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spring 2018 portfolio

awm


awm Andrew Meyer

phone email address

+1.502.558.8217 awmeyer11@gmail.com 567 Columbia Avenue, Lexington, KY 40508

Education Saint Xavier High School 2004-2008 University of Louisville 2010-2011

University of Kentucky 2012-2016, Bachelor of Arts in Architecture 2016-2018, Master of Architecture In progess

Extracurricular 2014-2015 UK AIAS Vice President 2015 AIAS Fabricate 2015 Midwest Quad at UK 2017-2018 First Year Studio Mentor

Work Experience Potter and Associates, Architects Summer 2014 and 2015, Intern Louisville, KY Reiser Umemoto, RUR Spring 2015, Externship New York, NY

Digital Revit AutoCAD Rhinoceros 3-D Maya Illustrator Photoshop After Effects InDesign V-Ray Render Maxwell Render

Alt32 Architecture and Design November 2016-current Internship

Current Studio 2018 Spring Commonwealth Studio, Master’s Thesis Project Topic : Animation in Architecture Studio Publication Co-editor

Analog Drawing/Sketching Drafting Modeling Small Scale Fabrication


Table of Contents

SPRING 2018

Michael Jacobs

04

Lexington Visitors’ Center

Jason Scroggin

22

NYC Public Library

Anne Filson

38

Paristown Pointe Masterplan

John Morrison and Brent Sturlaugson

48

Algae Appliqué

Gregory Luhan

58

West Liberty Bike Shop and Cycling Trail

David Biagi

70

Artist’s Studio Home

Michael Mead

78

Primitive Dwelling


01 | Lexington Visitors’ Center Our approach looks at the site as the new center for downtown Lexington. The project integrates the promotion of local and regional Kentucky culture through the arts, food, and education. The Center’s program includes a local restaurant, gallery space for area artists, and classrooms for nearby schools. All age groups are considered with programming such as a coffee shop, amphitheater, classrooms, galleries, event space, and outdoor park space. The entry level, ground level, and outdoor space will be made accessible 24/7 to encourage constant interaction with local residents and passers-by. The design focuses on connection in multiple facets and scales by connecting pedestrian pathways leading to the University and upgrading existing connections to the Main Street corridor. Visitors will be linked to events, being informed on where and how to get to places through an interactive map, and also be able to participate in activities on site. Local residents can come back to the site repeatedly for events, food, and leisure in the heart of downtown. Design will encourage connection from the university to downtown through development of the MLK Boulevard. A new city center such as this will host events to bring people downtown, as well as connect those same people to all the wonderful things Lexington, KY has to offer throughout the entire city. Any construction on the site will focus on sustainable approaches to design. This will be done through many aspects of architecture such as passive lighting strategies, active controls to maintain comfortable temperatures, and even renewable ways of generating energy on site. Water conservation will also be pursued in order to create a better park, as well as to connect with the new Town Branch Commons project that will pass through the site. Solar energy will be harnessed to generate power for active HVAC systems, and be incorporated in the canopy to provide shading. Health factors for those who occupy the space are to be considered through finishes selected, hours of natural light in spaces, and factors of human comfort. Using a cut and fill strategy, the dirt and foundations can be reused from the building site for the new outdoor space. This innovative approach to design will permit a healthy, fun, and active space for both visitors and local residents of Lexington at all times of the year.

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datum lines

activated circulation

program separation by circulation

structural grid

program

structure and program intergration


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2 18

6

8

3

6

17

LEVEL 03 +128’

3

2

+116’ 14

8

6

3

15

16 6

1 13

10

LEVEL 02 +118’


1. Entry 2. Elevators 3. Storage 4. Mechanical 5. Loading/unloading 6. Egrevss 7. Freight Elevator 8. Restrooms 9. Gallery

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2

+106

11

10. Help Desk 11. Classroom 12. Cafe 13. Tasting Room 14. Event Space 15. Catering 16. Catering Office 17. Break Room 18. Administration

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5 3

6

7

DN

9

9

9

DN

LEVEL 01 +104’

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2

4

3

5

7

6

1 8 10 9

9

LEVEL 00 +90’ 11


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02 | New York City Public Librar y

The project began with a series of study models exploring the combination of “hard” and “soft” materials. What was found was unique, weird conditions that were both spatial and formal at various scales. The techniques used for these study models were wrapping and tying off embroidery mesh onto itself, then pouring plaster or placing into molds to produce negatives, or pouring epoxy to develop a more transparent representation. Conditions produced at a micro-scale became drivers for both programmtic and spatail diagrams, without representing the study models too literally. After the study models, a narrative was produced based on one series of study models. It was an attempt to translate the study model to different scales from human scale, to building scale, to urban scale. The New York City Public Library became an opportunity to develop the narrative and study models into building program at large scale. A basic rectilinear tower was produced that was then manipulated by programmtic spaces by wrapping soft bodies around the rigid volume. The soft bodies produced a combination of reading spaces, study spaces, general meeting areas, and storage, while circulation and open volume concentrate near the center of the building.

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Program Bars

Program Intersection

Vertical Shifts

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level 3

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level 2


level 5

level 4

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South Elevation 30


North Elevation 31


West Elevation 32


East Elevation 33


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03 | Paristown Point Masterplan Studio Professor : Anne Filson

Studio Team : Shelby Arthur, Jennifer Bui, Shelby Carpenter, Andrew Fraser, Tara Greathouse, Shelby Hilliard, Thomas Kirk, Andrew Meyer, Matthew Pendrick, Bryan Ramirez, Tricia Rowedder, Shane Wireman

Studio Partner : Andrew Fraser In the heart of Paristown Pointe, governmental buildings sat nearly vacant on a twelve acre site. The studio spoke with the neighbors in order to grasp what they imagined the space could become and what types of programmatic spaces would takeover the now vacant site. After several meetings and discussions in Louisville with both Paristown Pointe residents and city officials, we programmed the site to integrate sustainable features, future transportation options, and healthy lifestyle site features. Our studio proposed that the site would contain space for local retail and restaurants, residential, hybrid office and parking, library and educational facility, and outdoor park space and farmers’ market. Our residential building sat atop the retail spaces along Barret Avenue and Breckinridge Street. The massings became an attempt to replicate the familiar shotgun house with a contemporary take in opening the sides up to daylighting to provide more light. To create a variety of units, vertical volumes were added to the shotgun units to develop 1, 2, and 3 bedroom units to accommodate both families and single persons.

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Driverless Future

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Most of our built environment is centered around the use of cars, but

Parking spots can become fewer as the population adapts to

what happens to our environment once fully automated cars are

transportation alternatives. As parking spots become less in-demand,

introduced into our daily lives? The advancement of technology will

surface lots and parking garages can be repurposed into more

soon affect not only the way in which we use the car and move

important, multi-functional space. Our urban spaces can respond to

through space, but will also enhance the way the city is designed.

this change in transportation by providing more walkable areas.


Health and Walkability About two-thirds of Kentuckians are considered overweight, and

The Paristown Pointe site aims not only to develop walking paths and

about one-third are considered obese. To improve health of

connect to existing cycling paths, but provide immediate access to

Kentuckians, the project intends to employ various modes of

exercise facilities and health food stores that will provide to both new

education on health and accessibility to exercise through the

and existing residents.

introduction of walking paths and connection to existing cycling path infrastructure.

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Made in Paristown Made in Paristown is about continuing to develop the artistry and

Our project proposes to add a state of the art Makerspace to bring

craftsmanship that exists in the neighborhood currently in Louisville

accessible art space and technology to Paristown Pointe, developing

Stoneware. The site presents a great opportunity to add to

retail space for local artists and craftsman, and adding restaurant

Louisville’s passion for arts and culture by bringing those qualities to

spaces for Louisville’s great food scene to create a vibrate district for

another neighborhood of the city.

neighbors and new tenants.

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Sustainable Integration The 12 acre site affords the opportunity to implement passive

Each project addresses solar orientation to heat and cool the

sustainable strategies and allowing these efforts to be visualized as an

buildings when necessary and allow for optimal daylighting. A

educational tool. Projects, such as the Farmers’ Market and the Drive

neighbor to the northeast edge of the site produces a great amount of

IN-Cubator, will have a water collection system that can be distributed

heat from running servers, which can potentially allow some buildings

to maintain the green ares of the site. Many of the projects also

on the site to integrate the heatflow into the project.

integrate a green roof feature to provide space to residents and insulate the buildings

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30

100

150

EB

roa

dw

ay

Goodwood Brewing

Stoneware

KCA

Artist Lofts

Barret Ave

Vine Street E Breckinridge Street

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APARTMENT 3

APARTMENT 1 SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP LIVE

LIVE

LIVE SLEEP

SLEEP

APARTMENT 2

Stair Cores Provide resident access from interior of site. Immediate access to apartments/terraces on second and third levels, access to roof courtyard on first level.

Two Bedroom Apartment Entry either directly from stair core or through integrated terrace. Bedrooms located either above or below living space, depending on entry floor. 30 To

Semi-Private Roof Patios Semi-private outdoor living space for first level residents. Individual patio paving, shared green space between.

Integrated Terraces Private outdoor living space for second and third level residents on opposing sides of the mass. Provides apartment entry access for some residents depending on floorplan.

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One Bedroom Apartment

Public Roof Courtyard

Entry from public roof courtyard. Double height living spaces. Access to semi-private roof patio space. 37 total.

Outdoor activity space accessible to all residents. Provides apartment entry access for first level residents. Plantings establish privacy from street below.


Bath

Bath Bath

Bedroom

Bath

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bath

Bath

Bedroom Living

Bedroom

Terrace

Terrace Bath Living

Bath Living Terrace

Bedroom

Bedroom Bath

Bath

Terrace

Living Bath Bedroom

Living

Third Level 0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

32’

Open to Below

Living

Open to Below

Bedroom

Open to Below

Living

Bedroom Open to Below

Bath

Bath

Terrace

Bath

Bedroom

Terrace

Open to Below

Open to Below

Open to Below

Living Bath

Bedroom

Terrace

Bedroom Bath

Open to Below

Terrace

Second Level 0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

B

32’

Bedroom

Living

Bedroom

Bath

Living

Bath

Bedroom

Bath

Living

Living

Bath

A

Living/Bedroom

Bath Bath

Living

Bedroom

Bedroom

Living/Bedroom

Bath Bath Bedroom

Living

First Level 0’ 2’ 4’

A

8’

16’

32’

16’

32’

Section 01 0’ 2’ 4’

8’

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04 | Algae Appliqué

Algae Appliqué started as a project examining modes of work as a general driver for a project. The studio began by asking basic questions in an attempt to define what ‘work’ means, how work is done with contemporary means, and how architecture affects the way we work and problem solve. This project attempted to look at Bakersfield, California as a potential urban design intervention using algae as a cleansing agent for their irrigation stream running through the city to the outlying farms. The project applied two systems, one being a facade applied retrofit to buildings near the stream in order to filter water into the algae, and back to the stream. The second system was fitting highway overpasses with algae tubes to absorb CO2 emissions from cars, allowing the algae to reproduce. Along with the overpass, a viewing tower wrapped with algae tubes is provided to encourage pedestrian and cycling traveling methods.

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nitrates phosphates ammonia carbon

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algae

cleans water reduces emissions in atmosphere biofuel production


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05 | West Liber ty Bike Shop In 2012, West Liberty, KY was devestated by a tornado that swept across much of their county, destroying countless homes and buildings. Our studio met with town members, including city council and the mayor, in order to understand what was lost and what was needed. After determining the needs and desires of the residents, the studio participated in a charette to masterplan the city to fulfill the needs. Projects in the semester included a local farmers’ market/grocery store, farm-to-table restaurant, a boutique hotel, a vertical farm, a cultural heritage center, a timber manufacturing plant, a community center, a hemp factory, and a bike shop. With these programs in mind, each project was plugged into a timeline, so that the studio projects could engage with each other. Building structure could be produced by the timber manufacturing plant, products could be produced from the hemp factory and sold at the grocery, the vertical farm produced fresh food to be sold, and a bike path developed to encompass these projects, but more importantly, encompassing the history of West Liberty. The bike shop was located just off Main Street, near the city’s park to provide quick access to biking routes and serve as a meeting area for group cycling. The building is located near the boutique hotel and vertical farm, offering views to each building and the history of Main Street.

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Health Advantages : Enjoyable Exercise : Less Healthcare Costs : Easy on Joints

Money Saver

: Low Costs : Low Maintenance : A 10-Mile Trip Saves Cyclists $10 / Day source: Commute Solutions

Less Fuel Used

: Lowers Emissions : Short Commutes Quicker on Bicycle

Branding

: Developing a Product : Bringing in Tourists : Creating Jobs

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Morehead, KY Cave Run Lake

Red River Gorge

Cave Run Lake : 30 Miles : 3 hr. 27 min. To ride : ~2500 cals. burned

Morehead, KY : 28.5 Miles : 3 hr. 15 min. to ride : ~2400 cals. burned

West Liberty Dawkins Line Rail Trail

Red River Gorge : 36 Miles : 3 hr. 59 min. To ride : ~2700 cals. burned

Dawkins Line Rail Trail : 39.3 Miles : 3 hr. 50 min. to ride : ~2700 cals. burned

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Existing Bike Lane New Bike Lane

500’

750’

1000’

1250’

Liberty Loop : Elevation


N

N

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Site Topography + Massing

Ramp to Green Roof

Reshaping Roof in Context with the Natural Landscape

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1. Entry:Bicycle Parking:Bicycle Rental 2. Sales Floor 3. Information & Departure Point 4. Cafe 5. Bicyle Maintenance Station 6. Men’s Restroom 7. Women’s Restroom 8. Fabrication Shop 9. Storage Space

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2

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3 4 1

Prestonsburg Rd.

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artwork by omar rodriguez-graham


06 | Ar tist ’s Studio Home

Given the urban context, the project was to develop a home and studio for an artist of our choice. The site is stuated on the edge of a river sharing a wall with a 30’ high building, with similar height buildings adjacent to the site. Developed initially through sketch models, the driver for the project was a combination of contradicting shapes. Omar Rodriquez-Graham was the artist I chose. is work consists of abstract scupltures that then become still-life paintings. He combines objects turning them into a unique composition. By combining a sliding a box into a cylinder, unwrapping and extending the cylinder, the house was able to be divided into three levels for specific program. Level one for studio, level two for living, and level three for sleeping. By dividing each level to these program functions, it allowed for views from each to the river while remaining private on the western street side.

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07 | Primitive Dwelling As a theme for the semester, the studio looked at the necessity of human form in architecture, at both human scale and building scale. Initial developments came from documenting positions encapturing a human standing in someway,or lying in some way. Following the initial positions, conceptual ideas were developed for how each position could translate to spatial conditions. The idea of an “embrace” became the driving idea and the intent was to develop a structure to hold someone in the lying position as a way of embracing them, in a nurturing way. The challenge was to construct a full-scale model using a 4’ x 8’ sheet of plywood without wasting any of the material. Using the idea of an embrace, the initial form was developed through a series sketch models. After the sketch models and early drawings, we teamed together for the full-scale build to connect two separate projects, one standing and one lying. Is tested us to redesign and continue to develop pieces of our projects into one, singular model that would then be constructed at full scale. The second half of the semester was spen on the project ‘Primitive Dwelling.’ Taking the knowledge from the first project and applying it at a larger scale, the question of how basic shelter can provide space for necessary movement and activity. Drumming became an action that developed a set of drawings exploring potential spatial conditions from a set of points of actions.

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Spring 2018 Architecture Porfolio  

A collection of Undergraduate and Graduate works at the University of Kentucky's College of Design

Spring 2018 Architecture Porfolio  

A collection of Undergraduate and Graduate works at the University of Kentucky's College of Design

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