would probably require that the kids spend at least a little time actually playing tennis — or maybe just learning to count using tennis balls. Because once you teach them that you get to five by counting love, 15, 30, 40, game with a deuce thrown in now and then, you’ll have to start all over teaching them how to actually count to ten.

‘Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 5

from the 50’s and 60’s.

Ciro, owner of Unisex Salon, Escondido

Ciro has been a professional singer (and a good one), a chef, a hair stylist, and has also worked in real estate. There’s a photo in his salon of when he was on the Merv Griffin television show. He cut Roger Moore’s hair and also sang . . . drawing praise from both Griffin and Moore . . . and, most important, the audience. A lot of other photos as well of other stars from tv and the movies. He once had his salon in Beverly Hills and would regularly see the top names in show biz.

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 9


The Paper • Page 9 • June 12, 2014

Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 8

Congrats to CPA Richard King of San Marcos. He has earned the Certified Tax Coach Designation

‘Tears and Tributes’ Cont. from Page 3

Lamers (1960) explain that, in some tribes, the wrapped body was set in a tree or on a manmade platform. Among Dakota Indians, "at the end of this period of air burial, it was given earth burial" (p. 687).

Although the cremation rate continues to climb (10 percent in 1960, 24 percent in 1998, and 40 percent in 2010), earth burial of casketed remains continues to be the most common form of final disposition in the United States, accounting for about 65 percent of all dispositions. Hawaii, Nevada, and Washington have cremation rates over 50 percent, There are two categories of ceremonies that mark the death of a loved one: a funeral service, in which the body of the decedent is present, generally in a casket; and a memorial service, in which the corpse is not present because it is not available (e.g., lost at sea, destroyed in a

fire, missing) or because it has been cremated.

The social functions of a funeral include: (1) public recognition that a death has occurred; (2) a framework to provide support to those most affected by the death; and (3) a socially accepted way of body disposal. Other functions include: allowing survivors to say good-bye; affirming the worth of one's relationship with the person who died; allowing people to search for meaning in life and death; reinforcing the fact of death in all our lives; and establishing an ongoing helping relationship among mourners. Involvement with funeral rituals may also help with adjusting to the loss, and a funeral can help the community of survivors acknowledge their own mortality while providing social meaning to the passing of a life.

‘Tears and Tributes’ Cont. on Page 12

He is one of just 200 tax professionals who has completed the American Institute for Certified Tax Coaches’ training academy leading to the Certified Tax Coach designation.

“Taxpayers who really want to beat the IRS can’t wait for their accountant to work magic with a stack of receipts on April 15,” says King“They need a plan for taking advantage of every deduction, credit, loophole, and strategy allowed. That’s what this training is all about, getting the best for our clients.” ••••• OOPS! OOP! A double OOPS to The Paper for attributing an

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 11

‘Local News’ Cont. from Page <None>

“Mr. Mike’s Traveling Miracle Medicine Show” http://www.thecommunitypaper.com/archive/2007/12_20/in dex.php

The Covert Agenda: Polansky vs. Covert http://www.thecommunitypaper.com/archive/2008/07_03/in dex.php

A Covert Operation http://www.thecommunitypaper.com/archive/2008/03_20/in dex.php

Bruce Krider, former Chair and present member of the board says of Covert: “Michael is a mixed bag. If you can tolerate his personality, you can expect extra ordinary results. So I would say that the people of north county should be glad he was here. I am not saying he was without his faults but

‘Local News’ Cont. on Page 10


The Paper • Page 10 • June 12, 2014

‘Tom Morrow’ Cont. from Page 7

with quick surprise attacks and equally quick withdrawal from the field. In other words, his tactics were ambush-style “hit and run,” befuddling the British.

The British especially hated Marion and made repeated efforts to neutralize his force, but Marion's intelligence-gathering was excellent, whereas that of the British was poor, due to the overwhelming patriot loyalty of the populace in the Williamsburg area.

In November 1780, the British had their own “head-hunter” in Col. Banastre Tarleton, who was sent to capture or kill Marion; Tarleton found it no easy task in finding the "old swamp fox." Marion eluded him by traveling along swamp paths. It was Tarleton who gave Marion the moniker when, after unsuccessfully pursuing Marion's troops for over 26 miles through a swamp. Tarleton gave up and swore "… as for this damned old fox, the Devil himself could not catch him."

Once Marion had shown his ability at guerrilla warfare, making himself a serious nuisance to the British, South Carolina Gov. John Rutledge commissioned him a brigadier general of his state’s militia.

In January 1782, Marion left the fighting when he was elected to a new South Carolina State Assembly. Later that year, the British withdrew their garrison from Charleston and the war was brought to an end by the Treaty of Paris. Marion is one of those characters in history who is surrounded by controversy. Many of his exploits have been exaggerated. His legend was helped along by a popular 1959 Walt Disney TV series, “The Swamp Fox,” starring Leslie Nielsen. In 2000, actor Mel Gibson starred in “The Patriot,” whose character was based on Marion’s legend. But when studying the legend of “The Swamp Fox,” consider the words of legendary film director John Ford: “If given the choice between filming truth or legend, choose the legend, it’s always more interesting.”

Subscribe to The Paper $30 for six months $60 for one year Call 760.747.7119

‘Local News’ Cont. from Page 9

the truth is most people will never appreciate what he did.

Krider goes on to say: “At the end of the eleven years, he has turned a couple of sleepy town average hospitals into some award winning Mayo system hospitals and I can say hospitals that Mayo is proud to have in their program.

Of course, I don't need to talk about the new facility but it is a pretty incredible place. Not perfect in a few ways but perfect would have cost more and we couldn't afford perfect.

He also organized the physician groups and aligned them with the hospital system. That's not an easy thing...”

All parties seem to agree, however, that given the debt burden and a small cash position that will be left behind by Covert, that the incoming administrator will be faced with a frightening task. DUI Enforcement Results Escondido

On Tuesday night, June 3rd, officers from the Escondido Police Department participated in a DUI Saturation Patrol. Officers assigned to this detail made 18 traffic stops and conducted seven Field Sobriety Tests. During the evening, two drivers were arrested for DUI, and two drivers were cited for being unlicensed or having a suspended license. Two vehicle passengers were arrested for felony possession of a controlled substance. Six vehicles were impounded and eight citations were issued.

Beaux is the pet of the week at your Rancho Coastal Humane Society. He’s a 1 year old, 55 pound, Treeing Walker Coonhound.

Beaux is active and playful and full of puppy energy. He likes to follow his hound nose in search of new adventures. When he barks, it sounds like he’s saying his name. Beaux! He was transferred from an animal shelter in Mississippi through the FOCAS program.

The $145 adoption fee for Beaux includes medical exam, vaccinations, neuter, and microchip. Find your best friend at Rancho Coastal Humane Society at 389 Requeza Street in Encinitas or log on to SDpets.org. Call 760-7536413 for more information or to sponsor a pet until it’s adopted. Kennels and Cattery open 11 AM to 5 PM Wednesday through Monday.

The Pastor Says . . .

Last summer, almost 400 elementary and pre-school aged children experienced Kids Camp together with over 150 counselors and staff. The kids are still talking about it!

Funding for this program was provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

For Advertising Information or to subscribe, Call (760) 747-7119

Harrison is a 3-year-old neutered male pit bull mix, ID 77894. Harrison isn't just a beautiful dog – he has a great personality, too. He loves to chase tennis balls and play with his squeaky toys, and he already knows basic commands like sit and down. He's a big favorite at EHS and has been voted "Top Dog" (volunteer favorite) in four of the past five weeks by the volunteers who work with him. Because of his size and energy level, he would probably be best with older children or adults only. Harrison is available for adoption at the Escondido Humane Society, 3450 E. Valley Parkway. His $25 adoption fee in June includes neuter, microchip and vet exam. For more information, call (760) 888-2247 or log on to www.escondidohumanesociety.org. Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week.

Our goal is to make Sunday morning the best hour of the week for each child who attends one of New Song’s eight worship experiences. Kids Camp takes it to a whole new level. Pastor Hal Seed, New Song Community Church, Oceanside The Best Week of a Child’s Summer

Parents look for enriching experiences for their children every summer. This is why New Song Community Church works so hard to make our annual Kids Camp (8:30am to noon, July 14-18) the best week of the year for every family involved. Kids Camp revolves around groups of kids, huddled with an enthusiastic counselor, learning sports, games and crafts, enjoying songs, and delving into the Bible.

We issue an invitation to every school-aged child in Oceanside to participate every year. Since our goal is to extend God’s love, we try hard to target families who are not already attending a church somewhere else. If that’s you, I hope you’ll consider this your warm invitation to join us for a great week.

This year’s Camp includes sports options for flag football, soccer, basketball, cheerleading, crafts, drama, karate, cooking, choir, ballet, gymnastics, and volleyball. The Camp WILL fill up, so if you’re interested, I encourage you to register today athttp://www.newsongchurch.com/ministries/chil dren/kids-camp-2014.html


A Weekly Message from the Mayor of Your Community published in the belief that it is important for elected leaders to communicate with their constituents and that constituents have a means of hearing from their elected leaders.

Escondido • Mayor Sam Abed Movies in the Park Start June 28

Looking for some inexpensive family fun this summer? Then you won’t want to miss “Movies in the Park”. This summer you can enjoy beautiful summer evenings in Grape Day Park while catching outdoor movies that are perfect for the whole family. The fun begins at 7:00 p.m. with a variety of children’s activities, as well as a snack bar. The movies will begin at dusk.

Movie schedule: June 28 - Frozen July 12 M o n s t e r s University July 26 The Lego Movie August 9 Despicable Me 2

All children must be accompanied by an adult. Families are encouraged to bring low backed chairs or blanket, a sweater, and flashlight.

“Movies in the Park” is sponsored by the Escondido History Center and the City of Escondido Recreation Division. For more information visit grapedaypark.org or call 760743-8207.

Vista • Mayor Judy Ritter Broadway’s Best Under the Stars!

V i s t a ’ s

Moonlight Productions summer season is here and offers a perfect mix of fun and entertaining shows. The Broadway musicals are presented June through October in the beautiful outdoor Moonlight Amphitheatre in Brengle Terrace Park.

The season’s productions include: Monty Python’s Spamalot (June 11-28) which tells the story of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table on their quest for the Holy Grail in the irreverent signature style of Monty Python. The cherished Disney film, Mary

Poppins (July 16-Aug 2) has been reimagined into a spectacular new musical. Henry Higgins and Eliza Doolittle have been vying for our hearts – and each other’s - since 1956 when the musical My Fair Lady (August 13-30) debuted on Broadway. Based on the hit film and the incredible true story that inspired Catch Me If You Can (Sept. 10-27), this splashy new Broadway musical tells the story of Frank Abagnale, who runs away from home in search of the glamorous life. Frank successfully poses as a pilot, doctor, and a lawyer – living the high life before he catches the attention of the FBI. The Moonlight offers two types of seating, lawn and reserved, and information is online at moonlightstage.com or by calling 760.724.2110.

San Marcos • Mayor Jim Desmond City Enhances Map Gallery

The City of San Marcos is pleased to announce that its mapping information available online now includes a PDF map gallery, an interactive map gallery and links to the City’s interactive mapping application. Maps available in the new interactive gallery are also cross-compatible so residents can enjoy viewing them on mobile devices.

Oceanside • Mayor Jim Wood New Face Coming to TCMC

Tri-City Medical Center (TCMC)has served our community for more than half a century and is a Gold Seal approved, full-service, acutecare hospital with over 500 physicians practicing in 60 specialties. It has become the county’s leader in robotic and minimally invasive surgical technologies, and a nationwide destination for hip preservation surgery. With so much happening at this great organization, strong leadership is needed and has been found! Just recently Tri-City Medical Center

‘Kirk Effinger’ Cont. from Page 7

As we all know, the San Pasqual High School moniker is ‘the Eagles,’ not “the Saints.”

Parties seem to have become more dogmatic in no small part because the candidate selection process is run by people inside the system who rose to their positions largely because they accepted their party’s view of things without question. It is rare that outside the box thinking sees the light of day in such an environment.

So, true confession time . . . The Paper goofed as well, by not checking the source of the editorial/graphics goof. (And we get paid for it . . . the kids don’t.) ••••• The peripatetic (that means ‘always on the move’) Carrie Clevers, longtime member of the San Marcos Kiwanis Club, tells me they are holding their

Explaining the office was nonpartisan meant nothing.

13th annual Flag Retirement Ceremony this Saturday, June 14th, at 6:30 pm at Walnut Grove Park in San Marcos.

If you have flags you wish to retire, bring them to this ceremony. There is no charge. It is a family friendly program with patriotic songs, readings and audience participation in a dignified retirement ceremony for

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 13

With a goal of providing timely and accurate geographic resources, the City’s Geographic Information Systems (GIS) program is responsible for the maintenance and distribution of geographic data and offers several different ways to access mapping information about our community and City services.

For more information about San Marcos maps or general To view the new maps, please GIS inquiries, please contact visit www.san- techsupport@san-marcos.net.

‘Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 9

editing error to San Pasqual High School and its Yearbook when, in fact, it, the editing error, should have been attribued to San Pasqual Union. See image above right:

marcos.net/maps.

While a member of the Republican Party, I was subjected to an endless stream of fundraising pleas essentially telling me the world was going to hell in a hand basket because of the Democratic Party, and push-polls that to

announced hiring Tim Moran as its new Chief Executive Officer after conducting a nationwide executive search. On June 23, this experienced senior healthcare executive, with more than 35 years of leadership experience and a successful track record serving as Chief Executive Officer, President and Administrator for hospitals in several states, will take the helm of TCMC. Even the Tri-City Healthcare District’s Board of Directors feel that the extensive strategy and operations experience that Tim will bring to the organization will benefit the community in the best possible way. So be on the lookout for this newest professional face and wish him well in his new duties!

the untrained eye look as though the party wanted my input, but in actuality were merely a tool to indoctrinate. Democrats do the same thing. So, does an aspiring independent candidate for office—any office—have much of a chance to get elected? I have no idea but, logic tells me the only way they would is by outworking and outspending—by a lot— their party-affiliated rivals. As distasteful as it might seem to most (including me), the only way for independent, largely moderate voters to have a say in our current political environment is, in my view, to organize into something that resembles our own “party.” I hope some day an army of independent candidates prove me wrong.


The Paper • Page 12 • June 12, 2014

Paul & Nome Van Middlesworth, The Computer Factory

www.computerfactorysanmarcos.com

Why Are We Still Here?!

Where has everybody gone? In August The Computer Factory will be nineteen years old. In that time we’ve seen at least a half dozen major North County computer specialty stores come and go (Computer Warehouse, PC Club, Comp USA, Good Guys, Circuit City, Computer Geeks). Oh Sure there are still stores that sell PCs like Fry’s, Best Buy, Staples, Costco and Wal-Mart but they aren’t really computer specialists. They sell “cookie cutter” boxed PCs as a small part of their retail business and most don’t even try to offer computer service. Those that do, like Best Buy’s “Geek Squad,” don’t do it very well.

We’ve also witnessed the coming and going of dozens of small independent PC builders like Datel, AMC and Doc Micro.

‘Tears and Tributes’ Cont. from Page 9

Some people may benefit more from funeral services, others from memorial services. It may be the contents of the service— rather than the presence of the body—that affects attendees.

A new twist on attending a funeral or memorial service has been made possible by the Internet. In a 2000 Washington Post article, Dan Eggen described the funeral service of a seventy-seven-year old woman in Scottsdale, Arizona, "attended" by over twenty people who watched it over the Internet from the East Coast, many of them elderly relatives who could not make the trip" Obituaries continue to notify the community of a death and convey the impact of someone's life and death for the family and community

A 1995 study reported that half the people responsible for final arrangements of a deceased loved one had no idea what the final costs would be before they met with the funeral director. Despite this lack of knowledge, a lot of money is at stake. The mean cost of final arrangements, the study found, was $6,500 (a range of less than $200 to over $14,000).

In North San Diego County

These were computer specialists offering the same kind of services that we do; now they’re gone. Indeed there are far fewer independent PC specialists here in North County today than there were a decade ago. That seems strange when you consider the fact that the population of North County, and especially San Marcos has blossomed over the past two decades. Certainly there are far more PCs in use today and business and home applications have expanded dramatically. More than ever there is a need for professional help when components fail, malware appears, applications and operating systems become corrupt, networks stop working and the Internet disappears. Business and home PC buyers also often need some professional help in selecting the right combination of features and functions for their particular applications. Big box retail sales clerks simply don’t have a clue.

have always been blessed with an excellent staff. Julian has been with us since the year before we opened this business. As a technician and as a man there are none finer. Raunel, our “road guy” started as an apprentice in his sophomore year at San Marcos High fifteen years ago. He has a bigger fan club than Justin Beiber. Christian has been our main PC builder and notebook set-up man for the past four years. Christian is also our go-to guy for notebook repair. Of course my life and business partner, Nome, is a huge part of the business. Not only is she a fine technician in her own right, she also happens to be the best listener and sweetest person God ever made.

have always felt it was our job to help our customers make the best choices. We do this by answering their questions and providing them the information they need to optimize their own decisions. We use our expertise to help our customers make cost effective decisions that fit their particular needs. We never try to sell.

town funeral that is special.

touch with families long after the funeral service has passed.

The other part is approach. We

Our regular business and home clients know all this but if you have not met us yet, give us a call or stop in. We’re definitely “old school” and “small town.” If you like the chrome and glass ambiance of the big box stores with their army of polite, uniformed sales clerks, you probably won’t like us. We dress funny and scratch a lot.

With all this opportunity around, why have so many of the small independent PC specialist simply left the business? We really don’t know. At The Computer Factory we do four times the service business and build three times as many PCs as we did ten years ago. We don’t know why the other PC specialty businesses couldn’t make it but we can guess that it was a combination of their approach to the business and our good luck. The good luck has been that we

there remain only a few family owned and operated funeral homes. California Funeral Alternatives, owned by Richard and Marcia Jungas, with offices in Escondido and Poway, being one of them. Alhiser-Comer, Escondido, being another, and Allen Brothers Mortuary of both San Marcos and Vista being another. The other funeral homes are corporately owned and operated.

It has been our experience that family owned and operated funeral homes have a closer connection the community and may, in fact, even know the decedent and its family whereas corporate funeral homes don’t seem to have that same community connection.

I can remember several family funerals in small towns where the funeral director knew the family; he would always knew exactly what to say or do at the service. Often he would gather with the family and remember the departed, sometimes sharing a tear . . . sometimes sharing a chuckle as the decedent was recalled with affection.

Even today, small town funerals are a special occasion. Folks still come together to say goodbye and to remember. They do that in larger communtities as well, but there is just something about a small

Folks who live, or have lived, or have spent any time in small town communities will know what I’m talking about. Folks who’ve always lived in the big city won’t understand. You kinda had to be there.

We’ve come to know several of the North County Funeral Homes and their owners. Richard and Marcia Jungas are good friends. Richard is a fellow Kiwanian in our Hidden Valley Kiwanis Club of San Marcos.

We knew the late Bob Allen, then owner of Allen Brothers Mortuary in San Marcos and Vista. He was quite active in the community and helped build a fine funeral home. His daughter, Linda, inherited the business and his grandson, Shane, recently married, has become a counselor for the firm.

When Evelyn Madison’s husband, Gene, passed away 16 years ago, she used the services of Alhiser-Comer, in Escondido. Stuart Comer had acquired Alhiser Wilson in 1989, now retired, he stilll lives locally but his daughter Megan has become General Manager. Megan says, “We are sensitive to the needs of the community and we’re here to help including after-care. We stay in

Losing a loved one is never an easy experience. Looking back at what was, however, it is easy to appreciate what is, today.

Today’s funeral homes handle a lot of the difficult work necessary to be done when someone dies . . . and, yes, that includes paperwork. The paperwork demands of today are much more demanding than the funerals of a hundred years ago. We are fortunate to have well trained professionals in this field. When that time comes, as it inevitably will, it is somewhat comforting to know you can have professional assistance in seeing to it that your loved one is treated with compassion, dignity, and care.

That the funeral industry has become a big business is undeniable. But it is a business that fills an important need for every family at some point. We’ve come a long way from the original funeral services. Much better organized and easier on the family.

Need Legal Ads? Call us. The Paper 760.747.7119


SERVICE DIRECTORY The Paper

ATTORNEY

PERSONAL INJURY

Car Accidents • Slips and Falls

FREE CONSULTATION NO FEE TILL RECOVERY Workers Compensation Call Michael Majdick, 760.731.5737

Cleaning Services ANNA’S HOUSECLEANING • Free Estimate • Great References • 20 years Experience Call 760.738.7493

JUNE, THE CLEANING LADY “When all you want is a thoroughly clean house”

Many years experience Excellent Long Term References 760.735.5852 CABINETS

CONSTRUCTION

A.L.K. Construction Lic#: 554492 Since 1989 FREE ESTIMATES Senior Discounts Alan 858.774.4195

‘Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 11

flags that have proudly flown over homes and businesses in San Marcos.

Bring a lawn chair for seating and wave hello to a lot of your friends and neighbors. If you’d like more information, go to www.kiwanisclubofsanmarcos.org. ••••• A few paragraphs ago we were yakking about verious excellent eateries in the Escondido area. Lemme tell you about another great place . . . this one tucked away in a strip mall in San Marcos.

It’s a small/intimate restaurant with superb food, great, friendly owners, and unbelievable prices. This past Monday we popped in and picked up the daily special of Italian Meatball Sandwiches, small $4.95, large $5.95. We got the large order.

• Page 13 • June 12, 2014

COUNSELING

MY DOG ATE THE COUCH UPHOLSTERY STUDIO

RELATIONSHIP IN TROUBLE? Get the help you need now. COUNSELING | MEDIATION CLASSES:ANGER MANAGEMENT PARENTING | RELATIONSHIPS The Optimize Center 350 W. 9th Avenue, Suite 101 Escondido, CA 92025 760.747.8686

Electrical Services

Residential-Commercial Electrical Services 40 years experience Lic# C10/B-805779 Ron

760.294.2957 Home Care

Specializing in short and long term care assistance for all ages, with all activities of daily living, in your home. Drive to/from doctor appointments, new mommy assistance/infant care, Alzheimer patient care, general assistance before/after surgery, respite care for parents of disabled children, and much more. Rates start at $16.00 per hour for companion services.

Call 800.783.3127 or 760.424.2400 24 hours/day 7 days/week.

Home Maintenance Improvements

JOHN the GOLD HANDYMAN I am good at Painting, Plumbing, Dry Wall Repairs, Pergo, Carpet and Tile and lots more - 27 years experience. CALL NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATE 760.738.7493

HOME GENERAL MAINTENANCE REMODELS Bath/Kitchen Designs, Tile Installation, Electrical, Paint, Fences, Concrete. Lic#33509 760.484.1302 760.529.1239 The name? Casa de Angelo. They are located in the same strip mall as The Computer Factory.

The owners, Tony and his wife, Shafi, are from Persia. While in Persia Tony was an accountant. After emigrating to America he turned to food service and he and Shafi do it wonderfully well!

On Wednesdays we always try to get over there as their Spaghetti special is an amazing $2.75 with garlic bread; you can add a small salad for $2.00. I have not found better prices anywhere and the quality of the food and the people can’t be beat. Super, super people. You can call them at 760.471.9725 though the specials do not apply to delivery . . . only eat-in or takeout. Give ‘em a try. Tell ‘em The Man Abut Town sent you. (Not to be confused with Gro ucho.)

‘Man About Town’ Cont. on Page 14

UPHOLSTERY

PAINTING

Young's Painting Interior/Exterior

Popcorn Remover -Texture Wallpaper removal - Crown Molding Wooden Floor Installation - Mobile Home Painting - Low Price Guaranteed! Sorry! No Small Jobs!

(760) 716-3585

SOUNDPROOFING

Super Soundproofing Co •Expert Products •Floor Noise Barrier •Insulation Floor and Wall Tape •Vibration Isolation Tape

Call 760.752.3030 Free Advice www.soundproofing.org 455 East Carmel St. San Marcos, CA.

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 7

Member of USS Midway Museum to Speak at TERC Meeting – A member of the Speaker’s Bureau of the USS Midway Museum, Herb Zoehrer, will be the guest speaker for The Escondido Republican Club’s (TERC) meeting on Monday, June 16. The Midway Museum is celebrating its 10th Anniversary this year and Mr. Zoehrer will share the “inside story” of that success, how the Museum is becoming a San Diego community resource, and plans for the future of the Museum. The meeting will be held at Cocina del Charro restaurant, 890 W. Valley Parkway, Escondido. Check-in starts at 11:30am with the buffet luncheon at 11:45am; the meeting promptly at noon and concluding at 1pm. Reservations are necessary. Cost is $14/person. RSVP to 760.807.5827. For info about TERC, visit www.escondidorepublicanclub.com.

Humane Society Offering $25 Adult Dog and Cat Adoption Fees – The Escondido Humane Society is bursting at the seams with cats and dogs of all ages and sizes. Kennels are filling up fast, and the animals just keep coming. If you are ready for a new companion animal, you are urged to visit the shelter and connect with your perfect pet. The Humane Society is offering $25 adoptions for all adult dogs and cats, 6 months and older. The special will run through June 30. All dog and cat adoption fees include spay/neuter; microchip with lifetime registration; up-to-date vaccinations; vet exam at EHS; wellness exam; bag of food; discounts at local pet supply, grooming and boarding partners; and behavior support for lifetime of animal. Contact the Adoption Center at 3450 E. Valley Parkway, Escondido; open from 10am-5pm, seven days a week. For info, call 760.888.2247 or visit www.escondidohumanesociety.org.

Charity Wings Art & Craft Center Announces Now Open Tuesdays Until 8pm – The Charity Wings Art & Craft Center in San Marcos has announced their later hours on Tuesdays, during the summer months only. This is a place to gather, give back, and create. Also, a “Thank You” to everyone who came to support Charity Wings celebrate their one year anniversary! Visit our website to see more pictures and information about the party, info@charitywings.org.

3643 Grand Avenue #C San Marcos, CA. 92078 760.484.3058 eduvall2012@gmail.com CONTACT: ERIC DUVALL

Death Notices

Marilyn A. Loranger, 82, of Encinitas, CA., passed away on June 3rd, 2014.

Arrangements by California Funeral Alternatives Escondido and Poway

S.M. Chamber June Events – Networking “Breakfast for Success” at the Broken Yolk, 101 S. Las Posas Road, Tuesday, June 17, 7:15am8:30am, special guest speaker on Customer Service; Fridays @4 at Hooters, 775 Center Drive (Nordahl Marketplace) on Friday, June 20, 46pm; a book signing on Tuesday, June 24, at 5:30pm at the Old California Coffee House; and the After Hours Business Mixer at the San Marcos Brewery & Grill, 1080 W. San Marcos Blvd., #280, (Restaurant Row) on Thursday, June 26, 5:307:15pm. Escondido Public Library Closed on June 18 for Software System Upgrade – All Escondido Public Library facilities will be closed to the public on Wednesday, June 18, for the installation of a new library catalog software system. The closure will be for one day only and includes the following locations: Main Library at 239 South Kalmia Street; Pioneer Room, the Library’s local history archive, located in the Mathes Community Center at 247 South Kalmia Street; Escondido Library Literacy Services Annex at 200 South Broadway; and Escondido Technology Center, located in the East Valley Community Center, at 2245 East Valley Parkway.

During the closure, Library users can visit library.escondido.org, to access eBooks, use online research tools, and view the calendar of events. Library users will be able to return materials to the Main Library during the closure, and fines will not be charged for items due on June 18, 2014. The Library will reopen for business as usual at 10:00am on Thursday, June 19. Loretta McKinney, Director of Library and Community Services said, “When the Library reopens, technology upgrades, such as text and email notifications, will be available and users will immediately notice and appreciate the fresh look and ease of use of the new catalog.” For more information, contact Cynthia Smith, Deputy City Librarian, at 760.839.4329. Cultivation Techniques Talk at Rare Fruit Growers Meeting – The California Rare Fruit Growers (CRFG) of North San Diego County will present a free evening event with Patrick Schumann on Friday, June 20, at 7pm in MiraCosta College’s Student Center, Room 3450. The New Mexico resident will speak on dry/arid region cultivation techniques. The North County Chapter of CRFG, a non-profit organization, holds education meetings once per month in Oceanside, and has a variety of educational and social events throughout the year. Meetings are open to all interested parties, and most events require membership which is $10/year. For more informa-

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. on Page 15


LEGALS

The Paper

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-013807

The name of the business: Sala Thai Massage, located at 1039 E. Vista Way, Vista, Ca. 92084, is hereby registered by the following: Phensri Phanlee and Mark Ernest Neumann 29107 Willows Landing Dr. Menifee, Ca. 92585 This business is conducted by a Married Couple. First day of business was n/a. /s/Mark Ernest Neumann This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/19/2014 5/22, 5/29, 6/05 & 6/12/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-013958

The name of the business: My Family Emergency Service, I.D. A House International, located at 3507 Caminito Sierra, Carlsbad, Ca. 92009, is hereby registered by the following: Leon Clenton Seabrooks, Sr. 3507 Caminito Sierra Carlsbad, Ca. 92009 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 3/15/1994. /s/Leon Clenton Seabrooks, Sr. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/20/2014 5/22, 5/29, 6/05 & 6/12/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-013414

The name of the business: Lulu’s Cleaning Service dba Ferte of San Diego, located at 3 Avenida Descanso, Oceanside, Ca. 92057, is hereby registered by the following: Eder Bernardino 3 Avenida Descanso Oceanside, Ca. 92057 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 4/20/14. /s/Eder Bernardino This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/13/2014 5/22, 5/29, 6/05 & 6/12/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-011630

The name of the business: New Leaf Wholesale Nursery, located at 2456 Foothill Drive, Vista, Ca. 92084-5809, is hereby registered by the following: Gerald D. Stewart 2456 Foothill Drive Vista, Ca. 92084-5809 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was April 1, 1978. /s/Gerlad D. Stewart, Proprietor This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 4/24/2014 5/22, 5/29, 6/05 & 6/12/2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2014-00009596-CU-PT-CTL

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Geovanni Leeper filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Geovanni Leeper to Proposed name Sirena Yasmine Pineda. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: June 20, 2014, 8:30a.m., Department 46. The address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, 220 W. Broadway, San Diego, CA. 92101. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 5/16/2014. /s/Lisa Schall, Judge of the Superior Court 5/22, 5/29, 6/5 & 6/12/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014179

The

name of the business: Allie Gray Beauty, located at 2055 Montiel Rd., Ste 109, San Marcos, Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Allison S. Gray 940 Bolex Way San Marcos, CA. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Allison S. Gray This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/21/2014 5/29, 6/5, 6/12 and 6/19/2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014417

The name of the business: Pretty in Paint, located at 1010A Arden Drive, Encinitas, CA. 92024, is hereby registered by the following: Jessica Amy Griffith 1010A Arden Drive Encinitas, CA.92024 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Jessica Amy Griffith, Owner This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/23/2014 5/29, 6/05, 6/12 & 6/19/2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2014-00015266-CU-PT-NC

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Victor Octavio Castellanos filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Victor Octavio Castellanos Gijon to Proposed name Victor Octavio Velasco. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 8, 2014, 8:30a.m., Department 26. The address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, North County Division, 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 5/14/2014. /s/K. Michael Kirkman, Judge of the Superior Court 5/22, 5/29, 6/5 & 6/12/2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014471

The

name of the business: PhilAsian Market, located at 853 W. San Marcos Blvd., San Mracos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Adulia G. and Brad T. Burleigh 626 Rickenbacker Ave. San Diego, Ca. 92154 This business is conducted by a Married Couple. First day of business was 10 May 2014. /s/Brad T. Burleigh This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/23/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014880

The

name of the business: Elegant Embroidery, located at 2654 Royal Crest Dr., Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: Deborah Tharp 2654 Royal Crest Dr. Escondido, Ca. 92025 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Deborah Tharp This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/30/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-012991

The name of the business: Aperture Photo Booth SD, located at 489 Almond Road, San Marcos, CA. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: My Ta Tran and Vinh Hien Tran 489 Almond Road San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by a Married Couple. First day of business was n/a. /s/My Ta Tran, Owner This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/08/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-015234

The

name of the business: Z ‘Motors, located at 789 Poppy Rd., San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Ridge Diversified Holdings, LLC 789 Poppy Rd. San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/James R. Ridge, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 6/03/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014536

The name of the business: Perks Coffee House, Perks, located at 803 Twin Oaks #110, San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: Mark and Deborah Wankier 504 Calle Capistrano San Marcos, CA. 92069 This business is conducted by a Married Couple. First day of business was n/a. /s/Mark Wankier This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/27/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

• Page 14 • June 12, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2014-00016729-CU-PT-NC

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Joseph A. Busuego and Ana Luz A. Busuego filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Michael Andrew Angeles Busuego to Proposed name Michael Andrew Angeles Busuego . THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 22, 2014, 8:30a.m., Department 26. The address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, North County Division, 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista Ca. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 5/27/2014. /s/K. Michael Kirkman, Judge of the Superior Court 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 & 6/26/2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2014-00017270-CU-PT-NC

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Oluwole A. Coker and Diana V. Coker filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Damilola Louise Coker to Proposed name Lola Louise Coker . THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 22, 2014, 8:30a.m., Department 26. The address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, North County Division, 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista Ca. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 5/30/2014. /s/K. Michael Kirkman, Judge of the Superior Court 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 & 6/26/2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-015068

The name of the business: Organic Soil Works, located at 26961 Cougar Pass Road, Escondido, Ca. 92026, is hereby registered by the following: Daniel P. Loftus 26961 Cougar Pass Road Escondido, Ca. 92026 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 3/01/2013. /s/Daniel P. Loftus, Founder This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 6/02/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014723

The name of the business: Toresco T.R.C., located at 1145 Industrial Ave., #H, Escondido, CA. 92029, is hereby registered by the following: Robert McKaskle 31314 Kira Place Valley Center, Ca. 92082 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Robert McKaskle, Owner This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/28/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-013882

The

name of the business: Prowess, located at 475 Taylor Drive, Oceanside, Ca. 92056, is hereby registered by the following: Elizabeth E. Dirk 475 Taylor Drive Oceanside, Ca. 92056 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Elizabeth E. Dirk, This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/19/2014 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 and 6/26/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014003

The name of the business: Ya Ting Imp & Exp, Zeyin Imp &{ Exp, located at 2305 Cobblestone Lane, Vista, Ca. 92081, is hereby registered by the following: Tao Yang 2305 Coblestone Ln. Vista, Ca. 92081 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was n/a. /s/Tao Yang This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/20/2014 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 and 7/03/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-015521

The name of the business: LDV Services, located at 1611-A South Melrose Dr., #374, Vista, CA. 92081, is hereby registered by the following: Luis Miguel Del Valle 1860 Timber Trail Vista, Ca. 92081 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 6/5/2014. /s/Luis Miguel Del Valle This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 6/05/2014 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 and 7/03/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014129

The

name of the business: All Merchant Group Distirbuting Company, AMG Distributing Company, located at 1263 Linda Vista Drive, San Marcos, Ca. 92078, is hereby registered by the following: All Merchant Services Group Inc. 1263 Linda Vista Dr. San Marcos, Ca. 92078 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/David Polanco, President This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/21/2014 5/29, 6/05, 6/12 & 6/19/2014

NOTICE OF INTENDED DECISION (Administrative)

The Planning Division Director of the City of San Marcos has considered and does intend to APPROVE Director’s Permit 13-036 on June 16, 2014. Project No.: P13-0048 Case No.: DP 13-036 Applicant: Socal Gymnastics Training Center Request: A Director’s Permit to allow the continued operation and 4,000 sq. ft. expansion of an existing youth gymnastics facility in the Light Industrial (LI) zone. Location of Property: 1740 La Costa Meadows Drive, Suite 300, more particularly described as: Parcel 4 of Parcel Map no. 16174, filed in the Office of the County of San Diego Recorder, State of California, together with that portion of vacated Sparrow Lane by Council Resolution 2004-6348 of City of San Marcos as file no. 20040520714 O.R. Assessor’s Parcel Number: 223-030-7600. NOTICE: Appeal rights are available. Any interested person may appeal the decision of the Planning Division Director, provided the appeal fee is paid and a written appeal is submitted to the Planning Division Secretary within ten (10) days (due no later than 5:30 PM on June 26, 2014). The Planning Commission shall hear the

‘Man About Town’ Cont. from Page 13

appeal within forty (40) days after the filing of such appeal. Appeal fees shall be paid upon submittal. Said appeal shall be in writing and specify where there was an error in the decision of the Planning Division Director. Contact the Planning Division at 760-744-1050, extension 3233. The City of San Marcos is committed to making its programs, services and activities accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you require accommodation to participate in any City program, service or activity, please contact the City Clerk’s office at 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos CA 92069, or call 760-744-1050, extension 3145. Further information about this notice can be obtained from Sean del Solar, Assistant Planner, at 760-744-1050 extension 3233, or sdelsolar@san-marcos.net. Phil Scollick, City Clerk, City of San Marcos. PD: 6/12/14. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-015437

The name of the business: Nordahl Pet Veterinary Animal Hospital, San Marcos, Escondido, locatd at 630 Nordahl Rd., #L, San Marcos, ‘Ca. 92069, is hereby registered by the following: Nordahl Pet Veterinary Corporation 630 Nordahl Rd #L San Marcos, Ca. 92069 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was 6/4/2014. /s/Won Jyuk Chun, CEO This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 6/04/2014 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 and 7/03/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-014228

The name of the business: Floral Designs by Bethany, located at 19743 Cool Valley Rd., Valley Center, Ca. 92082, is hereby registered by the following: Bethany Lara 26858 Canberra St. Menifee CA. 92584 This business is conducted by an individual. First day of business was 6/1/13. /s/Bethany Lara This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 5/22/2014 5/29, 6/05, 6/12 & 6/19/2014.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING (Planning Commission) The Planning Commission of the City of San Marcos will hold the following public hearing in the City Council Chambers, 1 Civic Center Drive at 6:30 p.m., Thursday, June 26, 2014. Case No: P13-0065: TA 13001 (Text Amendment) Application of: City of San Marcos Request: Proposed Modification to the San Marcos Municipal Code that would supersede and replace Chapter 20.465 of the SMMC in its entirety, as well as affected sections of SMMC Title 20, and the Addendum to the General Plan Program FEIR that was prepared for the update to SMMC Chapter 20.465. Location of Property: Citywide If you challenge the action(s) listed in this notice (or any of them) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues

Evelyn Madison, who besides being our Social Butterfly also serves as President of the Escondido Women’s Club, is all a-flutter and giggly over the Tea Committee, co-chaired by Carola Anderson and Rita Christie, having raised a gross of $3,401 last week during a tea at which attendees watched a play, “Tea with Eleanor Roosevelt,” with Annette Hubbell portraying Eleanor Roosevelt. True

you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the hearing body at, or prior to, the public hearing. The City of San Marcos is committed to making its programs, services and activities accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you require accommodation to participate in this public hearing or any other City program, service or activity, please contact the City Clerk’s office at 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos, CA 92069, or call (760) 744-1050. Appeal rights are available. Contact the Planning Division at Extension 3233. Phil Scollick, City Clerk, City of San Marcos. PD: 6/12/14. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-015685

The name of the business: TitleMax, located at 765 N. Escondido Blvd., Escondido, Ca. 92025, is hereby registered by the following: TitleMax of California, Inc. 15 Bull Street, Suite 200 Savannah, GA. 31401 This business is conducted by a corporation. First day of business was n/a. /s/Michael Kelleher, Assistant Secretary This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 6/06/2014 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 and 7/03/2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT #2014-015126

The name of the business: Casa Bonita Real Estate Group, located at 664 E. Vista Way, #A, Vista, Ca. 92084, is hereby registered by the following: C. G. Gonazalez Investments LLC 1553 Summercreek Ct. Vista, CA. 92084 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. First day of business was n/a. /s/Carmen Gonzalez, Manager This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr., County Clerk/Recorder of San Diego County 6/02/2014 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 and 7/03/2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME 37-2014-00017890-CU-PT-NC

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Susan Lynn Kubika filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Susan Lynn Kubika to Proposed name Susan Lynn Debban. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objections that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 22, 2014, 8:30a.m., Department 26. The address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, North County Division, 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA. 92081. A copy of the Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Marcos News Reporter, dba, The Paper, 845 W. San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos, Ca. 92078. Dated 6/4/2014. /s/K. Michael Kirkman, Judge of the Superior Court 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 & 7/04/2014

trouper that she is, Ms. Hubbell continued her role in spite of an accident where she fell off the stage, prior to the performance. It was only later that it was learned she had suffered a minor concussion. The audience thoroughly enjoyed the play, the tea, and the gross receipts. Evelyn’s not sure of the expenses but she doesn’t think they’re all that high so the Women’s Club will likely wind up with a tidy net profit. Well done!


The Mighty Mojo Page The Paper • Page 15 • June 12, 2014

Bar & Grill

Groceries - Discounted

Great Food and Entertainment 316 W. Mission #115 On Facebook: Comstock Bar and Grill

Bargain Market 125 SOUTH SANTA FE RD. SAN MARCOS,CA

760.746.6188

Chair Repair

Chiropractor The Joint

$19* per adjustment!

North County’s Newest Most Exciting Chiropractic Office! 1250-A Auto Parkway, Escondido

442.999.6464

Walk-ins welcome!

*(offer valid for first visit only. Lower cost plans available)

Peripheral Neuropathy Treatment Three Treatments - If, after three treatments you decide this treatment is not for you . . .you walk away paying nothing! State of the Art Chiropractic Treatment for Neuropathy Dr. Gary Loos Call 760.761.4436

Coins & Loans

760.745.4816 Escondido Coin & Loan, Inc. 241 E. Grand Avenue

www.escondidocoin.com Coins•Gold•Silver•Vintage Watches

Computer Repair

Fix@4Less

NOW OPEN! GROCERY OUTLET

Equestrian

Horse Training, Riding Lessons Will Travel Escondido Area Jerry Evans 760.747.7148

Legal Advice

John Smylie Law Offices 3643 Grand Avenue, Suite A San Marcos, CA. 92078 Probate and Business Law

Mattresses

Escondido Mattress Serving North County for 59 years! Randy Taylor

1281 Simpson Way - Escondido, Ca.

760.745.5336

760.480.1082

TriColor Insurance

We’ve Moved - New Location 723 S. Escondido Blvd Instant Auto Registration Same Day Suspension Lifted M-F Free SR22/Filing

760.291.0215

Lic#: 0803847 Ins. 60805 - Reg.

‘Social Butterfly’ Cont. from Page 13

tion and a map to the location, visit http://nc.crfgsandiego.org.

“Hello Summer” Social Mixer in Carlsbad – On Saturday, June 21, from 5:30-8:30pm the “Hello Summer” Social Mixer, for singles 35+, will enjoy a live band, happy hour drinks and appetizers, mix/mingle while watching planes land, and free parking (or $1 for 4 hours) at The Landings, 2198 Palomar Airport Road, Carlsbad. Cost is $8/person. For more info, visit www.SimplyTheBestSingles.com. Self Care Health Faire on Saturday June 21 - The 2014 Self Care Health Fair will be held Saturday, June 28, from 2pm-6pm. This free event will take place at 1600 Buena Vista Drive, Vista.

Real Estate

Donna Davis

Escondido Pharmacy and Home Health Care Always great prices and Service! Medical Supplies, Wheelchairs, Walkers 909 E. Valley Parkway

There will be Holistic Crafts and Practitioners, Wellness Workshops, Self Health Information and Demos and fun family activities. Sponsored by Enjoy the Moment Massage and Life Connection Magazine. Interested vendors email: missocean70@gmail.com

Daughters of Union Veterans Meeting – The Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War (DUVCW) 1861-1865, Nancy Hanks Lincoln Tent #5 will meet at 11am on Tuesday, June 24, in the Veterans memorial War Building at Zoo Drive and Park Boulevard in Balboa Park. For info, call 619.475.0153.

OASIS North County to Explore Escondido History – Did you know that California’s first millionaire died in Escondido? Explore the history of Escondido at the History Center in Grape day Park and discover many more interesting facts about the city. The tour is on Wednesday, June 25, from 9:30am-11:30am, and the fee is $8/person. This docent-led tour begins in the 1888 Santa Fe Depot, tour the Victorian Country Home, a blacksmith demonstration at Bandy Blacksmith Shop, and visit exhibits in what was the City’s first public library, which is also the History Center’s office, located at 321 N. Broadway in Grape Day Park. Tour size is limited. Register online at www.sandiegooasis.org or call OASIS at 760.796.6020.

Mike’s BBQ

Retirement Community

760.518.5612

www.donnadavisrealtor.com The finest compliment I can ever receive is a referral from my friends and clients.

STOP SMOKING! STOP SMOKING IN 1 HOUR GUARANTEED! Personalized Hypnosis Makes It Easy!

Absolutely Smoke Free - 1 Hour! 760.500.1456 DRE#00893014

No Excuses! We Get It Sold!

760.727.4248

760.510.2015 DMV

www.birdmanmediaservices.com

Mesquite Wood Grill Mouth Watering Brisket Burgers - Ribs - Sports Bar 1356 W Valley Pkwy, Escondido (760) 746-4444

Photo/Video Services 1531 W. Mission Rd. Suite F San Marcos, CA. 760.744.2800 VHS to DVD $10.95 every day

760.753.7907 Your local GEICO Office San Marcos

Medical Supplies/Pharmacy

mailtokenju@gmail.com

Restaurants

Insurance

277 S Rancho Santa Fe Rd San Marcos, CA 92078 b/t Cherokee St & 8th St Ken Xiu (or Ju)

Photo Video Services

Dr. Ginger Marable, PhD, CHt

$100 Discount with this Ad!

www.AbsolutelySmokeFree.com

760.420.2279 For free consultation:

Tree Trimming Restaurants

Westside Cafe

Just great food and great service! 912 S. Redwood St. Escondido

760.739.9265

Pegah’s Kitchen

Unfamiliar Name - Very Familiar Food! 576 E. Mission, San Marcos 760.744.3710 Corner of Mission & Mulberry Senior Service Council to Sponsor Suicide Prevention Program – On Friday, June 27, after the Senior Service Council, Escondido (SSCE) general membership meeting, they are sponsoring an informative training program “QPR: Question, Persuade and Refer;” three steps anyone can learn to help prevent suicide. Just like CPR, QPR is an emergency response to someone in crisis and can save lives. It is the most widely taught gatekeeper training program in the U.S. The program is open to the public and will begin at 11am, with refreshments served at the close of the program, approximately 12:30pm. RSVP by June 15 to 760.480.0611. The Senior Service Council is located at 728 N. Broadway.

Jazz Ensemble to Perform in Oceanside - On Saturday, June 28, the next concert of Oceanside Theatre Company's Music Series at The Brooks Theatre, 217 N. Coast Hwy, Oceanside, will be Virtuoso jazz pianist, Mikan Zlatkovich and his jazz ensemble JazzMikan Trio+. Zlatkovich has been described as a "master interpreter with an exquisite touch." Doors open at 6:30pm for "happy hour;" show starts at 7:30pm. All seats $15 individually, or $13 for a group of 10 or more (group tickets are sold at the door). Individual tickets can be purchased at www.oceansidetheatre.org. On the Go Program Expanded

760.402.5578 • 619.906.9097 CA. LIc: #973661 C61/D49

Wigs & Hairpieces Elite Wigs

105 West Grand Ave. Wigs, Hair Replacements, Cleaning & Styling Tuesday - Friday 10:30-5pm Sat 10am - 2pm

760.747.3030

Rides & Smiles to Rancho Bernardo - Jewish Family Service (JFS) of San Diego’s On the Go program has recently expanded its Rides & Smiles operations to five additional zip codes in the San Diego region, 92014, 92029, 92108, 92116, and 92123. The zip codes include those of Mission Valley, Rancho Bernardo and La Jolla. Rides & Smiles is one of three components of On the Go: Transportation Solutions for Older Adults, an award-winning program that provides transportation for older adults to necessary medical appointments, grocery shopping, and other life necessities in the North County Inland area, as well as Northern and Eastern San Diego. Other components include shuttle service, organized excursions, and taxi scrip.

Rides & Smiles is the largest volunteer-based transportation service in San Diego County. On the Go will hold a “Join Our Driving Force” to recruit new volunteers on Wednesday, July 9, at the JFS – Turk Family Center, Room 101. Three times are available for this allin-one orientation and training: 8am-9:30am (Room 318); 10:30am12noon; and 2pm-3:30pm. Pre-registration is required at www.jfssd.org/otgvolapp. For additional information about On the Go: Transportation Solutions for Older Adults, call 858.637.3050 or visit www.jfssd.org/onthego.


The Paper • Page 16 • June 12, 2014

ILY FAM AND D E OWN RATED E P O E SINC ! 7 8 19

Unfamiliar name... ...but very familiar food!

L GET THE 2ND MEA * FOR 99 CENTS!er value!

BUY

20% TWO DRINKS +

*2nd Meal must be of equal or

ONE MEAL

OFF

less

=

*M-F Only! Offer expires 6/30/14.

* Regular Menu

*M-F Only! Offer expires 6/30/14.

M - F Only!

Pegah’s

Kitchen

760.744.3710

576 E Mission, San Marcos Corner of Mission & Mulberry

Expires 6/30/124

Expires June 30, 2014

The Paper 061214  

The Paper 06.12.14

The Paper 061214  

The Paper 06.12.14