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VOLUME 16 ISSUE 11

November 2015 Follow us on Facebook and Twitter sdcnn.com

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Columbia • Core/Civic • Cortez Hill • East Village • Gaslamp/Horton Plaza • Little Italy • Marina

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Paris & Manhattan in San Diego ➤➤ NEWS

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After being at the helm of Film Forum for more than three decades, Ralph DeLauro will see his last screening at the end of November, much to the dismay of longtime fans and followers. (Photo by Ashley Fincham) By Hutton Marshall

Served by the bear ➤➤ LITTLE

ITALY P. 12

A little magic for Little Italy ➤➤ FASHION

P. 23

After running for over 30 years with the San Diego Public Library (SDPL) system, Film Forum — as many San Diegans have come to know it — will close. At November’s end, SDPL will terminate its contract with Ralph DeLauro, the weekly film screening’s wild-haired creator and programmer, replacing the program with comparable free screenings run by library staff. Every Monday for the last three decades, rotating throughout the month between the Central Library and three other library branches, DeLauro has shown films of his choosing while weaving in lectures and Q&A sessions. Films range from old classics like “The Third Man” to new artsy releases like “Nightcrawler,” starring Jake Gyllenhaal. DeLauro’s movie choices are famously unique and unpredictable — a draw for many of Film Forum’s regulars. He also teaches film classes to seniors throughout San Diego and

co-operates Cinema Under the Stars, the popular outdoor movie theater in Mission Hills. Library staff recently informed DeLauro — originally through email — that his program would come to a close in November. According to the staff member, DeLauro said, the library’s decision to end their relationship with him was financially motivated. DeLauro said SDPL paid him $100 per week for his screenings. “What bothered me was ... after 30 years I thought I deserved a sit down and for them to say that the library’s going in a different direction,” DeLauro said. “And yeah, it would have been a very unpleasant conversation for all involved, but to me it would have been the honorable thing to do, and yet [SDPL administrators] have never even talked to me, still.” DeLauro’s wife Carol married him in 1985, a year after he began screening films at the old Downtown central library. She soon began helping him promote Film Forum how-

ever she could, eventually taking things online and arranging guests after her arthritis forced her to stop working. Lately she’s been encouraging dismayed Film Forum attendees to email library administrators, City Councilmembers, and the mayor’s office, to protest DeLauro’s termination, but she said these supporters have been frustrated by the city’s lack of transparency. “The responses are extremely scripted and vague and generic,” Carol said. “But basically they’re all saying, ‘we’ve enjoyed Mr. DeLauro’s contribution and we appreciate him, but we have decided to move in a different direction, and we have a staff member who’s going to be stepping in with community partners. We’re going to do something different.’” “The Library has had a long term relationship with Mr. DeLauro and we are thankful for his service,”

see Film Forum, pg 17

Rethinking a city The millennials are shaping our core By Dave Schwab

Bing would be proud

Index Opinion…...............……6 Best of Downtown........10 East Village News.........14 Town Voices.................18 News Briefs..............…19 Calendar..................22

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Millennials are taking over. And that age group is driving what’s happening Downtown now and into the future, said Kris Michell, president/CEO of Downtown San Diego Partnership (DSDP), at a neighborhood mixer Oct. 20 celebrating Downtown’s newest exhibition, ReThink. DSDP is a member-based nonprofit committed to creating a vital urban center benefiting all of San Diego. Rethink Downtown is a major public exhibition, telling of San Diego’s urban development from its European-settler beginnings to its coming of age as a key American city. The exhibit in the Rethink Gallery at

(left) Kris Michell shares ReThink Downtown concepts to a crowd. (Photo by Stacy Keck) 700 First Ave. is free to the public and reveals clues to the city’s next exciting chapter. At the mixer, Michell shared recent demographic studies being done by the city and UC San Diego on the changing Downtown landscape during a

glimpse ahead at the next 30 years of development before a roomful of local residents and merchants. The millennial generation or “Generation Y,” are those born after

see ReThink, pg 15

Properties, long in limbo, transferred back to the city Morgan M. Hurley | Editor It has been four years since Gov. Brown, seeking relief for the budget crisis, dissolved the state’s redevelopment agencies as of Oct., 1, 2011, which led to the dissolvement of San Diego’s on Feb. 1, 2012. Since then, hundreds of ongoing or planned projects around the city have been in a state of flux, and while the city’s establishment of Civic San Diego picked up most of the slack, a great many projects were still held in abeyance. On Oct. 22, however, the city got some good news. “Forty-two properties once owned by San Diego’s redevelopment agency are expected to remain in local control now that the California Department of Finance has approved the city’s long-range property management plan for them,” said a press release from the office of San Diego City Attorney Jan Goldsmith. Of those properties, 18 of them are for public use; parks, pedestrian walkways, streets, and even a future fire station. Two others, Horton Plaza Park and Plaza — currently under seemingly endless construction — will be transferred based on previous contracts as will the Lyceum Theatre, and 22 other properties are being transferred for future redevelopment. Those last 22 properties have one more hurdle to finalize the transfer. “The City Council will need to approve the compensation agreement(s) for the future development sites,” said Paul Cooper, executive assistant to the city attorney. “City staff and the city attorney’s office are coordinating many details with respect to the compensation agreement(s), and any agreements will need to be negotiated between the City and other affected taxing entities, such as the County, the school districts, and special districts.” The representative said the process is expected to take at least 6-12 months. Had the state not acted, many of the properties — located in Centre City, Barrio Logan, Chollas View, Liberty Station, City Heights, North Park, Mount Hope, Linda Vista and Stockton — were at risk to be auctioned off. Much of the thanks goes to those who worked on the property management plan, which was a collaboration between various departments within the city —

see Properties, pg 7


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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FEATURE

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Beer lovers (above and below) enjoying events during last year’s San Diego Brew Fest (Courtesy Rascon Media)

Craft beer-palooza See what’s on tap during San Diego Beer Week By Kai Oliver-Kurtin The seventh annual San Diego Beer Week (SDBW) is set for Nov. 6 – 15 and is expected to be the biggest celebration yet. Produced by the San Diego Brewers Guild, the weeklong beer extravaganza includes more than 500 events taking place in San Diego County within the span of 10 days. The guild represents all 115 breweries in San Diego, with another 40 currently in development. It’s the largest guild within any region of the U.S., and according to Kevin Hopkins, SDBG president, about two new breweries open every week in California (based on applications filed). “We represent a large number of well-known, high-caliber breweries that are distributed not only throughout the U.S., but internationally as well,” Hopkins said. Kicking off SDBW is the VIP Brewer Takeover on Nov. 6 from 6 – 9 p.m., featuring rare specialty beers, barrel-aged brews and unlimited food samples — with many of the major players in the craft beer industry expected to be in attendance. The following day from 2 – 5 p.m., SDBW continues on Broadway Pier with even more breweries during the Guild Festival. Selling out for the first time last year, the Guild Festival draws more than 3,000 people to enjoy craft beer, live music, food for purchase, and a ceremonial tapping of the cask. “The craft beer industry is really burgeoning across the U.S.,” Hopkins said. “As we continue to grow toward 20 percent of the market share, I think it’s just amazing where we’ve come in 25 years.” The other major event is The Beer Garden, the official SDBW closing ceremony held on Nov. 15 from noon – 3 p.m. at The Lodge at Torrey Pines. The Beer Garden will feature food and beer pairings from 12 chefs and 24 breweries. Since interest is high but space is limited, breweries had to enter a lottery system to participate in the event. “We’re extremely proud to represent $600 million worth of impact to the local area, bringing business to the hotels and restaurants in and around the Downtown San Diego area,” Hopkins said. The SDBG establishes the dates and framework for SDBW, but brewers and retailers schedule their own events throughout the week. All events are listed on the SDBW website at sdbw.org/schedule. For more information, tickets or to check out other events not listed, visit sdbw.org. —Kai Oliver-Kurtin is a local freelance writer. She enjoys covering events, restaurant news, culture and entertainment. Contact her at kai. sdnews@gmail.com.v

Although there are hundreds of events going on throughout the week all across the county, below are 12 noteworthy events to look forward to during SDBW 2015. • Nov. 6 | Rare Beer Breakfast at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens in Escondido — enjoy a breakfast buffet with 15 beer tastings and live jazz music. • Nov. 6 | Mission Bay BrewCation at The Dana in Mission Bay — taste food and beer pairings from 11 local restaurants and breweries. • Nov. 7 | Meet the Homebrewers at The Homebrewer in North Park — learn about home brewing, with brewing demonstrations and refreshments. • Nov. 7 | The Wedge Artisan Cheese Festival & Craft Beer and Wine Pairing — an artisan cheese pairing with craft beer or wine served in more than 20 participating shops along Grand Avenue, in addition to music, art and exhibits. • Nov. 7 | Bikes, Brews and Brats beginning at Cal Coast Cycles in Normal Heights — presented by Green Flash Brewing Company, take an urban mountain bike ride through Balboa Park and Mission Hills, ending at Regal Beagle for Green Flash beer and a bratwurst. • Nov. 8 | Karl Strauss Beer Dinner at BO-beau Kitchen & Garden in La Mesa — the brewmaster at Karl Strauss will discuss the company’s evolution during a four-course beer-pairing dinner with beer-centric menu items. • Nov. 10 | Sculpin IPA 4-Ways at Barrel Republic in Oceanside — celebrate IPA by tasting and talking about four variations from Ballast Point. • Nov. 11 | Societe Beer-Pairing Dinner in Del Mar — brewers from Societe Brewing Company will be on hand to discuss their beers, with food pairings from Cucina Enoteca. • Nov. 12 | Craft Beer + Bites at Silo in Makers Quarter in the East Village — check out 15 breweries, food trucks, lawn games and live music.

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

Stylish homes. Fetching parks.

What does it feel like to live in an award-winning home? It feels like the best of everything. It feels beautiful and intuitive. It feels like someone thought equally about what you want and what you need. It feels like Civita, an urban community recognized time and again for designing the most chic, most livable modern homes. And with the new 14-acre park opening next year, Civita offers high-style and open spaces, both inside and out.

APEX

Best Architecture and Interior Design– 2015 ICON Award Single-family Detached Homes 2,092 to 2,229 sq ft Priced from the high $700,000s

LUCENT LOFTS Best Interior Design–2015 ICON Award Best Architecture, Interior Design and Attached Community–2014 ICON Awards Single-level and Penthouse Flats 1,464 to 1,878 sq ft Priced from the mid $700,000s

FRAME & FOCUS

Best Interior Design– 2015 ICON Award Motor Court Homes & Rowhomes 1,306 to 1,985 sq ft Priced from the mid $600,000s

• Nov. 13 | Baja Beer Craft at Mingei International Museum in Balboa Park — sample beer from some of the most popular craft breweries in Baja, paired with food, live entertainment and curated art. • Nov. 13 | Cask in Glory in Barrio Logan — Border X Brewing Company in Barrio Logan will unveil its cask program with two ales, accompanied by lengua nachos. • Nov. 13 | Battle of the Guilds at Toronado in North Park — drink beers from San Diego, Los Angeles and San Francisco to see which regional brewers guild deserves to inherit the prized Golden Keg.

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Civita Boulevard off Mission Center Road

civitalife.com

Civita is a master plan development of Quarry Falls, LLC. All information is accurate as of date of publication, but information and pricing is subject to change at any time.


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

Second chances

FEATURE

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New nonprofit strives to feed and train the needy with reclaimed food By Dave Schwab Restaurateur Chuck Samuelson had an “epiphany” when he saw usable produce being needlessly tossed away. “I saw cases and cases of apples being sorted through and much of it thrown in the dumpster because it was bruised or had soft spots or was cut in shipment or had a little funny shape,” Samuelson said. “That just stuck in my head — all that waste. “If I had those apples, I would make apple pie, jelly sauce, etc., not throw it away.” That inspired the former food manager for Stone Brewing Co. to spearhead the creation of a new nonprofit, Kitchens For Good, located in recently acquired space in the Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation in Market Creek east of Downtown San Diego. The new nonprofit seeks to give the area’s hungry and its unemployed a hand up. “In the United States, 40 percent of all edible food is disposed of, half of which is fresh produce with minor cosmetic imperfections,” said Samuelson, founder and president of Kitchens For Good. “In Southern California, we produce enough food, yet still see one in five San Diegans who are unsure of where their next meal will come from.” Samuelson’s new innovative approach to tackling hunger is to look at it as a full cycle, not only treating its immediate needs, but address-

ing it at its sources. “By training individuals, previously perceived as unemployable, to work in San Diego, we will serve to shorten food service and shelter lines,” Samuelson said. Kitchens For Good already has started these unique programs that work hand-in-hand to end hunger and poverty in San Diego: • Project Reclaim — establishes a system for sourcing surplus and cosmetically imperfect produce from local farmers and wholesalers. With an average estimated 140,000 tons of food reaching San Diego’s Miramar landfill each year, Kitchens For Good aims to effectively decrease the county’s output of food waste, while rescuing viable produce that would otherwise be disposed of. • Project Nourish — rescued foods comprised of fresh fruits, vegetables and other farm-fresh produce, will feed the Project Nourish program. As the second step in the Kitchens For Good model, produce and fresh foods will be gathered at the Jacobs Center kitchen for preparation of healthy and nutritious pre-packaged meals. • Project Launch — the establishment of a 13-week culinary training school in January 2016 will mark the third, and arguably most important, leg of Kitchens For Good’s programs. Project Launch, a free educational program, will train unemployed and underemployed individuals to work in the hospitality industry, San Diego’s second

(top left) Chuck Samuelson, Banquet Chef Kevin Ohl and Executive Chef Darren Street at the recent San Diego Press Club awards; (top right) Samuelson shares the nonprofit’s message; (above) Street and Ohl prepare food (Courtesy Kitchens For Good) largest industry for employment. Held at the Kitchens For Good facility, students will assist in the creation of healthy meals for Project Nourish, while adhering to a nationally recognized curriculum

developed by LA Kitchen and DC Central Kitchens in Los Angeles. In addition to gaining hard skills and experience, graduates will receive job placement and counseling services to ensure long-term stability

and success. Samuelson’s new career direction came sharply into focus once he realized he could make a difference. After that, he set about consulting with hunger relief groups, food banks and others, including the Leichtag Foundation, to begin exploring ways to implement his notion for re-purposing slightly imperfect food that would otherwise be wasted. That led them collectively to acquire space at the kitchen and events center of the Jacobs Center For Neighborhood Innovation in September. “I really didn’t want to do the traditional nonprofit model where you live or die by grants or donations,” Samuelson said, adding that his new approach builds on the idea that “kitchens can be an economic engine for good in their communities.” It’s Samuelson’s grand plan to transform the kitchen operation at the Jacobs Center by turning it into a self-funding and self-sustaining private catering company that will both provide jobs and strive to end local hunger. “We believe we can do $1.4 million worth of business in events and catering,” he said. Profits from that will be reused for Kitchen For Good’s new culinary training program and Samuelson said the venture is a win-win for everybody. “We’re making and providing nourishing meals, and we’re giving culinary training to people to help get them out of poverty,” he said, adding that all aspects of Kitchens For Good tie in with the concept of creating an integrated circular food system that feeds on itself. “We give students the products [produce] to work with to make meals for senior centers, school lunches and for the hungry, and revenues from events and catering

see Kitchens, pg 17


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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OPINION

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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123 Camino De La Reina Ste. 202 East San Diego, CA 92108 (619) 519-7775 sdcnn.com Facebook.com/sandiegodowntownnews Twitter: @sddowntownnews

EDITOR Morgan M. Hurley (619) 961-1960 morgan@sdcnn.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jeff Clemetson, x119 Ken Williams, x102 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Toni G. Atkins Charlene Baldridge Diana Cavagnaro Andy Cohen Christopher Gomez Hutton Marshall Dan McAllister Johnny McDonald Kris Michell Kai Oliver-Kurtin Jake Romero Frank Sabatini Jr. Dave Schwab Carol Williams COPY EDITOR Dustin Lothspeich WEB & SOCIAL MEDIA Jen Van Tieghem, x118 jen@sdcnn.com

Guest Editorial

Letters

Let’s help military EMTs in their transition to civilian careers

Inner city transit

By Nina Mojena Military veterans receive some of the best medical training and experience available when serving our country. Their sacrifices, commitment to duty, and ability to get the job done in austere environments make them exceptionally well suited for working as EMTs and paramedics in our communities upon their honorable separation from the U.S. Armed Services. Unfortunately, experienced military medics are often required to duplicate their medical training at the most basic level to receive certification to be hired for a civilian EMS job. The Veteran Emergency Medical Technicians Support Act of 2015 (S. 453/H.R. 1818) will help veterans return to work upon their completion of military duty and reduce unemployment among veterans. In 2012, 10,000 military medics separated and entered the civilian workforce. This important legislation makes it easier and faster for veterans who served as military medics to earn certification as civilian emergency medical technicians, and serves to fill an essential public function in communities across our nation. According to a recent Bureau of Labor Statistic’s Occupational Outlook, there will be 55,000 new civilian EMT and paramedic jobs created between 2012 and 2022. The projected job growth rate is 23 percent, much faster than the average for all occupations. S. 453/H.R. 1818 addresses these issues by: l Amending the Public Health Service Act to direct the Department of Health and Human Services to establish a demonstration program for states with a shortage of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) to streamline state requirements and procedures to assist

veterans who completed military EMT training to meet state EMT certification, licensure, and other requirements; l Determining the extent to which the requirements for the education, training, and skill level of emergency medical technicians in the state are equivalent to requirements for the education, training, and skill level of military emergency medical technicians; l Identifying methods, such as waivers, for military emergency medical technicians to forego or meet any such equivalent state requirements; l Giving priority to states who demonstrate a shortage of emergency medical technicians; and, most importantly, l Requiring no additional funding. Please write to all of your representatives and urge them to support this bill. —Nina Mojena is a San Diego resident and employed by the U. S. Senate.v

Very cool! [see “Downtown Partnership News: Technologydriven success for a new urban environment,” Vol. 16, Issue 9 or at tinyurl.com/ohcv43u] In 2016, San Diego residents should be able to cruise around in electric vehicles while enjoying high-speed Internet (speeds greater than one gig!) courtesy of Webpass’s fiber deployment in the same area. And it looks like those electric cars provide some great advertising real estate for Downtown businesses as well! —Brooke Dodson, via sandiegodowntownnews.com I saw these when they were being tested for one weekend in August in Hillcrest – and jumped on one. Was a great concept and they’ll take you anywhere in the area! —Benny Cartwright, via sandiegodowntownnews.com

Homeless questions So does that mean I should not contribute via the red box meters? [see “Editorial: Street feedings: a bridge or a barrier?” Vol. 16, Issue 10, or at tinyurl.com/om6mw5a] Btw, where can I find how much money is actually collected through these meters annually? Why was the homeless guy so mad at me when he asked me for money and I told him I put it into the red meter? Also I gave a homeless guy a nice turkey sandwich — he tossed it in the trash and asked me for cash … see above re: homeless guy so mad. —Kevin Wilson, via sandiegodowntownnews.com v

Poll of the

Month Last Poll Results:

This Month’s Question:

Are you fed up with the Chargers controversy, or still a die hard fan?

Will you participate in Black Friday?

88% Fed up 12% Die hard fan

Yes, I do every year Maybe, if I see something I need No, REI has a better idea

To cast your vote, visit sandiegodowntownnews.com.

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CREATIVE DIRECTOR Todd Kammer, x115 PRODUCTION ARTISTS Suzanne Dzialo, x111 SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR Mike Rosensteel (619) 961-1958 mike@sdcnn.com ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Andrew Bagley 619-961-1956 andrew@sdcnn.com Sloan Gomez, x104 sloan@sdcnn.com Lisa Hamel, x107 lisa@sdcnn.com True Flores (619) 454-0115 true@sdcnn.com ACCOUNTING Priscilla Umel-Martinez (619) 961-1962 accounting@sdcnn.com WEB DESIGNER Kim Espinoza kim@kespinoza.com PUBLISHER David Mannis (619) 961-1951 david@sdcnn.com

OPINIONS/LETTERS: San Diego Downtown News encourages letters to the editor and guest editorials. Please email either to morgan@sdcnn.com and include your phone number and address for verification. We reserve the right to edit letters for brevity and accuracy. Letters and guest editorials do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or staff. SUBMISSIONS/NEWS TIPS: Press releases and story ideas are welcomed. Send press releases, tips, photos or story ideas to morgan@sdcnn.com. For breaking news and investigative story ideas contact the editor by phone or email. DISTRIBUTION: San Diego Downtown News is distributed free on the first Friday of every month. COPYRIGHT 2015. All rights reserved.


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Notes from Toni Speaker of the Assembly Toni G. Atkins I’ve been thinking a lot about military veterans lately. It doesn’t seem like it was that long ago, but San Diego’s annual Stand Down for homeless vets was in July — it’s one of the events I’m most proud to support and attend. And last month, I took part in a veterans homelessness summit put together by Mike McConnell, a passionate and tireless advocate for ending homelessness in San Diego if there ever was one. As a group, we talked about who needs help, what kind of help they need, what resources are being deployed, what the gaps in assistance are, and how to implement the solutions that we know will work. For my part, I spoke about the progress being made in the wake of the voter-approved Proposition 41, which is funding affordable housing for veterans, as well as the help that the state’s cap-and-trade program is bringing to the table, and the need to pass my affordablehousing bill, AB 1335. November is an especially appropriate time to think about veterans. Veterans Day is Nov. 11 and it’s also the month when we’re reminded to give thanks, and I am incredibly thankful for their service to our country, whether they were drafted and sent to Vietnam or they volunteered and did multiple tours in the Middle East.

FROM PAGE 1

PROPERTIES city attorney, comptroller, street division, real estate assets, economic development and park and recreation — with Civic San Diego taking the lead. “Our attorneys devoted more than 1,500 hours over three years to formulating the best strategy for managing these properties within the framework of the redevelopment dissolution laws, and to help protect the properties against state overreach,” Goldsmith stated in the release. “We can all be proud of their work on behalf of the City, and to the benefit of some of our oldest urban neighborhoods.” Councilmember Todd Gloria was contacted via email to comment on news of the transfers. “The city and neighborhoods have great visions for many of these properties, and I’m grateful the state’s decision will bring them one step closer to reality,” Gloria said. “The North Park mini-park site and the east block of East Village Green will add long-awaited open space amenities, and I’m even more excited that the city has retained the property for Fire Station 2 on the west side of Downtown.” According to the City Attorney’s office, the following are some of the properties on the list, which are located Downtown: Balboa Theater: This historic theater completed a $26.5 million restoration in 2008, and will continue use as a premier performing and cultural arts facility. Chinese Historical Museum: This museum and cultural center located at 404 Third Ave., was constructed in 1927 and rehabilitated in 1995-1996. It includes a Chinese garden, gates and a pagoda that reflect Downtown’s Asian-Pacific thematic historic district. East Block of East Village

POLITICS / NEWS Did you know that there are still nearly 850,000 living American veterans of World War II, out of a total of more than 16 million service members from that era? This is also the time of year when I get to spend a lot of time at home in San Diego, now that the year’s legislative session has ended. I’m able to get out and about, talking to community groups of all sorts and sizes. I enjoy these encounters with interested and engaged citizens and the opportunity to update them on the many things the Legislature has accomplished throughout the year. Among the policy areas that interest me the most is veterans affairs, and here are some of the things I’ve been able to tell folks about how we’re making progress: l We’ve provided additional funding for county veterans service officers, who play critical advocacy and outreach roles, helping California veterans access the benefits they’ve earned. San Diego County received $238,747 in additional funding for this effort. l We’ve also pushed to create permanent state “Strike Force” teams at federal veteran claims offices. Since September 2013, the San Diego Strike Force has reviewed 14,124 veteran claims, resulting in $19.5 million in lumpsum awards and $3.1 million in monthly awards. l And we’ve helped fund the California National Guard’s Work for Warriors program, which connects guard members and reservists with jobs. Between 2012 and 2015, 172 local candidates found employment. The United States is truly a great country, but one area where

it needs significant improvement is making sure all of its military veterans are adequately served after they’ve served us so selflessly. On Nov. 26, while you’re talking around the dinner table about all the things for which you’re grateful — loving family, loyal friends, good health, plenty of tasty food and drink — maybe put in a nice word or two for our veterans who’ve answered the call of duty. And have a wonderful Thanksgiving. Around the District: Gov. Jerry Brown signed nine of my bills this year, including AB 226, inspired by our own Tuna Harbor Dockside Market, each Saturday on the Tuna Harbor Pier near Seaport Village, and AB 392, which makes the San Diego River Conservancy permanent … Don’t forget that the open enrollment period for Covered California began Nov. 1 and continues through Dec. 15. See coveredca.com for more details and new coverage options, including dental ... I hope you’ll turn out for San Diego’s Veterans Day events on Nov. 11 — the Parade on North Harbor Drive, which I’m happy to be part of, and Veterans Day on the USS Midway. Admission to the museum will be free that day for those with military ID.

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT The Laundry Room 1955 El Cajon Blvd. | San Diego, CA 92104 619-795-9588 | SDLaundryRoom.com Summer is coming to a close The relaxed summer schedule is coming to a close and fall is fast approaching. This means back to the structured work and or school schedules. For some, this means getting the kids to bed and up on time, making sure homework is completed and, for others, getting back to the work routine. And let’s not forget, dealing with dreaded weekend laundry. Laundry chores can consume an entire day on the weekend. Wouldn’t it be nice not to worry about laundry? Wouldn’t it be nice to have the weekend back to yourself? The Laundry Room provides next day Fluff & Fold service. Drop off your laundry and pick up the next day professionally washed, dried, folded and bagged. It doesn’t get any easier than that. However, if you enjoy doing laundry, try The Laundry Room’s happy hour specials from 6:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays for all two-load washers and Wednesdays for all six- and eightload washers. The Laundry Room where every wash is San-0-tyzed!

—Toni G. Atkins is the Speaker of the California State Assembly. For more information, please visit her website, asmdc.org/speaker where you can sign up for her enewsletter or get the latest news on legislation and other activities. You also may follow her on Twitter, @ toniatkins.v

Green: This block (bounded by F, G, 14th and 15th streets) is to become half of a 4.1-acre grassy park with other amenities that will make it the largest park in eastern Downtown. Fire Station No. 2: The property at 875 W. Cedar St. has plans to become a new three-story 16,000-square-feet fire-rescue facility serving waterfront properties along Harbor Drive and Pacific Highway. St. Joseph’s Park: The block in the Cortez neighborhood is the future location of a full block grassy park with St. Joseph’s Cathedral as its iconic backdrop. A complete list of all the properties can be found here: tinyurl.com/ qdghtqq. —Morgan M. Hurley is the editor of San Diego Downtown News. She can be reached at morgan@ sdcnn.com.v

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT The SDSU School of Theatre, Television, and Film combines the arts with the traditional roles of the university by teaching the theory, history, literature, and crafts of theatre and film. The School works to benefit the community by providing educational and entertaining arts performances, particularly to San Diego youth. Utilizing innovative curriculum, interdisciplinary initiatives, and research into evolving technologies, the school is committed to preparing the next generation of entertainment arts professionals. Don’t miss Gertrude Stein’s Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights on the Don Powell Stage, Dec. 2 – 6. In Stein’s poetic retelling of the classic Faust myth, an Edison-like Doctor Faustus has made a deal with the devil: he’s sold his soul for electric light. A collaboration with the Schools of Music and Dance, and Art and Design, this production brings together elements of dance, music, film, art, and theatre to create the multi-layered universe. For more info, visit ttf.sdsu.edu.

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

The Point Loma Patients Consumer Co-Op 3452 Hancock St. San Diego, CA 92110 619-574-0415 | plpcc.org The Point Loma Patients Consumer Co-Op (PLPCC), is the first medical marijuana dispensary legally approved in Council District 2 under the city’s new ordinance drafted more than a year ago. PLPCC was founded to provide a new model of excellence in medical cannabis. The PLPCC offers an extensive formulary of high-quality medications with varying levels of THC and CBD to meet treatment needs. We offer a complimentary medical marijuana delivery service (with minimum order) to the greater San Diego area, including Point Loma, Pacific Beach, La Jolla, Chula Vista, Mission Valley, El Cajon, North Park, Downtown San Diego, and more. Call for daily specials!


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

DINING

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Du-par’s famous pancakes are coming (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.)

A new egg-based eatery will open in November. (Courtesy The Crack Shack)

A former mechanics shop next door to Juniper & Ivy in Little Italy will open as The Crack Shack the week of Nov. 9. The much-anticipated eatery, co-owned by celebrity chef Richard Blais and entrepreneur Michael Rosen, promises a playful menu showcasing freerange, non-GMO eggs and the chickens that lay them. Blais and Rosen also run Juniper & Ivy on the same lot. Their latest venture features a 5,000-square-foot space with custom-made communal tables, a bocce ball court, a nine-foot-tall chicken statue, and an outdoor dining area. A preliminary peek at the menu reveals pollo asada sandwiches with schmaltz fries, chicken-fried farro with a sunny-side-up egg, and protein bowls filled with grains, smoked chicken breast and soft-boiled eggs. 2266 Kettner Blvd., 619-269-9036. The 12th annual San Diego Bay Wine & Food Festival will be held Nov. 16 – 22. It features a series of chefhosted meals and wine and cooking classes around town, as well as a lavish “grand tasting,” which will take place from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., Nov. 21, at Embarcadero Marina Park North. The outdoor event gives visitors a chance to sample wines from more than 150 wineries and foods from dozens of San Diego’s top chefs and regional gourmet food companies. Among the restaurants taking part from the Downtown area are Eddie V’s Prime Seafood, the Grant Grill, Royal India, Comun Kitchen and Tavern, and more. General admission is $135. Tickets can be purchased at sandiegowineclassic.com or the gate. 500 Kettner Blvd. After operating in a smallish space for nearly a decade on F Street in the East Village, Salad Style is settling into larger digs in Downtown’s west end, at 611 B St. The eatery, known for its fresh meal-size salads and savory homemade soups, is due to reopen in the coming month. 619-255-6731.

Fruit loops and Apple Jacks cover the “cereal donut.” (Courtesy E.Vil Donuts)

The Gaslamp Quarter is making way for a 24/7 eatery as Du-par’s Restaurant & Bakery prepares to open by the end of the year at the corner of Fourth and Fifth avenues. With locations in Las Vegas and the Los Angeles area, the restaurant is famous for its homestyle meals, freshly baked pies, and jumbo pancakes, which are served with melted, clarified butter. Biff Naylor, who is the third owner of the company since it was founded in 1938 in Los Angeles, closed the previous San Diego location on Midway Drive last month in preparation for the move to Downtown. His new location sits beneath Oceanaire Seafood Room. The space, he said, is about 80 percent the size in comparison, but will still serve breakfast, lunch and dinner around the clock. 440 J St.

Chef Chad White makes his debut next month on Bravo’s Top Chef. (Courtesy Comun Kitchen & Tavern) Season 13 of Bravo’s Top Chef reality TV show will feature a few familiar faces from the San Diego restaurant scene. Competing in the show’s new season for the “top chef” title is Chad White, who owns Comun Kitchen & Tavern in East Village and La Justina in Tijuana. He is one of 17 contestants featured in the series, which focuses this time around on chefs based in various California cities. Also appearing in the season are chefs Javier Plascencia of the new Bracero in Little Italy, and Richard Blais of Juniper & Ivy (and the upcoming Crack Shack). Blais is a former Top Chef All Stars winner who has been serving as a judge for the show for the past few years. The season premieres on Bravo Dec. 2 and 3. The craze for zany donuts is well represented at the new E. Vil Donuts, which opened recently in East Village with a menu that allows customers to choose from a wide range of toppings, including various ice creams and breakfast cereals. Head baker Kyle Wells said the top sellers so far have been the maple-bacon bars and apple-pie donuts. His latest rollout is the Wesley Snipes, a chocolate mousse-filled donut dipped in chocolate glaze and topped with Oreo crumbs. In the pipeline are gingerbread donuts and chicken-and-waffle donuts. The latter, he says, “is taking some time because it’s a little tougher to create.” 565 Park Blvd., 619-795-7661.

—Frank Sabatini Jr can be reached at fsabatini@san.rr.com.v


DINING

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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

9

TIMELESS ELEGANCE ON BROADWAY Restaurant Review Frank Sabatini Jr. When the former Pickwick Hotel reopened as the chic Sofia Hotel in 2007 after receiving a multimillion dollar makeover, it included a gastronomic cornerstone named Currant American Brasserie. Staying true to the building’s 1927 roots, the architects bucked modern design trends in lieu of checkered flooring, stately arched columns and soft chandelier lighting. The result is a dining atmosphere that feels part Paris and part Manhattan. Currant’s bill of fare mingles French classics with contemporaryAmerican cuisine as well as a few Italian-inspired dishes. The food is graceful and comforting, and especially luxurious when encroaching on Chef Walter Manikowski’s open-faced croque monsieur or the double-cut grilled pork chop buried beneath a mesh of watermelon radishes, braised fennel and parcooked red onions. Manikowski, a certified chef of the American Culinary Federation, has helmed Currant’s kitchen for six years. He sources produce from local farms and appeases discerning consumers by making regular, seasonal changes to the menu. The “market salad” recently captured an autumn bounty of

(clockwise) Green gimlet; gnocchi with lemon cream and black truffles; grilled pork chop with fennel and watermelon radishes; seasonal salad (Photos by Frank Sabatini, Jr.) sweet pears, juicy persimmons and luscious pomegranate seeds mingling with feta and fresh arugula, all dressed exquisitely in light Champagne vinaigrette. Oddly, the restaurant’s namesake berry seen crawling up a few columns in hand-painted form doesn’t appear in the food too often, except occasionally in salads, cheese plates or a fly-by-night sauce. “Currants have such a short season,” Manikowski said. “But we make use of them when they’re around.” Complementing our salad was an urn of classic onion soup gratinee capped with Gruyere cheese rather than inferior Swiss cheese that some restaurants use when cutting costs. The broth was richly flavored with Port wine and judiciously salted. As an herby, booze chaser, we imbibed on green gimlets garnished with jumbo basil leaves. The presence of refreshing cucumber puree

CURRANT AMERICAN BRASSERIE 140 W. Broadway 619-702-6309 currantrestaurant.com Prices: Starters, $4.95 to $15.95; entrees, $12.95 to $31.95 in the drink did a fine job camouflaging the high-octane unity of Tanqueray, Cointreau and absinthe. Other starters include roasted veal meatballs over mascarpone polenta, asparagus-prosciutto salad with a farm egg, and “popcorn of the moment,” which I savored in a previous visit when it was strewn with black truffle peelings. This time around, we enjoyed a bigger dose of the truffles set atop potato gnocchi. But the knockout

component was the pond of silky lemon and white wine sauce sitting beneath the bite-size dumplings. Rich and zesty, it was the dish’s show stealer that left us discretely spooning every last drop from the bowl. The chef puts an American spin on the aforementioned croque monsieur by using Virginia baked ham instead of the classic Black Forest variety. The result is a homier, more familiar-tasting sandwich, served open-faced but otherwise traditional with dollops of béchamel sauce and a hefty blanket of toasted Gruyere cheese. In regards to the pork chop, we couldn’t finish it due to its impressive girth. Just as well, since there is nothing more sinful for lunch the next day than a juicy bone-in chop covered in root vegetables, and with creamy celery root puree sitting alongside. The latter tasted better than buttery mashed potatoes, due likely to a generous dose of cream in the recipe. Ranking among the top sellers are steak frites, filet mignon, gingermaple duck confit, braised short rib ravioli, and the “brasserie burger” topped with cornichon-Dijon aioli and Irish white cheddar. The beauty of Currant is that you can dine on sophisticated white-linen fare or opt for simpler

dishes you’d encounter in a Parisian brasserie. The experience is what you make it, and without the pinkyfinger pretense of a fine-dining establishment, despite its tastefully classic confines. Skipping over a tempting Stump Jump dessert wine from Australia, we took a jaunt to the Land Down Under nonetheless with a dish called Pavlova, something Australians and New Zealanders have both laid claim to. Offered this day as a special, it featured stiffened meringue topped with late-season berries glazed in citrusy Spanish Liqueur 43 — a fitting finale to San Diego’s endless summer and perhaps a signal that we’ll soon start seeing those tart, little currants pop into Currant’s fall dishes. —Frank Sabatini Jr. is the author of “Secret San Diego” (ECW Press), and began his local writing career more than two decades ago as a staffer for the former San Diego Tribune. You can reach him at fsabatini@san.rr.com.v


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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POLITICS

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Congressional Watch Andy Cohen Welcome to the November edition of the San Diego Congressional Watch. Congress narrowly averted catastrophe at the end of October, with outgoing Republican Speaker John Boehner taking advantage of his lame duck status to team with House Democrats to pass crucial budget legislation. The “Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015” passed 266-167, largely along party lines. The approval of the budget act ensures that there will be no government shutdown for the time being, and that the U.S. government will not default on its debts, which would have catastrophic economic consequences. All but one of the 187 Democrats voted in support of the act — essentially voting in favor of keeping the government running and avoiding default — with only 79 Republicans joining them. Among the Republican ‘no’ votes: Darrell Issa (R-49) and Duncan Hunter (R-50). “I will not sell our future for this year’s budget,” Issa said in a press release. “Americans expect Congress to be the force that reins in Washington’s out-of-control spending, including an administration that has grown our federal bureaucracy to record levels.” The deal “avoids the economic disaster that would ensue from breaching the debt ceiling, which we are just days away again,” said Scott Peters (D-52). “I supported today’s deal because it gives necessary sequester relief to both the military and numerous domestic programs that have struggled to

provide needed services to working families in San Diego.” “This bipartisan agreement is promising progress for working families and the American people,” said Susan Davis (D-53), who noted that the budget provides “critical investments in medical research, infrastructure, early education, and national security.” But really what this budget deal does is take away the possibility of House Republicans taking the economy hostage over Planned Parenthood funding or Hillary Clinton’s emails. Last month we noted that Kevin McCarthy, the Majority Leader in the House of Representatives who hails from Bakersfield, California, was the leading candidate and presumed successor to John Boehner (R-OH) to become Speaker, arguably the second most powerful position in the country. Boehner announced his retirement in September after having grown tired of being (figuratively) beaten bloody by the most conservative factions of his own party and attempting to manage the unmanageable. But after a series of missteps and gaffes — including an admission that the House special committee investigating the 2012 terror attacks in Benghazi, Libya, was a political exercise designed to damage the campaign of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton — McCarthy was forced to step aside. Enter Darrell Issa (R-49), the controversial former chair of the House Oversight and Government Reform committee, who offered himself as a candidate for Speaker. Issa made a name for himself as enemy in chief of the Obama administration, overseeing several extensive, yet baseless and ultimately fruitless investigations into the

executive branch at the cost of tens of millions of taxpayer dollars. There’s no doubt an Issa speakership would have made for outstanding political theater, particularly given the unmitigated disaster his term as head of the oversight committee is considered to be, by both Democrats and Republicans. But alas, it was not to be. House Republicans elected Paul Ryan (R-WI) to step into what has become the worst job in Washington, despite the power it holds. Since his term on the oversight committee has ended, however, Issa has found more constructive uses for his office. He has been a staunch advocate for open data legislation to bolster government transparency, and in a recent Washington Post story, Scott Peters (D-52) credited Issa with convincing his House Republican colleagues to authorize the $500 million needed to complete the San Ysidro border crossing expansion and modernization project, which began in 2009 but has lagged along for several years due to lack of funding. Making it easier to cross the border with Mexico is typically an anathema in Republican politics, but Issa sold it as an economic issue for the San Diego region and helped win funding approval. Juan Vargas (D-51) teamed with Republican Florida Congressmember Thomas Rooney to introduce legislation that would allow the National Institutes of Health to establish a privately owned and managed investment fund to provide desperately needed funding for basic research to find cures for rare diseases. “The life sciences industry desperately needs help to overcome the ‘valley of death’,” said Vargas

San Diego Downtown News | November in a statement. “Recent advancements in genetics and biomedicine are leading to incredible research projects and novel therapies with the possibility of changing the lives of many patients who suffer from rare diseases. “However, the current lack of financing is leaving many promising therapies gathering dust when they could be saving lives,” Vargas continued. “The RaD Fund would allow for a larger number of biomedical projects to be funded, and thereby increase the likelihood for new cures to be found faster, more efficiently and with greater efficacy.” Susan Davis weighed in on the Chargers stadium quest, penning a letter to NFL Vice President Eric Grubman, who is overseeing the NFL-to-Los Angeles derby, and Commissioner Roger Goodell. In the letter, Davis emphasized San Diego’s growing innovation economy, status as a tourist destination, and the bi-national nature of our region — which could be viewed as a natural avenue for the league to expand its reach into Mexico (something the Padres and MLB have stressed in the past), among other virtues of the San Diego market. “No matter where their stadium is, the Chargers are an integral part of our community and civic identity,” Davis wrote. “We have some spectacular places for them to play, but the real question is not where the Chargers should play in San Diego. It is whether it’s worth it for them to play here. The answer is yes — it’s worth it for the Chargers and it’s worth it for San Diego.” —Andy Cohen is a local freelance writer. Reach him at ac76@ sbcglobal.net.v

Rep. Susan Davis, D-53 2700 Adams Ave. #102 San Diego, CA 92116 Local: 619-280-5353 Washington: 202-225-2040 house.gov/susandavis Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-50 1611 N. Magnolia Ave. #310 El Cajon, CA 92019 619-448-5201 202-225-5672 hunter.house.gov Rep. Darrell Issa, R-49 1800 Thibodo Road #310 Vista, CA 92081 760-599-5000 202-225-3906 issa.house.gov Rep. Scott Peters, D-52 4350 Executive Dr. #105 San Diego, CA 92122 858-455-5550 202-225-0508 scottpeters.house.gov Rep. Juan Vargas, D-51 333 F St. #A Chula Vista, CA 91910 619-422-5963 202-225-8045 vargas.house.gov

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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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LITTLE ITALY

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

13

A little ‘minor magic’ coming to Little Italy Little Italy News Christopher Gomez The Little Italy neighborhood is chock-full of art and culture — from public art and cultural events to public piazzas and much more — and the Little Italy Association is always working to enhance the neighborhood through arts and cultural projects. In order to keep bringing the community events like FESTA!, Taste of Little Italy and the Christmas Tree Lighting, and to keep implementing projects like installing Bocce Ball courts and Piazza Basilone, the Little Italy Association is constantly looking for creative ways to build community support. This month, we are calling on a little magic for some assistance as the Little Italy Association hosts “minor magic,” a fundraising art show from Nov. 21 – Dec. 30 to benefit the association’s efforts to promote the arts and culture in San Diego’s Little Italy. The show will feature local artist and creator of “minor magic,” Randy Crawford. A past commercial artist and an illustrator and graphic designer for a major aerospace company, Crawford traded in his pens, pencils and paintbrushes for a digital workstation. Today, he uses his Mac as his drawing board and easel, and Photoshop as his pallet and canvas to create his new form of art. Crawford focuses on capturing photos of urban scenes, old cars, motorcycles, images worldwide of his travels and more. He then takes the photos and alters them utilizing his digital work platform to create his rather unique “minor magic” works of art. The show will offer a variety of art for collectors and individuals new to the art scene, from original photos to images on canvases, of scenes from all over Little Italy, San Diego, Italy, San Francisco, some of Crawford’s favorite pieces, and more. Custom orders of prints will also be available. Fifty percent of sales from the art show will benefit the Little Italy Association’s efforts

(above) “Chef Bear” with guests at a recent pop-up dinner experience; (below) The identity of Chef Bear remains a mystery. (Courtesy Cow by Bear)

Culinary pop art A new beary secret dining experience By Kai Oliver-Kurtin

(above) Crawford’s shot of the harbor view from Little Italy; (below) Piazza Basilone in Little Italy; both images created by featured artist Randy Crawford, for LIA’s upcoming fundraising art show to promote the arts and culture in the Little Italy neighborhood. By having the community’s support at these events, enhancing and beautifying the neighborhood with new arts and culture projects is even more possible. The Little Italy “minor magic” art show will kick off Saturday, Nov. 21, with a private reception from 6 – 9 p.m. at the New City America office, 710 W. Ivy St. Guests will have the opportunity to meet Crawford and view his artwork while enjoying refreshments and small bites. Attendees can RSVP for the private reception by emailing rsvp@littleitalysd.com. The show will be open to the

public Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., and by appointment, 619-233-3898 through Dec. 30 at the New City America office. To find more about the featured artist, Randy Crawford, please visit minormagic.net, and for details about the upcoming art exhibition, visit littleitalysd.com. To check out what’s going on in our neighborhood, follow us on Instagram and Twitter @LittleItalySD and Facebook/San Diego Little Italy. —Christopher Gomez has been Little Italy’s district manager since 2000. Reach him at chris@littleitalysd.com.v

The pop-up dinner party concept has grown in popularity recently, with national companies like Dinner Lab launching in San Diego, occasionally bringing notable chefs to town for one night to prepare a special meal in a non-traditional dining space. But a new Little Italy pop-up dinner company, called Cow by Bear is especially unique because the San Diego chef is dressed in a bear costume during dinners to conceal his/her identity, and their dinners are held every Saturday night at different locations through the Downtown San Diego area. Serving dry-aged ribeye as the star of each fourcourse meal, Cow by Bear relies on word of mouth and social media to drive business. All dinners are by reservation only and are limited to 10 people each, beginning at 8 p.m. Dinner is $150 per person, with a 50 percent deposit required upon reservation confirmation, and the remaining balance due two weeks before the dinner. A welcoming cocktail is included, as well as wine pairings with each course. The menu is sent to guests about two weeks before their scheduled dinner, and the location is provided the day before. Since the chef is determined to keep his/her identity a secret, we settled for an email Q&A interview to get the latest on Cow by Bear. Downtown News (DTN): How did you come up with the concept for Cow by Bear? Chef Bear (CB): I wanted to find a way to share my 45-day dry-aged ribeye I had been cooking for a while, along with the fine wine I had discovered throughout the world. Originally I started bringing friends into my apartment to serve the meals, and then their friends would want to come, so it got bigger. After a few months I was receiving reservation requests from strangers all across the city and started welcoming them into my home. The concept was pretty easy to come up with. A few years ago in Buenos Aires, I had a great dinner with total strangers at a chef’s home. So when it came time for me to start serving my ribeye and wine, it was a natural decision to just use the space I already had. DTN: How are the dinner venues throughout Downtown San Diego selected? CB: We currently have five different locations we host dinners at and none are actual restaurants. Three are ground-level spaces and two are rooftops. We have a custom and portable kitchen we built that allows us to cook our dinners anywhere. That flexibility has resulted in some pretty crazy ideas for dinners that we’ll be rolling out next year. DTN: How long have you been doing the dinners and what has the response been like so far from guests? CB: The first dinner was in late 2011, but for the last year and a half we’ve ramped it up and it’s really taken off. We do a dinner every Saturday, and now most Fridays, too. The response has been fantastic. We provide an experience unlike anything else people have ever been to. Everything from the menu and wine; to the table, tableware and centerpiece; to the music playlist; has been curated to the “nth” degree. And the real joy for me comes in seeing how 10

strangers start out very timid and maybe a bit awkward with each other, but by the end of the night they are new friends, exchanging info and oftentimes even going out for another drink immediately after the dinner. Honestly, you’d have to be a really … how should I say this ... special kind of person to not enjoy your time at Cow by Bear. DTN: Why do you feel the need to conceal your identity? CB: There’s been quite the interest in knowing more about me, but I don’t think it’s important. I’m just Bear, and I’m here to make sure you have a great meal and dinner experience. I don’t think anything other than that should matter. In this day of the celebrity chef, I’d just prefer to take the opposite approach. DTN: How do you decide on the menu each week? CB: The dry-aged ribeye is the staple, so the whole meal revolves around that. Beyond that, I’m always just looking for what’s in season, so what’s new at the farmers market dictates most of the ideas. And then it just comes down to what I’m in the mood to cook or try out! DTN: Is it difficult to get a reservation? CB: We’ve been booked out about two months. There are still a couple seats remaining in December but we’re starting to fill up dates for January now. With a limited number of seats available per dinner, and only hosting a couple days a week, the seats fill up fast. DTN: Why did you decide to limit each dinner to only 10 guests? CB: Our table seats 10 comfortably, so our dinners are for 10! It’s pretty much as simple as that. There’s some talk we could eventually go to 16 guests, but I don’t see it ever being larger than that. It’s such an important part of our experience for all the guests to be enjoying the dinner together, and if we get too large, I think we’ll lose some of that. For more information or to make a reservation, visit cowbybear.com. You can also follow them on Twitter and Instagram @CowByBear. —Kai Oliver-Kurtin is a local freelance writer. She enjoys covering events, restaurant news, culture and entertainment. Contact her at kai.sdnews@gmail.com.v


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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LITTLE ITALY

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

13

A little ‘minor magic’ coming to Little Italy Little Italy News Christopher Gomez The Little Italy neighborhood is chock-full of art and culture — from public art and cultural events to public piazzas and much more — and the Little Italy Association is always working to enhance the neighborhood through arts and cultural projects. In order to keep bringing the community events like FESTA!, Taste of Little Italy and the Christmas Tree Lighting, and to keep implementing projects like installing Bocce Ball courts and Piazza Basilone, the Little Italy Association is constantly looking for creative ways to build community support. This month, we are calling on a little magic for some assistance as the Little Italy Association hosts “minor magic,” a fundraising art show from Nov. 21 – Dec. 30 to benefit the association’s efforts to promote the arts and culture in San Diego’s Little Italy. The show will feature local artist and creator of “minor magic,” Randy Crawford. A past commercial artist and an illustrator and graphic designer for a major aerospace company, Crawford traded in his pens, pencils and paintbrushes for a digital workstation. Today, he uses his Mac as his drawing board and easel, and Photoshop as his pallet and canvas to create his new form of art. Crawford focuses on capturing photos of urban scenes, old cars, motorcycles, images worldwide of his travels and more. He then takes the photos and alters them utilizing his digital work platform to create his rather unique “minor magic” works of art. The show will offer a variety of art for collectors and individuals new to the art scene, from original photos to images on canvases, of scenes from all over Little Italy, San Diego, Italy, San Francisco, some of Crawford’s favorite pieces, and more. Custom orders of prints will also be available. Fifty percent of sales from the art show will benefit the Little Italy Association’s efforts

(above) “Chef Bear” with guests at a recent pop-up dinner experience; (below) The identity of Chef Bear remains a mystery. (Courtesy Cow by Bear)

Culinary pop art A new beary secret dining experience By Kai Oliver-Kurtin

(above) Crawford’s shot of the harbor view from Little Italy; (below) Piazza Basilone in Little Italy; both images created by featured artist Randy Crawford, for LIA’s upcoming fundraising art show to promote the arts and culture in the Little Italy neighborhood. By having the community’s support at these events, enhancing and beautifying the neighborhood with new arts and culture projects is even more possible. The Little Italy “minor magic” art show will kick off Saturday, Nov. 21, with a private reception from 6 – 9 p.m. at the New City America office, 710 W. Ivy St. Guests will have the opportunity to meet Crawford and view his artwork while enjoying refreshments and small bites. Attendees can RSVP for the private reception by emailing rsvp@littleitalysd.com. The show will be open to the

public Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., and by appointment, 619-233-3898 through Dec. 30 at the New City America office. To find more about the featured artist, Randy Crawford, please visit minormagic.net, and for details about the upcoming art exhibition, visit littleitalysd.com. To check out what’s going on in our neighborhood, follow us on Instagram and Twitter @LittleItalySD and Facebook/San Diego Little Italy. —Christopher Gomez has been Little Italy’s district manager since 2000. Reach him at chris@littleitalysd.com.v

The pop-up dinner party concept has grown in popularity recently, with national companies like Dinner Lab launching in San Diego, occasionally bringing notable chefs to town for one night to prepare a special meal in a non-traditional dining space. But a new Little Italy pop-up dinner company, called Cow by Bear is especially unique because the San Diego chef is dressed in a bear costume during dinners to conceal his/her identity, and their dinners are held every Saturday night at different locations through the Downtown San Diego area. Serving dry-aged ribeye as the star of each fourcourse meal, Cow by Bear relies on word of mouth and social media to drive business. All dinners are by reservation only and are limited to 10 people each, beginning at 8 p.m. Dinner is $150 per person, with a 50 percent deposit required upon reservation confirmation, and the remaining balance due two weeks before the dinner. A welcoming cocktail is included, as well as wine pairings with each course. The menu is sent to guests about two weeks before their scheduled dinner, and the location is provided the day before. Since the chef is determined to keep his/her identity a secret, we settled for an email Q&A interview to get the latest on Cow by Bear. Downtown News (DTN): How did you come up with the concept for Cow by Bear? Chef Bear (CB): I wanted to find a way to share my 45-day dry-aged ribeye I had been cooking for a while, along with the fine wine I had discovered throughout the world. Originally I started bringing friends into my apartment to serve the meals, and then their friends would want to come, so it got bigger. After a few months I was receiving reservation requests from strangers all across the city and started welcoming them into my home. The concept was pretty easy to come up with. A few years ago in Buenos Aires, I had a great dinner with total strangers at a chef’s home. So when it came time for me to start serving my ribeye and wine, it was a natural decision to just use the space I already had. DTN: How are the dinner venues throughout Downtown San Diego selected? CB: We currently have five different locations we host dinners at and none are actual restaurants. Three are ground-level spaces and two are rooftops. We have a custom and portable kitchen we built that allows us to cook our dinners anywhere. That flexibility has resulted in some pretty crazy ideas for dinners that we’ll be rolling out next year. DTN: How long have you been doing the dinners and what has the response been like so far from guests? CB: The first dinner was in late 2011, but for the last year and a half we’ve ramped it up and it’s really taken off. We do a dinner every Saturday, and now most Fridays, too. The response has been fantastic. We provide an experience unlike anything else people have ever been to. Everything from the menu and wine; to the table, tableware and centerpiece; to the music playlist; has been curated to the “nth” degree. And the real joy for me comes in seeing how 10

strangers start out very timid and maybe a bit awkward with each other, but by the end of the night they are new friends, exchanging info and oftentimes even going out for another drink immediately after the dinner. Honestly, you’d have to be a really … how should I say this ... special kind of person to not enjoy your time at Cow by Bear. DTN: Why do you feel the need to conceal your identity? CB: There’s been quite the interest in knowing more about me, but I don’t think it’s important. I’m just Bear, and I’m here to make sure you have a great meal and dinner experience. I don’t think anything other than that should matter. In this day of the celebrity chef, I’d just prefer to take the opposite approach. DTN: How do you decide on the menu each week? CB: The dry-aged ribeye is the staple, so the whole meal revolves around that. Beyond that, I’m always just looking for what’s in season, so what’s new at the farmers market dictates most of the ideas. And then it just comes down to what I’m in the mood to cook or try out! DTN: Is it difficult to get a reservation? CB: We’ve been booked out about two months. There are still a couple seats remaining in December but we’re starting to fill up dates for January now. With a limited number of seats available per dinner, and only hosting a couple days a week, the seats fill up fast. DTN: Why did you decide to limit each dinner to only 10 guests? CB: Our table seats 10 comfortably, so our dinners are for 10! It’s pretty much as simple as that. There’s some talk we could eventually go to 16 guests, but I don’t see it ever being larger than that. It’s such an important part of our experience for all the guests to be enjoying the dinner together, and if we get too large, I think we’ll lose some of that. For more information or to make a reservation, visit cowbybear.com. You can also follow them on Twitter and Instagram @CowByBear. —Kai Oliver-Kurtin is a local freelance writer. She enjoys covering events, restaurant news, culture and entertainment. Contact her at kai.sdnews@gmail.com.v


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

East Village News

14th Street Pedestrian Promenade update

A $1 million grant will help fund the design and construction of the first block of the 14th Street Pedestrian Promenade, envisioned to connect City College with the Barrio Logan neighborhood through the East Village neighborhood. Located along the east side of 14th Street between Broadway and E Street, adjacent to the San Diego Police Department headquarters, the project will also be supported by $250,000 from CivicSD’s FAR Bonus Payment Program fund, which East Village Resident’s collects payments from developers Group Meeting: seeking additional density in the Nov. 19, 6 p.m., 1374 Island Ave. Downtown area. Featured speakers: Joyce Also described as a linear park, Temporal, deputy director to Sen. the completed promenade would Marty Block; Councilmember connect the future East Village Todd Gloria; Brad Richter, vice Green park — planned for the full president of CivicSD; Bahija Ham- blocks bounded by 13th, 15th, F raz, executive director of Clean & and G streets — and the recently Safe; Susie de la Pena, community completed Fault Line Park [see liaison for SDPD; Maelin Levine, sandiegodowntownnews.com/faultpresident of Urban Discovery line-park] at 14th and J streets. Academy The promenade will be both Live in or interested in East pedestrian and bicycle friendly and Village? Join the East Village provide a unique way for travelers Residents Group (EVRG). For to connect to public spaces in San more info, visit evrgsd.org. Diego’s urban communities.

Help preserve East Village online

A group of local architects, artists, and others that have lived, worked, and visited the East Village in the 1980s and ’90s have

been on a mission to bring back everything that surrounded them then to an online location for preservation purposes. They started the project earlier this year when they could not find anything available online and wanted to archive and share their way of life during those decades. Those involved in the project were close to Wayne Buss (ReinCarnation building), Vicky Wolf and Scot McDougall (Sushi), and many more pioneers of East Village, and have been working with Shirl Buss to archive all of her husband’s images. The project is dedicated to the people that lived and worked in San Diego’s East Village in the ’80s, ’90s and beyond. So far it is a collage of anecdotes, experiences and recollections from architects, artists and everyday people. “The purpose of this project is to have an online record of an era that deeply touched everyone that had a part in the life and creation of one of San Diego’s iconic landmarks,” said the people behind the project. For more information or to contribute, visit their Facebook page at tinyurl.com/na22r3e or the website at eastvillageproject.com.

East Village sign

The East Village Association is hoping to raise $500,000 to fund the design and installation of a land-

EVRG

Are you interested in what new developments, businesses, parks and other events are in the works throughout East Village? East Village Residents Group (EVRG) meets every third Thursday of the month at East Village Community Church, located at 1374 Island Ave. Many community leaders are featured guest speakers. For more information, visit evrgsd.org.

mark sign to be located within East Village. Similar to those seen in Little Italy, Hillcrest, Normal Heights and other neighborhoods, the sign would clearly identify for all foot, bike and car traffic that they have entered into the East Village neighborhood boundaries. Selbert Perkins was chosen [see rendering above] out of the five firms that submitted proposals for the sign. To view their portfolio, visit sdpwest. com. More than $117,000 has been raised so far. For more information or to make a tax-deductible donation to further the fund along, visit eastvillagesandiego.com and click on Landmark Sign.

Quartyard

A formerly vacant lot in the East Village has been transformed into a vibrant urban park with restaurants, a rotating selection of food trucks, live music, a beer garden, and a dog run. Visit quartyardsd.com for more information or a calendar listing food trucks and other events.

Girls Think Tank’s ‘Dine for Dignity’

The third annual “Dine for Dignity” week is underway. Every day through Nov. 8 participating restaurants will donate 10 percent of their daily proceeds to Girls Think Tank, a local nonprofit that works to “inspire, empower and organize” the local community to advance human dignity for those living on the streets. Restaurants still participating, (Nov. 6) Isola Pizza Bar in Little Italy (open to close); (Nov. 7) Carnitas Snack Shack in North Park (open to close); (Nov. 8) Sol Cal Café in East Village, brunch (8 a.m. – 2 p.m.).v

PUZZLE SOLUTION FROM PG. 18


/ NEWS

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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

FROM PAGE 1

RETHINK 1980 and the first generation to attain adulthood in the 2000s. Noting millennials are “coming of age,” Michell said the first phase of an ongoing demographic study revealed that an “urban renaissance is truly in full swing in Downtown San Diego.” Walking mixer guests through the early findings of the Downtown demographic study, Michell said 50 percent of San Diego’s population will be millennials by 2020. Millennials are currently about 34 percent of Downtown’s population, she added. “In order for us to understand the next 30 years, we need to understand what’s happening today,” Michell said. She explained that there are approximately 130,000 available jobs Downtown, with average incomes at $73,000, much higher than the county average of $53,000. In addition, there are currently 33,000 residents living Downtown in 24,000 homes, and millennials comprise about onethird of Downtown’s population. “That’s the most populous demographic, even more than baby boomers [those born from 1946 to 1964],” she said. “Millennials are very different from their older counterparts,” she continued, adding that the urban lifestyle is more amenable to the new generation and they are the catalysts for change we are seeing across the nation. By 2050, Michell said it is projected that seven out of 10 Americans will be living in cities, while in 2010, only half of all Americans resided in urban areas. There are numerous trends with millennials, one being that they are less apt to commute from suburbs,

One of ReThink’s exhibits (Photo by Stacy Keck) preferring to relocate closer to where they work and play. “We want to get millennials and their talent in the future workforce Downtown,” Michell said. “We in Downtown are focusing on that talent, and spending lots of time thinking about how to get ‘critical mass’ attracting talent and companies Downtown.” Discussing Downtown’s amenities, Michell spoke of its “24/7 lifestyle” and the need for improving mass transit and transportation “connectedness” in and around the Downtown area. “In 2017 the trolley line going from UC San Diego into Downtown will be finished,” Michell said. “That will be a game-changer.” The partnership’s president said a plan is currently in place now to improve transportation within Downtown itself. “This January we [the city] negotiated to put together a free ride system involving six passenger golf carts that will be on-demand taking people to and from point A to point B,” she said. “Our goal is to have about 50 of these vehicles. That will be [another] game-changer: getting away from cars and into these alternative modes of transportation.”

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Michell talked of other trends with millennials, including the fact that they not only delay getting married, but also delay purchasing their first home, until much later in life. She predicts this will translate into what she calls a “future millennial baby boom.” “Hopefully, that will be in the urban center where the population is more dense where we’ll have more transportation to transit-oriented developments and attractive urban amenities, which are everything,” she said. “This generation wants to do things, not necessarily own things.” Michell also predicted that Downtown’s job growth will outpace the rest of the region, with more millennials Downtown, creating a need for not only more schools near the urban core, but more ancillary facilities. The big challenge, she said, will be keeping San Diego’s Downtown “vibrant,” so that children born there in the future will want to stay. “If we figure out how to keep these kids Downtown — we’ve won,” Michell concluded. The Rethink Downtown Exhibition is currently on display at 700 First Ave., near G Street, Downtown. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For general questions about the exhibit, email info@rethinkdowntown.com. To learn more about the Rethink Downtown project and see its calendar of events, visit its interactive website at rethinkdowntown.com. To learn more about the Downtown San Diego Partnership, visit downtownsandiego.org. —Dave Schwab came to San Diego 30 years ago with a journalism degree from Michigan State University and has worked and free-lanced for numerous dailies, weeklies and other regional publications. He can be reached at dschwabie@journalist.com.v


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

/ TOWN VOICES

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‘Alonzos’ share in Downtown’s success Downtown Partnership News Kris Michell Before a crowd of more than 700, the Downtown San Diego Partnership honored the very best of Downtown at its 53rd annual Alonzo Awards dinner last month. Named after Alonzo Horton — considered the father of modern San Diego — the awards reflect Downtown’s growing reputation as an innovation hub, our thriving arts and culture scene, and our distinctive skyline. All 2015 honorees are playing a living, leading role in Downtown’s ongoing renewal. They deserve to be recognized widely as the people, places and projects responsible for fueling Downtown’s revitalization through innovative programs and projects. Here is a recap of the evening: Sustainable Business Practices Award: BRIDGE Housing’s Celadon at Ninth Avenue and Broadway is a 17-story, 250-unit affordable housing project that boasts best-in-class environmental design. It covers some of its electrical costs via a 143-foot-tall photovoltaic system — the tallest in North America — while a 2,400-gallon rooftop solar water heating system covers half of its hot water needs. Located amid a wide variety of public transportation options, Celadon also features an eco-roof and drought-tolerant landscaping. Build Your Business Award: Cisterra Development built the new 16-story facility located at Eighth and J streets. The Sempra Energy headquarters building includes 330,000 square feet of office space, 500 parking spaces, and green building features designed for LEED Gold certification. Sempra’s HQ is also breathing new life into East Village streets during business hours with its more than 700 employees frequenting restaurants and shops in the area. Made to Move Award: The San Diego County Regional Airport Authority is making it easier to access our international airport while reducing traffic flow on surrounding roadways through a series of capital improvements throughout the airport. New rental car locations, shuttles and parking will dramatically reduce traffic, total trips, circulating and idling times. Innovation Award: Fab Lab is more than a co-working space, it’s a nonprofit that’s shaping the future of Downtown’s innovation district. Fueled by invention, ingenuity and more than $100,000 worth of professional manufacturing equipment, Fab Lab’s low cost workshops and STEM curriculum are a magnet for makers, artists and doers. Downtown Hero Award: In June of 2015, Downtown’s Property-based Business Improvement District, commonly known as Clean & Safe, was set to expire and our community needed a hero. The city of San Diego, together with thousands of property owners, stepped up to overwhelmingly support the program’s 10-year extension. Because of that support, Clean & Safe launched its new program on July 1 with a renewed sense of purpose and enthusiasm for ensuring the urban center looks its very best for years to come. Make Your Place Award: Urban Discovery Academy is Downtown’s first K-8 charter school. This $10.5 million state-of-the-sciences school, in the heart of I.D.E.A. district, embraces the spirit of learning and innovation in this emerging

Made to Move Award, given to the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority

Vi Kops Humanitarian Award, given to Cox Communications, Father Joe’s Villages, The Rock Church, and Loving Spoonfuls

Downtown Hero Award, given to the city of San Diego (Photos Courtesy DSDP) neighborhood. There is a performing arts space, a visual arts studio (with a kiln!), silk screening, paper making equipment and a darkroom, topped with a dramatic rooftop playground with spectacular views of Downtown. The school’s design blends an existing classic structure with new construction designed to inject modern architectural elements into the East Village streetscape. Founder’s Award: Sempra Energy is a Fortune 500 Company, and those companies have options. When Sempra’s lease was set to expire, the company had to decide — would they stay in Downtown San Diego or move elsewhere? But Sempra Energy has always been forward-thinking and sees what’s happening — they doubleddown on Downtown San Diego, relocating to East Village and a new 300,000-square-foot 16-story headquarters, between Seventh and Eighth streets in the Ballpark District, for their 800+ employees. Volunteer of the Year Award: Some volunteers give time. Some give money. Others give knowledge or professional expertise. David Hazan gives it all, and has for the past 40 years. As the co-founder of the East Village Business Improvement District, a longtime member of the East Village Association and the organization’s current president, David has been a catalyst for change during

the East Village’s most transformational years. Vic Kops Humanitarian Award: Cox Communications, Father Joe’s Villages, The Rock Church and Loving Spoonfuls have allied to help communicate and coordinate services to address Downtown homelessness. A multi-phase effort to transform how meals are provided to Downtown’s homeless culminated in the San Diego Meal Service Program, a volunteer web portal and a public service campaign educating the region about how to effectively donate their time and energy to those in need. Together, this coalition of community leaders is redirecting good intentions into positive outcomes for the betterment of Downtown and the entire region. All of this year’s Alonzo Award winners have followed in the footsteps of Alonzo Horton, making sure San Diego stays both distinctive and ahead of the curve. —Kris Michell is the president and CEO of the Downtown San Diego Partnership, a nonprofit, member-based organization that oversees the Clean & Safe program and serves as the leading advocate for the revitalization and economic health of Downtown. For questions or comments, email info@downtownsandiego.org.v


NEWS

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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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FROM PAGE 1

FROM PAGE 4

a city spokesperson said days later through email. “We also have many other relationships with community members, including partnering organizations, film and music festivals, and academic connections that allow us to provide quality film programs. In addition, we take advantage of staff expertise in filming, including one staff member with a master’s degree in film.” SDPL has not announced DeLauro’s replacement as Film Forum’s programmer, but the city spokesperson promised that the program would include much of what attracted locals to the previous iteration. She said the winter schedule (December through February) is currently being put together and the film screenings will continue to be free for attendees. “We will continue screening interesting and provocative films and will be augmenting them with speakers, guests, artists, and discussion the way we always have,” the spokesperson wrote. “We have had many new community partners, including local filmmakers, helping us with our film screenings and we plan to continue expanding the scope of what we do with this programming. We are excited about evolving our film offerings.” Pat Pepper has been attending DeLauro’s screenings for decades. While she wouldn’t rule out attending the library’s new film program, she said the loss of DeLauro’s personal touch would without a doubt be felt. “[Library administrators] aren’t going to do what Ralph did,” Pepper said. “I go to a lot of movies in town, but I go to his program because he has such good judgment about movies. It’s not that he just has good taste in movies but he’s very knowledgeable in assessing all the camera angles and stuff like that.” What upset both DeLauro and Pepper the most, they said, was an incident that in their view exemplifies the inconsiderate manner library officials have dealt with DeLauro and Film Forum patrons. One of Film Forum’s monthly branch locations is the Point Loma/ Hervey Branch Library. Last year, equipment used for film screenings broke down, and DeLauro had to improvise by projecting films from

are driven back into the [other] food programs,” Samuelson said, noting that the ultimate objective is to take the model being created at Jacobs and transport it regionally throughout San Diego County. In just a matter of weeks, Kitchens For Good has gone from just three employees to 28, and Samuelson intends to pay his employees a “living wage” of $15 per hour. “We’re looking right now in the Diamond District for staff,” he said, adding that he also intends to employ the formerly incarcerated as well as foster youth aging out of the system, to help give them a helping hand, too. In fact, Kitchens For Good plans to offer that second chance by accepting up to 80 students into to the culinary program its first year, with a goal of having 70 percent of them placed in full-time employment within six months of graduation. Jennifer Gilmore, former executive director of Feeding America San Diego, recently joined the organization as executive director. Gilmore brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise with San Diego’s most pressing hunger issues, having piloted a number of the city’s essential hunger relief projects in her former role. Gilmore’s experience includes leading successful efforts to expand emergency food distribution to communities affected by limited access to grocery stores, low wages and the high cost of quality food. Samuelson said he is thankful to have so many people who’ve helped him launch Kitchens For Good, including staff at the Jacobs Center and the Leichtag Foundation, both which have helped with his venture from the start. He characterized the vision behind Kitchens For Good as “clean,” and its multi-pronged approach as “very synergistic.” “This makes sense, all the processes which sort of interconnect and support each other,” he said. “It gives me great hope that we can do this thing and make it work well.” To learn more about Kitchens For Good, visit kitchensforgood.org.

KITCHENS

FILMFORUM

(top, l to r) DeLauro with friends Bill Fleming and Mike Stewart, serenading him at Film Forum’s 30th anniversary (Courtesy Carol DeLauro); (bottom) Carol and Ralph DeLauro married in 1985, shortly after the Film Forum series began. (Photo by Cynthia Robertson)

his laptop, which downgraded the film quality. Several Film Forum regulars donated enough to the library to fund new equipment to allow DeLauro’s Film Forum to return to its regular operations. Pepper said she feels deceived that the library accepted donations for a program they would cut shortly after. “Poor Ralph was showing movies on the screen from his laptop forever, and you could hardly read the credits,” Pepper said. “So [library staff] told us that we could contribute to

a projector and a sound screen. So yeah, I wrote a check, and I never would have done that if they were going to turn around and cancel Ralph’s program, because that’s the only reason I did it, so I think that was kind of false advertising.” “Why treat donors that way?” DeLauro asked. “How do you treat people that way? Yeah I’ll take your money, but then I’ll axe the program you just gave the money to.” The library’s spokesperson said the equipment was never intended solely for DeLauro’s film screen-

ings, and that it will continue to serve a variety of purposes. “Donations for equipment were made to the Point Loma/Hervey Branch Library, not to the Film Forum,” SDPL’s spokesperson wrote. “Upgraded equipment is being used for films as well as other types of programming. Films will continue at Point Loma and other locations beyond the end of Ralph DeLauro’s service on Film Forum.” Looking forward, DeLauro hopes his Film Forum will live on in a new location. He’s in negotiations with another public library system in San Diego County, as well as a North Park-based nonprofit focused on film and education. DeLauro said that although he’s willing to play any role in bringing film to San Diegans in order to secure financial stability for himself and Carol, his ultimate goal is to continue bringing free cinema to the public. “First of all, I like the idea of free culture,” he said. “Secondly, I always viewed it as an educational outreach program — to bring people into the library. “You know, that interaction with the public is really one of the beauties of what I do. I love that dimension,” DeLauro said. Film Forum under DeLauro’s directorship will continue every Monday for the remainder of the month. For a full schedule of films and locations, visit Facebook.com/ FreeLibraryMovies. —Hutton Marshall is a San Diego-based freelance writer currently living abroad. Contact him at jhuttonmarshall@gmail.com.v

REALTOR SHOWCASE

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—Dave Schwab can be reached at dschwabie@journalist.com.v


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TOWN VOICES

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

The visionary da Vinci Exploring Balboa Park Johnny McDonald Leonardo da Vinci remains one of history’s most fascinating people, not only for his famous paintings, but also for his far-reaching explorations into science, machines and robotics. More than 90 artworks and replicated machines, many of which are interactive, will be on display every day (except Thanksgiving and Christmas) through Jan. 3, 2017, at the San Diego Air & Space Museum. We toured the “Da Vinci: The Ultimate Innovator” special exhibit with Curator Terry Brennan, where models and artwork are arranged in three categories — transportation, military and mechanical. The interactive models on display were built in Florence, Italy. Brennan shared information on the collection that brings da Vinci’s most important and impressive inventions — including the bicycle, a spring-powered car, hang glider and helicopter — to life. He was an astronomer, sculptor, geologist, mathematician, botanist, animal behaviorist, inventor, engineer, architect and even a musician. If da Vinci were alive today he’d probably be mapping universe travel, sketching well-advanced inventions and using his talents to broaden culture. It wasn’t known until the 19th century that the artist who painted the “Mona Lisa” and “The Last Supper” was also a Renaissance visionary who saw the modern world before it was realized. “Da Vinci made the first real studies of flight in the 1480s and had over 100 drawings that illustrated his theories on flight,” said Brennan, who is also director of restoration at the museum. “Some experts feel that the modern day helicopter was inspired by his concept,” he continued. “It was a continuous lifting airfoil motion which was called an aerial screw.” Little of his sculpture or engineering works survived. His notebooks, the only surviving evidence of his curiosity regarding science and technology, were hidden away, dispersed in private hands. Among the many subjects Leonardo studied, the possibility of human flight held particular fascination. “Unfortunately man’s arms were not strong enough to fly like a bird,” Brennan tossed in. However da Vinci considered a pilot’s position in a potential flying

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Civic Organist News Dr. Carol Williams

Spreckels Singeth Shall I play the Spreckels Organ tonight? She doth call me in her silenced pavilion The weather is much fair and it is still light Her pipes are quiet and she sleepeth like a civilian When the gigantic door doth open This lion speaketh a roar for all And every being is awoken And I at the keyboards, am King of All Her music doth glide over the valleys She singeth in every place Her sound doth glide into the galleys She singeth for every grace As long as we can hear and see The Spreckels Organ is a gift to thee —“Spreckels Singeth,” a sonnet written by Dr. Carol Williams for “Celebrity Sonnet Presentations” at The Old Globe, Oct. 12, 2015

Curator Terry Brennan with Da Vinci’s ornithopter (Photo by Linda Hite) machine and how control could be achieved by shifting the body weight, precisely as the early glider pioneers of the late 19th century. “He was the first person to envision a double hull for a ship,” Brennan said. “So if the exterior hull was damaged the boat wouldn’t sink. They use that basic construction today.” His spring-propelled car, too, is unusual. The gearing is pretty neat in itself. “It was his idea to transfer energy with a circular motion for his machines,” Brennan said. He also explained da Vinci’s theater lighting principle, whereby placing a candle inside a box could amplify light onto a stage. Among other interesting things was the use of ball bearings and a flywheel. For the past 50 years, a group of Florentine artisans have pored over da Vinci’s notes and drawings in an attempt to create replicas of his work, relying solely on raw materials that were available. Hall of fame inductions … Alan Mulally, former executive vice president of Boeing, Tom Cassidy, RADM, USN (Ret.) and Frank Pace from San Diego-based General Atomics are among eight honorees being enshrined during this year’s International Air & Space Hall of Fame induction celebration, Nov. 19. Among the others are PSA airline founders Kenneth and Jean Friedkin. The late Mr. Friedkin was an American aviator and businessman. He obtained

Downtown’s Sudoku Puzzle DIRECTIONS: Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

Sudoku Solution Answer Key, page 14

his pilot license at 17. PSA was created in 1949. Since 1963 more than 200 of the world’s most significant pilots, crewmembers, visionaries, inventors, aerospace engineers, business leaders, preservationists, designers and space pioneers have been inducted into the important hall of fame right here in Balboa Park. Elsewhere around the park — There are three museums that don’t receive the accolades of some of the larger facilities in the park. Located in the Casa de Balboa building are the History Center, the Photography Museum and the Model Railroad Museum ... The History Center houses over 2.5 million historical photographs, 45 million documents, and 7,000 pieces of costume and textiles, while the exhibits in the Photography Museum include a collection of over 7,000 images, representing the history of photography, its aesthetic movements, and technological advancements, which are particularly strong in modern and contemporary work ... At 28,000 square feet, the model railroad museum is the world’s largest in operation. It contains four enormous scale and model layouts, built by enthusiasts from separate model railroad clubs. —After an award-winning, 38-year sports-writing career with the San Diego Union and authoring three books, Johnny McDonald now considers writing a hobby. You can reach him at johnny23@cox.net.v

I had the pleasure of presenting this at the Old Globe Theatre here in San Diego. I grew up with Shakespeare and always struggled with him — great guy but for me, and most of my classmates, we would have rather read something else. As one looks back, gosh as we get older, we view things in a different light. Anyway, for the Celebrity Sonnets Evening I ended on a sonnet my husband had chosen — No. 62 about egos and stuff. So I decided to write a sonnet for our beloved Spreckels organ. As we say here in the USA, “enjoy!” As the nights grow darker and with hopefully a spot of rain — hey we can always dream — the month of November is a great month of anticipation and there will be much festive music at the organ pavilion. On Sunday Nov. 29, I will have the youth Thanksgiving concert at the organ pavilion. Joining me on stage will be the three young winners of the Spreckels Organ Scholarships. These young artists are amazing and you will be wowed by them. Do come along if you can and support them. This year has certainly passed quickly and I thank you readers for reading this column. See you in December. Dr. Carol —Civic Organist Carol Williams is proud to serve as an ambassador of San Diego’s arts and culture arena. Through her concert performances at home and abroad, Carol offers a fresh take on the classical organ concert. She is committed to illuminating San Diego’s colorful romance with the “King of Instruments,” always seeking to bring the organ to new audiences. For more information visit sosorgan.com.v


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Prepping for property taxes Tax Tips Dan McAllister The season of giving has begun! Annual secured property tax bills from our office were sent out in September. So by now, all of you who are property owners should have received your annual secured bill. This year, 2,269 additional bills were sent out — bringing the total to 986,858. These secured bills will generate more than $5 billion dollars for county operations to help our schools, our community colleges, our libraries, and so much more in our community. This year, we’ve improved our mobilefriendly platform to make it easier for taxpayers like you to pay online through your phone or tablet. We are always striving to provide you with more streamlined payment options. You can also sign up for our e-notification system to get a friendly email reminder when your taxes are due on our website. Here are some tips for paying your annual secured tax bill on time to avoid any penalties. • Mark your calendar. The Tax Collector’s office sends one annual secured bill only. The first installment is due on Nov. 1 and the last day to pay on time is Dec. 10. The second installment is due on Feb. 1 and the last day to pay on time is April 10. • Prepare financially. There is no legal provision to defer taxes due to financial hardship. If you are unable to pay your taxes when due, a penalty will be assessed. If your taxes are still unpaid by the end of the fiscal year, your taxes will default and additional penalties will apply. At that time, you may qualify for a payment plan to pay the taxes over a five-year period. • Check with your mortgage company. If you have recently refinanced or purchased a property, contact your lender to determine who will be paying the tax bill. If you have an impound account, make sure your mortgage company pays the bill on time. • Check your travel schedule. If you plan to be out of town, make arrangements beforehand. And remember, you can always pay online! It’s fast, free, and easy. • Don’t confuse your supplemental bill with your annual secured bill. Supplemental bills are separate from your annual secured tax bill. They are sent when there’s been a change of ownership or new construction. • If you are in the military, you may be eligible for deferred payment. If you’re on military deployment, you may be able to defer paying your taxes until you return. Call our office to check your status. —Dan McAllister is the San Diego County Treasurer/Tax Collector. Reach him at 877-829-4732 or sdtreastax.com.v

ATTORNEYS

DowntownBriefs FIT FOODIE 5K WEEKEND

Dubbed the “most delicious 5K ever,” the Cooking Light & Health’s Fit Foodie 5K race weekend launches on Friday, Nov. 6, and lasts the weekend. In its third year, the three-day event returns to the Embarcadero Marina Park South at 200 Marina Park Way, Downtown. The Fit Foodie 5K events feature a pre-race VIP party on Friday (separate $55); then group stretches, a 5K along the San Diego Bay on Saturday with a Finisher’s Village, featuring cooking demonstrations by celebrity chefs, fitness demonstrations, unlimited food, beer and wine garden tastings, and more; and a Sunday-Funday inspired brunch on Sunday. Free parking in the lot available on Convention Way. Pay parking is also available at the Hilton Bayfront San Diego and the San Diego Convention Center. Price for VIP events is $55; 5K is $55 and veterans receive a discount. Pets are welcome. A quick summary of the events: Friday, Nov. 6, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., a VIP cocktail party presented by Lexus at Music Box, (formerly Anthology) located at 1337 India St. Saturday, Nov. 7 — 5K Race at Embarcadero Marina Park South with group stretch at 7:30 a.m., race begins at 8 a.m., Finisher’s Village hours are 7 – 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 8 — Sunday “sweat session” presented by Fabletics, from 9 – 10 a.m. is the Tracy Anderson Method with Stacey McDermott, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. brunch at Marina Kitchen in the Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina. For more information visit tinyurl.com/pxx3hdv.

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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pair of custom eyewear, which use Knockaround’s flattering and popular Premius frame in golden yellow that fade to amber — inspired by the brew. The glasses are polarized and provide UV400 protection and the frames will display the Green Flash logo. “Both brands thrive on a commitment to culture, a labor of love, and an extremely loyal fan following, and I’m thrilled to bring the two of us together to celebrate one of my favorite weeks of the year, San Diego Beer Week,” said Adam Moyer, Limited edition pairing: Green Flash brew and sunglasses (Courtesy Knockaround) founder of Knockaround Sunglasses in a press release. The sunglasses will be available on the Knockaround website starting Nov. 12. Both the sunglasses and the beer will be celebrated in a joint launch at the Green Flash Brewing Co.’s Mira Mesa tasting room, located at 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd., on Friday, Nov. 13. This will be will be an official San Diego Beer Week event and open to the public, and it will include special merchandise, beer tastings, a DJ, food and beer pairings, a Knockaround pop-up shop, and more. For more information visit greenflashbrew.com or knockaround.com.

PARKS OFFER FREE ADMISSION TO VETS

In honor of Veterans Day, California State Parks will offer all military veterans free admission on Nov. 12. Gov. Jerry Brown authorized the state’s parks to offer the free admission, through AB-150 in 2013. “Free admission on Veterans Day is a small token of gratitude California State Parks can bestow upon all active military personnel and veterans for their service,” said California State Park’s Director Lisa Mangat in a press release. “We are excited to host them among the amazing natural and cultural resources of our state’s parks,” Included are parks accessible through the annual California Explorer pass; California State Railroad Museum; and various vehicular recreation areas. To learn more about California State Parks and which ones are open to veterans, visit parks.ca.gov.

COASTKEEPERS RAISE $80K FOR CLEAN WATER

The San Diego Coastkeeper’s recent 18th annual Seaside Soiree, which took place this year at the Bali Hai on Shelter Island, raised $80,000 during an event that updated attendees on plans for the organization’s next three years. Waterkeeper Alliance founder and President Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. attended the event. In addition to giving the keynote speech, Kennedy mingled with guests, took photographs, and joined VIPs on the Coastkeeper cruiser boat for rides on San Diego Bay. Future plans for the environmental organization include tripling its water quality monitoring volunteer force; bringing water education to 10,000 students; ensuring the region lowers household water use by 25 percent; and reducing water pollution and holding polluters accountable to the law. Funds raised at the soiree will assist the Coastkeeper’s Water Quality Monitoring Program, which is run by volunteer scientists; its Law and Policy clinic; their twice-monthly beach cleanups and countywide environmental science education. Founded in 1985, Coastkeeper already has a two-decades long list of accomplishments in the region with regard to water safety and usability. “These funds will support our aggressive plan to combat the chronic pollution threatening our quality of life in San Diego,” said Interim Executive Director Travis Pritchard in a press release. “The success of this event and the broad support we continue to receive from the community is evidence that San Diegans won’t stop until we have clean water for everyone.” Special interactive tables at the event encouraged participants to engage in a better understanding of the principles of conservation, sustainability and San Diego’s aquatic playgrounds overall. For more information about Coastkeeper, visit sdcoastkeeper.org.

SUNGLASSES AND BREW TO PAIR UP FOR BEER WEEK

In keeping with San Diego Beer Week, two local companies have decided to merge their collective marketing skills and collaborate their brands to release a limited edition brew and a matching pair of sunglasses. Downtown-based Knockaround Sunglasses and Mira Mesa-based Green Flash Brewing Co. are releasing Brightside Berliner Weisse, a malted wheat and a pilsner malt with a hint of cucumber coming in at 4 percent ABV to give beer lovers a “taste” of the San Diego experience. In addition, the duo are also releasing a new limited edition

ATTORNEYS

ATTORNEYS

(left) James Reily, a veteran profiled in exhibition (Photo by N. David King); (right) one of Carol Johnson's WWII drawing (Courtesy SDCC)

CITY COLLEGE TO HONOR VETERANS WITH UNIQUE EXHIBIT

San Diego City College (SDCC) graphic design and photography faculty and students will soon be featuring a special exhibition that honors veterans from World War II to present day. Called, “Voices: Honoring Veterans Portraits, Storytelling & Rare World War II Drawings,” the exhibit kicks off on Nov. 10 and will run through Dec. 10. “Voices” will profile 24 local veterans, showing their faces and sharing their personal stories, along with the original drawings, paintings and ephemera from Carol Johnson, acclaimed illustrator and WWII correspondent. Johnson, who went on to have a distinguished 65-year career as an illustrator and painter, was able to document combat by hand through his drawings and was said to have shaped the nation’s perception of WWII. After having been sent to serve as a combat artist in North Africa by the News Enterprises Association (NEA), he later transferred to London and his unique war drawings were soon syndicated with NEA, publishing in newspapers throughout the U.S. Candice Lopez, SDCC design professor and Voices curator worked with N. David King, professor of photography, who also took many of the photographs, to oversee bringing the exhibit to life. “[We hope the exhibit will] celebrate Veterans Day in a meaningful way that both educates and inspires,” Lopez said, adding that they also wish to assist with veterans transitioning from combat to campus life, and hope to expand SDCC’s Veterans Service Center and the services it offers. King, himself a veteran of Vietnam, served in the US Army 1966 – 70. Lopez said the graphics design students — sensitive to the needs of local veterans in the community and on their campus — conceptualized and designed the exhibition, and even did their own fundraising to make it happen. While California currently leads the nation with approximately 2.2 million veterans, the San Diego Community College District has more than 3,500 veterans attending schools throughout its system and 1,600 of those are taking classes at SDCC. Voices: Honoring Veterans will hold its opening reception at San Diego City College, Nov. 10, from 6 – 8 p.m. at the LUXE Gallery, on the fifth floor of the CTC Building, located at 1080 16th St., Downtown. The exhibit will be available Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., and with evenings by appointment. For more info call 619-388-3281 or visit sdcity.edu.

COMPUTER REPAIR

see Briefs, pg 21 LAWYER

MOVING


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

GASLAMP

www.sdcnn.com

The Davis-Horton House (1850), located at 410 Island Ave. (Courtesy GQHF)

Davis-Horton House streets to 11th and K streets. Anna contracted with San Diego Gaslamp County to run the house as the Landmarks “County Hospital.” She earned $1 per patient, per day. Jake Romero A late owner, George Deyo, inherited the house in the 1930s The Davis-Horton House — and passed it on to the Lanuza formerly known as the William Family in 1977, who in turn, doHeath Davis House and built in nated the house to the city of San 1850 — is the oldest standing Diego to become a museum. structure in Downtown San Diego. The house was moved to its It serves as the home to the current location when the museGaslamp Quarter Historical um restoration began. Electricity Foundation (GQHF) and the was installed for the first time in Gaslamp Museum at the Davis1984, and the layers of wallpaHorton House. per were peeled back to reveal Rare and unique to California earlier décor. Former Museum is the “saltbox” architectural style Curator Mary Joralmon worked of the home, which takes its name tirelessly to restore the house to from its resemblance to the wooden, its current state as a museum lidded box in which salt was once for visitors to enjoy. kept. Typically, a saltbox structure Each room in the house depicts has just one story in the back and a period in its history: from its two stories in the front. A long, use as a pre-Civil War military pitched roof that slopes down to the officers’ barracks, to a county hosback, a flat front and central chimpital, and a private residence. ney are recognizable features. Various individuals have ocIn 1850, the Downtown San cupied the home, including Alonzo Diego area was barren coastal Horton, considered the “Father of land with no trees or fresh water. San Diego”; an alleged German Since the area lacked trees for spy; and several families. lumber, William Heath Davis Today, the Davis-Horton purchased 10 to 14 prefabricated House welcomes thousands of visistructures from Portland, Maine, tors annually. to establish “New Town.” Davis set up his town near what is now —Jake Romero is the director of State and Market streets near operations of the Gaslamp Quarter San Diego’s oldest public park, Historical Foundation, located at Pantoja Park. 410 Island Ave., Downtown, in the In 1873, Anna Scheper historic Davis-Horton House. For purchased the house and had it more information visit gaslampmoved from State and Market quarter.org.v


GASLAMP / NEWS

www.sdcnn.com FROM PAGE 19

BRIEFS

DINERS TO ENJOY FREE PARKING WITH A VIEW

Mister A’s, located at 2550 Fifth Ave., on the 12th floor of the Fifth Avenue Financial Center, is one of the most recognizable buildings in San Diego, especially during the holiday season. The storied restaurant has been celebrating its 50th anniversary all year, but construction in lower levels of the building, which changed ownership in 2014, has challenged some guests. As a result, Mister A’s is now offering free self-parking for all of their dining guests for lunch, brunch and dinner service through the completion of all construction and remodeling efforts going on in the building. All guests who utilize the parking via the Maple Street entrance (between Fourth and Fifth Avenue) will receive validation from the Mister A’s as long as they park on the second, third and fourth floors. For more information, email the restaurant at info@asrestaurant.com. This new opportunity to access the restaurant with complimentary, gated and covered parking will last until the projected completion date, which is currently Jan. 15. For more information about Mister A’s or its dining options, visit asrestaurant.com.

HILTON HARBOR ISLAND HAS NEW OWNER

The San Diego Airport Hilton Hotel on Harbor Island, located at 1960 Harbor Island Dr.., near the San Diego Airport, is now the eighth local property now owned by the San Diego-based and independent hotel collection, Bartell

Hotels. The nine-story building went through extensive renovations in the last decade and has 211 hotel rooms and 9,000 square feet of banquet and meeting space. An additional $5 million in upgrades on the property are now planned by Bartell. “The San Diego Airport Hilton is a great fit within our portfolio of waterfront hotels,” stated Richard Bartell, president of Bartell Hotels in a press release. “This hotel is representative of the iconic San Diego experience and an important step in expanding our footprint in the region.” Other properties owned by Bartell include the Sheraton La Jolla, Island Palms Hotel and Marina, Humphreys Half Moon Inn & Suites, Holiday Inn Bayside, Days Inn Mission Valley, the Dana on Mission Bay and the Pacific Terrace Hotel, as well as three marinas associated with these hotels and the world renown Humphreys Concerts by the Bay. For more information about Bartell and its properties, visit bartellhotels.com.

SAILOR’S DAYS AT MARITIME MUSEUM

The Star of India and other ships will host “Sailor’s Days” through Nov. 29, and again Dec. 1 through Jan. 3, from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Activities vary daily but adults and children can expect to experience seagoing sailor-type activities such as making rope for sailing, moving cargo, raising and lowering sails, and more. Children can also learn more about the ship during a scavenger hunt. Sailor’s Days is included with regular admission to the Maritime Museum of San Diego: $16 for adults; $8 for children. 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. 1492 N. Harbor Drive. Visit sdmaritime. org for more information.

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

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(l to r) Cutting the ribbon for the parking garage are artist David Ade; Dan McAllister, San Diego County Treasurer and Tax Collector; April Heinze, County General Services director; Lou Palestini, Little Italy Association; Supervisor Greg Cox; Supervisor Ron Roberts; Helen Robbins-Meyer,County chief administrative officer; Supervisor Dave Roberts; and Supervisor Dianne Jacob (Courtesy County News Center)

NEW PARKING GARAGE IN LITTLE ITALY

On Friday, Oct. 30, the community of Little Italy as well as representatives from the County of San Diego came together to unveil the grand opening of a 10-story — seven above ground and three below — parking structure. The $36 million dollar garage, located on the corner of Cedar Street and Kettner Boulevard, will provide 600 parking spaces for employees of the County Administration Building during the daytime and offer a paid parking option to visitors to the Little Italy neighborhood at night and on weekends. On hand for the ribbon cutting were four county supervisors — Ron Roberts, Dave Roberts, Greg Cox, Dianne Jacob — board members from the Little Italy Association, county executives and employees. The structure, complete with a public art project on its north side by local artist David Adey, is the last phase of the County’s Waterfront Park project. Located on Pacific Highway on either side of the County Administration Center, the Waterfront Park opened in May of 2014 and its acreage eliminated the two existing employee parking lots. Since then, county employees have been parking off site, but the new 10-floor parking structure will once again allow them a consistent and safe place to park as well as open up more options for visitors to the Little Italy neighborhood. For more information about the Waterfront Park, visit tinyurl.com/lzpbte4.v


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

DOWNTOWN CALENDAR

FRIDAY – NOV. 6 Marina walkabout: Join DSDP’s Clean & Safe program at 10 a.m. Meet-up at Fourth Avenue and G Street (SW corner). For more info, call 619-234-8900, visit downtownsandiego.org or sign up for their newsletter. San Diego Brewers Guild Festival: This two-day event kicks off San Diego Beer Week. Day one’s VIP Brewer Takeover features specialty, exclusive and rare beer tasters with unlimited beer and food samples. Live music by The Flocculators. 6 – 9 p.m. Port Pavillion on Broadway Pier, Downtown. Visit sdbw.org/guildfestival and see our story on Page 3 for more information on San Diego Beer Week! SATURDAY – NOV. 7 Fit Foodie 5K: This race weekend will feature tastings, cooking and fitness demonstrations, a beer and wine garden and more. The race kicks off today with a group stretch at 7:30 a.m., race at 8 a.m. A VIP cocktail party will precede the race on Friday night and a special brunch with follow on Sunday morning. Embarcadero Marina Park South, 200 Marina Park Way. Visit fitfoodierun.com. Dr. Seuss’ How The Grinch Stole Christmas!: Previews start tonight for the musical based on the beloved children’s book. Opens Nov. 12. Sensory-friendly performance on Dec. 12. Closes Dec. 26. 7 p.m. Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage, Old Globe Theatre, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park. Tickets start $24. Visit theoldglobe.org or call 619-234-5623. ‘Stretch Yourself’ yoga classes: A twice-monthly yoga class at outdoor locations throughout Downtown. 9 a.m. The Headquarters at Seaport Village, 789 West Harbor Drive. Visit downtownsandiego.org. SUNDAY – NOV. 8 15th annual Fall Back Festival: A family-friendly street fair with free food and activities including gold mining, pony riding and more. Small fee for some activities. 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Visit gaslampfoundation.org. San Diego Great Books: Free discussion group, open to the public. This month’s reading: selected poems by Lisel Mueller. 2 – 4 p.m. Room 221, San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown. Visit sandiegogreatbooks.net. ‘Game on Little Italy’ popup dinner: A “fall game-inspired” five-course dinner including cheese in every course. $69 includes one glass of wine or beer. 6 p.m. The Cheese Store of San Diego, 1980 Kettner Blvd., Little Italy. Visit thecheesestoresd.com. ‘In the year 1915’ concert: Camarada presents a musical odyssey of tantalizing time travel in honor of the Balboa Park centennial celebration. Music of Debussy, de Falla, Bartok, Joplin, Casella, Rachmaninoff. Tickets are $30 for general admission,

$25 for students, seniors, military and museum members. 6 – 8 p.m. Mingei International Museum, 1439 El Prado, Balboa Park. Visit bit.ly/1l6pWsP. MONDAY – NOV. 9 2nd annual Brews, Views, and Chews pairing event: In honor of San Diego Beer Week this tasting event will pair top local breweries and restaurants including Soda and Swine, Bali Hai, Ballast Point, Acoustic Ales and more. $45. 6 – 9 p.m. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse, 2150 Harbor Island Drive. Visit tomhamsbeerweek.bpt.me. TUESDAY – NOV. 10 Opening reception for ‘VOICES: Honoring Veterans’: This special exhibition tells the stories of 24 veterans and will feature large-scale portraits of veterans (taken by David King) and their stories of service ranging from World War II to present day Afghanistan and Iraq. Opening reception from 6 – 8 p.m.; exhibit will be open through Dec. 10. The Luxe Gallery at San Diego City College, 1080 16th St., Fifth Floor, Downtown. Visit sdcity.edu. ‘…and the earth did not swallow him’ film screening: A free screening of this film by acclaimed independent filmmaker Paul Espinosa. The film focuses on the life of a poor Mexican American boy and his migrant farm worker family as they struggle to adjust to life in American society. 7 – 9 p.m. Museum of Photographic Arts, 1649 El Prado, Balboa Park. Visit bit.ly/1H4WixG. Lamplighter Awards: A celebration to honor the best businesses in the Gaslamp. Features a cocktail reception; hors d’oeuvre stations, and more. 7 p.m. Parq Restaurant and Nightclub, 615 Broadway. Visit gaslamp.org. WEDNESDAY – NOV. 11 – VETERANS DAY Veterans Day Parade: Sponsored by the USS Midway Museum and with a theme of “70th anniversary of America’s Greatest Generation,” this free, one-mile route begins at the Fountain Plaza in front of the County Administration Building and heads south along North Harbor Drive before turning left on Pacific Highway. Grandstands on west side of North Harbor Drive between start and Ash Street. 11 a.m. For more information visit sdvetparade.org. Salute to Veterans on Midway: Join the staff of the USS Midway Museum saying “thanks” to veterans with a special all day long event that is free for all veterans with ID. Blood drive, food, live entertainment, vintage warplane flybys, KidzZone, activities, prizes, etc. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Open to all. For more information visit midway. org/veterans-day-2015. San Diego Gulls: Our local hockey team will celebrate Veterans Day with a $2 beer night (starts 2 hours before the game and runs until one hour after puck

CALENDAR drop). Opponent: Bakersfield Condors. 7:05 p.m. Valley View Casino Center, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., Midway. Tickets at 619-359-4730 and sandiegogulls.com. THURSDAY – NOV. 12 Craft Beer ‘n’ Bites: The fifth edition of this event will be held in honor of San Diego Beer Week with 15 breweries along with food trucks, games, live music and art. Held in collaboration with San Diego State University College of Extended Studies Business of Craft Beer Program, benefiting the San Diego Brewers Guild. $35 in advance; $50 at the door. 6 – 9 p.m. SILO in Makers Quarters, 753 15th St., East Village. Visit makersquarter.com. Greater Golden Hill Community Development Corporation meeting: Monthly meeting for GGHCDC board of directors. 6:30 p.m. Golden Hill Recreation Center, 2600 Golf Course Drive. Visit goldenhillcdc.org. Book signing: Len Martini author of “Ice-X ’86: Freezing the Cold War” will sign copies of his book. “Ice-X ’86 ” is based on true events, telling the story of a top-secret mission by young engineers to test torpedoes in the Arctic. 7 p.m. Upstart Crow Bookstore and Coffeehouse, 835C W. Harbor Dr., Seaport Village. Free. Visit upstartcrowtrading.com or call 619-333-0141. ‘Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar’: This community program by the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center sends 50 scientists out to 25 bars all over San Diego. These experts will be available for a fun chat over drinks. The scientists should be easy to find at each location, as they’ll have a sign reading “We are scientists. Ask us anything!” The events will take place during varying times from 5:30 – 9:30 p.m. Participating locations in Downtown include: Ballast Point (2215 India St., Little Italy), The Flight Path (1202 Kettner Blvd. Suite 104, Marina District) and Rare Form (793 J St., East Village). Visit rhfleet.org/events/two-scientistswalk-bar for the full list of bars, times and more. FRIDAY – NOV. 13 East Village Walkabout: Join DSDP’s Clean & Safe program at 10 a.m. Meet-up at 17th Avenue and Broadways (SW corner). For more info, call 619-234-8900, visit downtownsandiego.org, or sign up for their newsletter. ‘The Oldest Boy’/REP Your Pride: Prior to tonight’s performance the San Diego REP will host a panel with PFLAG San Diego members and staff. San Diego Downtown News’ sister publication Gay San Diego is a sponsor. REP Your Pride, 7 p.m.; performance 8 p.m. Lyceum Stage, 79 Horton Plaza, Downtown. Visit sdrep.org. SATURDAY – NOV. 14 ‘Stretch Yourself’ yoga classes: A twice-monthly yoga class at outdoor locations throughout Downtown. 9 a.m. The Headquarters at Seaport Village, 789 West Harbor Drive. Visit downtownsandiego.org. SUNDAY – NOV. 15 Globe for All: ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: One of several special Shakespeare performances with a mask-making workshop preceding the show. Noon. Free. Joan and Irwin Jacobs Common, Shiley Special Events Suite at San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown.

www.sdcnn.com Visit theoldglobe.org. The Old Globe’s Annual Christmas Tree Lighting: Family event in conjunction with “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” features a live performance by members of the cast. Tickets are free but RSVP is required. 6 p.m. The Old Globe’s Copley Plaza, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park. Call 619-234-5623 to reserve a spot. MONDAY – NOV. 16 Film Forum: Free screening of “Land and Freedom” – a Cannes prize-winner starring Ian Hart. 6:30 p.m. Auditorium, San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown. Visit facebook.com/ freelibrarymovies. TUESDAY – NOV. 17 ‘Fish Taco TKO’: Fourth annual competition for best fish taco in San Diego featuring 12 local chefs. Plus a dozen craft beer stations and live music. 6 – 9 p.m. $45. Quartyard, 1102 Market St., East Village. Visit quartyardsd.com. WEDNESDAY – NOV. 18 Poetry night: Alchemy Poetry Series hosted by local poets Seretta Martin and Fred Longworth. Participate in discussion and share your own poetry. Each meeting features an open mic segment. Third Wednesday of the month. 7 p.m. Upstart Crow Bookstore and Coffeehouse, 835C W. Harbor Drive, Seaport Village. Visit upstartcrowtrading.com. THURSDAY – NOV. 19 Front Porch Pilates: These free classes are offered as part of U.S. Bank and Downtown San Diego Partnership’s summer series. 6 – 7 p.m. Lane Field, 900 W. Broadway, Downtown. Visit downtownsandiego.org. ‘Alpine cheese class’: Beer pairings with cheese tastings including aged Comte, Tete de Moine, and Raclette melted over potatoes. Will also teach tips for cooking with cheese and making memorable cheese plates. Wine available. $54. 7 p.m. The Cheese Store of San Diego, 1980 Kettner Blvd., Little Italy. Visit thecheesestoresd.com. FRIDAY – NOV. 20 East Village Walkabout: Join DSDP’s Clean & Safe program at 10 a.m. Meetup at Sixth Avenue and L Street (NE corner). For more info, call 619-234-8900, visit downtownsandiego.org, or sign up for their newsletter. FM 94.9 ‘Movember party’ with Boingo Dance Party: A fundraiser party featuring former members of Oingo Boingo. Music Box, 1337 India St., Little Italy. Visit musicboxsd.com. SATURDAY – NOV. 21 Sailor’s Days: The Star of India and other ships will host “Sailor’s Days” today through Nov. 29 and again Dec. 1 through Jan. 3, 2016. Each day adults and children can experience activities such as making rope for sailing, moving cargo, raising and lowering sails, and more. Included with regular admission to the Maritime Museum of San Diego: $16 for adults; $8 for children. 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. 1492 North Harbor Drive. Visit sdmaritime.org. Free workshop: Downtown San Diego Partnership and The Home Depot are teaming up for monthly free workshops. This month “Build a cat tower/Install a dog door.” 10 a.m. – noon.

Gaslamp Square, Fifth Avenue and L Street. Visit bit.ly/1MwuBtJ. SUNDAY – NOV. 22 Painting and Vino: Local professional artists instruct attendees on painting a masterpiece. Today – “Starry Night.” 12 – 3 p.m. 21+ up. $45, all supplies included, registration is required. Bring your own wine / $15 corkage. 98 Bottles, 2400 Kettner Blvd., Suite 110. For more info, visit paintingandvino.com. MONDAY – NOV. 23 Live Music – Liz Grace duo: Dine and drink to the sounds of diverse vocalist Liz Grace. 6 p.m. Croce’s Park West. 2760 Fifth Ave. #100, Bankers Hill. Visit crocesparkwest.com. TUESDAY – NOV. 24 San Diego Blood Bank’s Chargers Drive XXXVII: This daylong blood drive is one of the longest running and largest blood drives nationwide. There will be live entertainment, refreshments and opportunities for autographs from Chargers players, alumni and Charger Girls. 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Town and Country Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 500 Hotel Circle South, Mission Valley. Visit sandiegobloodbank.org. WEDNESDAY – NOV. 25 San Diego Gulls: Our local hockey team will take on the Texas Stars. 7:05 p.m. Valley View Casino Center, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., Midway. Tickets at 619-3594730 and sandiegogulls.com. THURSDAY – NOV. 26 – THANKSGIVING DAY Thanksgiving dinners: Many Downtown area restaurants will service special menus for Thanksgiving. Here are a few to check out if you don’t want to slave over a huge meal: Bertrand at Mister A’s – 2550 Fifth Ave., Twelfth Floor, Bankers Hill. Visit bertrandatmisteras.com.  Eddie V’s – 789 West Harbor Drive, The Headquarters at Seaport. Visit eddiev.com. Manchester Grand Hyatt – 1 Market Place, Marina. Visit manchestergrand.hyatt.com. Seasons 52 – 789 West Harbor Drive, The Headquarters at Seaport. Visit seasons52.com. The US Grant/Grant Grill – 326 Broadway, Downtown. Visit usgrant.net. The Westgate Hotel – 1055 Second Ave., Downtown. Visit westgatehotel.com FRIDAY – NOV. 27 ‘Irving Berlin’s White Christmas’: The final production of the 2015 San Diego Musical Theatre season. Based on the film, this musical adaptation features 17 Irving Berlin songs performed by a live 22-piece orchestra. Opens tonight, runs through Dec. 6. Spreckels Theatre, 121 Broadway, Downtown. Visit sdmt.org. SATURDAY – NOV. 28 Live music: Ballads and rock by Jonathan Valverde. 7 p.m. Upstart Crow Bookstore and Coffeehouse, 835C W. Harbor Drive, Seaport Village. Free. Visit upstartcrowtrading. com or call 619-333-0141. SUNDAY – NOV. 29 Closing Day at Del Mar Races: The Bing Crosby season closes today. Gates open at 11 a.m., first post at 12:30 p.m. 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., Del Mar. Visit dmtc.com.

see Calendar, pg 23


www.sdcnn.com

FASHION / CALENDAR

San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

Runways and racetracks Fashion Files Diana Cavagnaro An enchanted evening

Dame Zandra Rhodes presented her Enchanted Forest Collection at the Westgate Hotel on Oct. 22. The luncheon and fashion show began with a Champagne social hour where guests mixed and mingled. Rhodes is an international designer from the UK whose specialty is textile design. The distinctive garments have bold patterns with vivid colors. Most of the creations are made with silk chiffon, which gives them a very feminine and glamorous look. Many prestigious clients have donned her creations such as Helen Mirren, Sarah Jessica Parker, Paris Hilton, and HRH Princess Michael of Kent. Rhodes is truly a treasure for us to have here in San Diego. After the social hour, the guests adjoined to the Versailles room and sat down to a threecourse luncheon. The menu was created by

FROM PAGE 22

CALENDAR MONDAY – NOV. 30 Film Forum: Free screening of “That Obscure Object of Desire” – Fernando Rey plays an urbane widower tortured by his lust for the elusive Conchita. 6:30 p.m. Auditorium, San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown. Visit facebook.com/freelibrarymovies. TUESDAY – DEC. 1 Fantasy on Ice: A new ice rink at Liberty Station will be open through January 2016 with proceeds benefitting the Peckham Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Rady Children’s Hospital. Visit fantasyonicesd.com. WEDNESDAY – DEC. 2 ‘Festival of Christmas’: Opening day for this holiday play set in San Diego’s Little Italy. This holiday show features music, dance, laughter and more. Appropriate for ages 5 and up. Runs through Dec. 27. 7:30 p.m. Lamb’s Players Theatre, 1142 Orange Ave., Coronado. Visit lambsplayers.org. THURSDAY – DEC. 3 East Village Association Board meeting: All monthly board meetings are open to the public. 5 p.m. Room 219, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, 1155 Island Ave. Visit eastvillagesandiego.com. For live music listings Downtown visit Facebook.com/DowntownSanDiegoLive. —Compiled by Jen Van Tieghem. Send items for inclusion to editor Morgan M. Hurley at morgan@sdcnn.com.

Jeanne Jones, the international food consultant and cookbook author. In keeping with the Enchanted Forest theme, the luncheon was topped off with a Black Forest cake. Models for the runway were local television stars, including Angie Yang from CBS 8 and Neda Iranpour from San Diego 6. They came down the runway showcasing the Enchanted Forest Collection, which came direct from London. The models had bouffant hairdos by Vicky Lavanty, exotic makeup by Valerie Vonprisk, and were accessorized with knee-high gladiator boots. Many of the colors were in different shades of green reflecting the theme. Looking at these unique designs left the audience breathless and saying, “I want that one and that one and that one!” The luncheon benefits The American Friends of The Zandra Rhodes Museum. Rhodes set up this museum in London in May of 2003 and the current exhibit is Liberty in Fashion. For more information, visit ftmlondon. org. After the show, guests could come behind the scenes and meet Zandra

WEEKLY RECURRING EVENTS TUESDAY Residents Free Tuesdays in Balboa Park: Participating museums change the first four Tuesdays of the month. Free for San Diego city and county residents with ID, active military and dependents. Hours vary by museum. Visit balboapark.org/visit/Tuesdays. Coronado Certified Farmers Market: 2:30 – 6 p.m. First and B streets at Coronado Ferry Landing. Visit welcometocoronado.com. Trivia: Bring a team or play alone. 7 – 9 p.m. 98 Bottles, 2400 Kettner Blvd., Little Italy. Visit 98bottlessd.com. WEDNESDAY Comedy Open Mic: Up-andcoming comics test their skills while patrons enjoy drink and appetizer specials and no cover. 8 p.m. American Comedy Company, 818 B Sixth Ave., Gaslamp. Visit americancomedyco.com. THURSDAY Horton Square Certified Market: 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. (March – Oct.) 225 Broadway near Broadway Circle, Downtown. Visit sdfarmbureau.org. Trivia Night: Bring a team or play alone. 7 – 9 p.m. 98 Bottles, 2400 Kettner Blvd., Little Italy. Visit 98bottlessd.com. FRIDAY Take a bite out of Downtown: Hosted by food tour service Bite San Diego, join fellow foodies and winos for a historical walking tour sampling some of Downtown’s finest restaurants. 21+. Noon. Tickets are $45. Tours also on Saturday. Visitbitesandiego.com/index.php. Sights and Sips Sunset Cruise: Two-hour Hornblower

(above) Dame Zandra Rhodes with Angie Yang of CBS 8; (right) Best Celebrity Lookalike (Lauren Bacall) and grand prize winner, Lynn Wheeler; (far left) Yang modeling Zandra's fashions (Photos by Diana Cavagnaro) Rhodes and try on garments. If you missed this fashion show and would like to see these incredible creations, the studio is in Solana Beach. For an appointment, call: 858-792-1892.

It’s Bing Crosby season

The second fall season at Del Mar began on Oct. 29 and will run for five weeks through Sunday, Nov. 29. This 20-day meet is offering a variety of events such as festivals, free concerts, and giveaways. My favorite event is of course the

cruise held on Friday and Saturday nights through October featuring live music, light hors d’oeuvres and dessert; boarding cocktail included with other drinks and specials available. $31.76 per person plus fees. Boards at 5:30, cruise from 6 – 8 p.m. Departs from Navy Pier, 970 N. Harbor Drive, Downtown. Through Oct. 31. Visit hornblower.com. SATURDAY Little Italy Mercato: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Over 100 booths at Date and India streets.Visitlittleitalysd. com/mercato. The Gaslamp Architectural Walking Tour: Stops on this tour include architecturally significant structures from the 1800s including Old City Hall, the Keating Building, William Heath Davis House Museum and more. 11 a.m. 410 Island Ave., Gaslamp. Visitgaslampquarter.org. SUNDAY Rooftop Flow: Dynamic yoga class by Yoga One. Hotel Solamar, 435 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 9 – 10 a.m. Visit yogaonesandiego.com. Walk-in eReader and device assistance: Free and open to the public. Bring your Android and iOS devices for hands-on learning. 2 – 4 p.m. Room 222, San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., Downtown. Visit sandiegolibrary.org. Outdoor organ concert: The San Diego Organ Society presents a free organ concert. With over 4,500 pipes, this organ is one of the largest organs in the world with wonderful sound, playing classic and popular hits by Downtown News contributor Carol Williams. Enjoy free parking, lots of seating. Balboa Park’s Organ Pavilion. 2 p.m. Visit balboapark.org.v

opening day Hollywood fashion contest at the Plaza de Mexico bringing the best dressed to the fall season. This contest invokes Hollywood style and glamour reminiscent of the Bing Crosby era at the racetrack. Contestants came as celebrity look-alikes, couples, movie characters, and dressed as both women and men. All were ready to be a super star for the day. The second annual Hollywood fashion contest offered three categories: Most Glamorous, Best Dressed Couple, and Best Celebrity Look-

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Alike or Famous Movie Character, with $3,000 in prizes. The Bing Crosby Grand Prize winner received a two-night stay at L’Auberge Del Mar, plus dinner for two in Kitchen 1540 and breakfast for two at Coastline. The winners were: First place and grand prize winner for Best Celebrity Look-Alike or Famous Character went to Lynn Wheeler of Rancho Santa Fe for her Lauren Bacall outfit and second place went to Lori Shelton of Rancho Santa Fe. First place for Best-Dressed Couple went to Bob Ellis and Jenny Stoff and second place went to Jeffrey Cobes and Lori Sovacchio of Upland. First place for Most Glamorous went to Erin Howell of San Diego and second place went to McKenna Harchol of San Diego. The Bing Crosby Season offers a variety of events including concerts, Breeders’ Cup Viewing, Daybreak at Del Mar, Free & Easy Sundays, and Bing+Bubbles+Brunch every Sunday with celebrated chef Brian Malarkey. For more information, call 858-755-1141 or visit delmarscene.com.

Upcoming events Nov. 8 | Day at Del Mar Races — this fun day includes a fashion show in the Grand Ballroom at the Hyatt Aviara in Carlsbad. The event begins at 1 p.m. and will be benefitting the National Charity League, Inc. For tickets call: 619-709-3939. —Diana Cavagnaro is an internationally renowned couture milliner based in the Historic Gaslamp Quarter. Learn more about our hat designer, teacher and blogger at DianaCavagnaro.comv

San Diego’s Favorite Holiday Tradition Starts Saturday!

Steve Blanchard and Jason Edward Cook. Photo by Henry DiRocco.

Sm18asthh Year!

Children’s tickets start at $24 - Adult tickets start at $37

NOVEMBER 7 –DECEMBER 26 Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

Book and Lyrics by Timothy Mason Music by Mel Marvin Directed by James Vasquez Original Production Conceived and Directed by Jack O’Brien

Generously sponsored by Audrey Geisel (619) 23-GLOBE! (234-5623) www.TheOldGlobe.org Dr. Seuss Properties TM & (c) 1957 and 2015 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. All Rights Reserved.


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San Diego Downtown News | November 2015

www.sdcnn.com

San diego downtown news november 2015  

newspaper

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