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iGn S E D t c u D Pro D n A G n i r ctu in MAnuFA

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a m o l p i D d e c n a ? v n d g i A s e e h D t t s c i u t d o r Wha P d n a g n uri t c a f u n a M in The Advanced Diploma is a new qualification offered alongside A levels and Advanced Apprenticeships. By 2011, there will be seventeen Diploma subjects available in England.

to one of the largest and most diverse sectors in the UK, and gives them hands-on experience of key activities like testing the properties of materials, creating budget plans and carrying out health and safety and environmental assessments.

The Advanced Diploma in Manufacturing and Product Design is usually a two-year full-time qualification for young people aged 16 and over. It introduces students

The Diploma also helps students develop other valuable skills such as working independently, managing their own time and working as part of a team.

ufacturing ma in Man lo ip D e h t “ will, c t Design and Produ ea id v ro p ion, in my opin e route alternativ valuable, rsit y e or unive into colleg ho are w students for those ed by s u tly enth not curren y r a d l s e co n tr aditiona c au s e e b s p p er ha courses – ee the nable to s they are u of w hat pplication pr ac tical a by t. eing taugh they are b that n o ti an e duc a providing e th in aterial teaches m c turing the manufa f o contex t these , i believe industries ur a ge d ill be enco students w imately nd will ult to learn a vel than a higher le achieve at through e t have don h ig m y e th proach.” ditional ap a tr re o m a ar r-West , Malcolm c rE , cEng FiAg rsit y’s ugh unive ro o b h L oug Ad visor, Academic and gineering n E e tr n ce llence e xc uring E Manufact

t? n e r e f f i d t i How is The Advanced Diploma offers a unique blend of theoretical study and practical learning, and allows students to learn in a work-related setting – both real and simulated. Because it has been developed with employers and universities, the learning is put in context, and captures the relevance – and excitement – of the subject. The Advanced Diploma in Manufacturing and Product Design gives students an insight into an incredibly diverse sector, and helps them to develop their thinking, 02

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questioning, creative and communication skills. It also equips them with the knowledge and understanding to take on different roles, providing the kind of flexibility that employers are often looking for. Unlike other qualifications that focus on sector-specific skills in isolation, the Diploma has a cross-disciplinary approach. This way, students learn to apply their skills in various business and organisational settings and get a good idea of their career options. The Advanced Diploma in Manufacturing and Product Design gives students a fully-rounded education. It provides them with the skills they need for further study or future employment in many areas, and doesn’t necessarily have to lead to a career or university course in product design or manufacturing.


? e r a p m o c t How does i The Advanced Diploma is a level 3 qualification equivalent to 3.5 A levels – although it takes broadly the same time to complete as 3 A levels or a BTEC National Diploma. The Universities and College Admissions Service (UCAS) awards the qualification a maximum of 490 UCAS points (the same as 3.5 A levels). All UK universities will accept the right Advanced Diploma at the right grade for entry onto a degree course.

Principal Learning Main subject e.g. Engineering

Some will also expect students to take a particular A level or other qualification as their additional and specialist learning option to meet specific course entry requirements. Admissions criteria for 2010 (published by UCAS in May 2009) indicate that a Diploma is suitable for entry to about 80% of all UK undergraduate courses. For details of individual college and university positions on the Advanced Diploma, go to www.ucas.ac.uk/students/beforeyouapply/ diplomas/14-19diplomas/statements

Generic Learning

Project

Functional skills

Work experience

Foundation Diploma

Practical assessments + 1 exam

Project

ICT / Maths / English Level 1

Minimum 10 days

Higher Diploma

Practical assessments + 1 exam

Project

ICT / Maths / English Level 2

Minimum 10 days

ICT / Maths / English Level 2

Minimum 10 days

Advanced Diploma

Practical assessments + 2 or 3 exams

Extended Project

Additional or Specialist Learning Optional courses agreed with your teacher

Choose from a range of qualifications including: •

BTECs

GCSEs

A levels

Equivalent to

5 x GCSEs,    (grade D – G) 7 x GCSEs,   (grade A* – C)

3.5 A levels

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What will students learn? The Advanced Diploma is made up of three core elements: principal learning, generic learning and additional and specialist learning. These are described in more detail over the next few pages.

g n i n r a e l l a Princip The principal learning is compulsory and consists of nine core manufacturing and product design topics that teach students the main principles and practices for this sector. The topics are organised around three learning themes: • product design and materials science • business and enterprise • production systems. The themes do not feature as individual parts of the Diploma and are not assessed separately – but they underpin what is taught in the principal learning.

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Manufacturing business principles Students look at how a manufacturing business is structured and the implications of financial planning and cost management on profitability. How? Students could, for example, research how the world market economy, global trading and corporate social responsibility impact on manufacturing enterprises, as well as the strategies companies develop to comply with legislation. Why? Manufacturing enterprises need to be aware of, and respond to, the various economic, environmental, political and social factors that affect their business operations and sustainability. Customer needs and market requirements This investigates why and how manufacturers gather and use data about customers, competitors and markets, as well as how relationships promote sales and profits, and how businesses respond to their ethical and legal responsibilities. How? Students could use different market research techniques to explore customer needs and values, and analyse the data using specialist tools. Why? For a manufacturing business to be successful, it must provide a level of service that meets or exceeds the expectations of its customers and produce products that sell well in the market place. Supply chain management Students explore the principles of supply chain management, its integration across a company and how problems can be solved. How? Working independently or in a team, students may investigate and contrast logistics such as transporting, storing, recycling and safe disposal of goods and materials in, for example, clothing and chemicals manufacturing organisations Why? The manner in which a company deals with and manages its supply chain can have a huge impact on its performance, reputation and profitability. Managing resources and working practices Students look at supervisory roles, working practices and responsibilities. How? Students could, for example, research entry requirements, on-the-job training, and the skills needed to be a production manager, team leader of an improvement team, or marketing and sales manager in a local company. Why? Team working and target setting are crucial aspects of running a manufacturing business and apply to everyone throughout an organisation. Research, development and introduction of new products Students look at development and problem-solving techniques, as well as producing design specifications. How? Students could investigate and put together a presentation on how innovation, sustainability and continuous improvement, or economic, ethical and environmental issues affect the design and development of a new product.

Why? Knowing the factors that impact on the design and development of a new product and being able to use appropriate product development techniques are crucial to the innovation process. Materials science This looks at how the properties of materials are exploited in different products and manufacturing processes, how to investigate these properties safely, and how science and technology are used in manufacturing to increase productivity. How? Students could test complex materials such as a metal, a biofuel or soap, alongside a textile, cardboard or bricks. Why? The results of these tests and investigations are used to make important decisions about product design, development and manufacturing. Production and processing systems Students compare various manufacturing processes and explore the role of advanced technology and control methodology in the manufacturing process, as well as learn how to contribute to the efficient and safe manufacture of a product. How? Students could, for example, for example, set up, calibrate and use tools and equipment to manufacture a simple product. Why? Manufacturers must maximise efficiency in the manufacturing process whilst maintaining quality in safe working environmentss. Management of production and processing operations This explores organisational and management principles and looks at how to maximise plant efficiency using maintenance and problem-solving techniques. How? Students could, for example, use risk assessment and fault-finding techniques on plant or equipment. Why? Efficient production and process management that is integrated into the overall strategy of a business is fundamental to manufacturing success. Quality in manufacturing Students learn about the importance of quality in every aspect of a manufacturing business and the principles of total quality management, as well as how to monitor the quality of a product using appropriate techniques. How? Students could, for example, carry out a quality audit on a company, department or process and make recommendations to improve quality. Why? The emphasis placed upon quality by any manufacturing organisation can have a huge impact on its performance, reputation and profitability.

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g n i n r a e l c i r Gene As part of the generic learning, which is the same across all Advanced Diplomas, students will develop a number of transferable skills that are essential to their self-development. These include functional skills in maths, English and ICT as well as personal, learning and thinking skills. Students will also get the opportunity to do work experience as part of their generic learning. Functional skills (Maths, English and ICT) Functional skills give students the practical ability to use maths, English and ICT in everyday life, work and study. Advanced Diploma students have to develop and apply these skills in all the work they do.

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Functional skills are separately-assessed, stand-alone qualifications that all students have to complete at level 2 to achieve their Advanced Diploma. However, students who have already completed these qualifications before starting their Diploma do not need to repeat them. Functional skills are also incorporated into the principal learning. Advanced Diploma students in Manufacturing and Product Design will, for example: • need to construct and interpret financial accounts and budgets • write a product design specification. Developing a good standard of numeracy, literacy and IT skills is essential to all students – even if they do not choose a career in manufacturing.


Personal, learning and thinking skills

Work experience

Throughout their Diploma, students will develop six personal, learning and thinking skills:

The Diploma gives students the opportunity to do at least 10 days’ work experience. They could, for example:

• team working • creative thinking • independent enquiry • self-management • effective participation • reflective learning. These skills are not separately assessed, but are integrated into the assessment criteria for the principal learning and the extended project. They are vital skills in both life and work, and are embedded in the secondary curriculum.

• work at a birthday card manufacturer in their marketing department, analysing data and using business development tools to promote sales and profits • work at a portable tool manufacturer, covering a wide range of activities that involve analysing and reporting on the logistics of the supply chain • work with a soft furnishings manufacturer, helping the quality team gather information and carrying out quality audits with a view to implementing ISO 9000. Work experience is a great way for students to apply the knowledge and skills learnt on the course, and to further develop their personal, learning and thinking skills. It is one of the best ways to get insider experience, and may also help students develop project ideas for their course. Work experience does not, however, have to be within the manufacturing or product design sector, as the skills taught on the course are used in many different businesses. In fact, students who take on work experience in other industries will become better aware of other career paths and develop a broader understanding of how their skills can be applied elsewhere. 07

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t c e j o r p d e The extend As part of the Advanced Diploma, students will complete an extended project to demonstrate their ability to work independently. They are required to plan, prepare, develop and realise a project, and present the final outcome. Students could either explore a subject in real depth or broaden the topic by drawing connections between different areas or subjects. Either way, they have to choose a subject that complements and develops the themes and topics related to their Diploma. What types of projects can they do? The end result could be a written piece of work, either a report (with findings from an investigation or study) or a dissertation presenting an argument. Or it could be a practical piece of work, like a design, an artefact or a performance.

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A Manufacturing and Product Design student could, for example: • complete an industry challenge, such as the Formula One Technology Challenge, PrintIT! or the Food and Drink Schools Challenge, drawing on their own work experience • solve a problem set during work experience, designing or evaluating a product • carry out a business improvement exercise such as looking into how a production line could be improved. How does the project compare? The extended project is a qualification in itself – equivalent to half an A level in size and A2 in level. It is also available outside the Diploma to A level and other students. The project is worth a maximum of 60 UCAS points and has been welcomed by universities as a great preparation for students who want to go on to higher education.


g n i n r a e l t is l a i c e p s d n a Additional The additional and specialist learning lets students choose between a wide variety of optional courses. This helps them develop their individual interests, abilities and career aspirations. This could be: • a specialist subject to develop their particular manufacturing and product design interests further, like level 3 certificates in areas like food technology or process manufacturing • a subject that would help them get on to a specific university course, like an AS or A level in art and design, maths, business studies or ICT • a subject that reflects a student’s other interests and career ambitions, like a language or a creative subject like music.

There is a wide range of qualifications available, including A levels and BTECs. For a full list, see the National Database of Accredited Qualifications at www.accreditedqualifications.org.uk How many can they choose? Students can choose more than one subject, depending on the size of the qualifications they choose. They would, for example, only be able to take one A level or one large specialist qualification. But if they choose to take a smaller qualification, like an AS level, they could take two or more. What about extra qualifications? Students are also able to complete extra qualifications outside the Diploma. They could, for example, take another A level if they want to pursue a particular interest in addition to their Diploma. 09

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? d a e l t i l l i Where w The Advanced Diploma is designed to develop a wide range of skills needed for work, further training or university. It can be a first step towards a career in the manufacturing and product design sector – or in a range of other sectors. Going on to further education The Advanced Diploma is a great foundation for students choosing to continue to further and higher education. Students could take up an Advanced Apprenticeship, or do a foundation degree in chemical technology, furniture design or food manufacturing management. The Diploma could also lead to a wide range of undergraduate degrees in subjects such as textiles, printing and publishing, food manufacturing management, ceramics, process technology and management or manufacturing systems engineering – either full time or part time combined with a job.

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Going into employment There are plenty of opportunities for students going straight into employment. The Advanced Diploma could lead to work in areas such as process and maintenance operations as a laboratory assistant or quality control officer. However, the majority of jobs require applicants to have completed further or higher education. Students who have completed a degree can head for a career in areas like process engineering, consumer research, management training, new product development and quality assurance. Preparing students for the future Completing an Advanced Diploma in Manufacturing and Product Design doesn’t mean that students have to choose a career or degree in the sector. Students may go on into an unrelated – or less related – area, like finance, French, economics or marketing. Whichever path the student chooses, the Diploma provides them with skills that are relevant to the modern day workplace and degree-level study.


ma in “the Diplo ring Manufactu ct and Produ l help Design wil s acute to addres ging and emer s in skills gap tr y. our indus to it will help uitment shape recr that strategies oung suppor t y people’s to ambitions oyment gain empl ssful and succe careers in and a growing dustr y.” in g in it c x e lmes, Sabine Ho Manager, ls Project il k S m e h c e ir ork sh Humber/ y Focus l a ic m e h c

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? n o i t a m r o f n i e r o m t n a W HoW to FinD out MorE

HoW to DoWnLoAD tHiS LEAFLEt

For more information about the Diploma in Manufacturing and Product Design, go to: www.direct.gov.uk/diplomas www.manufacturingdiploma.co.uk

To download this leaflet, go to:

For more information about: • the new 14-19 curriculum, go to www.dcsf.gov.uk/14-19 • the structure of Diplomas and resources to support their delivery by schools and colleges, including illustrations of how students might progress from an Advanced Diploma course, go to www.qca.org.uk/diploma • individual university and college statements about the Diploma, go to www.ucas.ac.uk/students/ beforeyouapply/diplomas/14-19diplomas • awarding body specifications: • Edexcel – www.edexcel.com

• www.direct.gov.uk/diplomas • www.teachernet.gov.uk/publications and use the search reference DCSF-00385-2009 HoW to orDEr MorE coPiES oF tHiS LEAFLEt To order more copies of this leaflet: • go to www.teachernet.gov.uk/publications • call 0845 602 260 • textphone 0845 605 560 Make sure you quote the reference 00385-2009LEF-EN. Extracts from this document may be reproduced for non-commercial research, education or training purposes on the condition that the source is acknowledged. For any other use, please contact hmsolicensing@opsi.x.gsi.gov.uk

©

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Crown Copyright 2009.


Manufacturing and Product Design Diploma Post 16 Leaflet