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VOLUME 16 ISSUE 1

January 2015 Follow us on Facebook and Twitter sdcnn.com

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A transformation of services

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Abandoned hospital repurposed to accommodate education By Dave Fidlin

Clean living for 2015

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The 100-year journey

For years, it sat empty and dormant in Grant Hill, situated atop a hill and overlooking the Downtown skyline. But after a vision, an extensive fundraising campaign, and a heaping dose of creativity, a former convalescent hospital was transformed last fall into a middle school campus for Albert Einstein Academy, a growing San Diego charter school. At the beginning of the current school year, the wraps were taken off the 38,000-square-foot, four-story

“Mr. Goodhue’s dream,” acrylic on canvas, 2012, the cover of “The Art Traveler Guide: A Portrait of Balboa Park” (Courtesy SOHO/ Artwork by RD Riccoboni)

New lights for Downtown

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SOHO produces an artful portrait of San Diego’s crown jewel By Margie M. Palmer

The Balboa Park Centennial celebration is nearly underway. To commemorate the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, Save Our Heritage Organisation (SOHO) has partnered with local artist RD “Randy” Riccoboni and award-winning writer Ann Jarmusch to create the first-ever art traveler’s guide to Pick your plate

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Balboa Park. Riccoboni, who has a longstanding reputation for donating his time and talent to charitable organizations, said “The Art Traveler’s Guide: A Portrait of Balboa Park” has been a decade in the making. “About 10 years ago, I gave myself a personal challenge to create 100 paintings of Balboa

Park in advance of the Centennial,” Riccoboni said. “When I was done I started to wonder what I’d do with all of them. I’ve always loved SOHO and all the work they do, so I thought it would be great to partner with them to create an educational outreach program using the artwork I’d created.” The brilliantly colored paintings span everything from the park’s museums, to its gardens and most-beloved landmarks.

ing,” Chan admitted. “After we wrote the second book, it took some time to get it on Amazon.” The unpublished first book provides much of the back story for “The Reluctant Brides of Lily Court Lane,” as well as a third book, of which the duo have

building, located at 458 26th St. An estimated 475 students began walking through the school’s doors in September, but at full capacity, the middle school will accommodate 600 students in grades 6, 7 and 8. David Sciarretta, executive director of the academy, said the former hospital building has been ideal in helping to carry out Albert Einstein’s international baccalaureate curriculum, which is aimed at linking personal, emotional and social skills with an emphasis on global learning. Some of the features of the new middle school facility include a so-called “genius bar” that is dotted with computer stations and designed to foster collaboration among students. The facility also hosts a “maker’s space” that features cuttingedge technological tools. “We were interested in having a facility that was open, airy and inspiring,” Sciarretta said. Flexibility was also at the heart of the building’s redesign. In keeping with the handson baccalaureate curriculum, Sciarretta said the middle school is flush with such features as “accordion” walls, allowing learning spaces to shrink or expand. “We want to be able to shift

see Brides, page 20

see Einstein, page 4

see SOHO, page 3

Here come the brides

Downtown living inspires romantic novel By Alex Owens

Pets on parade

Index Opinion…..............……6 Briefs…..........………7 Calendar…................11 Gaslamp News.........…16 Town Voices...….….….18

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Downtown San Diego can be very romantic and two local authors are proving it with a romance novel set in the area. Susan Chan and Carol Polakoff are the authors of “The Reluctant Brides of Lily Court Lane,” a new book about the loves and lives of four women who live in Downtown on a fictional street called Lily Court Lane. “Some of them are young and enjoy going out at night in the Gaslamp, some are older and married or divorced,” Chan said. “San Diego is like a fifth character.” The plot concerns a year in the lives of these women, with a key point being a painting belonging to a holocaust survivor. Chan and Polakoff both came to San Diego from back east about a decade ago; New York for Chan, Detroit for Polakoff. How they met and came to write a book has a certain romantic appeal in itself. “We both live at the Renaissance in the Marina District and we belonged to a book club there,” Polakoff said. “One day, we both said the book we were discussing was so bad, we could write a better one.” So they did. Or at least they attempted to. “The Reluctant Brides Of Lily Court Lane” is actually Chan and Polakoff’s second book, but the first one that has been published. It marks the culmination of a three-year effort. “The first book took longer because we were learn-

The new middle school’s west side (Courtesy Brad Baquial)

(l to r) Authors Susan Chan and Carol Polakoff display their book. (Courtesy Susan Chan)


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FROM PAGE 1

SOHO

Although some may wonder if Riccoboni had a hard time deciding which landmarks to depict, the artist said it wasn’t difficult at all; he started by painting his favorite spots. “I think a lot of my favorite places within the park are also the favorites of others,” he said. SOHO Director of Education and Communications Alana Coons said the portable, softcover, saddle-stitched chapbook was designed for walking tours or as a handsome history-andart portfolio that can serve as a valuable reference. “It is so nice it really deserved to be a hardcover book, but then we had our goal always in mind, that we want people to really use it, to be able to toss it in a backpack or purse, and easily carry it by bicycle or wheelchair,” Coons said. Though the full walking tour in the book would take approximately three hours to complete, Coons said it can easily be broken up into several visits. “[Using the guide] I think people will be able to discover things about the park that might otherwise go unnoticed. It gives them a chance to look at Balboa Park in a different way, whether they do it on foot or by bike.” Jarmusch, who won numerous journalism and preservation awards during her time as the San Diego Union-Tribune’s architecture critic, provided the

More paintings from “The Art Traveler Guide: A Portrait of Balboa Park” (above, left) “Paint a Selfie,” acrylic on paper, 2014; (right) “Relaxing in the Plaza Sun,” acrylic on paper, 2014 (Courtesy SOHO/Artwork by RD Riccoboni)

text for the guide that accompanies the artwork. Historic preservation has always been a personal passion, she said, and she’s enjoyed being able to partner with SOHO and do some writing for the cause. “I love art, architecture and historic preservation equally, so for me, this guide is a bonanza,” Jarmusch said. “You can’t help but be captivated by Randy’s vivid paintings, made with intelligence, love and passion. “I think of the guide first as a sumptuous art portfolio to be enjoyed anywhere, anytime,” she continued. “Then, as a source of basic historic information about the main exposition buildings and other familiar park spaces, accompanied by a map for a

walking tour.” With SOHO publishing the guidebook just in time to celebrate the Centennial, Jarmusch she hopes it will engage people, especially those just discovering the park. “So they recognize its deep historic roots and significance, and support its preservation in whatever way they can,” she said. And while the guide covers the history of the park in a fun, entertaining and visual way, Jarmusch said they were diligent in making sure the text was historically accurate. “The research and writing totaled about six month’s work over about two years; there is so much to learn about the park’s

history,” she said. “Then, two Balboa Park experts reviewed the text and made excellent suggestions and some corrections.” The revisions took another couple of weeks to complete, but the guidance, she said, was invaluable. Coons, who edited the booklet and whose husband Bruce — SOHO’s executive director — wrote the forward, said she thinks the guide fits in perfectly with the park’s Centennial celebration, particularly for the art and preservation communities. “You can look at the historical buildings and cultural landscape and the fact that Balboa Park is a national historic landmark [and] one of the highest and finest forms of art in

the county,” Coons said. “It is a beautiful piece and a great gift.” “The Art Traveler’s Guide: A Portrait of Balboa Park” will be released on Jan. 11, 2015. It will be available for purchase at SOHO’s Museum Shop at the Marston House Museum and Garden in Balboa Park, and at all SOHO Museum shops, for $10.95. For more information about the guide, visit rdriccoboni.com. To learn more about SOHO, visit sohosandiego.org. —Margie M. Palmer is a San Diego-based freelance writer who has been racking up bylines in a myriad of news publications for the past 10 years. You can write to her at margiep@alumni. pitt.edu.v

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EINSTEIN ‘on the fly’ and use classroom space in a different way,” he said. “We have multipurpose space that could serve as a place for students to eat one minute and be a place for yoga teaching at another time in the day.” Prior to relocating to the independent facility, Albert Einstein’s middle schoolers were housed at the still-in-existence elementary school building at 3035 Ash St. in South Park. “Before the move, the [middle school classrooms] were acting as silos,” Sciarretta said. “We’ve taken them out of the vacuum and created a more collaborative learning environment between the different grade levels.” Sciarretta said the new learning space at Albert Einstein’s new middle school facility was inspired by some of the designs in New York City. To date, he said the design is not commonplace within San Diego. The completion of this fall’s middle school facility was the realization of a four-year effort by Albert Einstein’s leaders. Sciarretta said the exploratory process kicked off in 2010. A number of properties were considered, but the former convalescent hospital won out for a variety of reasons — including its close proximity to the elementary building. As planning on the build-

Executive Director David Sciarretta addressing Albert Einstein Academy staff at the “welcome back” event in September (Courtesy Brad Baquial)

An upper floor lunch balcony overlooks the basketball courts with a view of Downtown. (Courtesy Brad Baquial)

ing gained momentum in 2012, Albert Einstein’s board of directors agreed to bring Bankers Hill-based Studio E Architects into the fold, to plan the innovative features within the building. While the shell of the building has remained the same, the interior — which was described as being “in a dilapidated state” after sitting unused for at least a decade — was completely gutted from within. “The building had good bones; it was still very strong,” said Maxine Ward, one of the Studio E architects who was involved in planning the renovation project. In addition to the repurposed use of the building, Ward said a number of energy-

While Albert Einstein’s leaders and school staff are celebrating this milestone, Sciarretta said he does not see the new campus as the last for the charter school, which opened in 2002 with solely elementary school classrooms. Middle school classes were added in 2006. No firm plans have been announced, but Sciarretta said he envisions Albert Einstein also having a teen-centric campus in the not-too-distant future. “I definitely see high school as being on the horizon,” he said. “We’re looking at the fall of 2017, or perhaps even earlier. We have a task force that is currently looking into this.” One of the largest sticking points for planning a high school is where it would

efficient improvements have been added to the revamp, including new insulation and windows. She said Studio E has submitted the project to the U.S. Green Building Council for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — or LEED — certification. The actual renovation of the building took place within a nine month period. Sciarretta and Ward cite the brevity of the project toward a number of factors, including a streamlined approach by City of San Diego officials. “We had to work with a number of city groups and go through what was referred to as an entitlement process because this was a site that was originally zoned as a hospital,” Ward said.

actually be located, in what is a largely landlocked section of the city. “We really value the urban learning setting, and we would want [the high school] to have some sort of close proximity to the other two schools,” Sciarretta said. For more information on San Diego’s Albert Einstein Academies, visit aeacs.org. —Dave Fidlin has been a professional journalist for more than a dozen years. Throughout his career, he has contributed to a variety of newspapers, magazines and websites across the nation. He has a special affinity for San Diego and its people. Contact him at dave. fidlin@thinkpost.net v


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OH! Juice: the new age milkman Local company brings your greens right to your door Morgan M. Hurley | Editor

A young local woman is building the business of her dreams: keeping people healthy and empowered. Hanna Gregor is more full of facts and nutritional information that any one person could probably ever use, but that’s why she is so good at the helm of OH! Juice (OH stands for “organic health”), the local, all-organic, cold-pressed juice company she started in 2013. Less than a year in business, Gregor has worked her way into three of the most sought after farmers markets in San Diego — Hillcrest, Little Italy and La Jolla — and is tearing them up with her fresh juices every weekend. Though she does not yet have a storefront, she’s established a savvy marketing relationship with The Dailey Method, a fitness studio in Little Italy that also acts as a distribution center, and her Vista-based kitchen is already pumping out 5,000 16-ounce bottles per month. Barely two years out of Penn State with a degree in nutrition — you’d never know that when first meeting her — the Portland, Maine, native knows her stuff, and with the trials of

(l to r) Hanna Gregor and Anna Duff, co-owners of OH! Juice, are popular vendors at three local farmers markets (Courtesy OH! Juice)

Though those experiences almost made her throw in the towel last year, two friends who did take her passion and education seriously floated her some seed money to get OH! Juice off the ground, and forge ahead she is. Those two friends — Mike Mendoza and Khaled Azar, business partners in another industry — are still part of

The six, 16-ounce bottle “Lifestyle Plan” is a weekly subscription option that can be delivered to your door. (Courtesy OH! Juice)

running her own business, she’s learning more every single day. Natural juicing is becoming a bit of a phenomenon, but it is nothing new to Gregor, who’s been juicing for as long as she can remember. “I always crafted things, whether it was juicing, smoothies or salads, for family, friends or teammates because I played Rugby at Penn State,” she said. “I knew I wanted to service people.” After returning to Maine post graduation and recognizing the economy and population was not hefty enough to sustain her dreams there, she took off for California. After two failed attempts at helping others — who didn’t take her talent or value seriously — grow their juice businesses, Gregor took the lessons she learned to forge her own way.

her OH! Juice management team, which has since grown to include another Penn State nutrition grad, Anna Duff. OH! Juice offerings are vast, with flavors that Gregor often comes up with while lying in bed, and include three-day, fiveday, seven-day and even longer “extended” cleanses, as well as something Gregor calls the “lifestyle plan,” which is basically a juice “subscription” of six, 16-ounce bottles per week. Plus, they deliver. “We want to be known as the new age milkman,” Gregor said, adding that clients can get their juices at home, work or choose to pick them up at one of three farmers markets. Though there seem to be a plethora of new juice companies available these days, OH! Juice has a few advantages. Their juice is distributed only

in glass bottles to avoid leeching from plastic; it is cold pressed to preserve its nutrients; and they are all-organic — something they are about to have USDA certified. Gregor calls juices that don’t use organic fruits and vegetables a “pesticide cocktail.” “This is a nutrition-based company, this is not just a fun, fad juice company where we want to make sweet juices with the name ‘cold pressed’ on them,” she said. “This is legit.” While competition may appear stiff, Gregor knows what she’s up against; she knows what their juices consist of, how they are made, the containers they are sold in, and what drives her competitors. But Gregor’s true passion is educating her own clients about nutrition. “Cold pressed is the most superior way to extract juice from a fruit or vegetable,” the young entrepreneur explained. “There is no heat and very minimal oxygen, which are both very detrimental to nutrients. Heat denatures the nutrients and changes their composition, like the sun does to our skin. Oxygen also breaks things down. Gregor said there are many juices on the market that say they are cold pressed but upon closer review are misleading and actually using a process known as “high-pressure pasteurization” or HPP, which kills the nutrients. “In the grocery store they are cheaper, and advertised as cold pressed, but there is a little disclaimer on the back that says they have a 60-day shelf life,” she said. “That means the safety from bacteria may be extended but the nutrient shelf life is gone. You cannot extend the nutrient shelf life, it is five days and done.” Gregor learned a great deal by being a juice customer herself, routinely starting with

see OH! Juice, page 7

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Letters Dear Editor,

Editorial Ten steps to turn your New Year’s resolutions into success stories By Christian Wasinger, CHt

Every year, approximately 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions. A staggering 25 percent don’t make it past the first week, and only about eight percent stay on course and achieve their resolutions. After years of failing to succeed, our subconscious mind has learned to associate negative feelings with New Year’s resolutions, such as disappointment, failure, and anger. Here are 10 steps to shift the outcome and make the road to achieving your New Year’s resolutions both smooth and swift.   1. Give your New Year’s resolutions a name change. Words generate feelings. Some cause us to feel happy, others sad, and some leave us in a neutral state. The words “New Year’s resolutions” may awaken negative feelings. Replace the words “New Year’s resolutions” with “future accomplishments,” which leaves you feeling more positive.   2. State your goals as positives. When setting your goals, state them as positives. If I ask you not to think of an apple, your mind will immediately think of an apple and all your associations with them. Rather than stating, “I no longer want to be broke,” say, “I manage my money well, and pay all my bills on time.” Being in a positive mental and emotional state, you are far more likely to achieve your goals.  3. Be specific. If you want a taxi driver to drop you off at a specific destination, you must be clear, otherwise you won’t get there. The same goes for your goals. So long as you have a clear destination, you will eventually get there, even if there are detours and obstacles along the way. 

4. Make your goals measurable and give them a deadline. Your goals and the progress you make must be measurable, so you know whether or not you are getting closer to reaching them. Have a deadline, because goals without a deadline are only dreams. 

have faith that the next step will be revealed.

8. Keep at it, even if you don’t succeed at first. There really is no failure. It may have taken you multiple attempts, but you achieved every past goal that was important to you, because you persevered. Those you didn’t 5. Be realistic, flexible, and attain either were not imporbreak down your big goals tant enough to you, or were no into smaller goals. longer important because your It may not be realistic to go situation or desires changed. to the gym every single day, if When it appears you are you haven’t exercised once in experiencing failure, change and 2014? Perhaps commit to exercising three times a week. If you adjust some aspect of your apmiss a day, don’t give up. Make proach. Everything will work out up for it with an extra workout in the end. If it hasn’t yet, then it’s not the end. the next week.  If losing 100 pounds in 9. Be accountable.  2015 feels overwhelming, Have an accountability partfocus on losing two pounds a ner, or use smartphone apps, and week. You still end up with computer programs to help you the same result, but the goal stay on track. We are less likely feels more manageable.  to let others down than ourselves. Share your goal only with people 6. Keep your goals in front of who are supportive of you. you daily. Place your goals where 10. Are you getting closer to you will be reminded of them your goal? daily. Place a sticky note on the Always ask yourself if what dashboard of your car, or a vision you are doing is getting you closer board in your office. Read them or farther away from accomplishafter waking up and before you ing your goal. Don’t waste time, go to sleep. Falling asleep with the visuals and feelings of having money, or energy on anything that is not getting you closer to achieved your goals programs your final destination.  your subconscious mind to accomplish them.  Finally, be patient with yourself and be realistic. Start by 7. Take action and have faith. implementing one of the above Setting “future accomplishsteps at a time, until you have ments,” and affirming them reached your goals.  daily won’t “attract” them magically into your life. The last —Christian Wasinger, six letters in the word attracCHt, is a bestselling author, tion spell “action.” To achieve them, you must map out a plan, neuro-linguistic programand focus on one step at a time. ming trainer, and clinical hypnotherapist with an office When driving to L.A. from San in Mission Valley, San Diego. Diego, you must first get to Carlsbad, then Irvine, and so on To learn more about him, visit theNLPexpert.com.v northward before reaching LA. Take that very first step, and

Congress has passed a trillion dollar omnibus spending bill that includes giving trustees of multi-employer pension plans the ability to cut pensions earned by 1.5 million workers and retirees. Many pensions will be cut by up to 50 percent to retirees who are in no position to make up for the monthly short-falls they will be sorely missing in order to be financial secure. On behalf of the workers and retirees who read your newspaper, I feel you should publish an editorial telling members of Congress they should hold hearings early in the new Congress to explore better solutions other than cutting pension benefits. Reportedly, Congress acted out of concern about the $42.4 billion that the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. (PBGC) says it is short for needed payouts if at-risk multiemployer pension plans failed. Does this remedy open the door for the PBGC and single-employer pension plan sponsors to seek the same relief? Congress did not stipulate that this change applied to multi-employer plans only. It enacted the law in a way that it changed Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) [of 1974] to permit the change to some underfunded multiemployer plans but did not add the word “only.” Therefore, Congress did not preclude underfunded single-employer plans from being de-risked by allowing plan sponsors to cut retiree pension benefits in the future! Tell Congress it needs to amend the provision to protect single-employer pension plan retirees. —Irene Patton, via email v

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DowntownBriefs Nonprofit gets big gift Just Call Us Volunteers (JCUV), a local nonprofit that feeds Downtown’s homeless on every holiday of the year, received a large end-of-the-year gift from United Postal Service (UPS) Store Foundation to the tune of $10,000. Julie Darling, Executive Chef and CEO of JCUV, said the generous donation would be used to purchase a “hot box” to make sure the meals they make for each holiday at their Kearny Mesa kitchen “gets to where it’s going nice and hot.” JCUV collaborates with many other local nonprofits and shelters, including the Alpha Project, the Neil Good Center, the Veteran’s Village, Rachel Women’s Shelter, and others, to ensure San Diego’s homeless receive fresh and nutritious meals. In addition to a number of special holidays throughout the year, JCUV recently expanded their meal service to twice monthly at selected locations. To learn more about JCUV or to volunteer, visit justcallusvolunteers.org.

2014 beach cleanup stats released by local environmental groups In a combined effort, San Diego County’s beaches are taken care of by environmental groups San Diego Coastkeeper and the Surfrider San Diego County Chapter. The two organizations train volunteers to document the items they remove from area beach cleanups. Items that are picked up are tracked, typed, weighed and counted, and unique items are also identified. In 2014, nearly 10,500 pounds of debris was removed from San Diego’s coastal areas by more than 7,000 volunteers. Among 207,800 pieces of trash picked up, the top three items removed included 75,000 cigarette butts, 23,500 pieces of plastic and 17,500 bits of plastic foam. “Cigarette butts move with ease through our stormwater systems, meaning they don’t need to be discarded at the beach in order for them to find their way there,” stated Haley Haggerstone, Surfrider’s San Diego County chapter manager in a press release. “As with most of the debris we remove, their miniscule size can be misleading — they are non-biodegradable and leach a powerful punch of toxins into the water.” who kept it from polluting the ocean waters. Kristin Kuhn, Coastkeeper’s community engagement coordinator, said though the trash was picked up along the coast, it doesn’t necessarily get left there. “Its path is one of wind and rain from the far reaches of inland San Diego County,” she stated in the release. Fiesta Island had the most trash removed overall at 1,127 pounds, as well as the most trash per volunteer at 3.43 pounds. Interested volunteers can help in 2015 at one of the 40 cleanups already planned. Volunteers are requested to bring reusable

bags, gloves and water bottles. For more information visit San Diego Coastkeeper’s event calendar at sdcoastkeeper.org.

California Tower reopens On Jan. 1, the California Tower at Balboa Park’s Museum of Man officially opened to the public for the first time since 1935. Government officials and park leaders held a ribboncutting ceremony for the tower, which is part of the 100-yearold California Building — now home to the Museum of Man — which was originally constructed for the 1915 PanamaCalifornia Exposition. The tower opens just in time to kick off the centennial celebration of the historic exposition, which put San Diego on the map as an international port city made accessible through the construction of the Panama Canal. According to the Museum of Man, the California Building has been mentioned more than any other building in the city in American architectural studies. It is included in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the California Quadrangle, while the tower is recorded in the Historic Buildings Survey in the Library of Congress. Tickets to climb the inside of the tower to the top for stunning views of the park are approximately $20, and may be purchased at museumofman. org. Park staff recommends purchasing tickets in advance, as same-day tickets many often be unavailable. Further instructions are available Museum of Man’s website.

SANDAG offers $15M in grants SANDAG recently announced $15 million in grants to fund local smart growth and active transportation projects. Under its TransNet Growth Incentive Program and TransNet Active Transportation Grant Program, the intergovernmental planning agency will accept applications through March 20 for civic projects promoting smart growth, walking, biking and transit usage. Approximately $12 million in smart growth funds and $3 million for active transportation are available. The funding comes from the TransNet half-cent sales tax collected throughout the region. Only projects and organizations within San Diego County and the cities in the region may apply directly for funding. Nonprofits wishing to apply must do so in conjunction with a local municipality. For more information, visit sandag.org/ cycle3grants.

explore how the park, once known as City Park, originated and utilize rare, historic photos and film to give viewers a look at the 1915 Panama-California Exposition. Sevilla will also take behind-the-scenes tours of the park grounds, museum vaults and historic buildings. The show will also explore Balboa Park’s architectural and landscape designs and how they have changes over the last century. “San Diego’s Historic Places” airs Thursdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 11:30 a.m. and all episodes can be viewed online at video.kpbs. com. Topics to be covered: Jan. 8: Early Balboa Park plans, early architect plans, Museum of Man design, Saint Frances Chapel; Jan. 15: Expo planning, Spreckels Organ Pavilion, early park landscaping, California Building tower tour;

Report shows large growth in California jobs over past year The latest data released in a monthly employment report by the California Employment Development Department (EDD) shows that the San Diego region added 43,000 jobs from Nov. 2013 to Nov. 2014. This is the largest growth for the area in the past 20 months. Employment grew by 13,100 jobs in the past month alone, and unemployment remained at 5.8 percent – down 1.2 points from Nov. 2013. San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation (EDC) also released their “Manpower Monthly Report” with analysis of the California EDD’s data. San Diego Regional EDC’s report noted sectors that drove much of the growth from Nov. 13 – Nov. 2014 included ship and boat building (grew 13.6 percent), professional, scientific and technical services (grew 6.7 percent) healthcare (grew 4.9 percent), scientific research and development (grew 4.5 percent) and tourism (grew 3.9 percent). “We figured San Diego’s numbers would be great since the U.S. reported very strong figures a few weeks ago, but we didn’t expect local growth to be this outstanding,” stated EDC research manager Mike Combs in a press release. Visit San Diego Regional EDC’s website at sandiegobusiness.org for their full report and visit labormarketinfo.edd. ca.gov for the California EDD’s monthly release.v

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015 FROM PAGE 5

OH! JUICE a basic apple, kale and lemon, and then adding superfoods one at a time. Always ending up with a juice that was $12.50 out the door and not even cold pressed, she knew she could do better. “We are nutrition first and then flavor,” she said. “You’ll find that people either love or hate some of our juices. That’s okay. But if you hate it, we’ll have something you love, too.” Her standard six-pack, which can be mixed and matched, includes things like cantaloupe, kale, beets, cucumbers, romaine, pomegranate, coconut and Himalayan sea salt. A full list of ingredients of each flavor is on her website. While she said she used to be able to explore flavors and be creative on a more spontaneous basis, USDA certification will change that. “We want to be different,” she said. “We don’t want you to go to any juice bar and find similar juices.” Gregor said people doing cleanses often aren’t sure what they are getting into but often have specific expectations. “People will think they are going to have these huge transformations but rarely do we ever have disappointment,” she said, adding that even the smallest changes motivate people. Cleanses, as well as regular juicing, help people with their

digestion, skin tone, hair growth and health, headaches, skin rashes, and most importantly, your body’s ability to absorb nutrients. “You can even have better breath and better body odor, too, because instead of having fatty steak coming out of your arm pits you are having fresh pomegranate,” she said, laughing. “But the positive thing is, when you do give your body the good stuff, your body asks for more of that, intuitively.” They generally recommend the three-day cleanse as a great jump-start, but lately have found more and more first-time clients are capable of the five-day and beyond. The longer the cleanse, the better the results. What should you expect? Gregor said you should feel “a little bit lighter, tighter, motivated, with a little bit more energy.” She acknowledged that everyone’s body is different on a cleanse. But the most important thing Gregor said she wants her clients to get out of the process is education and motivation to make better decisions about what they put into their body. Want to start 2015 off with a seven-day cleanse? Visit OHJuicecleanse.com or visit Gregor and her staff at the Little Italy Mercado this weekend. Want to invest? She’s looking for those types of clients, too. —You can reach Morgan M. Hurley at morgan@sdcnn.comv

Downtown’s Sudoku Puzzle DIRECTIONS:

Balboa Park centennial to be featured on season of popular KPBS show “San Diego’s Historic Places,” one of the highest-rated local programs on KPBS-TV, returns for its seventh season in January with a special series honoring Balboa Park’s centennial celebration of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition. This season will feature several new episodes and segments devoted to the park and its history. Host Elsa Sevilla will

7

Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

Sudoku Solution Answer Key, page 19


8

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

www.sdcnn.com


THEATER

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San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

Where were you when the lights went up?

9

A wrap of 2014’s stage performances Theater Review Charlene Baldridge You were sitting in a seat facing the stage, I hope, taking advantage of a San Diego production or even a Broadway tour. Like any year, 2014 had its hits and its misses. Across the broad spectrum of entertainments, your intrepid critic and arts fan attended more than 150 events, including musicals, operas, symphonic or chamber music concerts, and straight theater; okay, some of it not so straight. Venues ranged from the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, to Orange County’s Segerstrom Arts Center, to San Diego County theaters large and small, near and far. Lots of people want my job, but please be assured it’s a pain in the ass sometimes, especially when something you simply must see plays in a folding-chairs venue. This was a big year for musicals, some highly touted yet bland, others surprisingly rich. It was also a big year for off-pitch singing. Broadway/ San Diego’s “Once” was an intriguing and intimate musical mostly lost in the cavernous Civic Theatre. Some of the biggest, and not necessarily the best, were as follows: La Jolla Playhouse’s “Hunchback of Notre Dame,” buoyed up and somewhat redeemed by the fine singing of the San Diego choral group, SACRA/PROFANA; The Old

Globe’s “Bright Star,” in which an overwrought book was nearly saved by a rolling bluegrass band and one exceptionally talented heroine. The outstanding musical production of the year was Lamb’s Players Theatre’s muchextended “Les Misérables,” which featured a magnificent company headed by Brandon Joel Maier as Jean Valjean. The other best was ion theatre company’s “Passion,” featuring an indelible performance by Sandy Campbell as Fosca. Cygnet Theatre also produced excellent productions of “Pageant” and “Spring Awakening.” These were my favorite plays: Ayad Akhtar’s “The Who & the What” at La Jolla Playhouse; ”Time and the Conways” at The Old Globe; “All My Sons” at Intrepid Shakespeare; “Mandate Memories” at North Coast Repertory Theatre; “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” at The Old Globe; Herbert Siguenza’s “El Henry” co-produced by La Jolla Playhouse and San Diego Rep at the outdoor Maker’s Quarter; “The Pianist of Willesden Lane” at San Diego Rep; “The Clean House” at New Village Arts; “Honkey” at San Diego Rep; “Enron” at Moxie; and “Pericles, Prince of Tyre” acted by The Old Globe/ USD MFA students. Notable: San Diego Musical Theatre’s production of “Next to Normal.” Richard Baird is back with New Fortune Players, which produced a fine “Henry V” at ion theatre, starring himself and a mostly grand company. Sledgehammer

(Clockwise from top left) San Diego Repertory Theater's "Pianist of Willesden Lane" (Photo by Carol Rosegg) and The Old Globe's "Time and Conways" (Photo by Jim Cox) were two of the critic's favorites, while Cygnet's "Spring Awakening" (Photo by Daren Scott) and The Old Globe's "Bright Star" (Photo by Joan Marcus) were huge hits with theatergoers.

also reappeared with a production of “Happy Days” at 10th Avenue Arts Center. Speaking of 10th Avenue, it was one of numerous venues for the second annual San Diego International Fringe Festival, bigger and better this year. Mercifully and by some kind of miracle, San Diego Opera survived its near closure, and the two recitals performed as

fundraisers for the 50th anniversary season — which opens at the end of January with “La Bohème” — were exceptional, sung by soprano Ailyn Pérez and tenor Stephen Costello and by mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe, were SRO. All three singers have endeared themselves to San Diego Opera audiences through appearances in previous seasons.

Epic turkeys were “Orphan of Zhao” and “Ether Dome” both at La Jolla Playhouse. See you next year at the theater! —Charlene Baldridge has been writing about the arts since 1979. Follow her blog at charlenebaldridge.com. She can be reached at charb81@ gmail.com.v


10

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

www.sdcnn.com

Artist’s rendering of new Piazza Famiglia, which will soon take over West Date Street between Columbia and India streets (Courtesy H.G. Fenton Company)

New piazza breaks ground By Christopher Gomez

On Dec. 1, the Little Italy Association officially broke ground on our most ambitious community addition yet: Piazza Famiglia. The new project, in partnership with H.G. Fenton Company, will transform

West Date Street, between Columbia and India streets, into a 10,000-square-foot public piazza to serve the Little Italy community. Mike Neal, H.G. Fenton president and CEO, led the groundbreaking ceremony, which took place at the corner of West Date and India

streets. Featuring commencement words from Mayor Kevin Faulconer, then-Council President Todd Chris Gomez Gloria and (Courtesy LIA) Little Italy Association Chief Executive Administrator, Marco Li Mandri, the ceremony was a symbolic milestone of Little Italy San Diego’s everevolving growth and its urban modernization. The project itself was inspired by the grand piazzas of Italy and Europe and will feature classic Italian architectural details and design. The European-style piazza will include attractive landscaping with a grand water feature, inviting seating and other gathering areas. Piazza Famiglia will become the new “heart” of Little Italy and a central community gathering space to host farmers markets, concerts and cultural events. It is scheduled to open in 2016. The new piazza joins several other public spaces in Little Italy, including Piazza Basilone on West Fir and India streets. It will be dedicated to the families who banded together to create Little Italy decades ago; to today’s residents, who have helped to create the Little Italy we know and love today; and to the families that will set their roots in Little Italy in the future. —Christopher Gomez has been Little Italy’s district manager for the past 15 years. Along with the Chief Executive Administrator Marco Li Mandri and the board members of the Little Italy Association, Chris has helped develop and maintain the community since 2000. Reach him at chris@littleitalysd.com.v


CALENDAR

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San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

11

DOWNTOWN CALENDAR BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT “A” Street Auto Service 1263 State St. (corner of A and State streets)  San Diego, CA 92101        619-239-8600 | astreetautoservice.com As an ongoing effort to better serve our customers with the “one stop shop” theory, we have added a new location offering paint and body repair. With the new facility we can now provide a variety of detailed care for your vehicle’s appearance. For example: bumper repair, minor bodywork, paintless dent removal (PDR) and lastly, detailing. Give us a call and let us know how we can be of service to you.

NOW OPEN Full-Service Classic Barber Shop

1604 State Street San Diego, CA 92101

Open Daily from 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Call or text Jeebs to schedule an appointment, or just stop by!

619-764-8833

WALK-INS WELCOME!

ly astronomer-led planetarium show touring the solar system San Diego Int’l Auto with a new topic each month. Show: Day two of the show which continues through Jan. 4 This month is “Wonders of the Deep Sky.” 7 p.m. Fleet Science with over 400 cars on display. Center, 1875 El Prado, Balboa Convention Center, 111 W. Park. Visit rhfleet.org. Harbor Dr., Downtown. Visit sdautoshow.com. THURSDAY – JAN. 8 Labor laws workshop: First 5 First Fridays – A “Points and Authorities: New fun story time celebrating the 2015 Labor and Employment New Year recommended for ages 4 and under. 10 a.m. Main Laws” workshop by Cara and Garland, APLC will cover new level – lounge, New Children’s labor laws taking effect in 2015. Museum, 200 W. Island Ave., 7:30 – 9:30 a.m. The Bristol Marina District. Visit thinkHotel, 1055 First Ave., Downplaycreate.org. Friday Night Liberty: Large town. For more information, call 858-454-2400. art walk first Friday of each East Village Association month. Free open artist studios, Board Meeting: All monthly galleries and performances. board meetings are open to 5 – 8 p.m. NTC at Liberty Station, 2640 Historic Decatur Rd. the public. 5 p.m. Room 219, Thomas Jefferson School of Visit ntclibertystation.com. Law, 1155 Island Ave. Visit Exhibit “Gifts of our Sisters – Lost & Found”: Free ad- eastvillagesandiego.com. Centennial Beer Tasting: mission to see this exhibit with Celebrating the 100-year anniwine and snacks served. Show versary of the Museum of Man runs through Feb. 1. 5 p.m. and the Panama-California Women’s Museum of CaliforExposition, this event will feania, 2730 Historic Decatur Rd., ture beer tastings from mulBarracks 16, Liberty Station. tiple breweries, food from local Visit womensmuseumca.org. eateries, a 1915-themed photo “Dinosaurs Before Dark” and “Fancy Nancy – The Mu- booth and more. Tickets start at $20. 6 – 8 p.m. Museum of Man, sical”: Dual opening night for 1350 El Prado, Balboa Park. two San Diego Junior Theatre Visit museumofman.org. shows. 7 p.m. Casa del Prada Theatre, 1800 El Prado, Balboa FRIDAY – JAN. 9 Park. Visit juniortheatre.com. Wine and Canvas: Step-bystep instruction and materials SATURDAY – JAN. 3 included, create 16-by-20-inch Steal Heaven: Comedy by gallery-wrapped canvas paintHerbert Siguenza world preing. Tonight: “Paris.” No outside mieres tonight. Runs through Jan. 25. 8 p.m. Lyceum Theatre, food or drinks — both available for purchase. $35 per person. 79 Horton Plaza, Downtown. 6 – 9 p.m. Fabrison’s French Visit sdrep.org. Creperie, 1425 India St., Little SUNDAY – JAN. 4 Italy. Visit wineandcanvas.com. Coronado Concert C.S. Lewis on Stage: An Series: Free concert with introduction to author’s perNadro John, 1 – 4 p.m. Corosonality and thought, adapted nado Ferry Landing, 1201 First by Tom Key from C.S. Lewis’ St. at B Avenue. Visit coronado- books, poems, novels and letferrylandingshops.com. ters. Runs through Jan. 18. 8 p.m. Lambs Players Theatre, MONDAY – JAN. 5 1142 Orange Ave., Coronado. Film Forum: Free screenVisit lambsplayers.org. ing of “C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America” a faux SATURDAY – JAN. 10 documentary exploring the Fresh Start Healthy LifeU.S. if the Confederacy had styles Fair: Free event open won the Civil War. 6:30 p.m. to all San Diego County resiAuditorium, San Diego Cendents. Activities include: health tral Library, 330 Park Blvd., screenings, a fitness obstacle Downtown. Visit facebook.com/ course, scavenger hunt and freelibrarymovies. more. 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. County Waterfront Park, 1600 Pacific TUESDAY – JAN. 6 Hwy, Downtown. Visit c5athletDirty Dancing: Broadway ics.org/events/healthfair. San Diego brings this classic story to the stage through Second Saturday SciJan. 11. 7 p.m. Civic Theatre, ence Club for Girls: “Fo1100 Third Ave., Downtown. rensic Detectives” — Who Visit sandiegotheatres.org. did it? Become an assistant detective and explore various WEDNESDAY – JAN. 7 The Sky Tonight: A month- types of physical evidence in

FRIDAY – JAN. 2

a mock crime scene. Noon – 2 p.m. Fleet Science Center, 1875 El Prado, Balboa Park. Members $12, non-members $14. Visit rhfleet.org or preregister 619-238-1233 x806.

SUNDAY – JAN. 11

Coronado Concert Series: Free concert with Blue Frog Band, 1 – 4 p.m. Coronado Ferry Landing, 1201 First St. at B Avenue. Visit coronadoferrylandingshops.com. San Diego Great Books: Free discussion group, open to the public. This month’s topic: “Plato: Meno.” 2 – 4 p.m. Room 221, San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown. Visit sandiegogreatbooks.net.

MONDAY – JAN. 12 Film Forum: Free film screening of “Pride” starring Bill Nighy. 6:30 p.m. Auditorium, San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown. Visit facebook.com/ freelibrarymovies.

TUESDAY – JAN. 13 PBID Advisory Board: Every second Tuesday the Downtown Property Business Improvement District (PBID) Advisory Board offers the public an opportunity for comment at beginning of meeting. 3 p.m. 401 B St., Suite 100. For more info visit downtownsandiego.org.

WEDNESDAY – JAN. 14 Annual State of the City Address: Mayor Kevin Faulconer addresses the city. The event is free, with reception following at US Grant Hotel. 6 – 7 p.m., Balboa Theatre, 868 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp. Visit sandiegotheatres.org.

THURSDAY – JAN. 15 Live Music: Professional chamber choir SACRA/PROFANA present an a cappella program titled “Heaven and Earth.” 7 p.m. Hibben Gallery at the San Diego Museum of Art, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park. Visit sdmart.org.

FRIDAY – JAN. 16 Rock in the Park: For the second year, this concert series will bring a variety of bands to Reuben H. Fleet Science Center once a month. The first show features Tim Flannery and the Lunatic Fringe with Michael Tiernan opening. 7:30 p.m., 1875 El Prado, Balboa Park. Visit rhfleet.org.

SATURDAY – JAN. 17 San Diego Multi-Cultural Festival: This all day event

see Calendar, page 22


12

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

NEWS

www.sdcnn.com

www.sdcnn.com

EAST VILLAGE/TOWN VOICES

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

13

East Village-opoly now on sale! The East Village Association (EVA), the nonprofit that manages the East Village Business Improvement District, has launched a creative new way to help raise funds for the East Village Landmark Sign. The new venture is a board game, “East Village-opoly,” a locally based, fun and creative spin on the classic board game “Monopoly.” This first edition game features unique landmarks and symbols that are specific to East Village, including a token that is a likeness to the Central Library Dome, a Petco Park board square, car2go GO square, four Metropolitan Transportation System squares, and game cards featuring East Village businesses. Friends of the Central Library and San Diego City College are among sponsors of the game, which the EVA is offering for $40 per game, and volume discounts are available. The game is an instant collector’s item and will be offered at the following East Village businesses: Knotty Barrel (844 Market St.), the Central Library (330 Park Blvd.), MAK Cleaners (1031 Market St.), The District (1021 Market St.), The Parlour (550 Park Blvd.), EVA Offices (705 16th St. #210-B), Style Lounge and Salon (540 Sixth Ave.), The UPS Store (1041 Market St.), Robert Weichelt Real Estate (1606 G St.), City Dog (550 Park Blvd.), and online. For more information about the landmark sign project or to purchase East Village-opoly, visit eastvillagesandiego.com.v

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Dragon’s Den 315 10th Ave. San Diego, CA 92101 619-358-9332 | thedragonsdensd.com Located in the heart of East Village at the corner of 10th Avenue and K Street, Dragon’s Den has established itself as the preferred business for East Village locals. With 19 televisions, including a 133-inch projector screen, 16 beer taps featuring local craft breweries, and a liquor selection that far exceeds expectations, it is easy to see why. Arriving hungry is a must as Dragon’s Den features a full sushi bar and a Chinese kitchen, ensuring that even the most fickle of appetites will find something delicious. The outstanding quality of the food is only surpassed by its value, as the asking price for this quality would be considerably higher at any surrounding establishment. With happy hour 3 – 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and all day Saturday and Sunday, it’s no wonder the locals don’t see a need to go anywhere else. Skip your local spot one of these weeks and come check out ours.

New decorative LED lighting on C Street, one of many corridors Downtown to get the permanent enhancements (Courtesy SDDP)

Lighting up Downtown’s life

Downtown Partnership News Kris Michell Things are looking a lot brighter for Downtown San Diego. That’s thanks to the Downtown San Diego Partnership’s Clean & Safe program, which has instituted a comprehensive decorative tree-lighting program throughout Downtown. This program installs stateof-the-art LED decorative lights in trees along such key corridors as B Street, Market, C Street and others. In all, close to 300 trees in Downtown have been wrapped with twinkle lights, helping make our streets and sidewalks safer and more inviting. And things will only get brighter. Starting in January, the Clean & Safe team — in partnership with the Gaslamp Quarter Association — will light up trees on Fourth, Fifth and Sixth avenues from Broadway to L Street, bringing even more ambience and illumination to Downtown. But this tree-lighting program is more than meets the eye. It’s not just about ambience; it’s about economic development and improving safety. A review of lighting studies in the United States and United Kingdom found that crime decreased by 21 percent in areas that experienced street lighting improvements. Studies have also shown that lighting programs make people feel safer so they are more apt to walk down a well-lit street. More foot traffic means more businesses for our shops and restaurants in Downtown, helping improve our local economy. This tree-lighting program also shows property owners and businesses that we are committed to investing and improving our Downtown. The recent tree-lighting pro-

gram along C Street is a great example of how that investment is paying dividends Downtown. We partnered with The Local to hold a fundraiser for the C Street tree lighting project, raising almost $3,500 from Downtown community members. The Downtown Partnership and our Business Improvement District contributed to the project, and the City of San Diego and business owners along C Street also stepped up to the plate. These businesses included Trilogy Management, the California Theater, Sycuan, HP Investors, Emmes Realty, Hines and LWP Group. The result is that 83 trees — from Front Street to Eighth Avenue — now light C Street and the result is truly transformative. For the first time in a long time, C Street seems alive and inviting at night. The new energy provides a platform to attract more private investment, luring new visitors and businesses to the area. So when it comes to revitalizing C Street, I hope everyone sees light. Love the tree-lighting program? It wouldn’t have happened without Downtown’s Clean & Safe program. Help us renew the Clean & Safe program so we can keep Downtown bright and beautiful for many years to come. If you are a Downtown property owner, we need you to sign a petition of support from renewing the Clean & Safe program. To find out how you can support the program renewal efforts, please contact Greg Parkington at gparkington@ downtownsandiego.org. —Kris Michell is the president and CEO of the Downtown San Diego Partnership, the organization that oversees the Clean & Safe program and also works toward creating a worldclass Downtown. For questions or comments, email info@downtownsandiego.org.v


12

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

NEWS

www.sdcnn.com

www.sdcnn.com

EAST VILLAGE/TOWN VOICES

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

13

East Village-opoly now on sale! The East Village Association (EVA), the nonprofit that manages the East Village Business Improvement District, has launched a creative new way to help raise funds for the East Village Landmark Sign. The new venture is a board game, “East Village-opoly,” a locally based, fun and creative spin on the classic board game “Monopoly.” This first edition game features unique landmarks and symbols that are specific to East Village, including a token that is a likeness to the Central Library Dome, a Petco Park board square, car2go GO square, four Metropolitan Transportation System squares, and game cards featuring East Village businesses. Friends of the Central Library and San Diego City College are among sponsors of the game, which the EVA is offering for $40 per game, and volume discounts are available. The game is an instant collector’s item and will be offered at the following East Village businesses: Knotty Barrel (844 Market St.), the Central Library (330 Park Blvd.), MAK Cleaners (1031 Market St.), The District (1021 Market St.), The Parlour (550 Park Blvd.), EVA Offices (705 16th St. #210-B), Style Lounge and Salon (540 Sixth Ave.), The UPS Store (1041 Market St.), Robert Weichelt Real Estate (1606 G St.), City Dog (550 Park Blvd.), and online. For more information about the landmark sign project or to purchase East Village-opoly, visit eastvillagesandiego.com.v

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Dragon’s Den 315 10th Ave. San Diego, CA 92101 619-358-9332 | thedragonsdensd.com Located in the heart of East Village at the corner of 10th Avenue and K Street, Dragon’s Den has established itself as the preferred business for East Village locals. With 19 televisions, including a 133-inch projector screen, 16 beer taps featuring local craft breweries, and a liquor selection that far exceeds expectations, it is easy to see why. Arriving hungry is a must as Dragon’s Den features a full sushi bar and a Chinese kitchen, ensuring that even the most fickle of appetites will find something delicious. The outstanding quality of the food is only surpassed by its value, as the asking price for this quality would be considerably higher at any surrounding establishment. With happy hour 3 – 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and all day Saturday and Sunday, it’s no wonder the locals don’t see a need to go anywhere else. Skip your local spot one of these weeks and come check out ours.

New decorative LED lighting on C Street, one of many corridors Downtown to get the permanent enhancements (Courtesy SDDP)

Lighting up Downtown’s life

Downtown Partnership News Kris Michell Things are looking a lot brighter for Downtown San Diego. That’s thanks to the Downtown San Diego Partnership’s Clean & Safe program, which has instituted a comprehensive decorative tree-lighting program throughout Downtown. This program installs stateof-the-art LED decorative lights in trees along such key corridors as B Street, Market, C Street and others. In all, close to 300 trees in Downtown have been wrapped with twinkle lights, helping make our streets and sidewalks safer and more inviting. And things will only get brighter. Starting in January, the Clean & Safe team — in partnership with the Gaslamp Quarter Association — will light up trees on Fourth, Fifth and Sixth avenues from Broadway to L Street, bringing even more ambience and illumination to Downtown. But this tree-lighting program is more than meets the eye. It’s not just about ambience; it’s about economic development and improving safety. A review of lighting studies in the United States and United Kingdom found that crime decreased by 21 percent in areas that experienced street lighting improvements. Studies have also shown that lighting programs make people feel safer so they are more apt to walk down a well-lit street. More foot traffic means more businesses for our shops and restaurants in Downtown, helping improve our local economy. This tree-lighting program also shows property owners and businesses that we are committed to investing and improving our Downtown. The recent tree-lighting pro-

gram along C Street is a great example of how that investment is paying dividends Downtown. We partnered with The Local to hold a fundraiser for the C Street tree lighting project, raising almost $3,500 from Downtown community members. The Downtown Partnership and our Business Improvement District contributed to the project, and the City of San Diego and business owners along C Street also stepped up to the plate. These businesses included Trilogy Management, the California Theater, Sycuan, HP Investors, Emmes Realty, Hines and LWP Group. The result is that 83 trees — from Front Street to Eighth Avenue — now light C Street and the result is truly transformative. For the first time in a long time, C Street seems alive and inviting at night. The new energy provides a platform to attract more private investment, luring new visitors and businesses to the area. So when it comes to revitalizing C Street, I hope everyone sees light. Love the tree-lighting program? It wouldn’t have happened without Downtown’s Clean & Safe program. Help us renew the Clean & Safe program so we can keep Downtown bright and beautiful for many years to come. If you are a Downtown property owner, we need you to sign a petition of support from renewing the Clean & Safe program. To find out how you can support the program renewal efforts, please contact Greg Parkington at gparkington@ downtownsandiego.org. —Kris Michell is the president and CEO of the Downtown San Diego Partnership, the organization that oversees the Clean & Safe program and also works toward creating a worldclass Downtown. For questions or comments, email info@downtownsandiego.org.v


14

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

FEATURE

www.sdcnn.com

Bread and Salt:

A fresh sound bound for Downtown By Will Bowen

Something is stirring down in Logan Heights and the big boys in the arts are all involved. The seedling activity centers on the old Weber’s Bread Factory at 1955 Julian Ave., just a couple of blocks north of the Coronado Bay Bridge and Chicano Park. “The building itself dates to 1896, but it has been added onto over the years,” stated new owner and mastermind architect Jim Brown. “It was a bread factory until seven and a half years ago. We are fixing it up to be a center for the arts.” The building, painted yellow and white with blue trim, and featuring large windows, lantern lights and a small French balcony, is called “Bread & Salt” after its bakery heritage. Athenaeum Music and Arts Library in La Jolla hired architect Bob Palmer to redesign the portion of the building they have rented for art classes. “[It was] built in an eclectic Spanish revival style, but today might be called postmodern be-

Bread & Salt has taken over the former Weber’s Bread building in Logan Heights. (Photo by Will Bowen)

cause of the way it blurs several genres of architectural style,” Palmer said. Ken Goldman, the Athenaeum’s chief art instructor, said that he loves the building’s high ceiling, good light, and its history. “I like that they have saved some of the old bakery equipment to retain historical flavor,” said Cornelia Feye, education director for Athenaeum’s School of the Arts.

There are already a couple of small art galleries, a business office and a radio station in the building. The San Diego Museum of Art has plans to move in, and this spring, Camarada will be putting on tango and bossa nova dinner shows. Another new occupant of the building is Bonnie Wright, founder and director of Fresh Sound, a new music venue designed to bring the most innovative performers of experimen-

Music producer Bonnie Wright, seen inside the venue, is launching a percussionist series — with ties to UCSD — starting in January. (Photo by Will Bowen)

tal new music, contemporary classical and avant-garde jazz to San Diego. Wright said she was immediately attracted to the building. “It has this amazing potential, but it is not quite there yet, and that’s what makes it fun,” she said. Wright has produced over 180 new music concerts since

1997, all held at the Spruce Street Forum, a venue she fashioned at her late father’s interior design building in Bankers Hill. She recently decided to close that space and look for a new one because renovations and bringing the building up to code were becoming too costly. San Diego music critic Robert Bush, who described the Weber building’s new interior as “funky industrial chic,” has attended almost all of Wright’s shows at Spruce Street Forum. “Bonnie is doing very important work for the creative music scene,” Bush said. “She is a very important person for the city. You get to see people at her concerts that you would otherwise never see. I have never been disappointed by one of her shows. In fact, they have been some of best performances that I have ever seen.” Steve Schick, UC San Diego distinguished professor of music and recent inductee to the Percussionists Hall of Fame, agrees. “For almost 20 years Bonnie Wright has offered exciting and uncompromising music to San Diego,” he said. “Without her the city would be a much poorer place.” Wright has already produced a couple of concerts at the Weber building and has plans to bring in some of the world’s best percussionists, many who worked with or studied under Schick, for a series of events taking place between January and June. The aim of her percussion series is to honor professor Schick, as well as all the people that have been associated with UCSD percussion. The concerts are also meant to recognize San Diego as a top breeding ground for worldwide percussion, due to Schick’s mentoring. “Putting on concerts gives my life purpose,” Wright said. “I want to continue to stay pure to my vision of bringing music to San Diego that otherwise would not be heard. Normally you would have to go to Los Angeles or New York to hear the type of music I am presenting. “I am not out to make

see Bread and Salt, page 21


DINING

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San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

Chops for the choosing Restaurant Review Frank Sabatini Jr. Stake Chophouse & Bar from Blue Bridge Hospitality awakens Coronado with a sleek, modern design that some might argue goes against the grain of Orange Avenue’s demure dining scene. Located a floor above street level near the Hotel del Coronado, the restaurant gives the impression of a high-rise lounge in downtown Chicago rather than a place built safely around the island’s village atmosphere. It also pampers with amenities that normally go missing when plunking down $50 or more on a hunk of topquality beef. Opt for the five-course “stake experience” priced at $140 per person, for example, and you get to eyeball your main entrée from a platter of raw steaks presented tableside, much like choosing a dessert from a display tray. Better to see it first instead of imagining its dimensions and attributes from paper. Beautifully crafted knives come next. They’re presented in a handsome box, allowing you to choose what feels best. My companion selected a slender French-made blade for her wellmarbled American Wagyu rib eye while I gravitated to slightly heavier steel of German origin, which glided through my dryaged bone-in New York strip as though it were Jell-O.

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Stake Chophouse & Bar 1309 Orange Ave. (Coronado) 619-522-0077 Prices: Appetizers, soups and salads, $10 to $24; chilled seafood, $16 to $32; entrees, $33 to $75

(above) Raw steaks and prime cuts are presented tableside (Courtesy Blue Bridge Hospitality); (right) Chocolate-almond caramel cake (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.)

Regardless of what menu route you take, Stake offers ultra-comfortable seating on heavy white-leather chairs, tags your leftovers for pickup on the way out and features a stunning outdoor cocktail lounge rigged with linear fire pits and a backlit onyx wall. And where else in Coronado do you find mouthwash supplied in the restrooms? In a further break from steakhouses of yesteryear, Chef Tim Kolanko (formerly of the Lodge at Torrey Pines) peppers the menu with uncommon appetizers and side dishes, although he keeps a few standbys available such as shrimp cocktail,

Oysters Rockefeller (Courtesy Blue Bridge Hospitality)

creamed spinach, and superb French onion soup constructed from beefy veal stock. From the potato category, there’s a traditional baked tuber along with gratin, Lyonnaise and Duchesse preparations. His tuna crudo with candied jalapenos and pickled mushrooms — or hamachi crudo with apples, preserved lemon and pine nuts — are the exceptional “surfs” that deliver you to his turf. Lobster dip with cheese curds and zesty Calabrian peppers also served as a climactic buildup. The fondue-like appetizer brimmed with tender lumps of tail meat that we trawled with every swipe of our crostini. With regard to his oysters Rockefeller, these are snazzier than most because they’re wood-fired and less watery. Our steaks were cooked accurately to medium. Kolanko finishes them with fat rendered from beef trimmings, which contains a whisper of herbs that he sneaks in. Yet overall, the meat tasted pure and oozed of light-red juices seeping from its caramelized edges. It was exactly what we came for.

Other chops include filet mignon, American Wagyu skirt and prized Japanese Wagyu, the richest of them all sold in three-ounce portions for $28 per ounce. There’s also a 50-ounce tomahawk rib chop ($120) for group feasts, a sight to behold when it passes through the dining room with its statuesque rib bone protruding from the platter. The vegetable side dishes we chose were refreshingly out of the ordinary, with spice-roasted pumpkin ranking as our favorite. The tenderly cooked wedges were accented with cranberry relish and toasted walnuts, a come-on to the holidays but with staying power for the entire winter season. Fire-roasted carrots with cumin and orange zest were also a departure from the norm. Kolanko gives them a divine, creamy twist with yogurt and avocado. As for the fired cauliflower with parsley, we liked the concept but the dish was over-charred to the point of severely distracting from the subtle flavor that defines cauliflower. Stake’s wine inventory is vast and displayed from a glass-enclosed room. From a few different glasses we ordered, the

Beronia Tempranillo from Rioja, Spain resulted in one of those wine moments that affirms your love of fermented grapes, when the flavors of fruit and terroir are so perfectly balanced, it leaves you speechless. The final showstoppers of our meal were two desserts: a geometric chocolate-almond cake with caramel mousse atop hazelnut crust, and blueberry bread pudding with white chocolate sauce that sent my companion over the moon. “Insanely fruity and refreshing,” was how she termed it. Stake is by all accounts geared to those with padded wallets. But you get top-notch food, astute service and a renewed appreciation for swank in return, the kind that will likely appeal more to young, successful entrepreneurs than traditionalists who prefer eating filet from red leather booths. —Frank Sabatini Jr. is the author of “Secret San Diego” (ECW Press), and began his local writing career more than two decades ago as a staffer for the former San Diego Tribune. You can reach him at fsabatini@ san.rr.com.v


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San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT The Bike Revolution 522 Sixth Ave. San Diego, CA 92101 619-564-4843 | thebikerevolution.com The Bike Revolution opened its doors in 2008 after identifying a need for a local community bike shop in the Gaslamp. With over 30 years of combined experience in our industry, we pride ourselves on our ability to identify our customers’ needs and leave them with a lasting positive experience. Looking to rent a bike? We are best known for having the largest fleet of rental bikes in San Diego. We offer comfort, road, mountain, kids, tandems, and now electric bikes for rent. Not sure where to ride? Let our expert staff help you tailor a route that fits your needs. We are also a full-service bike shop offering sales and repairs. Whether you need a simple adjustment or a full overhaul on your ride you are in excellent hands with our professional staff. In addition to basic repairs we also offer custom bike builds and wheel builds. Every member of the staff at The Bike Revolution is an avid cyclist. We expect the very best from our personal bikes. We feel our customers deserve the same quality and attention to detail that we’ve come to demand. We only carry reputable brands such as Giant, Kona, and Bianchi Bikes. Whether you need some advice, help finding a new bike, or just need some air, come on by our shop. We’re here to help you.

The Watts-Robinson building, located at the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and E Street, is an architectural landmark Downtown. (Courtesy Gaslamp Historical Foundation)

The Watts-Robinson building Gaslamp Landmarks Jake Romero The Watts-Robinson building, an architectural landmark of the Gaslamp Quarter, is at the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and E Street and was designed by Leonard T. Bristow and John B. Lyman, Jr., Architects. This structure was one of the first Chicago commercialstyle buildings to be erected in Downtown San Diego. “Commercial style” reflects advances in construction technology that permitted the creation of the first skyscrapers on the urban landscape. This style is also known as the “Chicago Style,” after the city where steel-framed, relatively unadorned, utilitarian, tall commercial buildings first appeared in the 1890s. The exterior of this building — finished in cut limestone and granite below and cement plaster above — featured advanced systems of the period, such as steam heat, mail chutes, vacuum cleaning and two high-speed elevators, claimed to be the fastest in the city. Additionally, it is the first building in Downtown San Diego to have a sub-basement, which extends 35 feet below street level. The first 10 floors of the Watts Building, its original name, were designed with

doctors and dentists in mind. The installation of hot and cold water, a compressed air system, special waste outlets and gas and electrical outlets, facilitated these two trades, along with lawyers and businessmen. In fact, historical photos show the windows of the building populated with advertisements for the doctors and dentists within. The 11th floor was divided into two penthouse suites. Interior corridors featured wainscoting in marble and tiled floors. Reinforced concrete stairways featured marble tread, risers and more wainscoting. From 1913 to 1927, the ground floor of the building was the home of the San Diego Savings Bank, which in 1927 became the San Diego Trust and Savings Bank. Jewelry businesses dominated the building during the 1940s and 1950s, establishing the building as San Diego’s “Jeweler Exchange.” In 1952, the building was sold to a group of attorneys that included Mr. Robinson, lending his name to the building. Today, the building houses the Gaslamp Plaza Suites and The Melting Pot restaurant. —Jake Romero is the operations and marketing manager of the Gaslamp Historical Foundation, located at 410 Island Ave., Downtown, in the historic William Heath Davis House. For more information visit gaslampquarter.org.v


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Celebrating the ‘King of Instruments’ Civic Organist News Dr. Carol Williams

ful performer and something I really enjoy. I want the audience to have a new respect for the pipe organ and be glad they attended the open-air concert in Balboa Park. I am also artistic director of the Spreckels Organ Society, and in that role, I work hard with volunteers from the Spreckels Organ Society, musicians, composers, park institutions and others in producing all the ongoing efforts to bring a special festive atmosphere to our organ and Balboa Park, including the Centennial Celebration Concert this past Dec. 31. My ambassadorship also extends internationally, as I always introduce or remind my audiences of San Diego’s great Spreckels Organ. I was recently selected as one of eight artists to perform at the 10th anniversary concert for the Walt Disney Concert Hall organ, and as is usually done at my “away concerts,” I was introduced as San Diego’s Civic Organist. Our great instrument was talked about to that audience; Russian, European and the Far East audiences all have

Editor’s Note: This is an introductory piece from Dr. Williams who, based on her advocacy as our Civic Organist, will be contributing a column on a rotational basis to San Diego Downtown News throughout 2015. As my dad drove me home one rainy night from one of my hundreds of organ performances in the U.K., I looked out the car window at Stonehenge and wondered where I’d be in 20 years with my chosen career path. At the time, I was a teenage organ scholar who first began performing concerts at eight years old. Many years later, I was again gazing out through a rainy window thinking of that night. I was on an aircraft preparing to land in San Diego. I could see the Spreckels Organ Pavilion all lit up. I was an international concert organist with a doctorate in music wondering how my audition for the San Diego’s Civic Organist job would go. It went well. The plaque in the pavilion now reads, Carol Williams, Civic Organist, 2001 – present. San Diego has had a Civic Organist perform organ concerts once a week for the past 100 years. A city organist is a comparatively rare breed in the world today, Carol Williams, shown with the Spreckels Organ, probably even an hosts performances every Sunday at 2 p.m. at Balboa endangered species. Park’s Organ Pavilion. (Courtesy Carol Williams) I am often busily engaged composing, transcribing and arranging been informed of our majestic music to play on the organ. Very beast. This very large box of little repertoire that can be toler- whistles is a part of me now ated by the masses is composed and I am honored and blessed for the “King of Instruments.” to be a part of San Diego’s These tasks, along with prohistory — both its past and gramming and planning, can future. Those of us privileged be challenging on a weekly to serve in this civic position basis, but I’ve got it down to an today, around the world, are art. The repertoire needs to be the heirs of a rich inheritance. varied, yet enticing, sophisticatI am always open to cultural ed and popular. Otherwise you and musical explorations that may end up with only 10 people involve the pipe organ and look left in the audience and they’ll forward to opportunities to bring all be texting. it to new audiences. I hope to see I love to collaborate with some new faces at our Sunday other musicians of all genres concerts at 2 p.m. and ages to provide our audience Please stop by the Organ Pawith a well-rounded musical vilion and say hello to me after a experience. The pipe organ has concert if you have a chance. had a kind of stigma attached to it and part of my passion is —Civic Organist Carol Wilto educate and broaden people’s liams is proud to serve as an awareness. I love and play all ambassador of San Diego’s arts kinds of music and even though and culture arena. Through I was classically trained, as a her concert performances at youngster I would be scolded home and abroad, Carol offers for playing jazz on the church a fresh take on the classical organ. organ concert. She is commitThis job is, of course, far ted to illuminating San Diego’s more than just programming colorful romance with the “King and playing. It is essential to of Instruments,” always seeking establish a fun relationship and to bring the organ to new audiconnect with the audience. This ences. For more information is a major part of a successvisit sosorgan.com.v

Vintage race cars from the 1915 California-Panama Exposition's Point Loma race will soon be on display at the Automotive Museum (Courtesy Automotive Museum)

Exploring Balboa Park Exploring Balboa Park Johnny McDonald Lighting the way City officials have figured a brighter way to elevate, promote and celebrate the yearlong Centennial celebration: Supply some illumination and spotlight Balboa Park. “After 100 years of serving as the crown jewel of our world-class city, we’re showing off Balboa Park in a whole new light,” stated Mayor Kevin Faulconer in a press release. “This is just one of the many ways we are elevating and improving Balboa Park to make sure it remains a treasure for future generations of San Diegans.” Workers removed existing outdoor light fixtures and replaced them with red, green, and blue LED lights, which are programmable in 2,700 color hues and will allow for architectural color washes on building exteriors. The project was a partnership among the city of San Diego, SDG&E and CleanTECH San Diego. In addition, the city has installed energy-efficient lighting in its antique-style streetlights throughout the park and the string lights that connect them. The overall effort reportedly will save the city approximately $50,000 annually in energy and maintenance. Appropriately, a New Year’s Eve party with marching units and a Spreckels Organ concert kicked off the celebration. “It’s been wonderful since the city has taken over the [Centennial] project,” said Michael Ruiz, district manager for Balboa Park 2015. “We’re really working with various non profit and profit organizations.” Ruiz said it was not the city’s intention to dictate what the museums should or shouldn’t do, but rather to encourage events with the main goal of celebrating the park. He pointed to some changes and innovations.

“The tower will be open to the public for the first time in 80 years, signs will be updated and there will be an expanded Wi-Fi system, making it the largest on the West Coast.” Other highlights will include an expanded Japanese Friendship Garden and a model railway garden exhibit, where visitors can take control with mobile phones. Although the disbanded Balboa Park Celebration, Inc. had planned to have professional acts and musicians, the city can call on many on the grounds. Several dance and ballet groups — including the San Diego Civic Dance Arts, San Diego Civic Dance Association and San Diego Civic Youth Ballet — as well as the San Diego Youth Symphony, are planning performances throughout the year. Ruiz said there is no other place — except for the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. — where there is such a diverse collection of cultural and art institutions all in one place. At least 13 of the 17 museums have selected venues that fit their formats and some will bring attention to 1915 Exposition achievements. The San Diego History Center will display components of the 1915 Expo, while Marston House will feature 20 landscape and building designers of that era. “We have at least 70 exhibitions, more programs and activities and more being added each day,” said Peter Comiskey, CEO of the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership. Elsewhere in the Park — Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Expo’s big auto race in Point Loma, 26 vintage cars will retrace the course on Jan. 10 and will then be placed on display in front of the San Diego Automotive Museum ... The Natural History Museum’s Discovery of King Tut exhibit will continue through April 26 ... Throughout the year the Veterans Memorial and Museum will feature one of the key

battles of the Korean War that took place June 10 – 18, 1953 … The popular traveling Dr. Seuss exhibition (on display now) will be featured throughout the year at the San Diego History Center. It will include signature elements emphasizing San Diego’s renowned Theodor Geisel as the world’s most celebrated children’s author and innovator … Through April 26, the Timken Museum of Art will show the masterwork of Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino ... See beasts familiar and strange, real and imagined at the Museum of Man and learn where they came from and how they behave in “Monsters!” ... Explore the history of the Spanish Village with a unique walking tour ... Beginning in February at the San Diego Air and Space Museum, escape for a world of science, technology, engineering, math and innovation, through Sept. 15 ... On April 24 a spring signature Botanical Building event titled “Garden Party of the Century” has been scheduled by the San Diego Floral Association, Botanical Foundation and Friends of Balboa Park … and watch for “Flannery at the Fleet” — Former Padres player and Giants third base coach Tim Flannery will turn to music with his Lunatic Fringe group Jan. 16 to open RH Fleet Center’s “Rock in the Park” concert series. San Diego native Flannery left the Padres to join old boss Bruce Bochy in San Francisco and picked up a couple World Series rings. A prolific and talented songwriter, he’ll soon release his 11th album in 15 years. This is the second year the science center will feature different musical concerts each month through May, including rock, country, blues, folk and soul. —After an award winning, 38-year sports-writing career with the San Diego Union and authoring three books, Johnny McDonald now considers writing a hobby. You can reach him at johnny23@ cox.net.v


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The year of the little guy Drink Shrink Jeff Josenhans As a twenty-year veteran of the beverage industry, I’ve seen small and big trends come and go. Some of the most notable ones have actually happened in the most recent years. Big, oaky California wines have given way to a more elegant, European-hybrid style. Varietals like Malvasia and Carignan are no longer shunned on the wine list. Whiskey has taken over vodka as the liquor of choice in most bars.

Craft beer brewers are trying not to become the corporate organizations they are simultaneously dethroning in the American “yellow beer” industry, and ironically are also slowly shifting away from the IPAs in favor of higher quality classic lager styles. So with another crazy holiday season finally behind us, the question inevitably becomes, “What’s next?” With this question in mind, I paused for a minute recently to stop and think about what made the strongest impression on me — and those around me — in the festive world of social drinking over the last year. The growler of a smallbatch test brew from a local

brewery was special. This is the arena that brewers can play in without having to be a large production facility or committing to a label design on a bottle. A wine I picked up directly from the winemaker in Valle de Guadalupe (down in Baja, California) was not only the most sound wine I have had from the area, but getting it from the hands that created it made the experience all that more special when it was consumed over dinner. And THAT is what I think will be driving consumer trends again in 2015. We don’t just want to buy a handcrafted bottle of gin from anywhere in the United

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015 States or abroad, we want to buy it from Ballast Point, where we can go and personally watch them make it. It’s become all about the experience. The word “craft” does not mean as much as it used to, mostly because it’s just becoming the standard. But now we want to take part in what we consume and feel like a tiny part of our soul is in that bottle in front of us. I took the plunge into home brewing this past year and my friend’s favorite beer of the year might have been mine. It definitely was not technically sound; I definitely screwed up the boil

and mash; but the fact that someone they knew made it for them — that is what people will pay for whenever they get the opportunity these days. Looking for a unique birthday gift or something special for this year’s upcoming Valentine’s Day? Head to the little guy (or gal)!

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Three ways to improve your finances in 2015 Financial News Taylor Schulte I love to-do lists. Even more so, I love crossing things off those lists. If you visit my office, you will likely notice that I keep a to-do list on my desk at all times. It helps clarify my thoughts and holds me accountable for the most important items I need to tackle in the coming days, weeks and even months. It may be common sense, but according to the famous Harvard/Yale study, those who write down their goals, share them, and maintain accountability, are 33 percent more likely to achieve them. As we begin a new year, I often hear rumblings of resolutions — many of them relating to money and finances. Most of the time, these rumblings turn into a distant cry by February and little progress is ever made. If you actually want to make changes to your personal finances this year, consider drafting a to-list for your financial goals. Here a few ideas for your list that we think might help improve your financial situation in 2015: ATTORNEYS

Increase 401(k) contributions. The limit on employee contributions to a 401(k) plan will increase to $18,000 in 2015. For participants over 50 years old, the limit will increase to $24,000. Take advantage of this opportunity and elect to increase your contributions starting in January. This will reduce your taxable income and increase your retirement savings. And if you haven’t started contributions, now would be a good time! Review debt. Contrary to analysts’ predictions, interest rates have remained low for an extended period of time. Rates are at historical lows, so I’m not sure how much longer this will last. If you haven’t done so already, review your current debt obligations to see if there is an opportunity to restructure them at a lower rate. This includes credit card debt, home loans, auto loans, and even student loans. If you’re not sure where to start, begin with the highest interest rate loans first and work down from there. Reduce fees. Every fee you pay means less money in your pocket. Banks are often changing their rules and you might be surprised to learn you are paying a fee for something you previously received for free. Sites like mint.com will help you track the fees you are paying and alert you when a fee ATTORNEYS

has hit your account. Challenge yourself, and see how many fees you can reduce or remove this year. Consider re-investing the dollars saved into a savings or retirement account. These ideas should be a great start, but did you also notice I stated that my to-do list was located on my desk — not in my phone, tablet, or computer? Though I’m a technology junkie, I still firmly believe that the physical act of writing out my to-do list reinforces the importance of the tasks. The act of crossing off my tasks as I complete them is much more enjoyable, too. Please contact us for a copy of our comprehensive financial health checklist for 2015. We wish you a happy new year filled with peace, prosperity, and financial wellbeing.

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(619) 565-4454

—Taylor Schulte, CFP® is the founder of Define Financial in Downtown San Diego. Schulte specializes in providing independent, objective, financial advice to individuals, families and businesses. He can be reached at 619-577-4002 or taylor@definefinancial.com.v

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NEWS

www.sdcnn.com FROM PAGE 1

BRIDES already written about two-thirds of. The “Lily Court” title was actually a suggestion from a mutual friend, Barbara Fatheree, who died of cancer while the book was being completed. Chan and Polakoff work on the book together. “We write one chapter each time we meet,” Chan said. “We discuss the story line and the dialogue and I type it up. Then I proofread it and add things we discussed that didn’t make it in initially.” Polakoff said she sees their differences as people as complementary. “Susan is such a positive person, where I will go to the darker side,” she said. “I’m creative and she’s the organizer and the typist.” Polakoff is also more willing than Chan to admit that parts of the characters may be autobiographical. “There’s a young woman whose husband leaves her for another man,” she said. “I related to that character very much and there were parts of me in other characters as well.” On the other hand, Chan said the romance scenes were particularly enjoyable to write. “It was the easiest part,” she laughed. “I had no problem with them.” Since the characters in the book live Downtown, naturally, local landmarks like Petco Park, the University Club and the Convention Center are important settings, as are Seaport Village and Balboa Park. Now Chan and Polakoff are trying to get the word out about the book, which they said in some ways, is harder than writing it. “It’s been difficult trying to figure out how to get the best feedback,” Polakoff said. Still, Chan said she already feels like a success “just having someone who’s read it and said they enjoyed it.” The authors hope to stoke greater interest in the book locally when it is featured in the Local Author’s Exhibit at the San Diego Central Library in February. In the meantime, Polakoff admits she does see the “Lily Court” series as having potential for a TV series and dreams about casting. Tolakoff was asked, “If San Diego is a character, who would she like to cast in the role” “Jennifer Lopez,” she said, laughing. “This city has a Latin flair.” “The Reluctant Brides of Lily Court Lane” is currently available on Amazon in both a print (paperback) and a Kindle edition. The two women have created a Facebook page for the book, called “Lily Court Lane.” To buy the book or read reviews, visit amazon.com and search for “The Reluctant Brides of Lily Court Lane.” —Alex Owens is a San Diego-based freelance writer. He can be reached at alexowenssd@ gmail.com.v


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San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

The airport’s landscape continues to evolve Art on the Land Delle Willett Continuing her awardwinning landscape architecture, Patricia Trauth, principal landscape architect with URS Corp., is applying her expertise to San Diego International Airport’s development on the north side of the airfield, just south of the Marine Corps Recruit Depot and adjacent to the intersection of Pacific Highway and Sassafras Street. Under Trauth’s direction, previous airport landside improvements at terminal two — identified as part of “the green build” terminal expansion — achieved LEED gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council last year. Trauth’s latest role on north side improvement projects include development of the landscape master plan for the airport, looking at the area holistically to make sure nothing slips through the cracks from a development perspective, and that there’s a seamless landscape theme incorporated into all parts of the airport. Subsequent work includes conceptual plans and construction documents for the interior road, called Terminal Link Road (the private road linking the north side to the terminals for shuttle purposes), the airport’s long-term economy parking lot, and Pacific Highway’s streetscape. Project features include the streetscape, entry monumentation, gateway enhancements,

Workers busy constructing a wall near the entrance of the new Rental Car Center at Sassafras Street and Pacific Highway along the north side of the San Diego International Airport. (Photo by Delle Willett)

landscaping, specialty lighting and fencing. “A bigger than normal challenge on this project was dealing with the existing soil,” Trauth said. “Over the years, when environmental requirements were less stringent, the soil was polluted from industrial uses. In some areas where we excavated we hit concrete and asphalt. Also, because we are so close to the ocean, the salt content in the soil is a big issue.” Cleanup was achieved by digging up and hauling away paving materials as well as soil, bringing in organics and top soil to amend the soil, and leeching, to move the pollutants further down into the soil. “We judiciously applied

New improvements are enhancing Pacific Highway’s streetscape (Photos by Delle Willett)

water to leech the soil, which took more time than anticipated,” Trauth said. “I’ve probably had a half-dozen soil analysis reports just on the one project,” she said. “The other challenge was when you excavate down about seven feet you hit the water table and you have saturated soil.” Drainage is always an issue, especially in coastal areas. In some cases, Trauth added additional drainage tubes and will enlist periodic checks to insure water seepage is under control. Another unique challenge to this project was the “instant landscape” that will produce a dramatic change overnight from an aesthetic perspective. “We are using really large plant material,” Trauth said. “For example, we brought in mature pine trees (pinus alderica) from north of Los Angeles on a flatbed truck and used a crane to plant them. They were in 72-inch boxes. Survival is more complex for large trees than smaller varieties; they are not as resilient and we have to be very diligent about how they get installed and maintained.” Just as Trauth did for terminal two’s green build expansion, she has specified drought-tolerant plants which include: desert spoon, blue oat grass, red hot poker, Japanese silver grass and Mexican sage for shrubs, and Mexican blue palm, pindo palm, Mediterranean fan palm, date palm and olive for the tree species. In addition to regional plants, she has also specified cobblestone and boulders at the entryway, streetscapes, and in other locations throughout the area. Storm water will be managed with the use of bioswales and retention basins at the entrance and in other key areas. Because so many trucks will be moving in and out of the area, it was not practical to use permeable pavers, but she is using pavers set on concrete to accentuate the intersection. Work still in progress includes the Sassafras Street entrance with a large curved

wall — faced with natural rock and angled upward — reminiscent of the upward movement of an airplane. Public art is also being incorporated into the north side improvements with three pieces of art at the new car rental area. “SANDAG is proposing a multi-modal facility right across the street from the rental car center along Pacific Highway, so with that in mind we have incorporated walkways throughout the property, to make the area pedestrian oriented,” Trauth said. Trauth is also working on a private road that hugs the runway blast fence and connects with Harbor Drive. Development and use of this roadway will significantly reduce the volume of cars and shuttle buses on Harbor Drive. With all these improvements, the entire north side of the airport will dramatically change in the upcoming year. The Airport Authority should be commended for the upgrades, both there and along Pacific Highway. —Delle Willett is a PR consultant and a freelance journalist. She does pro-bono work for organizations that empower women and work to end world hunger. Reach her at dellewillett@gmail.com.v

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BREAD AND SALT money,” she continued. “I am here to give musicians a platform to perform. In general, I am not going to hire local talent but will reach out to people from outside San Diego. What I present will be cross genre.” Wright said that one of her favorite works of new music is “Music for 18 Musicians” by Steve Reich. “Reich’s music moves me to tears,” she said. “In it, I see a sense of beauty. You never know what will move you like that. Once I was at the [Metropolitan] Museum of Art in New York. After looking all day at some of the world’s great art, I ran across a very small painting by Van Gogh. As I looked at it, I just burst into tears.” Wright said she hopes that those who attend her upcoming percussion series will have the same type of experience. “I hope that they find some beauty or truth, which will move them,” she said. “But I will be satisfied if my concerts simply expand their conception of what music is or they realize why San Diego is so famous for percussion. Even if they don’t like what they hear, I promise them that what they hear will be of the highest quality.” Wright’s upcoming percussion series kicks off Jan. 15 at 7:30 p.m. with a performance of “Timbre,” composed by Michael Gordon and performed by Red Fish Blue Fish, the UCSD-based percussion ensemble founded by Schick. The performance will consist of six percussionists each playing on one of six wooden plants arranged in a hexagon. The second event in the concert series will feature Ross Karre on Feb. 6. Karre, who is a former student of Schick and a current member of the International Contemporary Ensemble, will perform an improvisation piece that takes off from Alvin Lucier’s “Opera With Objects,” Fritz Hauser’s “Schraffur” (written for small solo gong) and Natacha Diels’ “Economy of Means” (a piece for micro drum set). —Will Bowen writes about arts and culture. You can reach him at wbowen1@netzero.com.v

619-233-1500 • 2231 5th Ave San Diego • 92101 www.plush-sd.com


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San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

CALENDAR FROM PAGE 11

CALENDAR features multi-cultural music and dancing on multiple stages, local and regional vendors, children’s activities, storytelling and more. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Ruocco Park, 585 Harbor Lane, Downtown. Visit sdmulticultural.com. Monster Jam: Featuring Monster Jam Trucks including Grave Digger, Dragon and many more. 7 p.m. Petco Park, 100 Park Blvd., East Village. Visit monsterjam.com.

SUNDAY – JAN. 18 San Diego Restaurant Week: Starting today hundreds of restaurants will feature prix fixe menus at lunch and dinner. The week officially ends on Jan. 24 but many participants opt to extend their menus for another week. For a full list of participating locations and menus visit sandiegorestaurantweek.com. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade: For the 35th year, San Diego will host one of the largest celebrations to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The parade includes floats, high school bands, drill teams and representatives of peace and youth groups. 2 – 5 p.m. Harbor Drive, Downtown. Visit alphazsl.org/mlkdayparade.html.

MONDAY – JAN. 19 –

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday 26th annual multi-cultural Martin Luther King Jr. Day: This free, family event will feature outdoor arts and crafts vendors, food vendors and more. Noon. WorldBeat Cultural Center, 2100 Park Blvd., Balboa Park. Visit worldbeatculturalcenter. memberlodge.com.

TUESDAY – JAN. 20 Painting and Vino: Local professional artists instruct attendees on painting a masterpiece. Today – “Tropical Oasis” at 98 Bottles in Little Italy, 2400 Kettner Blvd. 6 – 9 p.m. 21+. Cost $45, all supplies included, registration required. Corkage fee $15 if you bring your own wine. Visit paintingandvino.com.

WEDNESDAY – JAN. 21 Wine and Canvas: Step-bystep instruction and materials included, create 16-by-20-inch gallery-wrapped canvas painting. Tonight: “Mermaid.” No outside food or drinks — both available for purchase. $35 per person. 6 – 9 p.m. Fifty Seven Degrees – 1735 Hancock St., Mission Hills. Visit wineandcanvas.com.

THURSDAY – JAN. 22 Human Rights Watch Film Festival: This festival comes to San Diego for the fifth year with screening as the Museum of Photographic Arts through Jan. 25. 1649 El Prado, Balboa Park. Visit ff.hrw.org/san-diego.

FRIDAY – JAN. 23 Live Comedy: Best known for his time on “Saturday Night Live” and Showtime’s “Weeds,” Kevin Nealon will

www.sdcnn.com perform standup for three nights. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. American Comedy Company, 818 B Sixth Ave., Gaslamp. Tickets $30 americancomedyco.com. Avenue Q: The original Broadway version of this adult-theme puppet-filled comedy opens tonight. Runs through Feb. 28. 8 p.m. Coronado Playhouse Theatre, 1835 Strand Way, Coronado. Visit coronadoplayhouse.com.

SATURDAY – JAN. 24

La Boheme: The San Diego Opera is celebrating their 50th anniversary with the first opera they ever produced. Sung in Italian with projected English translations. Additional performances Jan. 27, 29 and Feb. 1. 7 p.m. Civic Theatre, 1100 Third Ave., Downtown. Visit sandiegotheatres.org. Paranormal Investigation: Once a month these investigations visit the “most haunted house in the Gaslamp.” The tour lasts two hours and guests can bring cameras and video and digital recorders but no professional media equipment. Limited to 20 people. 10 p.m. William Heath Davis House, 410 Island Ave., Gaslamp. Visit gaslampquarter.org.

SUNDAY – JAN. 25 The Art of Riding: Monthly (fourth Sunday) bike ride with Bike SD to experience art, music and culture. 9:30 a.m. Bike SD Headquarters, 525 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp. Visit bikesd.org. Coronado Concert Series: Free concert with Velvet Cafe, 1 – 4 p.m. Coronado Ferry Landing, 1201 First St. at B Avenue. Visit coronadoferrylandingshops.com.

MONDAY – JAN. 26

Film Forum: Free film screening of “Freedom Writers” starring Hillary Swank preceded by a poetry performance by SDSU college freshman Zaria Suggs. 6 p.m. Auditorium, San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown. Visit facebook.com/ freelibrarymovies.

TUESDAY – JAN. 27

Painting and Vino: Local professional artists instruct attendees on painting a masterpiece. Tonight – “Tree of Life” at 98 Bottles in Little Italy, 2400 Kettner Blvd. 6 – 9 p.m. 21+. Cost $45, all supplies included, registration required. Corkage fee $15 if you bring your own wine. For more info, visit paintingandvino.com. Murder for Two: An “Insights Seminar” precedes tonight’s performance of this musical comedy brought to life by only two performers. Free seminar at 5:30 p.m., performance at 7 p.m. Sheryl and Harvey White Stage, Old Globe Theatre, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park. Tickets start $29. Visit theoldglobe. org or call 619-234-5623.

WEDNESDAY – JAN. 28 Film: Each month Women Occupy San Diego (WOSD) holds a special movie night with refreshments. Tonight TBD. Doors 6:30 p.m., film 7 p.m.

Women’s Museum of California, 2730 Historic Decatur Rd., Barracks 16, Liberty Station. Visit womensmuseumca.org.

THURSDAY – JAN. 29

San Diego Black Film Festival: Annual festival runs through Feb. 1 and features several related events in addition to film screenings. All films are screened at Reading Cinemas, 701 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp. Visit sdbff.com.

FRIDAY – JAN. 30

Wine and Canvas: Stepby-step instruction and materials included, create 16-by-20-inch gallery-wrapped canvas painting. Tonight: “Downtown SD.” No outside food or drinks — both available for purchase. $35 per person. 1 – 4 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe – 801 Fourth Ave., Downtown. Visit wineandcanvas.com. Wendy Whelan’s ‘Restless Creature’: La Jolla Music Society presents this project of the former New York Ballet dancer. 8 p.m. Balboa Theatre, 868 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp. Visit sandiegotheatres.com.

SATURDAY – JAN. 31 Live Music: An Evening with Patti Smith and her band presents the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee amidst a world tour. 8:30 p.m. Balboa Theatre, 868 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp. Visit sandiegotheatres.com.

SUNDAY – FEB. 1 – Super Bowl Sunday Coronado Concert Series: Free concert with Dixie Jazz Katz, 1 – 4 p.m. Coronado Ferry Landing, 1201 First St. at B Avenue. Visit coronadoferrylandingshops.com. MONDAY – FEB. 2 Live Music: Rock lineup with Yuck, GRMLN and Tropical Popsicle. Casbah, 2501 Kettner Blvd., Little Italy.com Visit casbahmusic.com.

TUESDAY – FEB. 3

Murder for Two: Free “post-show forum” follows tonight’s performance of this musical comedy brought to life by only two performers. 7 p.m. Sheryl and Harvey White Stage, Old Globe Theatre, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park. Tickets start $29. Visit theoldglobe.org or call 619-234-5623.

WEDNESDAY – FEB. 4

The Sky Tonight: A monthly astronomer-led planetarium show touring the solar system with a new topic each month. This month is “Light Pollution.” 7 p.m. Fleet Science Center, 1875 El Prado, Balboa Park. Visit rhfleet.org.

THURSDAY – FEB. 5

East Village Association Board Meeting: All monthly board meetings are open to the public. 5 p.m. Room 219, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, 1155 Island Ave. For more info visit eastvillagesandiego.com.

—Please send items for inclusion to Editor Morgan M. Hurley at morgan@sdcnn.com.v


FASHION

www.sdcnn.com off next year’s parade as the 2015 Grand Marshal. If you missed all the dog-gone fun activities this year, visit gaslamp. org for next year’s information and parade date.

Fashion Files Diana Cavagnaro Gaslamp goes “to the dogs”

Wish upon a snowflake

Downtown ACE Hardware and Market Veterinary Clinic presented the Gaslamp Holiday Pet Parade on Dec. 14. The afternoon began with a fun Pet Expo that was free to the public. Arrays of booths were set up with dog products such as Bark Bling, Camp Bow Wow, Rosie Barkery, and Four Paw Rescues, and many vendors had “spin the wheel” for added entertainment. As the contestants began to arrive, many dog watchers came out to see all the festivities. At 3 p.m. the contestants began congregating under the Gaslamp archway. The dogs and their owners walked up Fifth Avenue to E Street and then back down Fourth Avenue for a three-quarter mile walk. The sidewalks were filled with crowds of people (and dogs) encouraging them on. The parade was a huge hit, with pets “dressed” in a variety of costumes, such as Santa Claus, reindeers, elves, and an assortment of holiday themes. The afternoon wrapped up with the announcements of the winners, which were presented by DoozyDog Club and The San Diego Humane Society & SPCA. Winner of “Best Costume Made Out of Duct Tape,” presented by Downtown Ace Hardware, was Jackie Silva and Sammie the Maltipoo; “Ugliest Christmas Sweater” went to Scott Bowen and Luca the Cocker Spaniel; “Cutest Critter” was Ronit Kugelmass and Pia the Yorkie; “Best Pet Costume” went to Tiffany Thater and Zoila the Pomeranian; “Best (noncanine) Pet Costume” went to Peter Miller-Keys and Kendra II, the pedigreed Somali cat; “Best Pet Holiday Costume” went to Jennifer and Corey Dobbs and Ferra and Ozzie; winner of “Best Costumed Duo” were Elle North Toyer and Kindle; “Best Costumed Group” went to Jan Savage and Sir Ruffles von Vicious; and “Best in Show” was Heather and Lori Signs with Muttley Cyrus and Rambo as Canine Candyland. The “Best in Show” will lead

Also on Dec. 14 was the “Wish Upon A Snowflake” fashion show and toy drive at Jolt ‘n Joe’s Downtown. This holiday event was presented by Lady Lane and featured an evening of fashion, music, and shopping. Between each segment, guests could do some holiday shopping with incredible jewelry from The Space Drop, beautiful scented candles by Elia Candles, musthave shoes and eyewear by Shoe Traffic, Stick Wit It Apparel, and cosmetics from Mary Kay. Peggy Chisam, a Mary Kay consultant, said that for the last 52 years Mary Kay has donated $3 million a year for domestic violence and women’s cancers. The evening showcased independent designers on the catwalk, and in keeping with the theme, the runway was decorated with snowflakes. The crowd was entertained by tunes from Lavelle and then Digital Lizards of Doom. The lineup featured C.DeveYale, Sass Creation, The Write Fit, and Brooke Journey. Norma Hill photographs art, nature, and graffiti around the world and then turns it into incredible designs by printing on the fabric. One of the standouts was an exquisite green satin skirt with a New York graffiti top, which was finished with Berlin graffiti on the collar and waist. The finale brought Lady Lane — a local designer who creates vintage inspired fashion designs — to the runway. Lane takes the old and turns it into the new. You may have most recently spotted her unique designs at Fashion Week San Diego 2014. Guests were encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy for the charity drive. Event proceeds and toys went to Polinsky Children’s Center and Rady Children’s Hospital.

San Diego Downtown News | January 2015

p.m. It will showcase local artists and feature a fashion show, an art gallery, film screening and musical performances. For more information visit rawartists.org Jan. 30 | In Style Bollywood~The Spice of Life — The 24th annual fashion show and luncheon at the University Club atop Symphony Towers will be hosted by the Iris Auxiliary beginning at 11:30 a.m. Mistress of ceremonies will be Sandra Maas of KUSI-TV and the show will feature Haute Couture fashions by Lizz Russell. Proceeds will benefit San Diego Center for Children. For more information call 619-5631249. Feb. 8 | Winter Bridal Bazaar — Three fashion shows will be presented throughout the day at the San Diego Convention Center. For more information call 760-334-5500. —Diana Cavagnaro is a nationally recognized hat designer and milliner and for the last 20 years she’s operated her business from Downtown San Diego’s historic Gaslamp Quarter while moonlighting in the fashion department at San Diego Mesa College. She can be reached at diana@aheadproductions.com.v

Downtown’s Holiday Pet Parade “Best Costumed Group” winner, Jan Savage and Sir Ruffles von Vicious (Photo by Diana Cavagnaro)

Upcoming Events Jan. 14 | Visionary — this fashion show will be presented by RAW SD at the House of Blues San Diego from 6 – 10

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