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Health

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 2

Fitness

Jan. 17–30, 2014

Pg.21

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Hillcrest • University Heights • Normal Heights • North Park • South Park • Golden Hill • Kensington • Talmadge

Old Town • Mission Hills • Bankers Hill

‘We must dare to be great’

➤➤ NEWS P. 5

Gloria lays out his vision for creating an even finer city

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tary bases and representatives from several international communities, many from Tijuana. A host of children from local communities then also became part of the annual event, with the JROTC Color Guard of Madison High School presenting the colors, Girl Scout Troop #3854 leading the Pledge of Allegiance and Melanie Jiminez singing the National Anthem, before Lightner returned to announce the interim mayor’s arrival. While introducing the gentleman who as Council President was automatically tapped — by virtue of the City Charter — to take the reigns last August 30

At the corner of Dale and Ash Streets in Golden Hill, city officials gathered on Friday, Jan. 10 alongside a small horde of city interns to begin the City’s first effort to evaluate the condition of its roughly estimated 5,000 miles of public sidewalks. Expected to take a year to complete, the project will be carried out by engineering students from San Diego State and UC San Diego interning with the City of San Diego, who will use handheld GPS devices configured to enable rapid data entry. The assessment is estimated to cost $1 million, which is the same amount the city spends each year on new and missing sidewalks. This undertaking signifies a new, proactive approach to the city’s sidewalks, said Councilmember and Infrastructure Committee chair Mark Kersey. City administration receives an average of 200 sidewalk complaints per month, according to a December report to the Infrastructure Committee. With each sidewalk repair costing approximately $2,500, the funding required to address these concerns is considerable. “This is going to be an ongoing discussion we’ll have this year, which we kind of started at my committee in December,” Kersey said. But the real problem is a liability issue. Current city laws put the burden of fixing a sidewalk on its adjacent property owner, but if someone trips on one of these neglected walkways,

see SOTC, page 8

see Sidewalks, page 4

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San Diego begins an assessment of its 5,000 miles of public sidewalks

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Index Opinion…………………6 Briefs……………………7 Classifieds…………..18 Calendar………………21 Health & Fitness..……22

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805 remarks, In her opening Lightner introduced her city 15 council colleagues seated behind CEDAR her; Kevin Faulconer, Myrtle In his first — and presumably Cole, Mark Kersey, Lori Zapf, last — State of the City address, Scott Sherman, David Alvarez Interim Mayor Todd Gloria deliv94 Emerald. She also GOLDEN and Marti ered a passionate, inclusive and HILL ambitious speech, as introduced city staff members admittedly chartered on Wednesday, January also seated on stage; City Attor15, to a94standing room only crowd ney Jan Goldsmith, COO Scott Chadwick, Independent Budget at Downtown’s Balboa Theatre. 805 Analyst Andrea Tevlin and City People from all walks of life IMPERIAL Clerk Elizabeth Maland, who attended the public event and also gave the invocation. the loud buzz throughout the 15 One by one, each councilhistoric theater while everyone member then took a turn at the socialized and found their seats podium to assist in introducing was noticeably positive. the many distinguished guests Council President Pro Tem present for the address, which Sherri Lightner called the “speincluded past and present elected cial meeting of the San Diego officials, leaders of the local miliCity Council to order” at 6 p.m. BALBOA PARK MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSE

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The first sidewalk walk begins

How tall? Hillcrest building heights dominate community’s discussion of the Uptown Community Plan Update By Dave Schwab SDUN Reporter And Hutton Marshall SDUN Editor

As the City of San Diego continues its multiyear process of updating the community plans of Uptown, North Park, and Golden Hill, part of the progression is to receive input from the planning groups of the respective communities. The planning boards, in turn, rely on input from the community and local organizations to form their recommendations. In Uptown, the Hillcrest Town Council (HTC) and the Uptown Planners Community Planning Group (Uptown Planners) have continued to bear down on the issue of building heights, which has become a focal point of contention surrounding Uptown’s plan update.

The two groups show that much of the community still battles with the question: Should the community opt for more — or less — flexibility in building height in the years to come? At its January meeting, Uptown Planners chose to delay finalizing their stance on that question until February, but HTC voted in strong favor of lower height limits at its Jan. 14 meeting. After considerable debate, Hillcrest residents at January’s town council meeting voted down an amended motion that would have allowed heights to be considered an additional 15 feet above the current 50 and 65-foot levels. The audience vote was nine in favor of, 16 opposed to considering greater building heights. Residents in the HTC area then voted overwhelmingly in favor of a motion made by the City Council and its steering committee. That motion was to allow a 50-foot ministerial (by right without challenge) and 65-foot discretionary (community review) height limit in Hillcrest commercial areas. The motion called for building heights to be less on Fourth Avenue between Robinson Avenue and Upas Street, where limits would be reduced to 32-foot ministerial and 50 feet with discretionary review. The vote was 21 in favor, three opposed and five abstentions. HTC Chair Luke Terpstra said he opposed

the amendment to allow the possibility of a greater 15-foot limit because “we want to keep it basic, don’t want to confuse it with discretionary levels. The City doesn’t operate that way. Uptown Planners doesn’t operate that way.” Several others spoke at the meeting at length about their opposition to higher height limits. “We’ve seen a lot of fights over too-tall buildings over the years and I don’t think we want to do that for the next 20 years,” said Tom Mullaney, president of Friends of San Diego. “We’re fighting for reasonable heights. I think 50- and 65-foot limits are pretty standard, and don’t see any benefit to going taller.” A couple of Hillcrest residents disagreed with Mullaney, noting Little Italy has allowed higher and more flexible building height limits, arguing that Little Italy’s height flexibility contributed to its greater economic growth compared to Hillcrest. The week prior, the public voiced their input in the same room at a special meeting of the Uptown Planners, where they held their first formal discussion on building height. Local residents gave their highly varied takes on whether building heights in diverse Uptown neighborhoods, which includes Hillcrest, ought to be

see Plan Update, page 17


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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

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America’s Finest City Improv nestles into North Park By Dave Schwab SDUN Reporter

You never forget your lines. That’s the best thing about improvisational comedy, quipped Kat Brown, America’s Finest City Improv’s publicist, when asked if doing comedy off-the-cuff is tough.

“Improv is all about responding to things.” — Tommy Galan

often delirious style of humor. The first thing you need to know about improv is that it’s not stand-up. Individuals don’t parade up to the mic doing pre-written or rehearsed monologues. “It’s all improvised theater,” Lisewski noted. “Every show is the opening — and closing — night, both the premiere and the final curtain.” In improvisational comedy, two or more comedians work together as a team, feeding off one another. “When you step out on the stage, with no idea what is going to happen and just let it flow, and you succeed — you feel you could take on anything,” Brown said. America’s Finest City is also distinguished in that its practitioners teach as well as perform improvisational comedy. One of the troop’s instructors, Jacob Bruce, an adjunct professor of acting at University of San Diego, said doing improv is “the same thing as music. You kind of

“What we tr y to do is not be witty, but tr y and bring to light truth in ever yday situations — put the light in that,” agreed Amy Lisewski, head of the improv club, which debuted just a couple of months ago at North Park’s Lafayette Hotel at 2223 El Cajon Blvd. “Usually, that resonates in people best,” Lisewski added. Brown and Lisewski are two of a few dozen “improvisites” for whom the hotel has become the new home for their — Comedienne Peggy Walkush free-form,

“There is something totally satisfying and magical about the improv concept of ‘yes and —’ I love creating silliness on stage by simply trusting and supporting my scene partners.”

“Improv is like jazz for actors, it all depends on the moment and the people. And Finest City has great people. And sometimes, great moments.” — Joe Huppert

A member of Finest City Improv performs at its Silent Majority show on Jan. 4 (Courtesy Finest City Improv) either do it or you don’t. We just make you better at it.” Insisting “everybody is uniquely funny in their own way,” Bruce said the trick for a lot of people is to “figure out what their thing is.” Behind the scenes at a recent America’s Finest City Improv Saturday night show at Lafayette Hotel, improvisers are “bouncing” off the walls — and each other — getting warmed up for their performance. They’re

dancing. They’re singing. They’re rhyming. Above all, they’re getting in tune with one another, ensuring their various styles mesh together so when it’s time go on they can act — and react. On stage that night, Lisewski and colleague George Caleodis, down from L.A., do a skit about love, athletics, relationships and having children. Then improv crew “Minor Suspension,” do a comedic song named “That’s What We Do,” poking fun at the male “mystique.” And the audience on this and every night at an America’s Finest City Improv performance appreciates the effort, skill and teamwork of the professional comedy troop for whom

“play” is a serious business. Improv is also a great way to connect with other noted practitioners Jason Casey and Erica Clermont. “It’s the best place to meet new friends,” Casey said. “Two years ago when I moved here, I had one friend in San Diego. Now ... I have 39. Improv is a great way to meet exciting and openminded new people.” “Improv has enriched my life so much,” Clermont said. ”Wonderful people who accept me for who I am, and I get to play with them on a regular basis. Improv makes me happy and brings so much joy to my life.” America’s Finest City Improv is a tongue-in-cheek performance group whose mission it is to develop and showcase the best comedy improv in the region. The group offers classes in improv and team building workshops in the style of Second City. Internships are also available. For more information visit facebook.com/FinestCityImprov or lafayettehotelsd.com.u

“In a world of so much control and perfection desired, improv gives us permission to just show up, let go and be creative. It’s unique, one-of-a-kind theater every time.” — Shawn Roop


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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

NEWS

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SHOP Hillcrest winners announced

Councilmember Mark Kersey, Interim Mayor Todd Gloria, city officials and engineering students on the first day of the San Diego sidewalk assessment (Photo by Hutton Marshall)

FROM PAGE 1

SIDEWALKS it’s the City that can be held liable. Because of this, most sidewalks have been left in disrepair, with both the City and the residents unsatisfied with the result. $100,000 is budgeted each year through the Street Division’s operating budget for its “50/50 Sidewalk Cost Share Program,” which helps residents repair their deteriorated sidewalks by providing half the cost of doing so. However, participation in the program has been next to nonexistent. Only 13 property owners used it from its inception in 2011 until 2013. At the time of the report to the infrastructure committee last month, 14 people were currently participating in the program, and 87 others had submitted requests for participation. While this serves as an incen-

tive for residents to initiate the process of repairing sidewalks near their home, the City will look at new policies to address sidewalk maintenance itself. Currently, it will only repair a sidewalk that presents a clear safety liability. “If there’s a truly egregious situation where it’s an obvious trip and fall hazard, the City will come out and patch it,” Kersey said. The City Council recently voted to issue a $120 million infrastructure bond, but none of this money can be used for sidewalk maintenance, since it isn’t technically considered capital infrastructure said Kersey. Because of this, the city will need to create a clear financial pathway that allocates money toward sidewalk maintenance. “It’s a quality of life issue is what it comes down to,” Kersey said. “If you’ve got a busted up sidewalk in front of your house, you want it fixed.”u

(l-r) HBA Marketing and Communications Program Manager Megan Gamwell, SHOP Hillcrest Winner Paul Donaldson, and Artist and Craftsman Manager Tracy Ann Ball (Photo by Hutton Marshall) By Hutton Marshall SDUN Editor

This season’s SHOP Hillcrest was the shopping extravaganza’s biggest year to date. Put on by the Hillcrest Business Association, the event capitalizes on holiday shopping fervor during November and December by drawing San Diegans to Hillcrest businesses with the allure of a $2,000 raffle prize.

Shoppers get entered into the raffle two times whenever they spend more than $20 at one of the participating businesses or restaurants. Thousands of raffle tickets were collected from the 44 businesses from Nov. 25 to Dec. 24. This year’s SHOP Hillcrest winner was La Mesa resident Paul Donaldson, a regular at Artist and Craftsman Supply, where he acquired his winning ticket. He

received approximately $2,000 in gift cards to businesses participating in the community. Donaldson, an artist, said he makes the drive from La Mesa to Hillcrest regularly because of the diverse selection at Artist and Craftsman Supply. “That’s the great thing about [Artist and Craftsman], they’ve got materials for sculpting, painting, sketching — everything,” said Donaldson, who taught art for 42 years in Orange County. Donaldson’s victory also came about through bizarrely fortunate circumstances. His was the first name pulled, but because of an illegible phone number, the HBA pulled a second name, which was again Donaldson, who only had four tickets in the drawing. With thousands of names entered into the drawing, the odds of his name being pulled twice is a small fraction of a percent. This being the biggest year of SHOP Hillcrest yet, the HBA attracted enough businesses to award a second place prize as well. That winner was Gene Foster, who purchased her winning raffle ticket at Babette Schwartz. She'll receive $1,000 in gift cards to participating Hillcrest businesses. This year’s SHOP Hillcrest participating businesses were Adam & Eve, Artist and Craftsman Supply, Babette Schwartz, Bamboo Lounge, Baras Foundation, Beauty by Dolly, Beauty Lounge, Bombay Cuisine, Buffalo Exchange, Canine Lodge and Spa, Cody’s Home + Gift, Cohabitat, Commonwealth, Crest Café, Crypt, Detour Salon, Edith Ernestine, Establish, Fig Tree Cafe, Giola’s Room, Harlequin Boutique, Heat Bar & Kitchen, Hillcrest Ace Hardware, Jet Rhys, Kasi – Fresh, Liv Bar Juice & Smoothies, Local Habit, Lotus Thai, Luna Grill, Mint Footwear, MO's Universe (Urban MO's, Baja Betty's, Gossip Grill, and Hillcrest Brewing Company), Obelisk, Pretty Please, Pappaleccos, Pure Healing Now, Revivals, Snooze, i-mobile Sprint, The Wine Lover, T-Deli, Urban Shave, Uptown Tavern, Which Wich and Urban Optiks. For more information on the HBA, SHOP Hillcrest or similar events, visit fabuloushillcrest.com and hillcrestbia.org.u


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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

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Pappalecco’s delicious fundraiser By Vince Meehan SDUN Reporter

A fundraising event was held at Pappalecco Italian Restaurant in Hillcrest on Sunday, Jan. 12, in support of Animate A Way, a local nonprofit organization empowering young victims of violence through filmmaking. Pappalecco CEO Francesco Bucci teamed up with Italian winemaker Piergiorgio Castellani to host a night of great food and wine to generate financial support for the organization. The Animate A Way foundation was created to raise awareness among teens about topics such as dating violence and abuse by holding after-school classes at Montgomery Middle School in Linda Vista. Their unique approach encourages students to express themselves by creating short films using stop-motion animation techniques. These films will be screened at the Museum of Photographic Arts (MOPA) in Balboa Park this June. “By utilizing stop-motion animation, we can get the students to open up about issues they may have encountered, in a fun and non-threatening way,” said founder and Development Director Karla Duarte. “It can help put the gravity of the situation aside so we can start a positive dialog, and let the healing process begin.” Event hosts Bucci and Castellani served a generous spread of Italian fare to the eager crowd in a relaxed, family-style setting. The two grew up together in Pisa,

(l to r) Winemaker Piergiorgio Castellani, Pappalecco’s Francesco Bucci, Animate A Way’s Steven Topham and Karla Duarte. (Photo by Vincent Meehan)

Castellani's Luca Forte shows off his company's pride: two bottles of Sangiovese (Photo by Vincent Meehan)

(l to r) Bill DeRisi, Ruth DeRisi, Vefral Miles, Espy Duarte, at Pappalecco's Animate A Way fundraiser (Photo by Vincent Meehan) Italy, on the southern edge of the famous wine-producing region of Tuscany. Wine is in the blood

of the Castellani family, which has been producing wine for more than 300 years. They began

distributing their wine in the U.S in 1903. It was Castellani who convinced Bucci to open his first restaurant in San Diego’s Little Italy seven years ago after touring several California locations. Three years later, he expanded by opening his Hillcrest location. The two men have remained close friends throughout the years, and Bucci serves Castellani wines at both his locations. “Piergiorgio [Castellani] took me up to Los Angeles and San Franscisco to scout locations for my restaurant, but when I came to San Diego I fell in love,” Bucci

said to the crowd at the fundraiser. “ I knew this would be the place, and here I am!” Many close friends and family members of Bucci attended the event, and he thanked them for their support. “There’s one thing that holds us all together, and that is passion!” Bucci declared. “Passion in food, passion in wine, and passion in art. That’s why I chose to support Animate A Way, I love the idea of using art to heal.” The event raised over $1,000 for the foundation. Benissimo! For more info on Animate A Way, go to animateaway.org.u


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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

OPINION

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3737 Fifth Ave. Suite 201 San Diego, CA 92103 (619) 519-7775 Twitter: @SD_UptownNews PUBLISHER David Mannis (619) 961-1951 david@sdcnn.com EDITOR Hutton Marshall (619) 961-1952 hutton@sdcnn.com ASSISTANT EDITOR Morgan M. Hurley (619) 961-1960 morgan@sdcnn.com REPORTERS & COLUMNISTS Charlene Baldridge Blake Beckcom Gwen Beckcom Logan Broyles “Dr. Ink” Dale Larabee Cynthia Robertson Frank Sabatini Jr. Dave Schwab Kevin Smead DIRECTOR OF SALES & MARKETING Mike Rosensteel (619) 961-1958 mike@sdcnn.com

Editorials

Building heights should reflect Change vs. No Change the community character of Uptown A debate is underway about Uptown building heights for our future. This debate will affect development for decades to come, via the new Uptown Community Plan. On one side are advocates for higher development in Uptown, especially on Washington, University, and Fourth, Fifth and Sixth avenues. On the other side — our side — are community residents supporting retaining Uptown as a livable community with thoughtfully determined heights. Our Uptown neighborhoods were first developed over 100 years ago, and retain an older ‘village’ feeling. Many of our residential and commercial streets are filled with interesting, vintage architecture, beloved landmarks and the ‘quirky’ places that define our community. Our neighborhoods are vibrant and livable. In fact, the American Planning Association named Hillcrest as one of the “Top Ten Great Neighborhoods” in America in 2007, along with San Francisco’s North Beach. And compared to Downtown and some areas, our residential and commercial areas are overwhelmingly lower-scale. That allows plenty of sunlight, ocean breezes and the “big sky,” which provides colorful sunsets. These characteristics provide the sense of place that defines our Uptown neighborhoods. It is this community character that draws most residents to live here, both as homeowners and as renters. While not every structure is worth saving, the basic fabric of our community is worthy of protection. New development should complement and blend with our home community and not detract from it. Therefore, building height limits should reflect and protect the character of our neighborhoods, while allowing reasonable new development to enhance our community. That means 30-foot buildings and in some cases 35 to 65-foot buildings. The majority of residents also want new building heights to reflect the lower-scale character of Uptown so our community does not transform into another Downtown. Residents also want adequate infrastructure, pedestrian and bike facilities, green space and adequate parking, and to retain as many quality older homes and buildings as possible. However, some building advocates want to push the height limits skyward, in the hopes of encouraging massive new development in Uptown. Their arguments are misplaced. For example, one building advocate has asserted that there is almost

nothing worth saving in Hillcrest and the entire area should be scrapped and re-developed. Some claim that the Uptown neighborhoods are “stagnant” and crumbling, that only an injection of new development can save us from decline, and that building height limits are standing in the way. They have claimed that the Interim Height Ordinance (IHO), which put in place temporary building height limits of 50 and 65 feet in areas where 150 or 200 feet were allowed, has killed development in Uptown. Most Uptown residents would strongly disagree with the premise that we need to “start over” or that our neighborhoods are in decline. The recent recession, not the IHO, slowed development across Uptown and all of San Diego. Nevertheless, well-received projects have been built within the IHO area, including 3940 Fifth Ave. (Snooze and D bar restaurants) and the Mission Hills Vons project. A lot of building can be constructed within 50 or 65 feet. The argument has also been made that taller buildings are necessary to provide more affordable housing for middle-class residents. This argument flies in the face of reality: Basic economics dictate that taller residential buildings, which are more expensive to build due to the structural requirements to support such height, house mostly luxury units and cannot “pencil out” for affordable housing. (A few residential towers built in the early 1970s for retirees were built with large subsidies that are no longer available.) Affordable housing in Uptown is housing that complements our current building heights. Building heights are a big part of the character of any community. There is no way to insert tall projects next to lower scale buildings without forever altering community character, as well as blocking sunlight for surrounding areas. A wave of excessively tall buildings would forever change our Uptown neighborhoods and destroy the character we cherish. Reasonable height limits will not stand in the way of development; they will protect our community and enhance the standard of living for us and future generations. Join us in protecting the character of Uptown by supporting reasonable height limits in Uptown. —Barry Hager, board member and cofounder, Mission Hills Heritage —Luke Terpstra, Chairman, Hillcrest Town Councilu

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Sloan Gomez (619) 961-1954 sloan@sdcnn.com Jerry Kulpa (619) 691-1964 jerry@sdcnn.com Lisa Peterson (619) 691-1956 lisa@sdcnn.com Yana Shayne (619) 961-1963 yana@sdcnn.com ART DIRECTOR Rebecah Corbin (619) 961-1961 becah@sdcnn.com

The Vibra Hospital and the Village Hillcrest Shopping Complex on Fifth Ave. (Photo by Sharon Gehl) Should Uptown change or not change in the future? That’s the debate the Uptown Planners, a local advisory board to the City of San Diego, has been having for the last few years as members consider how to update the City’s Uptown Community Plan. So far, those who want no change in Uptown have been winning the debate. That’s why the City of San Diego is proposing reducing density and therefore reducing the amount of new jobs and housing near the Hillcrest hospital complex, shopping areas in Hillcrest, University Heights, and Mission Hills, and near public transit routes. This proposal is contrary to the City’s Master Plan that calls for a “City of Villages” strategy to encourage growth near village centers and public transit as a way to create more vibrant communities, and reduce environmental damage from automobile traffic and urban sprawl. The changes we’ve seen in Uptown since the current community plan took effect in 1989 have made the community better. Projects like the Vibra Hospital and Village Hillcrest Shopping Complex on Fifth Ave. have added jobs, stores, restaurants, and much needed public parking in the core of Hillcrest. We’ve also added housing near our village centers and public transit. There is no reason to stop making changes that have worked. Surprisingly, the current plan regulations, despite all of the changes we’ve seen, have not produced much growth in population when compared to the City of San Diego as a whole. According to SANDAG statistics, City population grew at an average annual rate of .9 percent from 1990 to 2012, while Uptown grew only .3 percent annually; from 35,167 in 1990 to 37,855 in 2012. That doesn’t mean that people don’t want to live here, just that the housing supply hasn’t kept up with growing demand. The increase in the cost of renting and buying in Uptown shows that people do want to live here. Because current city regulations for Uptown have resulted in little actual growth, proposals to reduce the amount of new housing and jobs near our village centers would likely lower the future annual growth

see Editorial, page 8

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT wVincent Meehan (619) 961-1961 vincent@sdcnn.com ACCOUNTING Priscilla Umel-Martinez (619) 961-1962 accounting@sdcnn.com WEB DESIGNER Kim Espinoza espinozawebworks.com kim@kespinoza.com OPINIONS/LETTERS San Diego Uptown News encourages letters to the editor and guest editorials. Please email both to hutton@sdcnn.com. Include phone number and address for verification. We reserve the right to edit letters for brevity and accuracy. Letters and guest editorials do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or staff. SUBMISSIONS/NEWS TIPS Press releases and story ideas are welcomed. Send press releases, tips, photos or story ideas to hutton@sdcnn.com. DISTRIBUTION San Diego Uptown News is distributed free, every other Friday. COPYRIGHT 2013. All rights are reserved. Printed in the United States of America.


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UptownBriefs $120 MILL INFRASTRUCTURE BOND PASSED BY CITY COUNCIL On Tuesday, Jan. 14, the City Council unanimously approved the issuance of a $120 million deferred capital bond to go toward addressing the backlog of the city’s capital improvement projects, which in 2011 was estimated to be approximately $898 million. Many suspect that number is much larger today. More than $43 million from the bond is earmarked for street resurfacing, and a significant amount of funding is dedicated to new capital projects, such as the San Ysidro Library and Fire Station 5 in Hillcrest. “San Diegans deserve neighborhoods with smooth roads, sound facilities, and water and sewer pipes that don’t break,” Interim Mayor Todd Gloria stated in a press release. “This bond will help us achieve that goal.” This lease-revenue bond is the largest of several issued throughout the last few years as part of a $500 million, five-year bonding program previously approved by the City Council. “This type of funding is appropriate at this time while construction costs and interest rates are still competitive,” Councilmember and Infrastructure Committee Chair Mark Kersey stated in a press release. He said other funding options will have to be used in conjunction with the bond program in order to address the full scope of the city’s infrastructure funding needs. THE SALON OF ART IN MISSION HILLS HOSTS ITS 10TH ANNUAL ART SHOW The art school of Concetta Antico hosts its 10th annual art show on Jan. 25, showcasing the work of approximately 30 students. Said to be a medical marvel, Antico is a tetrachromat, which means she has a fourth color vision receptor in her eyes. She has received significant media attention for this, as it allows her to perceive 100 million different colors (100 times more than what is visible to the average human). While tetrachromacy is a recently discovered phenomenon in humans, it’s been estimated that two to three percent of women could be affected by it. Regardless of the condition’s prevalence, Antico attributes her insight into color theory to her “supervision.” Antico has taught at her Mission Hills art studio for more than two decades, instructing more than 12,000 students to unlock their creativity through painting. The work of her current students will be on display from 6 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 25 at The Salon of Art, 1920 Fort Stockton Dr., Suite A in Mission Hills. MAYBEBOP VISITS ALBERT EINSTEIN ACADEMIES On Tuesday, Jan. 21, awardwinning German a cappella group MAYBEBOP will lead a workshop of 70 fifth graders at Albert Einstein Academies (AEA) to teach students about a cappella, and to share with them the diversity of Germany’s culture through two concerts. German TV station ZDF will also be on campus to film footage for its documentary on MAYBEBOP’s U.S. tour. “This is the first time we are bringing this type of immersive, cultural experience to our students,” said Birgit Schafer, AEA’s German programs coordinator, in a press release. “We are honored

to have MAYBEBOP join us and showcase the German language that our students are exposed to every day at school along with their passion for music and creative expression.” While the MAYBEBOP’s first concert of the day will be open only to AEA students, its second performance at 5 p.m. will be open to parents and the public. Entrance is $10 per person. More information can be found aeacs.org.

April 22. The organizers, San Diego EarthWorks, have already planned for the 25th annual EarthFair for April 19, 2015 coinciding with the year of Balboa Park’s Centennial. San Diego EarthWorks encourages anyone interested in volunteering or becoming a vendor to email info12@earthdayweb.org or call 858-272-7370.

REDWOOD BRIDGE CLUB ANNOUNCES ART SHOW WINNERS After its inaugural December art show, Balboa Park’s Redwood Bridge Club announced the art show’s democratically chosen winners, whose works received the most votes throughout their

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014 Club can be found at redwoodbridgeclub.blogspot.com.

REBRANDED MARDI GRAS ANNOUNCES NEW LOCATION The Hillcrest Business Association (HBA) and the GSDBA Charitable Foundation announced the Hillcrest Mardi Gras will take place on March 4 in its rebranded form as “Hillcrest Fat Tuesday.” The celebration will begin with a parade of floats beginning on Park Blvd., continuing down University Avenue and ending on Tenth Avenue, where the other festivities will take place. Originally created to raise money for college scholarships for LGBT students, this year the proceeds will be divided between HBA and the GSDBA Charitable Foundation, which will use the funds for LGBT scholarships that will be presented to students in conjunction with the HBA. For more info, visit hillcrestbia.org.

HILLCREST CLEAN T.E.A.M. HITS THE STREETS On Saturday, Jan. 18, the Hillcrest Clean T.E.A.M. (Together Everyone Achieves More) will host a Community Cleanup from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. to cleanup the Hillcrest neighborhood, and they invite all to volunteer an hour or two of their time to join in on the effort. Volunteers will receive a free, orange Hillcrest T.E.A.M. LOCAL HEALTH t-shirt. RefreshOFFICIALS URGE ments will also be SAN DIEGANS TO GET served. Volunteers FLU VACCINATION should meet at 200 As of Dec. 28, W. Arbor Drive at 357 flu cases have (l-r) Marian Zeldin, Mike and Anita, Participants in the Redwood the main hospital been reported this Bridge Club December Art Show (Courtesy Redwood Bridge Club) entrance. For more flu season, which is information, contact Zach Schlagel month on display. Lois Simmons, 50 percent more than the number or David Mier at 619-543-3665. the Redwood Bridge Club’s presiof cases reported this time last dent and contest organizer, won season, reported KPBS. Additionfirst place in the contest. Bella Hol- ally, more than 80 percent of those EARTHFAIR 2014 DATE ANNOUNCED lingsworth and Mark Smith won cases were identified to be the The 24th annual EarthFair will second and third place, respecH1N1 strain, or “swine flu,” which take place on April 27, and is now tively. Each month, the Redwood caused a worldwide pandemic in open for exhibitor and volunteer Bridge Club features works of art 2009. While there have been no registration. Billed as the world’s from a member of the community deaths in San Diego County, 10 largest free annual environmental people over the age of 65 have been fair, EarthFair attracts approximate- in their lounge. January’s featured artist is Marian Zeldin. More infor- hospitalized and taken to intensive ly 60,000 visitors each year, and mation about the Redwood Bridge care. County health officials urge is centered around Earth Day on

7

that everyone get vaccinated if they haven’t already, especially young adults, who are most susceptible to H1N1. Last year, 5,300 influenza cases were reported in San Diego County, as well as 65 fatalities, although H3N2 was the strain circulating then, which health officials say causes more servere infection than H1N1.

SAN DIEGO MAYORAL DEBATES SOLIDIFIED As the Feb. 11 runoff election date nears, councilmembers and mayoral hopefuls Kevin Faulconer and David Alvarez have agreed to participate in six debates from Jan. 15 to Jan. 31. Each will be broadcasted and moderated by a San Diego media outlet and will be cohosted by local community associations, although the organizations paired with the media outlets have yet to be finalized. The mayoral debate schedule is as follows: Jan. 17, 2:30 p.m. taping, broadcast time TBD: hosted by KUSI News (Channel 9, 51); Jan. 23, 6 p.m.: hosted by NBC 7 San Diego (Channel 7/39); Jan. 26, 9 p.m.: hosted by San Diego 6 the CW (Channel 6); Jan. 30, 11 a.m.: hosted by KFMB (760 AM and Channel 8); Jan. 31, 6 p.m.: hosted by Univision San Diego (Channel 17). The nine community associations in the process of partnering with a media host are Educate for the Future and the Cesar Chavez Service Clubs, Livable Streets Coalition, Mid-City Community Advocacy Network Youth Council, San Diego Center for the Blind, San Diego and Imperial Counties Labor Council, San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, San Diego Society of Professional Journalists, Senior Community Centers San Diego, and the Veterans Museum.u

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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

OPINION/NEWS

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FROM PAGE 6

EDITORIAL rate closer to zero. We actually need to increase the amount of new housing near jobs, public transit, and stores for the sake of the environment and to lower the cost of housing. More people living close enough to walk or bike to stores, restaurants and work, would mean less traffic and therefore less greenhouse gases. Those who are in favor of changes that accommodate normal growth and shifts in population need to get involved in the debate over the future of Uptown. The City hasn’t heard enough from the approximately 2,000 businesses who want more customers nearby, or from the owners of the more than 1,000 properties that may be reduced in value. Others who haven’t been heard from at all are environmentalists, builders and those who want to live here now or in the future, but will be kept out if the supply of housing isn’t allowed to increase. If you’re in favor of continuing change that would make Uptown better, tell our City Council member, Todd Gloria toddgloria@sandiego.gov and city planning staff, MPangilinan@sandiego.gov Then join the debate at the Uptown Planners meetings the first Tuesday of most months, at 6 pm. uptownplanners. org/home —Sharon Gehl, Mission Hills residentu

Dear California, I don’t know if I’ve ever told you, but you rock. I’m so grateful you didn’t cave to peer pressure and send Southern California that ridiculously, bitter cold weather that the rest of the country succumbed to, including Florida, the state that tends to go rogue in every election. I’m glad you had the sense and the coolness (pardon the pun) to rise above it, and thank you very

FROM PAGE 1

SOTC

when former mayor Bob Filner resigned, Lightner made it clear that she felt Gloria had been “the right person at the right time” to inherit the job. “With a clear vision for what our city needs, a firm hand on the wheel, a collaborative handson style and a dedicated team working to rebuild trust in our city government, this smart and selfless elected official graciously assumed the top executive position and engaged — engaged us all — in the recovery effort,” Lightner said. “He is more than our mayor. He is more than a councilmember or a City Council President. He is a true statesman,” she said. Lighter then asked those gathered to not only welcome Gloria, but thank him for leading the city these last four and a half months. And thank him they did, with a resounding standing ovation that lasted several minutes. With the complete City Council — including two may-

much for the mild temps we’ve been having. It’s been most agreeable, and just one of the reasons those of us who live here love you. The sunny, clear skies are a nice touch, by the way, and a great way to start a year. It makes up for nights when we’ve dipped into the 40s, not that I’m complaining, mind you. I like how you give us just enough brisk weather to make us want to turn on our gas fireplaces and pretend we live in a wintry climate. Heck, most of us consider 60 degrees another way of saying “just above freezing.” But we like it all the same, because it’s the one time of year we can don our sweaters and bring out the warm apparel — scarves, Ugg boots and shorts. Thankfully, you never make it so cold we get frostbite. Much appreciated. Yes, from the moment I arrived here from the east coast 20 years ago, I knew I was going to like you. I didn’t complain once about the water drought or the flooding and mudslides brought on by the rare torrential rain. No, I was just happy not to have thunderstorms anymore. Ditto for blizzards. Thanks to your savvy know-how, rarely does San Diego get inclement conditions. I mean, when you live here, who has to listen to the weather report, anyway? Not I, my fair-weather friend, for I can tell you what’s in store for tomorrow without checking anything: sunshine and one gorgeous day after another. So, California, I like you. I really like you. I know I could do worse. Like Florida. They’ve got humidity and alligators. Need I say more? And we’ve got temperate weather. Thanks again for that. Of course, the downside is I have to keep my legs shaven all year round. But honestly, I’m not complaining. A small price to pay for not having to shovel snow and scrape ice off my car. So why are we still talking? Let’s go catch some more rays. Surf’s up, baby! —Monica Medinau

oral candidates who will face-off for his job in a few short weeks — and other City of San Diego executives sitting behind him, Gloria kept his speech on point and on time. He did not spend much time on the circumstances surrounding his elevation to the mayorship, and never even mentioned his predecessor’s name. Instead he spoke of the greatness of San Diego now and in the future. Gloria started with three critical areas he said he identified last August, that he felt necessar y to get the city back on track; he also listed the many victories and accomplishments that have occurred during his short tenure in office. He laid out an ambitious plan for the city’s future, which as Council President and District Three Councilmember, he will still have a hand in once a new mayor is elected on Februar y 11. He described those three initial objectives as getting what he called the “machinery of government” working again in a timely, effective and efficient manner; restoring confidence in the city — as both a home and destination — and the city’s leaders again; and rebuilding the morale and pride of the city’s workforce. Before launching into specifics, he thanked those same city workers for helping him deliver on the first two critical objectives and asked the dozens present in the audience to stand for public appreciation. He also thanked his parents, also in attendance, for establishing his work ethic and teaching him “if I care about something, I should leave it better than I found it.” Gloria claimed this lesson has not only guided him throughout life, but has especially resonated with him since becoming mayor. “I’ve tried to approach the responsibility that comes with the Office of the Mayor with one overriding goal: doing what is best for San Diego,” he said. “We will leave

our city better than we found it.” Using the new Downtown Central Library — which opened early in his short tenure — as a metaphor, Gloria gave listeners a peek at his ambitions for the City. “The library is a road map for San Diego to follow as we chart our path to the future,” he said. “Built with unprecedented collaboration, its soaring heights and breathtaking architecture remind us of the need to dream big, and the importance of working hard to accomplish those dreams. “Ladies and gentlemen, we must dream big,” he said. “San Diego will always be America’s Finest City, but we shouldn’t be content with just being fine. We must dare to be great.” The speech was positive and full of promise, with plenty of good news regarding the City’s financial outlook, plans for expansions in infrastructure, the convention center, and public transportation, as well as attracting more innovation and technology businesses to the region and more. “Make no mistake; none of this will be easy,” he said. “Nothing worth doing ever is. This is part of our effort to leave this place better than we found it, and it’s an effort worth making.” The address was a stark contrast to the state of the city just six short months ago, when the controversies and scandals surrounding then mayor Bob Filner had not only created a crisis locally, but even turned the City of San Diego into both late night and cable network news fodder. “San Diegans aren’t looking for miracles,” Gloria said. “You’re looking for responsible, responsive leaders focused on providing basic public services effectively and efficiently. You want us to work together to solve problems. We hear you. And we have only just begun to provide the kind of government you deserve.” For a complete transcript of the 2014 State of the City address, visit sandiego.gov.u


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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

Be a part of our Realtor Showcase next issue! For more information call:

YANA SHAYNE

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10

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

OPINION

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Caves are not for claustrophobics

Larabee'sLowdown D a l e L a ra b e e

In 1949, on East Talmadge Drive, Kensington, Dr. Ralph Havens and his son Glen started to dig into his charcoal pit, 50 feet downward on the side of Fairmount canyon. “Dad dug in a flurry of activity” his son Ralph, Jr. reported later. “Dad was one of those guys who had to work seven days a week.” That first day, Havens Sr. dug and dug and just kept going, ending his day 70 feet under his house. Some time later, Haven and other diggers entered the Haven house through daughter Carol’s bedroom closet. (I hope she knew they were coming.) Havens said digging helped him think. Come 1960, the unusual house addition was 700 feet of tunnels, 9 rooms and tons of sandy soil transferred downward to the canyon. The diggers uncovered shark teeth and bones, a whale’s eardrum, and a tooth of an extinct four-tusked walrus that lived 3 million years ago. Havens and friends created

the Havens’ Caves. Havens’ house, now owned by Art Gonzales, is a Tiger Woods’ drive from ours of 40 years. Until Sunday past, I have never set foot in the Caves. My sons have, hundreds of others have. After Sunday past, I never will again. I am claustrophobic. First, no one really knows why Havens dug except Havens. I found two articles telling more about the Caves: a 1983 U-T article and Thomas Baumann’s 1984 book Kensington-Talmadge. Both describe Havens as a non-stop worker and inventive man. Havens was an engineer with numerous patents (fiberglass fishing rod, for example). He was also a shrewd dude. As he and his family burrowed their way from canyon wall uphill to daughter Carol’s closet, news spread. Neighborhood kids flocked to Havens’ house (Havens had five children); so Havens paid ten cents for each red wagonload of sandy soil lugged from the snakelike tunnels to the canyon below. Lifelong resident Darlene Love remembers this assembly line of kids as much fun and some 1950s pocket cash. She also recalls Ralph Jr. turning off the lights and scaring the hell out of everyone. Havens’ Caves is a 90-foot-deep catacomb containing: a game room big enough for ping pong tournaments, a slide from one room to a lower one, a fishpond (all the fish died in the darkness), an array of once-lighted tunnels, nine rooms including a King’s room, a rat’s maze so elaborate and rooms so huge that in 1960, 200 guests at Carol’s wedding reception toasted the newly weds underground. I would have protested with others safely upstairs. Carol’s husband declined Havens’ invitation to move in saying he didn’t want a mole for a wife. Havens ignored City building codes and permits. The City advised everybody

to stay out, but said it would not “issue a citation unless some hazard develops.” City tax folks didn’t wait and tripled the Havens’ property value due to the nine-room addition. The Doctor had the underground designated a non-taxed basement. The senior Havens died in 1982. Barry and Pam Bernasconi purchased the Cave House in 1974 and stayed until 1980. They sold to a man named Brooks and he to Gonzales. Barry Bernasconi told me he crawled — crawled! — into tunnels sometimes to dead ends. Some nosey carpet cleaners went into the Caves from a trap door while the Bernasconis were away. They couldn’t find a light switch and, using Bic lighters, started down the 99 steps. Their Bics went out. When Bernasconi got home, he found them pale and sweating on a patio. They could not see their hands in front of their faces as they crawled up. Bernasconi added that in his day the Caves were entered through what had been Carol’s bedroom down well-maintained steps, with a bannister and a glass door at bottom. No more. Gonzales early after moving in entered the Caves through a small entrance on the outside of his house. Deep underground, his flashlight batteries went dead. “Dale, if you had put your hand on my shoulder as I was crawling back up …” He couldn’t find the words. Today, during the Chargers-Broncos game, I had to try spelunking. The entry Gonzales used, the trap door long ago closed, is a cluttered crawl space. I made it five steps down. I looked below at the first of 94 more steps dropping into the gloom. This is NOT the way wedding guests descended for a glass of champagne and toasts. I expected to hear echoes of kids hauling red wagons, a Ping-Pong game, screams as Ralph flicked the lights off, or a clink of glasses. All I heard was my bongo drum heart and raspy gasps. I returned to the light.u

In the caves of Kensington (Photo by Diane Larabee)


CALENDAR

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CalendarofEvents FRIDAY, JAN. 17

Preschool story time: 10:30 – 11 a.m., Mission Hills Branch Library, 925 W. Washington St., free. Craft Beer Museum Exhibition Party: 5:30 – 8:00 p.m., The San Diego History Center is celebrating the end of its craft beer exhibition with a party featuring Societe Brewing Company. 1649 El Prado #3, in Balboa Park. $25. North Park Historical Society: 6:30 – 8 p.m., third Friday of the month board meeting, Grace Lutheran Church, 3967 Park Blvd.

SATURDAY, JAN. 18

Golden Hill Farmers’ Market: 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. every Saturday, B Street between 27th and 28th streets, free. Classical Melodies in Balboa Park: 8:45 a.m. – 7:15 p.m., every Saturday and Sunday the San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory’s ensembles fill Casa del Prado with classical music. The public is invited to enjoy these rehearsals of student musicians. 1549 El Prado in Balboa Park, free. Old Town Farmers’ Market: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. every Saturday, Harney St., free. University Heights Open Aire Market: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. every Saturday, 4100 Normal St., free. Get Fit: 9:30 – 10:30 a.m., fitness experts Leah Francis and JJ Brawley lead well-rounded workouts encompassing cardio, strength, agility, balance and coordination. Bird Park at 28th and Upas St. Call 619-800-3480 to register, free. Children’s craft time: 10 a.m., Mission Hills Branch Library, 925 W. Washington St., free. UH Librar y Children’s Program: 10:30 a.m., arts and crafts event for children, University Heights Library, 4193 Park Blvd., free. Organ Concert: 2 p.m., music by organist Carol Williams, Spreckels Organ Pavilion, Balboa Park, free. T-32, 3rd Saturday Stroll About: 4 – 8 p.m., stroll the businesses of Thorn & 32nd streets, with new events monthly, North Park. Electronics Waste Collections & Recycling: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., donate electronics and wearable shoes. Teachers Annex Building, 4100 Normal St.

SUNDAY, JAN. 19

Hillcrest Farmers’ Market: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., every Sunday under the Hillcrest Pride Flag, between University and Lincoln avenues and Normal St., free. Classical Melodies in Balboa Park: 1 – 5 p.m., every Saturday and Sunday the San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory ensembles fill Casa del Prado with classical music. The public is invited to enjoy these rehearsals of student musicians. 1549 El Prado in Balboa Park, free. Organ Concert: 2 – 3 p.m., music by organist Carol Williams, Spreckels Organ Pavilion, Balboa Park, free.

MONDAY, JAN. 20

Signs at Play – Mission Hills Librar y: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., teach your baby to sign, first and third Mondays of the month, Mission Hills Branch Library, 925 Washington St., free. Bankers Hill Residents monthly meeting: 6:30 – 8 p.m., Third Monday of the month at the Inn at the Park, 525 Spruce St., top floor.

TUESDAY, JAN. 21

Old Mission Rotar y: 12 p.m., regular weekly meeting of the Old Mission Rotary Club, Best Western Seven Seas, 411 Hotel Circle South. Pajama Stor y Time: 6:30 – 7 p.m. Every Tuesday children are invited for story time fun with books, singing, and puppets. Feel free to come dressed in your pajamas! Mission Hills Branch Library, 925 W. Washington St., free. Tasty Truck Tuesdays: 6 – 9 p.m., every Tuesday night Smitty’s Service Station hosts several food trucks under their well-lit shade structure, live music, 3442 Adams Ave. Hillcrest Business Association Sustainability Committee: 2:30 p.m., third Tuesday of the month meeting of the HBA office at 3737 Fifth Ave., Suite 202. North Park Planning Committee: 6:30 p.m., third Tuesday of the month meeting of the Planning Committee, North Park Christian Fellowship, 2901 North Park Way.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22

LEGO play time: 5 – 6 p.m., children are invited to get creative with LEGOs, Mission Hills Branch Library, 925 W. Washington St., free. Wednesday Jazz Jam Session: 7:30 p.m. Gilbert Castellanos hosts the Wednesday Jazz Jam Session with special guest musicians and surprise guests at Seven Grand, 3054 University Ave., no cover charge.

THURSDAY, JAN. 23

North Park Farmers’ Market: 3 – 7 p.m. every Thursday, parking lot behind CVS at 32nd St. and University Ave., free. Gentle Yoga for Seniors: 2:45 – 3:45 p.m. every Thursday, presented by The Center and Silver Age Yoga Community Outreach (SAYCO). SAYCO’s mission is to improve the health and overall wellbeing of all seniors, regardless of age, physical ability or financial status, The Center, 3909 Centre St. in Hillcrest, free. 25 Years of the Casbah: 8 – 10 p.m., Casbah co-founder Tim Mays and musical friends hold court at the Birch North Park Theatre with talk and music. 2891 University Ave., $15-30.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24

Preschool story time: 10:30 – 11 a.m., Mission Hills Branch Library, 925 W. Washington St., free.

SATURDAY, JAN. 25

[See Jan. 18 for reoccurring Saturday events] Open casting call for Padres

Announcer: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., an open casting call for the next Petco Park public address announcer. Entry will be through the Home Plate gate on Park Blvd. at Petco Park. The 1:1 Movement’s 2nd Annual P(ART)Y: 6 – 11 p.m., art show benefit featuring 30 local artists auctioning off painted repurposed tote bags for charity. 3RDSPACE, 4610 Park Blvd., free with reservations at: 1to1artshow2014.eventbrite.com

SUNDAY, JAN. 26

[See Jan. 19 for reoccurring Sunday events]

TUESDAY, JAN. 28

Old Mission Rotar y: 12 p.m., regular weekly meeting of the Old Mission Rotary Club, Best Western Seven Seas, 411 Hotel Circle South. Pajama Storytime: 6:30 – 7 p.m., every Tuesday children are invited for story time fun with books, singing, and puppets. Feel free to come dressed in your pajamas! Mission Hills Branch Library, 925 W. Washington St., free. Talmadge Maintenance Assessment District: 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., 4th Tuesday of the month at Franklin Elementary School, 4481 Copeland Ave., San Diego CA 92116. Tasty Truck Tuesdays: 6 – 9 p.m., every Tuesday night Smitty’s Service Station hosts several food trucks under their well-lit shade structure, live music, 3442 Adams Ave.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29

LEGO play time: 5 – 6 p.m., children are invited to get creative with LEGOs, Mission Hills Branch, 925 W. Washington St., free. San Diego Chorus Open House and Auditions: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m., the San Diego Chorus shares a love for music and singing barbershop harmony. All interested singers who would like to join the chorus, or who want to learn more about the group are welcome to attend. Casa del Prado, Room 207 in Balboa Park. Visitsdchorus.org or call 858-735-5924. South Park Business Group: 8:30 a.m., monthly meeting on last Wed. of month at Alchemy, 1503 30th St. Vixen Fashion Show & PopUp Boutique: 7-11 p.m., local designers display their art. Shop for unique pieces while sipping cocktails. Bamboo Lounge, 1475 University Ave., free.

THURSDAY, JAN. 30

North Park Farmers’ Market: 3 – 7 p.m. every Thursday in the parking lot behind CVS at 32nd St. and University Ave., free.u

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

11


UPTOWN FARMERS' MARKETS

When: Saturdays, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Where: 4100 Normal St. (the intersection of Normal St. and El Cajon Blvd.) Average Size: 20 vendors What makes it unique: Opening late last year, this is Uptown’s youngest market by a few years. Eager to get its feet off the ground, the Open Aire Market welcomes a broader spectrum of participants, including a monthly art show, yoga classes and “featured teachers” who wish to share their knowledge about a topic with the community. Contact: Lisa Hamel at 760-500-7583 or lisahamel123@gmail.com

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15

CEDAR

A

DOWNTOWN

W. BROADWAY

ELM

PE RS HI

CEDAR CE CED DAR

NG

N

GRAPE

94

MARKET ISLAND J

Golden Hill Farmers’ Market PETCO Park

30TH

LITTLE ITALYORN

SAN DIEGO NATURAL HISTORY MUS.

PER

TIMKEN MUS. OF ART BALBOA PARK MUS. OF MAN BOTANICAL GARDENS SAN DIEGO MUS. OF ART

163

LAUREL

O ZO

5TH 6TH

OLD GLOBE

FLORIDA

TO THE AIRPORT

4TH

1ST

5

30TH

SAN DIEGO ZOO

PARK

BANKERS HILL

AR

University Heights Open Aire Market

ROBINSON

TEXAS

ROBINSON

INDIA

When: Saturdays, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Where: 519 West Date St. Average Size: 150 vendors What makes it unique: Designed to replicate the lively atmosphere of markets in Florence, Rome, and Venice, the market is six blocks long with live music in three locations, rivaling Hillcrest’s for the city’s largest. Contact: SD Weekly at 619-233-3901 or info@sdweeklymarkets.com

UNIVERSITY

PENNSYLVANIA

KETTNER

Little Italy Mercado

UNIVERSITY

PACIFIC HIGHWAY

When: Thursdays, 3 – 7 p.m. Where: Herman Ave. between University Ave. and North Park Way Average Size: 50 vendors What makes it unique: As one of the few markets open in the late afternoon, it allows us working stiffs a convenient outlet to do a little organic, local grocery shopping. Contact: SD Weekly at 619-233-3901 or info@sdweeklymarkets.com

WA

UNIVERSITY

WA

North Park Farmers’ Market

EL CAJON

ORANGE

TON

HILLCREST

ON GT

N

I SH

MONROE MEADE

MEADE

G SHIN

DI IN

When: Sundays, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Where: 3960 Normal St. (Hillcrest DMV Parking Lot) Average size: 175 vendors What makes it unique: Its long-standing history (began in 1997) in the community, large vendor selection, and its experienced management. It has a welcoming atmosphere, and having just undergone a one-block expansion, is arguably the city’s largest market. Contact: David Larson at 619-237-1632 or hillcrestfarmersmarket.com

805

EL CAJON

Scripps Mercy Hospital

FT. STOCKTON

MONROE

35TH

UCSD Medical Center

MISSION HILLS

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS

MADISON

MADISON TEXAS

163

FLORIDA

8

Hillcrest Farmers’ Market

ADAM

ADAMS MADISON

5TH 6TH

Uptown Farmers' Markets

NORMAL HEIGHTS

8

34TH

MISSION VALLEY

www.sdcnn.com

10TH 11TH

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

4TH

12

IMPERIAL

When: Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Where: 2740 B St. Average Size: 35 vendors What makes it unique: Credit cards are accepted throughout the entire market, and their goal is to keep prices low. They also participate in multi-farm Community Supported Agriculture programs (CSAs), which offer buyers a bundle of produce from several different farms for $15 or $25. Contact: Brian Beevers at 619-795-3363 or brian@sdmarketmanager.com Convention Center

15


DINING

www.sdcnn.com

FRANK SABATINI JR. |

S

ilky hollandaise sauce, bubbling Gruyere cheese and airy puff pastry are among the starring ingredients that turn weekend brunch at Café Bleu Bistro & Wine Bar into a golden, Parisian sunrise. And if you can’t wait until evening to throw down a glass or two of Chateau d’Eau Viognier, the menu abides. Café Bleu launched as a “French-influenced” restaurant several years ago on the 500 block of University Avenue in Hillcrest. The owners have since taken their penchant for steak frites, coq au vin and bouillabaisse (poured tableside) to a relaxed space in Mission Hills, retaining a burgundy color scheme and antique sofas incorporated into the seating arrangement.

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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

13

Restaurant Review

French onion soup, once an omnipresent offering in most restaurants before becoming usurped by more seasonally creative potages, has improved by 200 percent since I visited the former location. Exceedingly less diluted, it’s among several suppertime dishes that carry into brunch, which is held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. The broth is made from homemade beef stock, red wine and copious onions braised down to perfect, translucent sweetness. Thyme and bay leaf add additional depth. Most importantly, the chef caps the crock with nutty-tasting Gruyere cheese toasted from a run under the broiler. The waxy Swiss or low-fat mozzarella (gasp) that other restaurants pass off as “original French” is utter sacrilege to this classic recipe. We also tried the soup du jour, an asparagus-curry concoction that relayed all well-conthe creaminess of well-con structed bisque. Parked alongside was crusty baguette served with softened butter and a lovable house-made relish of diced berries soaked Complimentain red wine reduction. Complimenta ry refills of the bread and spreads are available for the asking. The criminally delicious Gruyere reappeared in my Florencompanion’s crab Floren tine benedict featuring two jiggly poached eggs. Each meticuegg was layered meticu lously with minced spinach, artichoke hearts and traces of crab meat. Draping them was

(above) Crab Florentine benedict (below) The “bleu burger” with frites and Brandy French toast (All photos by Frank Sabatini Jr.)

hollandaise sauce that proved a proficient emulsion of egg yolks, butter, lemon and either paprika or cayenne pepper lending the exact, pretty orange hue you’d find in French brasseries. It took everything in me to resist ordering the croque monsieur, a ham and Gruyere sandwich heated to a toasty finish, and with sinful béchamel sauce smothering the thing. There’s also a croque madame using the same construction, but with the added cholesterol of a fried egg on top. I love them both, but always tend to unfairly ignore other dishes on the menus they reside. So I went instead with Café Bleu’s signature burger crowned with Point Reyes blue cheese, which melts sensitively to warmth — in this case a half-pound all-natural beef

patty tucked into a hot and crusty buttered roll. The meat and cheese danced the Bourree with pickled red onions, cornichons and a thin layer of mayo. A piling of thin parsleydusted fries on the plate, which required no ketchup, helped me to further forget about those tempting croques. Adding sweetness to our brunch was brandy-spiked French toast made with brioche and topped with powdered sugar and diced strawberries. Whether it was from the brandy or extended soaking in the egg mixture, the thick bread slices surprised us with their appealing custard-like texture. Firm and chewy French toast this wasn’t. Other brunch items include hamand-brie omelets, hanger steak and eggs, moules frites (mussels and fries) and chicken-mushroom vol au vent, which doesn’t disappoint as the puff pastry shell deflates into a pond of savory filling. It’s one of the dishes that stole my heart when visiting here initially for dinner. Outside of weekend brunch, Café Bleu serves lunch Monday through Friday and dinner daily. Also, on Monday evenings, from 4 p.m. to close, wines by the bottle are half price. They include a potpourri of choices from France, Spain, Italy and California.u


14

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

DINING

3650 Fifth Ave. (HILLCREST)

619-295-9590 Happy Hour: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Monday through Friday

The power of oregano Come On G e t H a p py !

brews that are light and hop-less. At the rustic-chic Origano, now under new management, I discovered the magical pairing by chance. Among the sizable draft beers discounted to $3.50 during happy hour is Karl Strauss Amber, which I learned upon first One of the latest restaurants in Hillsip that it’s one of Strauss’ lightest, if not crest to wave the happy-hour flag is most vapid-tasting brews in their portfolio. Origano. Its name depicts the Latin root It wasn’t until my prosciutto-laden flatbread spelling for the herbaceous plant that arrived that the ale became pleasantly eventually morphed to “oregano.” Food drinkable. connoisseurs know it as an herb whose The flatbread, which was essentially an flavor sings kindly to beer, particularly to irregularly shaped Neapolitan-style pizza yanked from a hot brick oven, came with ramekins of red pepper flakes, Parmesan sprincheese and dried oregano. I sprin kled the latter generously onto the pie, which indeed complemented every slug of beer, much like the marriage that occurs between lime and tequila or cinnamon and red sangria. The pizza would have otherwise been fantastic on Karl Strauss Amber with rustic prosciutto pizza (Photo by Dr. Ink) its own, given

D r. I n k

the generous measures of prosciutto, arugula and shaved Parmesan sitting on top. Beneath was a thin layer of mozzarella and bright-red sauce made from San Marzano tomatoes, a requirement if you’re calling pizza “Neapolitan.” This was a good bargain for $6. The other flatbread choices, caprese or vegetable, are priced at $5. All run about 50 percent below their regular costs. Drink deals extend to several cocktails made with fermented spirits, such as agave margaritas and mango or peach daiquiris for $4.50 apiece. The bar also concocts sangria; the red uses a merlot base and the white is constructed with Chardonnay and a hint of orange juice, which would have probably gone undetected had my endearing Italian waitress not revealed the recipe. Either are priced at $5 a glass or $10 for a “craft,” meaning carafe. Other food items on the happy hour menu feature Cajun pan-seared tuna for $7; meat-and-cheese boards for $10; fried calamari and shrimp for $7; and a deluxe bruschetta with olives and pesto on crostini for only $3. Since coming under new management a couple months ago, Origano has also introduced breakfast service while adding new pasta dishes to its lunch and dinner menus.u

www.sdcnn.com

Ratings: Drinks:

Discounted beers include a few crafts, domestics and imports while the wine deals narrow down to familiar “house” brands in red or white. The bargains extend also to house-made sangria and short list of cocktails like peach daiquiris and agave sunrises using lowalcohol fermented spirits.

Food:

The Neapolitan-style pizzas are substantial and cook fast. Their crusts are crispy with the right amount of chew. And the pestoenhanced bruschetta is splendidly flavorful.

Value:

Drink prices are reduced by about 15 percent, although you’ll save nearly 50 percent on certain food items such as pizzas and combos of fried calamari and shrimp.

Service:

The waitress, a native of Italy, promptly provided a happy hour menu when arriving and offered a sample of sangria when inquiring about it.

Duration:

Rounding out the end time to 7 p.m. instead of 6:30 would give patrons driving in to Hillcrest extra slack for battling traffic.


THEATER

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Rep explores Mirabal martyrdom “In the Time of the Butterflies” WHEN: 7 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays; 8 p.m. Thursdays – Saturdays, with matinees at 7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Jan. 26

WHERE: Lyceum Space,

San Diego Repertory Theatre, 79 Horton Plaza, Downtown San Diego

TICKETS: $31 – $47 INFO: sdrep.org or 619-544-1000

(clockwise) The opening scene of “In the Time of the Butterflies”; Sandra Ruiz as Dedé Maribal; Maritxell Carrero as Maria Teresa Maribal (All photos by Daren Scott) By Charlene Baldridge SDUN Theater Critic

“In the Time of the Butterflies,” produced by San Diego Repertory Theatre showing through Jan. 26 at the Lyceum Space, tells the story of three Dominican Republic (DR) sisters, Minerva, Patria and Maria Teresa Mirabal, who were brutally murdered on Nov. 25, 1960 because of their resistance to the dictatorship of Generalissimo Rafael Trujillo. A fourth sister, Dedé Mirabal, who raised her sisters’ orphaned children, was not involved in the resistance movement and survived to tell the story. Trujillo, who called the assassination of the Mirabal sisters a traffic accident, was himself assassinated by a group of conspirators the following year. Dedé wrote her own Spanishlanguage book, in effect becoming the storyteller for the violence and oppression of women who live under dictatorial regimes. In 1994, Julia Alvarez wrote “In the Time of the Butterflies,” a best-selling work of historical fiction that further popularized the story. The current play, by UC San Diego graduate Caridad Svich, is based on the Alvarez novel. Todd Salovey and Herbert Siguenza (who plays numerous men, including Trujillo) co-direct. Ericka Aisha Moore, who choreographed Eveoke Dance Theatre’s 2010 and 2012 productions of “Las Mariposas,” a dance work based on the same material, choreographs Svich’s play. “Butterflies” is the code name of the resistance movement in which Minerva (Jacqueline Grace Lopez), Patria (Elisa Gonzalez) and Maria Teresa (Maritxell Carrero) became involved. The well-educated young women were raised on an estate in Ojo de Ague, a town in Salcedo, DR. The action is set in the garden where the spirits of the sisters are said to live, and where

the three martyrs are now buried. Dedé is played by the extraordinary, award-winning Catalina Maynard, whose makeup and hair make her a dead-ringer for the real-life character. Excellent UC San Diego graduate Sandra Ruiz portrays the younger Dedé. Ruiz also plays an American woman who comes in “the suspended present” to interview Dedé. Once this is sorted out in the playgoer’s head, it is smooth sailing. Carrero, a UC San Diego grad with extensive international credits, is exceptionally endearing as Maria Teresa, the script’s most fully fleshed and lovable character. In spite of magnificent acting and a beautiful staging upon Ian Wallace’s set (he also did projection design), Svich’s play observes the story from an oddly removed vantage. The best thing this manifestation of the story has going for

it is the emotional involvement of composer/soundscape designer Michael Roth’s score — especially as realized by splendid violinist Batya MacAdam-Somer, who plays live from the loft. It is the work’s heart and soul. Roth has written a couple of intricate chorales for the sisters. The culminating “The Flowers of Santo Domingo” is a humdinger. Perhaps an opera? Minerva, Patria and Maria Teresa were between 24 and 36 at the time of their “accident.” Dedé has devoted her life to keeping the memory of her sisters’ sacrifice alive. The United Nations declared November 25 the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in honor of the Mirabel sisters. Sadly, the message is still needed: Women suffer worldwide under dictatorial, totalitarian regimes.u

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

15


16

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

MUSIC

www.sdcnn.com

DRIVING SOUTH LA rock band The Lonely Wild settle in for a month-long residency at Soda Bar

The Lonely Wild (Courtesy Zoe-Ruth Photography) By Logan Broyles SDUN Reporter

January is a special month for anyone familiar with indie rock band The Lonely Wild, who are midway through a four-show residency at Soda Bar in Normal Heights on Tuesday nights. They already have two shows under their belt with two more to go, and lead singer and founder Andrew Carroll says this is all part of the group’s plan to build a fan base here in San Diego. “We had done residencies up in Los Angeles before and we were really successful at developing a fan-base, so hopefully we’ll get to know San Diego a little bit better and really build something here,” Carroll said. “We’ve played Soda Bar a few times, I think our first show in San Diego was there last year but overall we haven’t really played here that much. “It’s only been like four or five times so we decided that doing a residency would be a good way to get to know the fan base down here and just get a feel for what audiences are like.” The five-piece band has a great sound that shows their knowledge and love of the great rock and folk music of the sixties and seventies. Carroll and fellow band members Ryan Ross and

Andrew Schneider are all classically trained musicians, which explains the band’s tight and well-executed style. “I guess I’d call it indie rock with a kind of a folk western tilt to it,” Carroll said. “Someone once called it Laurel Canyon Vibe with the intensity of a big city.” The Lonely Wild have already played two great shows with some of the best local San Diego acts, beginning with their first show that was on Jan. 7 with a performance with The Heavy Guilt followed by another on the 14th with The Palace Ballroom and Low Volts. “Our first two shows were great, the audiences were really receptive,” Carroll said. “There’s always room to grow so we’re hoping that by the end of the month we’ll be packing the house but we’re already off to a good start.” There are two more concerts remaining for The Lonely Wild, the first on the 21st with Soda Pants and Nena Anderson & the Mules, followed by a final performance a week later on the 28th with Adams & Eves and The Whiskey Circle. “We picked out the bill in tandem with Soda Bar and their promoter, they gave us a list of some

good local bands and let us pick through it and then our agent added a few others on the bill,” Carroll explained. “It’s been cool to hear some good local music and get to know the San Diego music scene, we played with The Heavy Guilt our first week and they were fantastic, they put on a great performance that was a lot of fun to watch.” Ross, Carroll and Schneider met while studying music at Loyola Marymount. After a band called You, Me & Iowa that Carroll and Ross had been a part of broke up, they linked up with Schneider, vocalist Jennifer Talesfore and drummer Edward Cerecedes in 2010 to form The Lonely Wild, releasing a debut EP titled Dead End. Talesfore and Cercedes have since left the band and were replaced by vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Jessi Williams and drummer Dave Farina, who were part of the group’s lineup when it recorded its first full-length album, The Sun As It Comes. “We’re hoping to start debuting some new material during this residency and we also have a lot of cover songs we’ll be doing, and of course we play a lot of songs from our previous two releases,” Carroll noted. “We have a bunch of new songs in the works and we hope to be heading back to the studio later this year, probably around early summer. We’re tentatively thinking we’ll be releasing in early 2015 because these things always take more time than you think they will.” Catch The Lonely Wild’s final two performances at Soda Bar on January 21st and 28th.u

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FEATURE/NEWS

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5over2 By Kevin Smead SDUN Reporter

Don’t have a resolution for the New Year yet? Here, I’ve got one for you: Go to more shows. To get you started, here are five of the best shows coming up during the next two weeks. 25 Years of The Casbah @ The Birch North Park Theatre 8 p.m., Thursday, Januar y 23 — $10 – 30 casbahmusic.com Alright, so this is cheating since it isn’t exactly a show, but this will still be a great event for fans of local music. Casbah founder Tim Mays will be joined by a bunch of guests, musical and otherwise, to explore the history of arguably San Diego’s most famous venue. Did you know January 14 was proclaimed Casbah Day by the City? Gloomsday, Pheasants, Chess Wars, Shovel @ The Tower Bar 9 p.m., Friday, Januar y 24 — $5 thetowerbar.com I saw Gloomsday a little while back at the Ché and was very impressed. With a two-piece set up and “doom pop” sound, it’s the perfect band to see at The Tower. Couple the fact there’s a group of solid openers with the probability that this show won’t be more than a few bucks and you have yourself a great night. Forever Came Calling, Africats @ House of Blues, San Diego 7 p.m., Friday, Januar y 24 — $12 houseofblues.com There’s a part of me that still loves angsty poppunk, and seeing how Title Fight got a spot playing Coachella this year, I’m apparently not alone. Forever Came Calling is not one of the bigger bands in that scene, but they’re definitely one of my favorites. Ultra Bide`, The Steinbacks @ Til-Two Club 9 p.m., Friday, Januar y 24 — $8 tiltwoclub.com While this is already a packed night, this is one show you might be bummed you missed. Ultra Bide` is an old-school — we’re talking late ‘70s here — alt-punk band hailing from Japan. Their sound is a familiar one, though that’s because they’re one of its pioneers. According to their latest press-release, they’re “Back into OLD SCHOOL to NEW SCHOOL to JUST PUNK ART ROCK to Blow Up your L & R Braines!” If that doesn’t sound fun, I don’t know what does. Reggie and The Full Effect, Dads, Pimento @ Soda Bar 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Januar y 29 $13.50 advance / $16 day of show sodabarmusic.com While it’s rad that Reggie is back from an extended hiatus, I’ll be at this one seeing two-piece twinkly group Dads. Noodly guitars and songs like “If Your Song Title Has The Word ‘Beach’ In It I’m Not Listening To It” followed by “Get to the Beach!” make these guys one of my favorites from Midwestemo revival scene.u

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

17

FROM PAGE 1

PLAN UPDATE kept the same to preserve community identity and integrity, or be changed to allow more flexibility in accommodating future growth. Uptown Planners Chair Leo Wilson noted building heights were the proverbial “elephant in the room” in the ongoing community plan update. “Anyone who’s been in Uptown knows the height ordinance has been much in discussion,” he said. Public testimony given was varied, with some residents expressing fear that allowing greater building height could lead to degradation of existing neighborhood character. Other residents and business owners spoke to the need for leaving “leg room” in future planning, pointing out that future architectural needs are unpredictable, and could be subject to change in the future, which might include a need for greater building heights. Speaking for more lenient building height requirements, Robert Bettinger who lives in a Park Boulevard high-rise said, “We have infilling in a community that’s growing and we need to have some fluctuation above 65 feet.” “One size building does not fit all,” commented another Hillcrest small-business owner. Another group with considerable clout in the Hillcrest neighborhoods is the Hillcrest Business Association, headed by Board President Jonathan Hale and Executive Director Sonya Stauffer. Representing the area’s business community, which has historically favored higher heights, the HBA issued a letter to the area’s senior City Planner Marlon Pangilinan stating its comprehensive campaign, “Hillcrest 2.0,” which calls for relatively taller buildings, but takes into consideration factors such as adjacent street size and amenities provided by the building’s developer. The Uptown Community Planning Area is bounded on the north by the steep hillsides of Mission Valley, on the east by Park Boulevard and Balboa Park and on the west and south by Old Town San Diego and Interstate 5. Communities represented include the Bankers Hill, Hillcrest, Mission Hills, Middletown, the Medical Complex, Park West and University Heights neighborhoods. Currently, the Interim Height Ordinance (IHO) limits building heights in Hillcrest and Mission Hills to 65 and 50 feet, respectively, along with similar heights in surrounding neighborhoods. Prior to the IHO, the 1998 Uptown Community Plan allowed building heights up to 200 feet on some streets, and under these guidelines a 12-story hotel was proposed for 301 University Avenue in 2008. The project was out of scale for the relatively narrow street, so residents protested, and the City Council enacted the IHO for the period required to complete Uptown’s Community Plan. Now the updated Community Plan is targeted for completion in late 2015. Meanwhile the IHO has been extended repeatedly. Many residents and community leaders advocate for making it permanent, or even further reducing its height limit. Areas like the Medical Complex and highrises on Park Boulevard are planning “orphans,” as they far exceed the 50 to 65-foot height limits elsewhere within the Uptown Community Planning Area. The group opted not to take a final vote on the controversial height limits question until its next regular meeting on Feb. 4 at 6 p.m. at Joyce Beers Community Center at Hillcrest’s Uptown Shopping Center.u

Uptown’s

Sudoku

Answer key, page 19

Uptown Crossword

Happy Days

Answer key, page 19


18

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HEALTH & FITNESS

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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

Reasonable Resolutions:

Setting yourself UP for success in ANY YEAR

BLAKE & GWEN BECKCOM

FITNESS Now that the last gift boxes have been put away and the holiday decorations are starting to come down, the New Year and a new set of resolutions is well underway. Before you get sucked into the stress of setting New Year’s resolutions and deciding what type of bandwagon you want to jump on to lead a healthier and fit lifestyle, it’s important first and foremost to establish some solid groundwork to ensure you’re setting reasonable resolutions for yourself that can be realistically achieved. Seven out of ten resolutions don’t work because come January 1 people think they can just turn on a light switch. Right now, your light switch is off and it can be months, and most of the time years, that you’ve spent ingraining bad habits into your life like not exercising, eating unhealthy or being stressed out. As a human being, you can’t just change your emotions and habits from being off to on overnight. To switch up the odds that may be stacked against you in succeeding with your resolutions this year, make sure to include the following criteria into your planning so that you can successfully transform your health goals, ambitions and resolutions into a new lifestyle for the long-term. Take Small Steps to Accomplish Big Results Contrary to popular New Year approaches, resolutions shouldn’t be an all or nothing approach. The foundation to building successful resolutions that last for the longterm relies on making incremental realistic changes to your lifestyle

on an ongoing basis. For instance, instead of saying that you’re going to start working out and restricting all unhealthy food items all at once, a more successful approach is to pick one goal to focus on for the first couple of weeks and then add the second goal only after you get a good handle on managing the first one. It also is important to realize, and plan, that you are going to hit bumps along the way to accomplishing your resolutions. The best way to stay on course is to not worry about the past –— it’s already gone; or stress out about the future — it’s not here yet. Only think about today and focus on what steps you can take now to get closer to achieving your goals. Within six to seven weeks, up to 70 percent of people who make resolutions drop off. People are putting too much on their plate, it stresses them out and when they hit an obstacle like not working out for a few days or having a bad day eating healthy, they just give up. You have to give yourself enough time to work it out and figure out how to break your bad habits. If you do it in small increments, it’s less stressful and more manageable. In time, small steps will equal big steps.

Give yourself the green light to enjoy life Resolutions can have negative connotations associated with them and they can automatically put you into a negative mindset when the first of the year arrives if they aren’t approached appropriately. Turn the negativity associated with making resolutions — taking away the food you enjoy, doing exercises you don’t like — into a more positive experience by adapting your resolutions to fit what you enjoy and what makes you happy. For example, if want to start exercising next week, pick out something that you like to do first. Whether you enjoy bicycling, swimming, walking, doing aerobics classes or playing sports, focus on becoming consistent with one of your favorite activities. Eventually, after you’ve gotten into a more active routine, you can then branch out to try different workouts or activities when you’re ready for a new challenge or adventure. The same concept holds true with changing up your diet as well. Rather than starting to eat healthy cold turkey and forcing yourself to eat foods that don’t taste good to you, gradually wean yourself off your guilty indulgences —

whether it’s sodas, sweets or salty treats — until you eventually substitute all of your cravings with healthier alternatives that agree with your nutrition goals and your taste buds. Surround yourself with a strong support system When you set out to make changes to who you are and the life you live, you have to surround yourself with a strong support group who will accept the changes you want to make for yourself and encourage you to do whatever it takes to successfully meet your goals. Your personal support can be anyone — a family member, friend, mentor or even a personal trainer. You just need to have someone who supports what you’re doing and is available for you to turn to when you need advice or guidance. If you hang out with the wrong group of people, those resolutions will go right down the drain. Celebrate your successful results Although living a healthy and fit lifestyle takes continuous effort and dedication, it should only take about four weeks or so of doing all of your workouts and eating right before you start realizing the

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results of sticking to your resolutions. The results, though, won’t necessarily be ones that you can see on the outside, but rather ones that make you feel better inside about the accomplishments you have achieved and the person you are becoming. You ARE going to start feeling better on the inside before you start seeing differences on the outside. The key is to stay at it consistently and not give in or give up. You will become proud of yourself and begin to feel confident in your abilities. You also will start to believe that what you’re doing is really worth it. That’s when the BIG MO kicks in … MOMENTUM baby. Whether it’s internal or external results that you accomplish first from your resolutions, it’s important to celebrate all of your successes to keep you on course and motivated to continually strive to achieve your ultimate goals for the year. The key to successfully accomplishing any type of resolution is to keep your expectations realistic and to lay out a path to achieving your goals that fits with your specific personality and interests. —Gwen and Blake Beckcom own Fitness Together Mission Hills, offering personal training with qualified professionals by regular appointment in private suites. Exercise and nutritional programs are custom designed to fit your needs and abilities. Call 619-794-0014 for more information or to schedule a free fitness diagnostic and private training session.u


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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

HEALTH & FITNESS

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Exercise teacher going strong with senior fitness By Cynthia Robertson SDUN Reporter

When Lois Schenker, a Hillcrest resident, used to teach dance to young children and teens in Palm Springs, the only example she had of an elderly person keeping in shape was TV fitness guru Jack LaLanne. It never crossed Schenker’s mind that she would one day teach senior citizens how to lift free weights, much less any kind of aerobic movement. But now Schenker, 67, is a revered exercise teacher sought after by people over the age of 50. Her typical week involves teaching several classes, including Silver Sneakers at 24Hour Fitness, Arthritis Aquatic lasses at the Y at Paradise Village, Fitness for All and Gentle Yoga at Paradise Valley Hospital, and Chair Yoga at several different libraries. She also substitute teaches for a Zumba Gold class at the Mission Valley library. The chance to teach exercise to seniors first came for Schenker in Palm Springs when a ballet dancer she knew had to leave her job teaching a “Fitness After 40” class. Schecker jumped at the opportunity. “Back then, the qualifications to teach were not as stringent so I spent some time watching her classes and taking notes and just jumped in,” Schenker said. About a year later, she became fully certified with the American Council on Exercise as both a group fitness instructor and per-

sonal trainer. When Schenker and her husband moved to San Diego in the mid-90s, she looked for work teaching exercise classes. The insurance company Secure Horizons hired Schenker to teach “Seniorfit” at various 24Hour Fitness facilities throughout San Diego. “They figured their members would spend less time in the doctors’ office if they got involved with a regular exercise program,” she said. Schenker and her 24Hour Fitness class in Mission Valley have been going strong ever since. The class has about 40 members, ranging in age from mid-50s to 90s. Just this past year, the name of the class changed to Silver Sneakers, a new program under the Healthways Insurance plan. “I think many people would be shocked to see some of the seniors in my class who are in their 80s and 90s and are in better physical shape than those in their 20s who don’t exercise,” Schenker said. “They are also young at heart, dating, going to parties and traveling all over the world. They act as role models to the

(above) Silver Sneakers class members stretch and do core exercises with a plastic ball, led by instructor Lois Schenker; (left) Senior fitness instructor Lois Schenker (Photos by Cynthia Robertson) younger ones who come to class and see that age is just a number.” SneakIn her Silver Sneak reguers class, one of the regu lar members is Grace, who is 91 years of age. “We call her ‘Amazing Grace.’ She gets to the gym at 9 a.m. to work out on the machines. After three hours of that, she takes a little lunch break and then attends my 1 p.m. class,” Schenker said. The popular notion just

a decade or two ago was that seniors could not attempt an exercise class unless they had been a jock or a dancer. They thought if they had any aches and pains, they were better off resting as much as they could, Schenker explained. Research and scientific studies have repeatedly proven the benefit of exercise for older adults. Some of the benefits include lowered blood pressure and resting heart rate, increased muscles mass, stronger bones, more flexibility, better balance, relief from depression and better cognitive skills, Schenker said. Bonnie Bekken, 72, joined 24Hour Fitness after retiring. She wanted to maintain an exercise program, one that her husband would join in with her. “Good fortune led us to Lois’s class,” she said. Diagnosed with an arthritic condition, so-called “trigger finger,” her doctor had said either surgery or cortisone would help. “I rejected both. Coinciden-

tally, Lois [Schenker] began including new hand exercises that completely cleared the condition,” Bekken said. Her husband Larry Bekken, 78, was a high school track star in his Wisconsin hometown, but he had not exercised for many years before finding Lois’s class about seven years ago. “What I most appreciate about Lois’s class is the aerobics, her uninterrupted and steady pace, the good cardiovascular exercise,” he said. One more benefit that Bekken pointed out was a given in Schenker’s Silver Sneakers class. “We have made forever friends,” she said. Breathe in, breathe out, Schenker reminds her students in class. She takes her own advice. At the end of a long day teaching, she likes to take a walk at sunset, watching the way the clouds and light change. “Exercise is good for the mind, too. It relieves stress,” she said.u


HEALTH & FITNESS

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Health & Fitness Business Spotlights Beauty & Body Medlounge 1450 Washington St. San Diego, CA 92103 619-692-9300 medloungespa.com Beauty and Body Medlounge is an affordably priced medical spa that offers services such as Botox/ Dysport for wrinkle reduction, fillers (Juverderm/Restylane/Radiesse) for facial augmentation, IPL Photofacial for sun damaged skin, laser hair removal, laser vein removal, Sclerotherapy, Fractionated CO2 and Ultherapy for skin tightening and lifting. We customize your treatment plan to achieve the goal of having a youthful and glowing complexion without looking “overdone” or “over-augmented.” Multiple treatment modalities are used to reduce wrinkles, plumb skin and erase pigmentation or broken capillaries in order to achieve the best results without surgery. Our experienced estheticians provide skincare treatments such as microdermabrasion, chemical peels and facials to maintain and compliment laser procedures. They also provide Brazilian wax, a variety of facials and body waxing for men and women. Our staff — which includes a registered nurse, nurse practitioner, and a physician’s assistant, along with our estheticians — all work together to help you achieve your goals. Visit our website for detailed information on the different modalities offered and we also have a current price list and monthly specials posted on the home page. Feel free to contact us at 619-692-9300 or

email us at beautyandbodylounge@ gmail.com for questions about our services, book a complimentary consultation, or to schedule your next appointment. Dr. Jeffrey S. Keeny, D.D.S. 1807 Robinson Ave. Suite 101 San Diego, CA 92103 619-295-1512 drkeeny.com Dr. Keeny’s professional staff is eager to help with your dentistry needs. They are ready to answer any questions you might have during your visit and provide top quality care. Each member of our team specializes in a particular dentistry service, including dental cleanings, root canals, teeth whitening, continuing care, bonding, cosmetic care, and more. Open Monday through Friday, special arrangements can also be made outside of our normal operating hours by speaking to our office administrator. Please visit our website at drkeeny.com to learn more about our dental services and other offerings. Fitness Together 4019 Goldfinch St. San Diego, CA 92103 619-794-0014 fitnesstogether.com Fitness Together Mission Hills offers personal training with qualified professionals by regular appointment in private suites. Exercise and nutritional programs are custom designed to fit your needs and abilities. Our 2014 New Year 28 Day

Challenge is a comprehensive fitness, nutrition and supplementation program to reach your goals. You’ll train one-on-one with a Fitness Professional in a fully equipped private suite, where there is no fear, no intimidation, no sweaty equipment and no waiting. Our nutrition and supplementation plan will be tailored to your current body composition and caloric needs to help you lose weight without starving. It features a 10-day phase to prepare your body for maximum nutrition absorption and a 14 Day Phase to give your body what it needs to reach your goals. Along with the supervised workouts, your gonna look great and feel fabulous. Call 619-794-0014 for more information or to schedule a free fitness diagnostic and private training session. See what others are saying about us on Yelp and San Diego City Search. Hillcrest Advanced Aesthetic Dermatology 3737 Fourth Ave. San Diego, CA 92103 619-299-0700 drheimer.com Healthy, smooth skin gives you a fresh, youthful appearance. Great skin is a key element of beauty; when your skin is well taken care of, it acquires the famous “glow” and it is “radiantly” beautiful. Though they may not be able to put their finger on the exact reason, people tend to notice something special about a person with perfect skin. When you attempt to guess someone’s age, the number that you come up with is usually based

San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

primarily on the appearance of the person’s skin. As people age, their skin slowly loses its elasticity and the pull of gravity causes it to sag. Wrinkles and jowls begin to form and you may end up looking older than you feel. Dr. William Heimer and his highly skilled team of medical professionals can help beautify and rejuvenate your skin using a wide variety of advanced procedures. Dr. Heimer specializes in giving his patients the healthiest, most beautiful skin possible. He uses the latest medical technology combined with a refined eye for detail and beauty to provide his patients with natural-looking rejuvenation. We have a wide variety of treatments that can dramatically reduce the visible signs of aging, including jowls, frown lines, wrinkles, and other fine lines. We have a variety of chemical peels and procedures designed to lift and tighten your skin and Dr. Heimer also offers cutting edge treatments for skin problems such as acne. We also offer advanced methods of volume restoration, including wrinkle fillers such as Sculptra™, Restylane, Radiesse™, and the GentleWaves® system, which uses soft pulses of light to diminish wrinkles by encouraging growth of collagen in your skin. Contact Dr. Heimer’s office today to find out how we can beautify and rejuvenate your skin! iTan Hillcrest 660 University Ave., San Diego, CA 92103 619-298-1826 itan.com/locations/hillcrest iTAN Hillcrest has been serving the community since 2009. We offer several Sun, Spray, and Spa services including Versa Spa, Mystic HD, Hydration Station and FIT Body

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Wraps, among others. Our knowledgeable staff is ready to assist with any of your needs and is educated on the smartest way to tan. We strive to provide the highest standards of cleanliness and customer service to our clients for the best experience each and every visit. From skin sensing beds to the newest spray formulas, iTAN provides the latest in self-administered sun, spray, and spa technology. Urban Optiks Optometry 3788 Park Blvd., #5 San Diego, CA 92103 619-683-2020 urban-optiks.com Urban Optiks Optometry is Hillcrest’s premier optical boutique featuring one of the most impressive and unique collections of superiorquality classic, modern and retroinspired eyewear from around the world, along with leading edge eye examination technology. Whether you are looking for ultra-light minimalist frames or memorable frames that make a statement, Urban Optiks has the perfect eyewear to fit your prescription and style. Their expert opticians ensure that each customer finds the perfect frame for their face and prescription, using the latest digital optical lens technology in the industry. In addition, Urban Optiks is the only boutique in San Diego where you can design your own frame and lenses, creating a completely customized and personal piece of eyewear. Urban Optiks understands how much eye health and appearance can mean to your quality of life and are committed to excellence in serving each patient’s complete eye care needs. Your face is a masterpiece — frame it well!u


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San Diego Uptown News | Jan. 17–30, 2014

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