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ISSUE 1 | 4th Quarter 2012 £ 4.00 [UK] € 5.00 [EUROpE] $ 6.50 [USA]

‫د‬.‫م‬. 60 [Morocco] ₦ 1000 [Nigeria] r 55 [S. africa]

THE FACES OF THE SPORT DRIVING NIGERIA TO RACE

BOND STYLE

celebrating

50 years of 007

AFRICA 'S CREATIVE BUSINESS

NOËLLA BEAUTY COMES FROM GIVING


the Ndoro Jewellery collection in sterling silver

w w w . pat r i c k m av r o s . c o m


A way into Style, showcasing both African and International designers. A way to Prosper, highlighting individuals and organisations who have shown exceptional vision and belief in Africa. A way into our Culture, discovering the vast cultural wealth Africa has to offer. A way to Indulge, Treasure and Refine. With original interviews, artwork and photography showing emerging excellence to an international readership and, most importantly, Africa`s discerning set.

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CONTENTS

Issue

PROSPER

10

STRIVING TO DELIVER SOLUTIONS

Courteville Business Solutions solves a very Nigerian problem.

12 Energizing Africa

EcoBank’s Rolake Akinkugbe shares her world of resources.

16

Racing To Build An Industry

Meeting the men behind the Nigerian Racing Eagles team.

1 | 4th Quarter 2012

54 Christie Brown

The Ghanaian designer with the pan-african dream.

A peek into the life of model Leomie Anderson.

60

007 Iconic Style

Celebrating 50 years of elegance and charm with A:L African Bond.

CULTURE African heart 70 An reaching for the stars

something 22 Producing special

76 Rotimi Babatunde

Fashion and Media in the words of Tanya Samuel & Caroline Chinakwe.

STYLE

30

The art and science of Kofi’s Fashion

A journey into the style of Ghanaian designer Kofi Ansah.

Fashion Weeks 36 Special

New York, London, Paris & Milan for the season Spring/Summer 2013.

44

CITY TO BEACH ALLER - RETOUR

Angolan artist Daniela Ribeiro shows her inspirations.

A:L meets the winner of the Caine Prize 2012.

78 80

Style picks for him.

fashion industry 46 The is a good fit A talk with “New African Fashion” author, Helen Jennings.

Who, Where and 50 The How of Sophistication Robert Emmett talks about his African successes.

Can’t wait for the week to start

Legendary promoter Mr. Monday gives us his African essential listening.

SPECIAL CITY: 88 A:LCasablanca

The perfect destination for the 48 hour holiday.

YOUR 97 INDULGE TASTE BUDS

A Moroccan inspired recipe from A:L resident Chef.

98

ENGINES

106 Just Looking

Grown ups favourite field trip, the London Motor Museum.

EXP 9 112 Bentley A LUXURY CONCEPT

A vision of the future with this new Sport Utility Vehicle.

NEW ERA PRINCESS 114 AFORBOLD

The first 40 metres yacht is a sublime expanse of interior and exterior living.

TREASURE JEWELLERY SPECIAL Allure 118 A:LNatural

Modelled by our cover girl NoellaCoursaris-Musunka.

124 TIMELESS TIME PIECES

Elegance and action to suit your mood.

A:L EXCLUSIVE COVER STORY THE FACE OF PHILANTROPHY Noella Coursaris-Musunka, the model humanitarian.

Style picks for her.

IN-PAT COOL STYLE

A:L meets Luke Dale-Roberts, creator of the finest food in Cape Town.

that 56 Who’s girl?

to Earth 21 Down DiVA

Tunji Bada talks to Arit Eminue about film, TV and digital media.

Hand 102 Cool Luke

Decanting Luvo

The surprising Luvo Ntezo, South Africa’s number one sommelier.

REFINE

128

Get your mind and body around modern nutrition

Expertise nutrition by Kat Starr Johnson.

& 132 Rise Shine

Put your body through Francesca Giacomini’s workout.

the stars shining 135 Are over your finances?

A:L Astrologer K. Joya reads your future prosperity in your star sign.

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I

t’s been a hot summer. Not necessarily in temperature, because London, after all, leaves a lot be desired when it comes to basking in sunshine. What has kept us warm at the Away Luxury offices has been the overwhelming mix of talent, culture, art, business and, of course, style that Africa has offered us. From enjoying polo matches featuring the combined talents of Nigeria and Ghana horsemanship, sipping chilled champagne; to watching the Nigerian Olympic basketball team warm-up matches from a hard sports hall bench, bottle of water in hand - the contrast in surroundings could not have been more distinct. But remember, it is not only elegant living that conveys a sense of luxe; it is also the experiences on offer that make life richer. Walk with us, then. We will show you designs and designers that have inspired us and the world. Ankara print is no longer for the everyday African woman, but for the woman of the world. Jermyn Street shirtmakers are taking on the ubiquitous African kaftan and putting a London establishment twist on it. Africa on the catwalks of New York’s fashion week. Everywhere we look, Africa is showing the world how to style. Open your eyes to the art and artists who have shown us shapes, colours, sounds and words. The heat of Africa surrounds us - in the prose of the Caine Prize short listed authors; in the colourful world of artists who tell us stories of the African sun from their canvases. The drumming, the rhythms, the lyrics of artists such as Tony Allen, Dele Sosimi and Seun Kuti have brought us to our feet and lifted our hands. Business men and women who have used their African roots, or used the resources Africa has to offer to make sure Africa becomes a force to be reckoned with. You hear their stories. Sample the flavours, tastes and textures of Morocco and South Africa. All this and more in our first edition of Away Luxury Magazine. This mix of engaging articles appeal to an educated and affluent reader who demands to know what`s new and whats important in Africa. This giant has awoken and has enveloped us in luxury. This is African heat.

Anna Marie Benedict, Editor in Chief

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TONY ALLEN IN CONCERT

ACCESS POLO 2012

LE MANS 24 HOURS

ANNA MARIE BENEDICT @ TV3 GHANA

NIGERIAN OLYMPIC BASKETBALL TEAM

JUDY KOLOKO

CECILIA ZOPPELLETTO

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You can find us online at

www.awayluxury.com For information, possible collaborations, advertisements or just to tell us that you like us, please e mail us at:

info@awayluxury.com If you would like everyone to know, be social and share

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FOUNDER and EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Chris Okigbo ADVISOR Uju Okigbo EDITOR IN CHIEF Anna Marie Benedict FEATURES EDITOR Cecilia Zoppelletto FASHION EDITOR Judy Koloko TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Paolo Camata PICTURE DIRECTOR Bernard Campbell PHOTOGRAPHERS Moneyshot-Inc, Stefano Santoro CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Richard Foulser, Othello De’Souza-Hartley CONTRIBUTORS Tunji Bada, Francesca Giacomini, Kat Starr Johnson, Ruben Volckaert, K. Joya, Manley Communications GRAPHIC PROJECT LEGAL ADVISOR Curtis Legal Practitioners & Arbitrators RESEARCH Hien Nguyen One&Only Sept12 AWbleed.pdf

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27/09/2012

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ISSUE 1 | October 2012 £ 4.00 [UK] € 5.00 [EUROpE] $ 6.50 [USA]

‫د‬.‫م‬. 60 [Morocco] ₦ 1000 [Nigeria] r 55 [S. africa]

THE FACES OF C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

THE SPORT DRIVING NIGERIA TO RACE

BOND STYLE

celebrating

50 years of 007

AFRICA'S CREATIVE BUSINESS

NOËLLA BEAUTY COMES FROM GIVING

A:L Away Luxury Magazine is a part of Away Publishing and Entertainment ltd. It’s a lifestyle magazine published quarterly. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is strictly prohibited. While every step has been taken to ensure all the information is correct, Away Luxury is not responsible for any changes that may occur after printing. Printed in Spain by www.ulzama.com. Registered in Nigeria N*RC 1025470. Registered Address 8 Okigbo Crescent, Independence l/o, Enugu. © 2012

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0807 4 911 911 0807 5 911 911


EMINUE

AKINDELE

NIGERIAN RACING EAGLES

SAMUEL

AKINKUGBE

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STRIVING TO DELIVER SOLUTIONS A closer look at Nigeria’s IT needs Anna Marie Benedict

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LAGOS


M

eeting Adebola Akindele of Courteville Business Solutions was inspiring. Hugely charismatic, he Extremely happy to extol on one of his favourite topics. Busines Solutions. He is also mournfully apologetic “I can talk all day about the problems in delivering viable solutions in Nigeria.”. But when I assured him, I had all day to listen, he brightens considerably. Courteville Business Solutions was incorporated in 2005 in Lagos Nigeria as a business advisory firm and was listed on the Nigerian stocks exchange as a publicly quoted company in 2009. In 2006, Courteville was competing with the large consultancies coming in from the West, even though they were dealing with large local corporates in terms of business advisory, they were having a hard time making them recognise their competency. Bola is rueful of the problems he had to face in the firm’s infancy in taking on the international consulting giants. “The first inclination of these businesses was to say “No, we can get KPMG or PWC”, or if they gave us a chance with consultancy, we were having problems of getting paid - if we got paid at all.” They quickly realised that there was a gap in the market to provide consultancy for process improvement for transactions. Nigeria is historically a paper-based, cash based society and records and quickly lost in disorganisation. “We started to look at areas that serviced the mass market, which means the Public Sector, and areas where people had had a lot of issues. That’s where we came up with the idea of tackling the motor vehicle licensing and registration. An area which had service challenges, infrastructure challenges, compliance issues and also veracity of current registration documentation.” A country as populous as Nigeria has, understandably, the highest car population in Africa. Between 14 and 15 million motorcycles and cars on the road. This challenge was not for the faint-hearted. “We knew there were challenges especially with genuine documentation. Our government had been unable to do anything about it. Anybody could buy a car and put it on the road, there was no database to rely upon. Unfortunately, the tariff system was structured at the government level but the administrative system was in the hands of the States and each State could decide how it wanted to run its own motor vehicle registration system. We decided to show people that we had to start with the most challenging product in the most challenging environment - the almost 3 million car owners in

Lagos State. We went in the with objectives to resolve revenue collection, counterfeiting, removing the bottlenecks that prevented people from receiving fast service.” How were the counterfeiters weeded out? The scale of the problem seems unimaginable. “It was an industry dating back to the 1960s. The revenue from counterfeiting licensing documents has fed entire generations of families in Lagos State alone. Of course it was daunting to realise there was such a monster to be eradicated, but the way we tackled it was to make it unprofitable for the counterfeiters to operate, and make it pointless for the car owner to even pay for a counterfeited documents. So if it is faster, cheaper, more accessible and legally authorised; it is vey compelling for the consumer to get original documents instead of counterfeit.”

we had to start with the most challenging project, in the most challenging environment How were the logistics taken care of? “We came with the technology, but it was not enough, we had to come up with a business solution. We had 38 licensing stations throughout Lagos State to service over 2 million motor vehicle users. It was not enough. We expanded to over 1000 licensing stations in one year by leveraging our relationships with banks, insurance companies and other public buildings and created extra licensing outlets within those locations. For a process that used to take up to one month, now only took 5 minutes from once the paperwork was submitted. You were verified by the State and your records were sacrosanct. With that success we have rolled out into about 80% of the Nigerian States and they have found that their revenue has increased collection by 300%. Now they have more revenue to work with and do more infrastructure and budget planning.” The next project for Courteville is to help the Food & Drug Agency to build an online portal database for all the drugs and food that they have certified as safe. All online. Totally paperless. Nigeria is such a virgin forest to be harvested for these processes that were historically paper-based and chaotic. They now can be streamlined and digital. A Nigerian company has solved a Nigerian problem. /

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ENERGIZING

AFRICA Rolake Akinkugbe shares her world of resources

Anna Marie Benedict

I

encountered Rolake Akinkugbe for the first time in a darkened auditorium while she was giving the keynote speech on Sustainable Energy Resources of Africa in London’s Grosvenor House Hotel. I was riveted. Now, I admit, I am not as fascinated by sustainable energy resources as I probably should be, but this highly articulate, beautifully cadenced voice held me to my seat and made me listen to her. “I’ve only got an hour, I’m off to plan a friend’s wedding”, she said, as I cornered her on her way out. I made suitably sympathetic noises. Having recently helped plan my brother’s wedding, I knew what was in store and I wished her all the best, then made the most of my hour. Rolake is the Head of Research Energy for the Ecobank Group in the City of London, a job she enjoys thoroughly as it allows her the opportunity to travel Africa advising her bank and, more importantly, shareholders interested in |investing 14 in African energy.

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LONDON

Looking at the global market financial trends, it is clear that the West is becoming squeezed with the eurozone problems and sovereign debt. Latin America and Africa are now looking very attractive as areas for high growth and high returns. But, over and beyond African natural resources, there is a wealth of social resources, human capital resources, the wealth of people and the wealth of culture which makes doing business with Africa very exciting. All of this Rolake was very happy to share with me.

So what is new for African energy? “Well, natural gas is big in East Africa. Tanzania and Mozambique are one of the the two most prolific gas producers in Africa. Nigeria still has the largest reserves - 186 trillion cubic feet, but now these two east African countries have suddenly discovered huge gas reserves; and because of this, there is a huge amount of interest as you can imagine.


Companies are fighting bidding wars to win offshore licences and contracts, and in as much as these opportunities are going to make money and finance, natural gas has the ability to transforms Africa more than any other type of hydrocarbon energy source. Fertiliser plants and thermal power plants can be built, plastic manufacturing can be boosted through petrochemicals. It’s more wide-reaching than oil. If these governments think strategically, there are various ways they can positively transform their economy for gas production. But infrastructure is a real problem and I think that Mozambique and Tanzania need up to $50billion investment to develop their gas sector. There is a whole chain of transportation pipelines, gas plants that have to be built. The real challenge for an investor thinking of investing that that type of infrastructure is how to make good returns. African consumers do not feel that they should be paying so much for their gasoline or electricity if theirs is a rich oil or gas producer. So the investor may look to produce for export where returns will be higher unless the governments

can guarantee. It is a political sensitive issue so much so, that some of the ways governments will plug the investment gap is to look to China because they are more willing to invest in the long term and they will loan money relatively cheaply. China doesn’t have an immediate requirement to satisfy shareholders with large returns Those are some of the considerations and reasons why African countries are readily courting China for these ‘resource for infrastructure’ deals where hospital and schools will be built in return for energy.”

How do those governments, who do not have appropriate infrastructure and suddenly find out they are ‘energy rich’, broker the right deals for their own country with investors? “This boils down to governments and politics. Leadership without vision has been the bane of African development. The issues that may happen with Tanzania, for example, is that they rate they are discovering gas is outstripping the time it takes to build the institutions in order to absorb the wealth generated. You need a framework, you need advisors to 15 | balance your current economic needs against consumption.


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How can a country meet the needs of their economy versus the needs and saving up for future generations? These resources are finite and one day they will run out. A sophisticated way thinking and models are needed to ensure the future. A fine example is Ghana, they have set up a Petroleum Management Bill which has three different types of structures. One is a stabilisation fund which means that if ever the economy suffers a rainy day then there is a pot of money to draw on to make sure that the economy doesn’t collapse; and then there is an infrastructure fund which is specifically targets social infrastructure - hospitals schools and the other institutions that are really important for economic growth; and there is a futures fund which saves up for the future generations. Those companies willing to invest in Africa need to be prepared to help African governments negotiate these contracts. As an investor, it is in their favour to do this. For example, an investor may be in favour now, but if there is a government change within the next 4 years, the sanctity of the original contracts may be looked at again. So investors need to have a long term view and negotiate a fair deal for the country as a whole.

“Natural gas

has the ability to transform Africa” The concept of local content which ensures that locals are employed, that they also have access to contracts because essentially it is about creating wealth. But it will take a few years to transfer skills, knowledge, technology as the local producers do not haves the skills to provide, for example, a national oil rig.”

How does EcoBank view your outside speaking engagements? “When I graduated, I wanted to go into the media, but I found it very competitive to get a job, but then, in a previous analyst job, I started to do media work and started to build a network of people - BBC, CNN etc. I found that even after I left that job and started to work for EcoBank, they still wanted me to come and talk so I struck an informal

agreement to EcoBank which enabled me to do this. As an employee its just as important the things you can bring to the job and your value as a person. EcoBank are happy because I will always reference the fact I work for them. All this talk of speaking engagements has led me quite nicely onto what else Rolake does in her spare-ish time. “I think I had been working for about seven years since leaving university, and I was receiving good feedback from my talks on and off mainstream media that I should become a motivational speaker. I channeled my skills into Vox Perfect. I believe what you hear and what you see can make a difference. Vox Perfect is a platform for women, who have a particular talent, make a show or event more interesting as a host presenter or MC. The other side of the business is Vox Articul8, which is what I am really passionate about. I used to mentor young girls in church. And that was something that was quite useful for those girls who were in alternative educational or had been excluded from mainstream school. I’ve always been of the belief that mainstream education is not for all people, some need a hybrid of learning. I know the increase of self confidence public speaking gave me, can actually make the difference to those girls in getting a job or not getting a job. So I came up with a series of programmes around global issues, that would not only inform, but also challenge and motivate them and perhaps help them to contribute. Social skills are almost as important as how or where you studied.”

Does she have time for anything else? Rolake looks a bit shy. “I’m a jazz pianist. I play a little guitar as well. I actually play in a band!” So I press for the name and she tries to change the subject, but she does volunteer the fact that her band is playing that Friday night. “Where?” “Oh somewhere in Vauxhall...” She waves her hand vaguely. I let her go, but I insist on her personal favourites. “I am traditionalist so when I started playing jazz, I listened to Thelonius Monk and John Coltrane, but increasingly, I do play a lot of contemporary jazz which means anything from taking a pop song and reworking it. I play in my church band so there is a lot of gospel influences as well. It’s good to have these things in life.” Where next for Rolake. “I’m off to Tanzania in a few days. I’m speaking at a conference and it’s one of the few African countries I haven’t been to so I hope I can get some time off.

So will you be moving out of your job and advising governments? “It could happen....” , she says cryptically. And with that she waves me goodbye and rushes off to plan weddings... /

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NIGERIA RACING EAGLES Cecilia Zoppelletto

T

hey say London is such a cold city where nobody sees you, no matter what you may be wearing, what you may be doing, because everybody has much better things to do than caring for what you are up to. Possibly a generalisation but pretty true, until I experienced standing next to a little fast number decorated in Nigeria’s green and white

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LONDON

colours. People stopped, people looked. Many came to ask questions and a great number who did not cross the road would shout “a long way from Nigeria”, but they do not know just how long the trip has been for the first motor racing west African team. Just ask Ribi and he will tell you. 19 |


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Ribi Adeshokan


Starting off as a racing club Ribi Adeshokan knew that in the motor racing business there was a profitable business model to export to Africa, so he set up to do it. “That was in 2007. I liked the idea of the A1 GP because it is about countries racing each other rather than teams. I thought it would work for us so we could run for the country and get everybody’s backing. Every Nigerian would feel involved because it would have been a matter of national pride. So we started working on the idea, we established a relationship with the formula spent on merchandising and as we were about to put the final entry the A1GP went bankrupt and we lost money.”

“ In motor

passion is there, but what about the whole organisation and team? Who is going to drive and where? “The idea for Nigeria Racing Eagles is to use Nigerian drivers. People ask ‘are there any drivers from Nigeria?’, I say yes there are some and if there aren’t, we have to train them. We have three drivers, enough for the GT series. We are now getting interest from other parts of Africa - Zimbabwe and South Africa in particular. Although we started as a Nigerian team we decided to become more inclusive, and bring them in as guest drivers.” Promising talent and expert advice can put the Eagles on track, especially when the

may be in Nigeria where poverty issues may leave people uninterested in an elitist sport, but Ribi is clear on the potential of this industry. “If you look at motorsport carefully you will see that actually that the elite may be spearheading and running a project but the amount of employment it creates is going to the masses. Motorsport is about car and technology development. This is the kind of opportunity we want to give to Nigerian University students, technical students, to come onboard and become a mechanic, a data analyst, a telecom expert. This is the only way we can catch up with the rest of the world. You have to see the wider picture. The business model works 50% on track and 50% off. There are the races but also the

racing, there is a profitable business to export to Africa

A stressful and disappointing time for the motivated business man who learnt straight away to make the most of the harsh lesson. “Motorsport is an exclusive club and to penetrate that club is not easy, but they have accepted me a little bit. I have to keep up with the momentum for the motorsport committee to feel comfortable with me or because they see that, although I have lost some money, I am not going to give up. Right now I am enjoying it because everyone knows that I have the zeal and the passion to make the project a success.” So I sit, and glass of water after the other, I listen to the compelling and inspiring case for motorsport in Nigeria. Sure the

Sanmi Adegoke, Bolaji Falana and Ribi Adeshokan

team manager is John Wickham. Legendary figure since the 80s when he had his own F1 team to then continue his success by winning the most series as team manager of Bentley and Audi. “John shares our vision as well. It’s a challenge to him as well to accomplish this project. He has done it all, F1 to manager, this is a new challenge.” Thinking out loud I expressed my doubts about how much a challenge this project

tourism, the grid girls, the merchandise, the music.” The question is, then, legitimate: ladies at the grid and at the wheel? “Actually we have been getting inquiries from women who want to drive in Nigeria and we are very open to it. Even in 2007 when we did the first club race we had a woman driver, so yes definitely.” Well, I may just have been converted to motorsport. /

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A

tall dark and strong-featured beauty, Arit Eminue looks stern whilst she works but then one of her staff approaches her about a query. She smiles and you realize this is a woman who is super focused while she works but has time to give her attention to others. It is just as well then that she is in the business of listening and helping others find work in the UK’s film, TV and digital media sectors. She is founder and managing director of Diversity in Visual Arts otherwise known as DiVA . DiVA is an independent training provider that helps people from minority and ethnic groups to find work in the UK’s film, TV and digital media sectors through apprenticeships, graduate work placements, coaching and training. As she also runs a film company called Diva Films I wondered if she prefers producing films or running a company. “The physical production side never interested me about film. With the training side, I am more interested in building a business. You can’t do both. If you want to build something, you have to focus your energy on building that one thing. Understand the sector. Understand the key players. Make friends with the key players and all of that. You have to do that.” Before setting up DiVA Eminue studied a producing MA at the National Film and Television School and worked at Creative Skillset, which is a body that supports skills and training in the UK creative industries. “I had the benefit of an excellent film education. I wanted people from my community to have that experience also.” She designed and delivered the Graduate Fellowship Programme, a work programme that supports film professionals from ethnic communities. She describes the Graduate Fellowship Programme as “more of a programme of excellence and not one of those worthy pat you on the back I am being diverse kind of programmes. It was about matching excellent talent to excellent positions with excellent businesses who are at the top of their game when it comes to film.”

I noticed that she talks about development a lot. For someone who is a doer she has a strong nurturing side. She ascribes it to be being a mother. Does she think this nurturing attitude that has been formalised in the workplace through apprenticeships and placements would benefit African businesses? “That personal development is linked so closely with a person’s ability to do their job. I think talent now is the most important commodity for any business. You need to develop that talent in-house so that your employees become more effective within the working environment. You get people to think about where their talents are and how they can use them to drive the business forward, so that they don’t just look at you as being the leader and the driving force. They start to believe in the company and the contribution they make.” Eminue tweets many quotes (@ AritEminue) but my favourite was originally by Erma Bombeck: “When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, ‘I used everything you gave me.’” What more is there to give? “I am still young,” she says. “I have still got years left. We want to be the number one leader of vocational learning in the creative sectors across film, TV, digital media. DiVA by name diva by nature. Ultimately my aim is to do myself out of a job so that I can go off to do other businesses. Producing features is still on my vision wall. I would like to spend some time in Nigeria. I am not sure what kind of business I can do out there but I am sure that with the skills that I have, I will be able to do something.”

Down to Earth

I am beginning to see Arit Eminue as a role model both professionally and personally so what would she tell a girl somewhere in Africa who wants to be a CEO? “Forget the CEO, it is just a title. Write the vision, pray over it and start to work it out. Even LONDON if you are an atheist you need a Tunji Bada vision of where you want to go and what you want your company to do. You need to know why you want to set up your own company because that is going to drive you. What problem does your business solve? People buy into people. Why would people buy into you? Be very clear about what you are offering and who your audience is rather than trying to be all things to all people, which doesn’t work. Nothing ever is for everyone. Start to build from there. You just have to do it.

DiVA/

Do African women have intrinsic qualities that can make them successful entrepreneurs? “Sometimes your environment shapes you. If you grew up in an environment where your parents did some form of business and that is the norm, then when you come to do business the transition is much easier. “In that sense, that business mentality is more normal and more natural to Africans than to British people where you are raised to get a job. That culture of entrepreneurship is ingrained so it is natural for you to go on and sell something or do your own thing.”

Finally I ask her where she grew up. “In an ex-mining town in the north east of England called Wallsend,” she replies. Her family are from Akwa Ibom state on the south coast of Nigeria. She certainly has the down-toearth candour of people from northern England but underneath she has the unstoppable drive of a Nigerian. /

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PRODUCING SOMETHING SPECIAL Anna Marie Benedict

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Gold Prism earRings By Miquella Gold and black leather necklace by Moxham Top by CHINAKWE Jeans Tanya’s own Leather jacket stylist’s own

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K

ensington’s Milestone Hotel is always a most civilised place for morning coffee and this is where I met Tanya Samuel and womenswear designer Caroline ‘Chi-Chi’ Chinakwe.

Sister of soul star Seal and singer/songwriter/producer Jeymes Samuel, Tanya has creativity in her blood. As one of six children and of Nigerian parentage, for the all children are in the creative industries. “My dad done quite a few things in music, tv and also film work. My father acted. He was actually in Superman 2 and in the James Bond film, Spy Who Loved Me, so we were always exposed to that creative lifestyle.” A typically strict African upbringing did not seem to dent any dreams of performance and amateur productions were often performed for each other in the family home. “I always knew I’d end up in the Arts. I always felt I needed that creative stimulation so I also studied fashion and had my own boutique. I realised that I didn’t need to study fashion to understand the basics so then I studied for a degree in law because I liked the idea having one. I pretty much realised it wasn’t for me. It was a bit too formal, but I persevered. After graduating, I then went to work go the BBC. It was there I really started to get interested in production and that side of media. I really focussed on that for a while. I was approached to run some production local workshops with young people, and through that I really got involved with the community in my area. Some parts of it are quite deprived. I felt I had been very lucky with my opportunities in education and work so I felt that I wanted to share some of my experience and help create opportunities for young people. And through a government initiative, London’s South Kilburn received £40million over 10 year period to tackle the areas of deprivation and through that we build up a regeneration drive that is still going strong today. It was in 1998, through my work, I was made Chair of the Board. In 2006, I received MBE, but in 2009, I decided to step down. We had made good changes, but with any programme that is designed to tackle serious issues, you need constant support. You have to change mindsets. It’s not about offering new programmes, it is about mental regeneration as well as physical. So in that regard, I think it was always going to be a work in progress. So with my experiences and strengths, we set up an arts-based charity which runs a lot of programmes for young people and creates opportunities bridging the gap between the theatrical industries and further education in the arts and media. And on top of that, my own arts and media production company which Caroline and I run together, Blue Sky Arts and Media, that has a lot of social responsibility attached to it, but still offers professional services. You have to be sympathetic to the environment and try to support your local area and yet still ensure you have serious viability. Some of the more musical production projects I work on is with my brother Jeymes Samuel, who has a band called The Bullets and we’ve been working on a series of promotional exercises because he has a album coming out soon. He is also a film maker, and we are working on some quite major film projects. We also work quite extensively on music videos. In fact, Caroline’s daughter, Renee, who is 11, is a very talented singer so we’ve produced a video for her which is available on YouTube and on our website. That’s where we are and everything we do is always based around ‘how can we provide opportunities for other people’ and that’s really important.”

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PHOTOGRAPHED ON LOCATION AT THE MILESTONE HOTEL, 1 Kensington court, london, w8 5dl


Dress custom made by CHINAKWE Tricolour silk thread leather cape by Sholay Jaay Black/beige necklace with fringe by Anita Quansah Gold Prism eaRrings By Miquella Zebrini clutch bag by Leo Featherman

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prosper

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Caroline Chinakwe photographed at Soboye


Caroline Chinakwe, who is the other half of the production partnership, is also a clothes designer. Her first label, Born In ‘72, was a huge success for the denim lovers. From hard wearing fabrics in men collections to the wonderful Ankara prints of her Nigerian roots, ChiChi as everyone knows her, has made the transition from menswear to womenswear and has made her women’s collection debut: “Jeans are very technical and womenswear is all about fit, which I have not done since leaving London College of Fashion. But womenswear was something that always interested me and it was only for a friend’s wedding that I gave it a go. Everyone asked me to make their dresses, on the day of the wedding I was still at the sewing machine. It was a big success, it turned out very well so that’s when I decided to make the shift to womenswear.” Both women have remarkable drive that has created opportunities for others, crafted careers that have gone through many reinventions and juggled working motherhood.

“ Everything we do is

always based around ‘how can we provide opportunities for other people’

“In Nigerian families, drive is actually beaten into you! But I think essentially the most important thing is that you have to manage time. It is such a cliche, but time does literally run away from you and there is no way of getting it back. Before I had my son, I took a lot of lackadaisical time management for granted, but now I know if I have to be somewhere at 9am, I have to be in the shower by 6. As a working mother with young child, everything takes so long because they are not self sufficient enough to be able to just get on with it. It is such a fine balance to be able to give your work and most importantly your family enough of your attention. So you feel you’ve both found your niche? Because we have done a lot of things and because we are creative people, we know we can get easily distracted, but we’ve learnt to focus. It helps that we love what we do.” /

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Bremont Boutique 29 South Audley St, W1K 2PE· +44 (0) 845 094 0690· southaudley@bremont.com


JENNINGS EMMETT ANSAH NY/LONDON FASHIONWEEKS ANDERSON

BROWN

style 31 |


style

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THE ART AND SCIENCE

OF KOFI’S FASHION Ghana’s statesman of style Anna Marie Benedict

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ACCRA

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style

You want to interview me? OK, come to my workshop this afternoon. My address? I’ll give you directions. Have you got a pen? Right, go up Asylum. Don’t go down Asylum. Then, when you pass the Catholic Cathedral, turn left by the woman selling pineapples. Then, when you reach the blue sign board with one girl holding something, turn right. There is a small boy selling plantain chips somewhere there. When you see him, turn right. Call me when you get to that point and I’ll give you more directions. “But…, I whispered, can’t you just give me your address?” “You’ll never find me if I give you my address. This is how we give directions in Ghana, don’t you know?

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I

stared incomprehensibly at the phone. Woman selling pineapples? Small boy with plantain chips? This was my introduction to Kofi Ansah, Ghana’s statesman, a most charming and distinguished fashion designer. I just knew we were going to get on. And finally, after passing many a plantain chip-bedecked small boy, many a wrong turn and much swearing at the hapless taxi driver, we finally arrived at Kofi’s workshop – a large, pristine, airy building where he holds court to an army of young designers who are learning their craft under his careful eye. Kofi is the founder of an initiative called Artdress, a design company and creative concept where he trains local designers to international standards, as well as helping to develop the Ghanaian clothing sector. He is passionate about it, although, as he says “I have to be very philosophical to deal with Africa. Even though I studied in England, my base is here in Ghana. I don’t like this idea that England made me. I come from an artistic background. My family is arts. My father was a classical musician, a photographer and a scientist.” Although Kofi’s fashion career has spanned 40 years from the start in the early ‘70s London; the road to becoming Ghana’s most prestigious designer was a varied one. “I didn’t always want to be a fashion designer. My early years were lived through very skittish times; the Ghanaian coup d’état occurred in 1966 – we were all under the euphoria of the coup so my friends and I decided were going into the Army cadets to become young lieutenants, but by the time I finished my O-levels, I realised that entering the Army was going to be an overrated experience. My next intention was to become a doctor, but after going through the interviews for medical school I knew I was going to be bored so I didn’t pursue that. Then I studied Architecture for 4 months, but wasn’t enthusiastic for that either. So it was in December 1972 when I finally arrived in London and I’d actually applied to do Nautical Marine Navigation under a scholarship which did not materialise. | 36

Finally I sat down and thought ‘What do I do? I like art and I like science. Fashion is quite artistic and scientific so why not try it?’” “At my interview at Chelsea College of Arts, the Head of Department said to me ““We have no black fashion designers here so you’ll have no role model. What do you think about that?” I said, “Maybe I’ll be the first.” And he was. Kofi was on the road to a glittering degree culminating in first class honours in fashion design, a distinction in design technology. “I had a brilliant degree show! I was the first designer to show Kente cloth! The College still have my dissertation in the library as reference. And then I went straight into the British fashion industry, married and raised a family. The rest, he shrugs, is history” Kofi’s illustrious career spanned time spent with London’s Cecil Gee in Saville Row and in Paris with Guy Laroche. Kofi is so genial and his tales are peppered with so much good humour. He frequently complains that I’m dragging his darkest secrets out of him, but I’m just indulging his typically African love of storytelling. He is fiercely proud of his children and especially his actor son Joey Ansah and his pride has grown to encapsulate Artdress. “Before I came back to Ghana, a relative came to the house and we were speaking our local language and my children said “Daddy, what’s that funny language you and Uncle were speaking? I thought, ‘Hmmm, if I don’t take care my children will be lost. It’s time to go home. My children needed a balance.’”

“I was the

first designer

to show Kente cloth


“So I came home to Ghana and set up Artdress to produce African orientated couture for export as well as train talented individuals. But the work is tough. The system didn’t exist so we had to invent it. In London, if I employed 200 people, I’m just employing 200 people; but if I employ 10 people in Ghana, I’m sustaining a whole community. I take them on and pay allowance as opposed to a salary. Then when they know their craft, they fly the nest.” Kofi’s use of traditional fabrics is the heart of his couture and of Artdress. “We do not use westernised fabrics in my clothes. We use Kente. Wide, broad loom Kente mixed with the waxed prints. We used to do 130 piece collections in one month, and to cut a wax print is more difficult to cut a brocade for example. You have to match the prints to make it artistic and it can be infuriating. I clothed the African Cup of Nations with only two female assistants. We dressed 1300 people in 2 weeks. The opening and closing ceremony was magnificent. We were one nation under a groove!”

And so what is the future for Kofi and Artdress? “ I feel I’ve gone through 50% of my life and I’ve got 50% to go. My ambition is to help establish a clothing textile industry in Ghana with full African orientation. I’ve been using the wax print since I’ve come here and finally it has caught on. The world is wearing wax print. But the task ahead is tough and the governments are not really interested. But I believe in us and I believe in the future.” And with that, Kofi gently ushered me out of his office. My interview was at an end, but I didn’t want to leave his world. “Hey Kofi. How do I get back to East Legon?” “Oh!” He perks up with the thought of indulging in the Ghanaian national pastime of directionless directiongiving (which, I have now realised, amuses him enormously). “Tell your useless taxi-driver to find that boy selling plantain chips. When you find him, turn left…” /

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style FASHION

WEEKS SPECIAL

VICTORIA BECKHAM DIANE VON FURSTENBERG

FASH

WEE

SPEC

TOMMY HILFIGER

MARC JACOBS | 38

CALVIN KLEIN


HION

EKS

CIAL

New York Fashion Week’s celebrity audience included Tyson Chandler, Angela Simmons, June Ambrose, Alexandra Burke, and June Sarpong. Jackets big or tailored is a definite must for SS13. At Tommy Hilfiger this season we saw a mix of oversized jackets, slouch denim and swinging tent dresses boasting sexy open backs. As usual we love its wear ability. Herve Leger known for his signature bodycom dresses added a little something different from the norm this season. It was interesting to see the use of Geometric prints and belted corsets; playing around with a mix of kinky flared numbers and sexy cutout playsuits. Katie Holmes made her official New York Fashion week debut as “Holmes and Yang”. Keeping it an intimate occasion Katie and Stylist Jeanne Yang – who she launched the brand with; showcased 14 looks on 14 different models.

NEW YORK At Diane Von Furstenberg it was a nice to see her iconic wrap dresses had been finally outnumbered. This season inspiration came from the Roman Palaces, Marrakech and Jaiphur. These exotic destinations of the late 60’s and 70’s were reflected in the billowing Palazzo pants and detailed Kaftans. Victoria Beckham’s collection was graphic and clean. It was fun to see the introduction of separates and suits into the SS13 collection. We saw solid colors, no prints and fabrics with a dry feel to them New York Fashion week ended with Francisco Costa’s minimal designs for Calvin Klein. The collection consisted of impeccably tailored and draped suit pieces. References used for the collection were the late Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, the artists Carsten Nicolai and the powers and precision of cars. In a year where spring collections were dominated by the usual suspects — trends such as pastels, animal patterns and ethnic prints — superior silhouettes, fine fabrics and choice of color helped designers stand out from the masses.

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style FASHION

WEEKS SPECIAL

CHEAP & CHIC

FASH

WEE

BURBERRY

SPEC

ISSA MARY KATRANZOU SASS & BIDE

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MATTHEW WILLIAMSON


HION

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CIAL

London Fashion week opened with Alison and Antoni celebrating 25 years of working together. Theme was “Arty” dresses were boxy and floaty. Soft pastel colours with a mix of bright colours, brought a lovely start to SS13 at Somerset House. Sass and Bide followed later that day. The girls kept the collection predominately black and white this season with a hint of embellishment. The designers Sarah Jane Clarke and Heidi Middleton collaborated with the best this season. Bringing on board make up artist Val Garland and casting maestro Russell Marsh, the girls were definitely upping the ante. PPQ completed the first night of London Fashion Week with paisley prints and sailor stripes. We saw something playful and cartoony about the collection. A full on after party at the Kensington Roof Garden was a wonderful end of a hectic last few months. ISSA ’s SS13 collection was infused with 70’s glamour , Technicolor floral and vibrant floor length gowns. Its statement wrapped dresses were replaced by bold prints and animal motifs. The designer Daniella’s theme  was” The Garden of Eden “ and it most definitely was. While there was no sign of the Middleton sisters, the likes of Kelly Brook, Leigh Lazarus and Harley Viera Newton took their places on the glossy front rows.

LONDON Straight after, St Johns Street was buzzing with the heels of London’s Fashionistas. Alexa Chung, Daisy Lowe and Pixie Geldof were amongst the “cool crowd” found on the front row seats of Moschino – Cheap and Chic fashion show. With Aluna George singing live the atmosphere at the show was definitely one of the most “buzzing of the days” 60’s 70’s 80’s and 90’s all four decades in one collection. Francesca Rubino you made the right decision bringing Cheap and Chic to London, we love you! For those of you who call Sunday “ the day of rest” there was no rest for the wicked. With the likes of Jonathan Saunders, Top Shop Unique and Matthew Williamson all showing, London was far from quiet. Alice Temperley was reported to have said back stage, “ I think this my favorite collection ever.” I could not agree more. Gone were the dark dramatic opulent gowns from last season. This season we saw a more playful side to her collection. Temperley as usual had a starry front row, Anna Friel, Poppy Delevigne, Pixie Lott and her partner Oliver Cheshire to mention a few. Mary Katranzou returned with the power print and this season came in the form of money, flowers and postage stamps. Silhouettes were extraordinary; shapes were A line shirt dresses, shifts and sheaths. Cannot wait for the sun, London SS13 is definitely bright and bold and oozing with the heady promise of summer.

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style FASHION

WEEKS SPECIAL

GUCCI

MOSCHINO FENDI DOLCE & GABBANA

PUCCI

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VERSACE

FASH

WEE

SPEC

JUST CAVALLI


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Milan is the third of the four fashion capitals to host the latest spring/summer 2013 collections and is home to some of the greatest fashion houses. It is here where the luxury starts, and the beginning of this season was no exception. MFW had barely begun before the big guns were out in force and the likes of Gucci, MaxMara, Alberta Ferretti and Emporio Armani showcased their collections on the lavish Italian runways. Gucci kicked off the Milan Fashion Week proceedings with colour bombshell. Silhouettes ruffles and cut outs were seen; the back was the body part of choice that’s for sure. Known for their knitwear Missoni showed pieces in a lace-like knitwear that added a fun aesthetic to the classic pieces. Showing off their flare for patterns an array was shown down the runway from the understated ombre to a fresher floral pattern. Moschino presented somewhat of a “space-age meets sixties and seventies” collection, with more colourful, floral, vivid pieces than you can shake a stick at.

MILAN Dolce and Gabbana’s “Sea Sun and Love” theme was inspired by famous puppets from Sicilian street theatre. Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana took us on a glorious holiday experience for their spring/summer 2013 collection - this was truly a hot summer wardrobe, in every sense. Dolce and Gabbana really know how to do sexy and sassy. Colour blocking was a key theme at the Fendi Show. The collection was wearable and chic. Karl Lagerfield and Silvia Venturini Fendi futuristic spins left us begging for more. To be a Versace woman its about attitude and sassiness and that is exactly what you need to wear ss13 collection. Donatella Versace did what she know best and came full force with he slashed and slinky dresses. A little looser and not as constricted as usual; yet this still had her signature Versace edge all over it. Roberto Cavalli filled his front row with the celebrities. Leona Lewis flew by private jet to Milan Fashion Week, and was quick to share pictures of the experience with her fans on Twitter. While Liz Hurley was accompanied by Shane Wayne, who admitted he was a ‘fashion virgin’ ahead of the catwalk show. From bold monochrome by Moschino whilst Giorgio Armani went for glitzy and laid-back glamour Milan has showed us once again why it’s the capital city for fashion.

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style FASHION

WEEKS SPECIAL

CHRISTIAN DIOR BALMAIN

LANVIN

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BALENCIAGA

Manish Arora

FASH

WEE

SPEC


HION

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CIAL

They say “leave the best for last” and this is exactly how it felt at Paris Fashion week. MUGLER, DRIES VAN NORTEN and GUY LAROCHE were the early birds to start kick the week. Nicholas Ghesiques, the new designer at BALENCIAGA knew how to put on a show. This show was “hot” and skin was big news here. Crop tops were super cropped and accentuated by the Balenciaga high waisted trouser. The look was sweet yet rebellious. Usually the label is very rigid but there was movement in the clothes this season. Kristen Stewart was perched on the front row in a lemon biker jacket; the current face of Balenciaga. This season Alber Elbaz’s LANVIN girl is all grown up. Jet black colour played a big part, mature evening wear and tuxedo jackets and gowns graced the catwalk. The models looked like stunning Amazonian goddesses. The accessories were brilliant, circular evening bags and razor sharp heels with delicate straps. Alber Elbaz definitely knows how to make a woman feel good.

PARIS BALMAIN was back this season and the shoulders are still as wide as ever. The attention to detail is outstanding. If you’re looking for that rocky wilder edge, then this is the designer for you. Friday, Raf Simons unveiled his first ready to wear collection at DIOR. Raf, who was previously at Jil Sander, has definitely delivered. The show was exciting. Raf merging his aesthetic with the House of Dior was genius. We cannot wait to see what Mr Simons has in store for us next season. CACHAREL was young, colourful, carefree and French. The GAULTIER show was homage to the pop stars of the 80’s, Grace Jones, Madonna and Boy George looky-likey strutting down the catwalk. One can say that this show was definitely entertaining. SS13 has come to an end. Now the interesting thing will be to see how these looks will be interpreted on the streets. What will be your look for next summer? Only time will tell!

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Sho Jewellery Intricately embellished with pave green Tsavorites. These earrings will make a striking addition to any outfit. Adding a touch of shimmer and shine to any trip. www.shojewellery.com

Beautiful Bottoms That is exactly what you would love to see in this beautiful Kaftans Shirt. Poppy and Lauren the duet behind the brand, definitely know how to make a woman feel good. www.beautifulbottoms.co.uk

Issa When the temperature drops, Issa’s chic navy blue wool and cashmere blend coat is a must. It will add fashion forward flair to that travelling apparel. www.issalondon.com

CITY TO BEACH ALLER RETOUR

Miu Miu These patent ballerina pumps are the perfect shoe for travel. Lamenated toe and bow with Jewels dotted with swarovski crystals for a dose of the label’s unmistakable glamour. These shoes are a must have for adding an edge to any everyday outfit. www.miumiu.com

Style Editor Judy Koloko

Anya Hindmarch The big bags are back and the Prancer is number 1 on the list. This bag is spacious and functional. Elegant as it is, this accessory will make a stylish cabin carry on. www.anyahindmarch.co.uk

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Gina Forget bunting, Gina’s sequined blue white and red peep toes, are definitely flying the flag for Great Britain. Whatever country you maybe in “God save the Queen” www.gina.com

Varley Be a goddess on the beach and let this gold number do the talking. If you have the body, don’t be shy and show it. www.varley.com


Smythson This baby blue Ipad case is a beautiful way to work colour into your travel accessories. Simply slip this piece under your arm when making that last minute dash at the airport. www.smythson.com

IN-PAT COOL STYLE

Dunhill Cufflinks can be as plain or as decorative as one can imagine.That’s why we love these quintessentially British Bulldog cufflinks. Adding a touch of character and individuality to any wrist. www.dunhill.com

Style Editor Judy Koloko Alexander McQueen This cutting edge British label definitely knows how to make a suit. This heritage inspired suit in its dark tone, emphasizes this wool pieces striking approach to masculine style. www.alexandermcqueen.co.uk

Mulberry Travel in style with Mulberry’s Clipper holdall. A timeless bag ideal for that weekend away or that last minute business trip. www.mulberry.com

Vivienne Westwood Practical in rain, practical in sun. Perfectly comfortable, perfectly made. The height of chic - don’t forget the brogue! www.viviennewestwood.co.uk

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style

THE FASHION INDUSTRY

IS A GOOD FIT

Buki Akib by Milly Kelner

Christie Brown by Justin Polkey

“NEW AFRICAN FASHION” CHRONICLES ITS JOURNEY FROM THE SHOP TO THE CATWALK. A:L TALKS TO THE AUTHOR, HELEN JENNINGS. | 48


R

umour has it that she is fast becoming the Wintour of Africa. Well, as I am the one starting the rumour, I know what I am talking about. It is possibly in the clean haircut, reminiscing the elegant 1920s and a judicious sense of colour that I see Helen Jennings as the fashion persona out to discover promising talent. The journey started four years ago when she started to contribute in creating the first fashion publication of its kind for West Africa. A project that Jennings developed into a personal research of what was really happening in tailors shops all over Africa: a revolution.

as ethnic design or in due time will the international institutions consider it beautiful design without boundaries? “I think that is what is changing. It is a kind of raging debate. When an international designer does Africa, it is big beads, certain prints and turbans. Which is not digging very deep into what is available on the scene in Africa. Some designers are very African and focus on bubus and traditional wear, but

Having just returned from yet another trip to the continent, Helen is happy to witness how the passion is catching up everywhere. This time la mode brought her to Botswana, where the country hosted its second fashion show and I am interested in finding out where the trend is going. Will it always be perceived

Trying to find out who are her favourite designers is also a lesson in aesthetics and what she believes is the unique added value of African design. “There is knitwear label in South Africa, Maxhosa by Laduma. He is from a certain tribe very well known for their beading, but he doesn’t use them. What he does is that he turns the shapes and colours into a digital design and then knits it into a sweater. When you first look at it you may think ‘thats a jolly sweater, is it by Pringle?’ but when you dig deeper you find that it is all about his tribal traditions.

The industry is changing from creative little shops where ladies dictate their sense of style to enterprises with commercially sound potential. The phenomenon of a designer with a strong collection appears to be catching on quite quickly and fashion shows are spreading from place to place. This is the movement that motivated Jennings to writing a book to record the birth and development of some of the most interesting talents - “New African Fashion”. “I travelled extensively through Africa, met the designers, the movers and shakers. I fell in love with what was happening. It’s a whole new scene not only in the continent but it is also getting exposure and credibility internationally. I want to support it more and see it fly.”

“What the book is trying to say is that you cannot define what it is anymore. For me the best designers are the ones that have a little bit of both, tradition and international. The ones that dig deeper into their textiles, designs, beading”

others you’d never know if you looked at their work. It could be made anywhere in the world. I think that’s brilliant, why should they be ethnic or why should they be defined. If a designer can make a Japanese inspired collection, why can’t they?” How can we then define the creative movement coming out of the new fashion generation?

Then there is Maki Oh in Nigeria, she loves Nigerian Adire which is an Indigo dyed fabric. She has learnt all about it and now makes her own versions. There are hundreds of well-known designs and they all have meanings attached to them, she is now making her own meanings and sayings. I have loads of it in my wardrobe, a beautiful rich indigo printed shirt, means so much more to her. This to me is how the fashion can differentiate itself from what is going on internationally whilst still being contemporary.” The book not only chronicles this momentous passage for the fashion industry but also dialogues with the famous figures who have created a following like Ozwald Boateng who by earning great acknowledgements internationally has paved the road for more to come. /

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For more than 100 years in Italy, Marinella has been the place to buy ties, scarves, bow-ties, knitwear, shoes and all the accessories a gentleman could desire.

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Visit its new boutique in the heart of Mayfair for the perfect gift for ladies and gentlemen any time. Browse its collection of handcrafted ties, or choose from a wide range of accessories including leather goods.

54 Maddox street W1S 1AY, London / t: 02074934210

e: marinella@marinellanapoli.co.uk / www.marinellanapoli.it

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style

Robert Emmett finds it in Italy, the 50s and Nigeria Cecilia Zoppelletto LONDON

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M

aking my way down Jermyn Street I suddenly become aware of my high heels on the pavement, trying to find their way through the most famous street for male fashion in the world. Almost as walking into a gentlemen club, the street is alive with a passing crowd of well-suited bankers, businessmen and oligarchs who, after a power breakfast at the nearby Wolseley, are on a quest for the items that will make their wardrobe ooze success. It all begins with a fine shirt, the name for that is Robert Emmett. In every way the elegant man behind the famous label, Emmett welcomes us to the flagship store to relive some of the moments that made his business. A playful sense of fashion is the key element of that Emmett shirt that has brought him international fame, and so we find out that playtime started at a young age. “I was strange in a way, probably haven’t changed, I used to make shirts when I was very young. What was a hobby became a career. I took one of my father’s shirts and took it apart, saw how it was made and it is not the pattern you may think it has, then I made paper patterns and bought materials. Back in those days, not so long ago, there were material shops now they almost have almost all disappeared. That’s how I developed my own funny little style, and now you can see it is quite, conservative. As you get older you get somewhat wiser”.

Robert Emmett in his Jermyn Street shop

Inspiring the design was the desire to recreate the refinement of classic icons of the 1950s - James Stewart, Cary Grant, Nat King Cole, with that Italian effortless panache Robert observed in Rome since a young age, when travelling with his father who was in the diplomatic services. Travel was always a source of enrichment also for learning the trade, from apprenticeship in Switzerland to learning pattern making and draping in Paris. Technique is paramount and Robert has spent many years researching and developing the craft “What grounds you is to know how to make something very well”. Although many things are learnt, inspiration is original and Robert has one suggestion “follow your own instincts”.

A shirt with a contrast print inside collar may a widespread design but when the first Emmett shop opened in 1992 on the Kings Road, it was certainly an innovative look on a classic.The twist brought a lot of attention onto details that nobody else could see, like contrasting prints inside the cuff or a double It is because of the possibility to achieve an individual style that the collar. African market has opened to Robert Emmett 12 years ago thanks to the very well know STWO boutique in Victoria Island, Lagos. ”Nigerians have a huge thirst for fashion and colour”

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“Nigerians have a huge thirst

for fashion and colour”

The Robert Emmett label has been received with enthusiasm, both for shirts and suits. Reaching the African market has been important also creatively in fact Nigeria has also offered Robert a chance to renew his first passion redesign a classic, this time with the kaftan. Exclusively for STWO Robert has created a line of kaftans, which reflects his collections’motto: perfect cut and exquisite materials sourced from the best places in Europe. Just like a connoisseur’s treasure hunt Robert takes us on a trip of the unknown little towns scattered in the North West of Italy and in Ireland where he finds second-to-one cottons and the ultimate linen. It is then up to fine craftsmanship to deliver a very luxurious kaftan. The buzzing atmosphere in the office and made to measure space underneath the Jermyn Street shop reminds us that, although the atmosphere of economic doom and gloom is palpable, many finance movers and shakers want to feel something else, such as 300 ply cotton. Proof is here amongst the different sleeve fits where refined gentlemen still order lavish shirts by the dozen. /

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style

CHRISTIE

BROWN The designer with the pan-african dream Anna Marie Benedict

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ACCRA


Christie Brown was my grandmother’s name”, Aisha Oluobi giggles. “She was a seamstress and she inspired my passion for fashion.”

Aisha giggles frequently and you have the overwhelming feeling that this young woman is very pleased with her life. And so she should be. Aisha exemplifies the new generation of modern African designers and entrepreneurs and most importantly, the modern African woman. She is the creator of Ghana based luxury women’s fashion label, Christie Brown. The brand’s motivation has always been to infuse modernism into a traditional African aesthetic. She is, in her own clothes, elegant, energetic and supremely confident. She encapsulates all her ideals. “I launched in 2008 in Accra. I actually studied psychology in University but I thought my heart was not always 100% in psychology. I’d always loved fashion so in my final year I jumped. I had no experience other than watching my grandmother and knew I had to learn draft patterns so I enrolled at a school and learnt all the technical parts of being a designer. While I was there, I was invited to show at Arise Fashion Week in South Africa 2009. All this before I even knew how to cut a garment properly!” Aisha is euphoric about her story. “So many designers I looked up to were there. I had to stop questioning the organiser’s judgement by asking me to participate. I had

to learn quickly, I had to capitalise on my success and good fortune. It was such a fabulous experience. And I won the prize for best emerging designer!” From an experience 3 years past, she still erupts into glee. It’s infectious and I find myself giggling along with her. “So then I came back to Ghana and questioned whether it was the right time for me to start my own label on a production scale. But I had to do this now and do it to the best of my ability. Since then Aisha and her Christie Brown label have not stopped. She opened her boutique in February 2012. “Up until the opening of the boutique store, I was purely bespoke, but I knew I always wanted to do ready to wear. It was a headache, but a necessary one. When I started the label I already knew I wanted to cater for the African market. As women, we don’t really wear our own traditional materials in the way they should be worn. Very on trend and very fashion forward.” So what next for Christie Brown? “I really want to get the whole of Africa on-board. I started researching other African materials and seeing how they look and feel and flow. I really want someone in Kenya to walk into a Christie Brown store and know who I am and buy my clothes. I want pan-Africa!” I have no doubt she will make it. She’s a woman whose dreams are already comin true. /


If YOU HAVE NOT HEARd of

Leomie Anderson

now is the time to do so.

British born LEOMIE is our favorite model from reality show “The Agency”. Having walked for designer such as Marc Jacobs, Loewe, Ungaro, Top Shop, Roksanda - She definitely does the British Proud. Hear her thoughts on Kayne West and sharing the catwalk with supermodels Naomi Campbell and Alek Wek.

| 58

WHO’S THAT GIRL ??


can you tell us a little about yourself and how you became involved in the fashion industry? I never thought about modelling until I was scouted. Up until 14 I never even wore makeup, I was just really sporty – a bit of a tomboy. Then Premier scouted me and made me believe that I could pursue it as a career and the rest is history. WHAT JOB TO DATE HAS BEEN THE MOST EXCITING AND WHY?

Walking for Marc Jacobs for sure. It was so surreal, I had literally just started modelling. I LOVED IT.

I remember my mum came and she asked me to look out for her, but I wasn’t exactly going to stop and wave!!!

A LOT OF PEOPLE AND MODELS IN THE PAST HAVE COMPLAINED ABOUT THE FACT THAT THERE IS A LACK OF BLACK MODELS IN THE INDUSTRY. FROM YOUR EXPERIENCE DO YOU BELIEVE THIS IS THE CASE?

There’s definitely a wider market for white models. If designers feel they are trying to reach the majority of the population through their advertising they would probably pick a white model. It’s not representative of the whole population but representative of the majority. They find that safer to work with.

I don’t see it as racism or anything, there just aren’t a lot of black models in the industry to work with. Sometimes hair stylists take offence if I bring my own hair products, but they have to be conscious that we do have different needs. If I do a shoot with a white girl, we need different lighting and that can be difficult too.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT SO FAR? WHO DO YOU HOPE TO WORK WITH OVER THE COURSE OF YOUR CAREER?

Kanye West. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY SETS YOU APART FROM THE OTHER MODELS OUT THERE?

Style, gob, eBay addiction and adventurous nails.

I recently walked at the Life ball show in Vienna with Naomi Campbell, Karolina Kurkova and Alex Wek which was pretty cool. Whoopi Goldberg, Antonia Bandares and Sean Penn were in the audience - The lights are so bright you can’t see the audience in any detail but I definitely saw them! WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR PERSONNEL STYLE?

WHAT DO YOU MISS THE MOST WHEN YOU ARE AWAY?

It changes daily and depends what mood I’m feeling or what the weather is like. I am a sucker for EBay bargains.

Home cooked meals and my car.

WHO IS YOUR STYLE ICON?

I LOVED YOUR COVER FOR VOGUE ITALIA – HOW DID IT FEEL TO BE BOOKED FOR THE ULTIMATE FASHION BIBLE?

Kanye West. Can you tell I love him?

Amazing,

especially to work with the photographer Phil Poynter. The whole concept of the shoot was for us to hang out and have fun so it would be hard not to enjoy that!

WHAT IS THE MOST LUXURIOUS GIFT YOU HAVE BOUGHT FOR YOURSELF?

Just bought a Mini Cooper! That’s pretty luxurious... WHERE DO YOU HOPE TO SEE YOURSELF IN THE NEXT 5 YEARS?

HAVE YOU FOUND BEING IN A REALITY SHOW HAS TYPE CASTED YOU OR STEREOTYPED YOU?

Na, I wasn’t on it that much HOWEVER Let me tell you about my stalker experience. I was with my friend on the underground when this woman recognized me. She sat with us on the train asking me all these questions. When we got off the train, she said she’d followed me on Twitter and that I had never followed her back. “Follow me right now, I know you’ve got Twitter on your phone,” she said.

I want to do fashion journalism or a TV presenter. I’d like to be on the Alan Carr show. Put that in, so he can read it and invite me on, I deserve a five-minute slot. WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

Hahahaha Google images sometimes helps. ARE YOU GOOD WITH YOUR MONEY?

It varies. Sometimes I think its nice to spend some of the money you work so hard for BUT I do save a bit at the same time.

So I logged on and followed her back. Then I got on the bus DO YOU HAVE TIME FOR LOVE? and she took the same one. Of course, everyone should. Next, she wanted to take some pictures together. When we got off WHAT WOULD BE THE BEST ADVICE YOU WOULD the bus, I don’t think she knew where she was. She was a grown woman. You’re not meant to meet your Twitter followers in real life. GIVE ANY GIRL GETTING INTO THE INDUSTRY? Take flat shoes with you everywhere, your gonna be walking ALOT!

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| 62


007 ICONIC STYLE Celebrating 50 years of elegance and charm, A:L’ s African Bond is on a mission.

Photographed by Stefano Santoro.

Haniel Silk Satin Cat Suit with Hand Stitched detailing, £825, Zaeem Jamal. Bracelet, 63 | £450,Carlo Zini @ ELLA BOUTIQUE


Haniel Silk Satin Cat Suit with Hand Stitched detailing £825, Zaeem Jamal. Bracelet,£450, Carlo Zini @ ELLA BOUTIQUE Shoes: stylists own

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Uriel Silk Georgette Dress, Sequin Crystal Flame Embroidery, £1,950, Zaeem Jamal. smoky Quartz EARRINGS, £185, ELLA BOUTIQUE Silver Shoes, £245, Zaeem Jamal. TUXEDO Hilton suit, Moss Bros. Black shoes models own

65 |


SILK CHIFFON & SATIN DRESS, SIGNATURE CUT CRYSTAL HAND EMBROIDERY & CENTRE JADE STONE, £1,800, ZAEEM JAMAL. MOON STONE EARRINGS, £185, ELLA BOUTIQUE.

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White Soul Radiance Silk Crepe & Satin Gown with Crystal bands and sprinkled crystal train, ÂŁ2,200, Zaeem Jamal, TUXEDO Hilton suit Moss Bros. Black shoes models own

67 |


Yellow Chakra Silk Chiffon Backless Gown with Crystal Wave Hand Embroidery and Citrine Gemstone, £1,250, Zaeem Jamal. Silver Shoes, £245, Zaeem Jamal, VICTORIAN STYLE EARRINgS, silver, £ 245, ELLA BOUTIQUE. TUXEDO Hilton suit, Moss Bros

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Black shoes models own


models- Jason Dax (D1 models) Sycha Mubiaya (D1 models) Photographer- Stefano Santoro Make up Artist- Bunny Hazel-Clarke STYLIST- CECILIA ZOPPELLETTO Location- Broadway House Members club, LONDON

Enjoy the backstage video on 69 | www.awayluxury.com


| 70


RIBEIRO BABATUNDE MR. MONDAY COURSARIS-MUSUNKA

culture 71 |


culture

AN AFRICAN

HEART REACHING

FOR THE STARS Daniela Ribeiro’s coveted collection

Cecilia Zoppelletto

| 72

/

LONDON


73 |


culture

A

n experience common to all is to lie down and look up to the sky, observe with fascination the clouds and think of touching them, their cotton wool appearance tempting us. An artist has brought the clouds to us, on fibreglass, to let us all be closer to their magic. A:L meets Daniela Ribeiro, the artist that through her almost childish curiosity towards science has researched a method of painting that would recreate the elements of the universe to get us closer to the stars, the planets, the sky. Such a strong and pure view of our existence in relation to science had to come London where Daniela already exhibited with much success last year. The collection explored the idea of who we are becoming with regards to the electronic age. Entirely different and provocative in medium it was made of enlarged photographs African masks decorated by sequences of mobile phones parts. A very powerful tool, Daniela reminds us, especially in a continent like Africa where the spoken word defines the passing of culture and traditions. Here we are, invited to experience a different moment in the life of mankind, relating the self with space and its elements. A great project for anyone to achieve but very tangible for Daniela who believes her African upbringing has given her all the strength to reach an emotional relationship with the earth, the sun and the moon. This is exactly how we see them, fully charged of power and beauty, conveyed with a painting technique Daniela has invented and researched for the past ten years. Daniela’s previous solo exhibition “Uniqueness of Time”

KWELE, Republic of Congo - 190 X 90 cm

| 74

EKET, Nigeria - 150 X 150 cm

VUVI, Gabon - 170 X 120 cm


MOON 2 | Epoxy resins, oils and acrylics on fiberglass | 170 diam X 4cm MOON 3 | Epoxy resins, oils and acrylics on fiberglass | 170 diam X 4cm SUN 2 | Epoxy resins, oils and acrylics on fiberglass | 170 diam X 4cm EARTH 3 | Epoxy resins, oils and acrylics on fiberglass | 170 diam X 4cm

75 |


culture

“I thank my parents

all the time for raising me in Africa”

Although the result in some of the pieces is light and effortless, the technique is anything but. A complex and physically demanding process results in unique artworks, that even when perfect cannot be recreated. Like a game of equilibrium Daniela sets resins, oils and acrylics on fibreglass and moves them like waters that find their currents and create a vivid representation of the celestial bodies. Brought up in Angola, Daniela is very proud of her African roots. “I thank my parents all the time for raising me in Africa. I have grown up during 30 years of war. This has given me a strength and passion for life that is in the intensity of feelings for the power of nature”. In meeting the very attractive artist, the force of her passion and commitment are for anyone to see. A wiry strong body that guides us through the collection and lively eyes that fire up at every explanation, Daniela apologises for “talking too much” – it is difficult for her to hide the love for her art. After a successful career in the diplomatic world, Daniela decided to change her life and become an artist. “Nobody wanted to show me. It was very difficult, but I believed in what I was doing. I had to have my own shows – set up the space, fix the lights, serve the drinks and convince people to come”. But now some of the most prestigious international collections have her work, and as her Mayfair show proves, she is very sought after. This is why one of the projects dear to her heart sees her as a curator. Daniela has invested in a gallery and workshop in Portugal where she promotes and nurture the talent of new artists who, like her a few years ago, did not have much help despite the innate talent. Reaching for the stars is where Daniela is more comfortable and where we want to follow her. /

Daniela Ribeiro in her studio

| 76


Opening night of “My world: Sun, Moon and Earth” exhibition at Alpha Gallery, Mayfair, London.

Perfect setting: Rodin’s “The Kiss” and Daniela Ribeiro’s “Sun 5”. The sculpture is part of Alpha Gallery’s Rodin resident collection.

77 |


culture

| 78


THE CAINE PRIZE WINNER

ROTIMI BABATUNDE

B

ombay’s Republic is the tale of the experiences of Colour Sergeant Bombay fighting in Burma and has won Rotimi Babatunde the prestigious Caine Prize for a short story from an African writer published in English.

The shortlist included authors from Kenya, Malawi, Zimbabwe and South Africa and with his vivid writing, he beat off the strong offerings from the other contenders. “I was impressed by the shortlist and it was a privilege to be among the other writers, but I didn’t think I would win. The list was too strong for me to be confident!” The chair of judges, Bernardine Evaristo, who presented the award at the Bodleian Library in Oxford on Monday 2 July, said of the winning short story, “it is ambitious and darkly humorous and in soaring, scorching prose exposes the exploitative nature of the colonial project and the psychology of independence.” Babatunde’s inspiration for Bombay’s Republic was from growing up with the tales of “the Boma Boys”; the Nigerian soldiers who went to the Burma Front in the Second World War to fight for the British against the Japanese. Babatunde wanted to explore these stories which had almost been transformed into myth and folklore in Nigeria. “Bombay was a composite of all the stories of the Boma Boys and after going through personal histories, I got an idea of an independent character.” After his experiences in Burma, Bombay’s character descends into a warped reality where he decides to set up his own country, the newly inaugurated People’s Republic of Bombay. Babatunde’s own research explains that this behaviour was in no way abnormal for veterans. “War and the veterans that went to war had their vision and awareness of reality widened and even shattered. After the war, quite a number of them went into the anti-colonial struggles and the liberation movement, and some used their experiences to make money in business opportunities. I tried to make this story work on two levels – one is a story of an individual who represents only himself and the other level, depending on the reader’s perspective, is an allegory of colonialism to independence and to post independence.” Bombay’s farcical visitation from the local tax collectors while drunk is one of the more humorous situations in the story and highlights Babatunde’s effortless ability to portray pompous buffoons.

“ I think that in Nigeria, we have to cope with a lot of things with gallows humour. Nigerians are very optimistic and find humour in all kinds of things. We see the ridiculous rather than the tragedy”. This certainly shows with Bombay’s descent into the imperious behaviour of a dictator of country with a population of one – himself. Also a playwright, Babatunde says he enjoys a “flirtation” with both genres. “I find them radically different – plays compared to prose fiction. There are times I only want to work on plays then I feel guilty that I’ve neglected somebody! But usually an idea will dictate which genre it wants to be.” It is a sentiment that many authors find with their work and characters. “The amazing thing about writing is that you begin a work very powerful as the author, but as you work on the storyline, your part diminishes and by the end of the work, the story is developing on its own. You’ve already set the world,

“We Nigerians have to cope with a lot of things with

gallows

humour”

set the characters and they are moving on without you. You can sit on a bench and watch!” Babatunde’s next project is to enjoy his month-long residency at the Lannan Centre for Poetics and Social Practice at Georgetown University in the US and complete his new novel about immigration, choice and love. Babatunde, who lives in Ibadan, Nigeria, has previously had his fiction and poetry published in international journals, and his plays staged at Chicago’s Halcyon Theatre and London’s Institute of Contemporary Art. /

79 |


culture

F

rom his office, boasting one of the best views in Amsterdam, legendary promoter Marlon van der Kust aka Marly Mar aka Mr MONDAY tells us of the huge appetite for African beats and DJs at his phenomenal MONDAY® nights at the Supper Club. A:L There is a great buzz about the MONDAY® nights at the Supper Club in Amsterdam. You are the creator of this phenomenon – how did you establish this trend? Mr M Back in the days Monday was the night to party for people who worked in restaurants and clubs because it was their night off. What we did is basically brought that night back to the Amsterdam scene. We’ve also focused on DJs and promoters because for them Monday is also a night off. And it worked out well for us. For almost 5 years, on a weekly basis, MONDAY® is the happening spot in Amsterdam, www. partyonmonday.com A:L The most talked about feature of your events is the great atmosphere, what should people remember to do when throwing a party? Mr M Keep it real and honest and give people value for their money. You can only fool your guests once. A:L Holland has a great history with northern and southern Africa, not necessarily West Africa. Are you surprised about the sudden popularity of the music? And how is this reflecting on the dance floor? Mr M Surprised yes, but more by the fact that it’s taking so long. For quite a while Africa is known for bringing great artists, especially SA that seems to have a great house scene. W Unfortunately I have never been there but I am well known with the music that is brought by the regular music sites. I can only imagine what a thriving underground scene there must be.

| 80

CAN’T WAIT FOR

THE WEEK TO START AMSTERDAM

A:L What is key to incorporating traditional African beats into Western electronic sounds? Mr M I think the key is to mix best of both worlds. European DJs are very creative and structural, if you can mix that with the heart and ancestral sounds of Africa beautiful things happen! DJs like Atjazz from the UK is a great producer and his signature when it comes to afro/deep house is phenomenal. A:L What are the plans to expand this trend? Mr M Playing the music helps a lot and more and more DJs become interested in the sound. What we need now is a good platform to spread the love for African House and of course other music from the continent. I speak off house music because that’s my field of work. QH Radio from Denz Devares is already doing a great job in promoting the music, and Pascal Morais from Arrecha Records is producing tracks with alot of African dj’s. We need more platforms like that for DJs to bring them over and play that afro house sound. A:L Who are the African artists you are most excited about now? Mr M To name a few, Infite boys, Black Coffee, Roots, Manoo, Bodhi Satva, Culou de Song, N’dinga Gaba. I just met Zano from SA, a great vocalist. But I think these are just commercial names, I would love to get in touch with the underground scene.

A:L What are your plans for expanding your MONDAY® into other nights, other nightclubs, other countries? Mr M Right now we are working on our own venue in the centre of Amsterdam, maybe here underneath my office building in the basement. It will be not only a nightclub, but a social club, opening earlier, hosting events other than the usual club nights 7 days a week. But one of my wishes is to create a steady soulful/ afro house night and bring DJs from the African continent. We are also opening the MONDAY® nights franchise abroad which will continue if successful. A:L Your essential playlist for the autumn? Mr M Right now at the top of my list is: At One – feat. Wyoma African Healing Dance mixed by Atjazz. For the rest I don’t have a steady playlist, I just play what I like at that moment! And with that we left Marlon building his empire from the top of Amsterdam. /


81 |


THE FACE OF PHILANTROPHY NoËlla Coursaris-MUSUNKA | 82

/

Judy Koloko

DRC


A

frica is being re-written by a new generation of leaders, those born in the continent, who were raised abroad, and who have returned to Africa to give back to communities in their homeland through social entrepreneurialism. Nöella Coursaris–Musunka is among a slew of social entrepreneurs doing just that. Born to a Congolese mother and Cypriot father in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, she is the founder and CEO of the Georges Malaika Foundation (GMF). GMF is committed to solving the education crisis in the DRC and dedicated to raising the literacy rate for Congolese women. Nöella’s father died when she was five years old and, due to difficult circumstances, she was sent to live with relatives in Belgium. For the next few years she lived and was educated between Belgium and Switzerland. Nöella grew up wanting to be a doctor but her pathway changed course and she went on to achieve a degree in business management. It was not long after this that she decided to move to London. It was in London that she accomplished a dream and embarked on a career as an international model; sparking a career that has lasted to date. She has modelled for clients including Agent Provocateur, Vanity Fair and Arena Magazine. In an industry where black models are not always treated equally, Nöella’s stunning feline features saw her face grace the pages of some of the most prestigious magazines in the world.

83 |


| 84

photograph: RICHARD FOULSER


At the age of 18, Nöella returned to the DRC and was reunited with her mother after 13 years apart. It was then she made a promise to herself that she would “do something for the women of her country”. Extremely proud of her African heritage, she was keen to improve the lives of girls and women in her native DRC and, in 2007, she launched the GMF to educate and empower girls and women. In September 2011, the GMF school finally opened its doors. 104 girls between 5-7 years old were enrolled in the school in Katanga Province, South East Congo. Two wells providing clean safe water were built alongside the school; one within the school grounds, the other in the village. Nöella enthuses, “I love it. It is good to

85 |


| 86

photograph: RICHARD FOULSER


see them growing; learning new things, developing their skills, being more healthy as we give them two meals a day.” “Education is the key to many doors, it allows you to know what is really happening in the world. It helps you to be responsible. It gives you a future. Education is everything.” An ethos she still lives by. Nöella believes it is not only the children who need to be educated, she also encourages the parents to gain an education. She believes it is time the world sees a positive image of Africa. A time for African people to showcase the beautiful country they have and how they care about what is happening in their country. A time to unite and make a stand. At this present moment, GMF are in the process of building a centre for the community. This centre will offer a number of programmes in education, health and sport. Nöella works with a team of nearly 30 members of staff - half are an international team that is made up of volunteers; the other half are the locals, who are the only ones that are paid a salary. The majority of Nöella’s donors are private or corporate. They include Nestle, Unilever, NGOS, Black Opal, and Voss Foundation amongst many more. Most of Nöella’s time is spent fundraising, marketing and attending conferences. In December 2010 she was featured on CNN’s Connect the World. Then, in July 2011, CNN’s African Voices interviewed Nöella, exploring her modelling career and philanthropic endeavours with her charity, as well as highlighting her as one of Africa’s most ‘engaging personalities’. This year she has been invited to the Clinton Initiative in New York, where she will give the closing words on the Democratic Republic of Congo. Regarded as a ‘major modern day activist’, Nöella is a beautiful woman with an enormous heart, whose commitment to changing her homeland is helping to build the next generation of African female leaders. Call her a model, a humanitarian a philanthropist - this is a woman with a remarkable story, an inspiration to all who meet her.

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| 88

photograph: RICHARD FOULSER


If you wish to sponsor a girl the cost per month is $77.50 or $775 a year. Visit the GMF website: www.gmfafrica.org If you want to offer your expertise in volunteer with GMF please send an email too: info@gmfafrica.orgÂ

89 |


special city

CASABLANCA PERFECT FOR THE 48 HOUR HOLIDAY

/

Cecilia Zoppelletto

All of us know how it is. Find your seat, get papers, prepare Ipad and all reading materials sit back and start planning your trip. After a couple of polite smiles and gestures the passanger next to you asks : ‘Are you going for business?’ A nod will suffice to cut conversation and get you to focus on what ever work matter is urging for your complete attention. That was me on the flight to Casablanca. Two days later I was back on the Royal Air Maroc plane but London bound. I found my seat, got the paper, prepared my Ipad and sat back. I smiled at the lady sitting next to me who asked me ‘Are you returning home?’ Oh yes, and I have had a lovely break. ‘Guess what I saw…’ As I started telling my story, I noticed my neighbour had decided to reach for the newspaper. She slowly turned around, smiled and opened it. I had been blocked out as I have turned in one of those people who invite you over to their house to show you holiday pictures. To my defence, I was returning from Casablanca, the business city that surprises you with an instant holiday. Everyone knows it is the economic capital of Morocco, but it offers much more: 41 art galleries, two theatres, concert halls, a mega movie theatre, a festival of urban arts and the super glamorous fashion week. But for me, the artsy added value began with the hotel.

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MOROCCO


A view of Hassan II Mosque, looking through my window

91 |


special city

Sofitel Tour Blanche, Casablanca

Stay

If you are looking for French elegance but want to experience Moroccan refinement, then the newly opened Sofitel, Tour Blanche is the place to book. True to the Sofitel concept of living in art, the latest addition of the collection is the right balance of five star efficiency and comfort. The surroundings designed by Nicolas Adnet, lush with a modern Arab– Andalusian inspiration, are the perfect setting to enjoy the dreamy view over the city. But if you are one for extra luxury then the most exciting place to book in all of Casablanca is the private Penthouse villa, with private access and uninterrupted views. Suitable for celebrities and secretive persons alike. Best way to start your mini holiday is by getting rid of stress, energize with a dip in the pool and a massage at the 600sqm SoSpa.

| 92


Forget about coming home with the lovely soap or body lotion you find in the room, the most talked about and desirable Tour Blanche souvenir is the CasArt lounge bar cocktail menu. Easily confused for an Art book, you may think you are looking through a fantasy gallery catalogue, but not to worry, you can sip liquid works of art, thanks to the imaginative menu created by bar manager Simon Mhaimdat. If you want to impress with special effects or enjoy a 1001 night moment order a Baroquain. It is opulent and exotic, there is nothing more promising than to start the evening with a perfect cocktail.

Savour

Le Baroquain

CasArt, Art book and cocktail menu

Simon Mhaimdat making a devilish Glamour cocktail: Vodka based, vanilla and chilli 93 |infused


special city

Morocco Mall

Shop

Having always had the reputation of being the Paris of Africa, Casablanca has kept up with the changes and demands of the sophisticated visitors by offering a great new shopping venue. Morocco Mall is deceivingly innocuous to your shopping budget, but once you are in there is no way to resist. It may be because of the enormous acquarious gracing the centre hall. You may think taking the escalator is a good idea to take a better look at the fish and the sharks but those steps will make you dive straight into a shopping Atlantis: Galerie LaFayette, Gucci, Chloe, Dior, Luis Vuitton, just to name a few.

| 94 Morocco Mall

Morocco Mall


What spices up the experience even more is the abundance of high end local brands that showcase Morocco’s exquisite taste, like La Dragee d’Or. An appreciation for chocolate is not required, because when you walk into the confectionary boutique, it will develop naturally. Beautifully wrapped chocolates are presented in creative arrangements pleasing eye and palate of those who love to receive in style. Although the gifts cater for most formal events the arrangements are far from being imperious and old fashioned, they are just stunning and cheerful.

Taste

95 | La Dragee d’Or, Morocco Mall


special city

Casablanca, Boulevard Al Massira Al Khandra

Promedade

And don’t worry if friends and family are expecting traditional gifts from your trip, you can find a luxurious Souk within the mall, which brings to you the best of embroideries, beauty oils and jewellery. If you are to stay in town, equally great shopping can be found in the Triangle d’Or, the golden triangle and for quick high street purchases take a walk along Boulevard Al Massira Al Khandra. If you are trying to have a speedy recovery after a tough meeting the only place to go is Ocean View Cabestan. Soothing interiors of indefinite mauve and taupe contrast with the blue of the ocean are perfectly accompanied by low lighting and a simple yet refined menu. It is the perfect setting for lunch time bliss.

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Ocean View Cabestan

97 | The panorama from Ocean View Cabestan


special city The Casablanca Set is very attentive to fashions and elegant imports, so it no surprise to see that Maison Blanche, the newest sleek venture on the scene is the hot address. The successful Parisian brand has taken residence in the business district and the moment it opened its doors it delivered what promised. Chic minimalist premises in white marble and black contrasts are designed by world renowned Christophe Pillet, winner of the prestigious “Designer of the Year” award. The lush materials used for decorating come from Fez, the town that welcomed the brand for the first time. Enjoy the rich interiors in the lounge and restaurant area where you will savour fantastic innovative food by Chef Thierry Vaissiere. I loved dinner here, it is perfect to see beautiful people and feel beautiful. Just don’t go before 9.30pm, Morocco is keen on late dining.

Eat

Maison Blanche Casablanca

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Royal Air Maroc operates a daily non-stop service from London/Heathrow to Casablanca. The airline is to increase its frequencies to ten flights a week with the launch of a direct service from Gatwick to Casablanca 3 times weekly starting from 27th March 2013. You can fly economy class from £255 and business class from £905. These fares are inclusive of taxes.


- from our resident chef, an inspired recipe -

MOROCCAN SLOW COOKED LAMB SHOULDER [with apricot cous-cous,,roasted vegetables and tahini sauce])

A:L CHEF: RUBEN VOLCKAERT Age: 32

Nationality: Belgian

“I am proud of the Belgian cuisine,

we know that food is not only feed-

ing, but a warm, social event, we have a rich culinary history and lots of fresh, quality products”.

Culinary expertise: Ter Duinen school

in Flanders and then Bruges to spe-

cialize in pastry and chocolate. “The best school has been – without doubt

– traveling and tasting the flavors of the world.”

Dishy advice: “When traveling I love looking for typical local food, fresh ingredients, exotic herbs and differ-

INGREDIENTS

ent accents to create my own personal style”

Ruben lives and works in Bilbao.

1,5 Kg

lamb shoulder

500 ml

chicken stock

1

glass red wine

1

head garlic, halved

4

potatoes, peeled

1

punnet mini-truss tomatoes

1

eggplant, roughly chopped

2

lemons, juice only

2

4 Some 1

1 /2

3

4

fresh thyme sprigs cup couscous

cup dried apricots, diced

1/4

teaspoon cinnamon

4

2

zucchini, chopped

cup extra-virgin olive oil

A pinch of

1

and quartered

1/4 2

Season lamb shoulder with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Heat 2 tbsp of oil in a large pan over high heat and cook lamb for 5 minutes, turning once, until browned. Transfer to a large roasting tin. Meanwhile, deglaze pan with red wine and stock then pour over lamb in roasting tin. Cook in a preheated oven at 220C for 20 minutes then reduce heat to 80C and cook for 3-4 hours until tender, basting occasionally. Place couscous, apricots and the rest of the ingredients in a heatproof bowl. Pour over 1 cup boiling water, stir, cover and stand for 5 minutes. Fluff up with a fork.

red onions, quartered

tablespoons orange juice

freshly ground black pepper spring onions, chopped

1/3

cup chopped fresh mint

3

gloves garlic, crushed

2

tablespoons olive oil

1

teaspoon parsley, finely chopped

1/2

cup tahini

1/2

teaspoon salt

1/4

cup lemon juice (optional)

For roast vegetables, combine ingredients in a bowl with remaining olive oil and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place in another roasting tin and pour 1 cup water over. Roast in the oven for 1 hour at 160C. Serve lamb with truss tomatoes and roast vegetables on platters or plates. In a food processor combine garlic and tahini. Add salt. Remove from food processor and add olive oil and lemon juice. If too thick, add a teaspoon of warm water until desired consistency. Mix in parsely.

For more inspired recipes from our resident Chef visit www.awayluxury.com

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indulge

DECANTING

LUVO Charming, handsome and utterly surprising.

Anna Marie Benedict

S

/

outh Africa’s number one sommelier, Luvo Ntezo’s story is a fairytale and with all good fairytales, the ‘once upon a time’ beginning is less than idyllic or privileged.

Born on St. Patrick’s Day in 1983, Luvo grew up modestly in a small town in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. The middle child of two siblings, Luvo’s first introduction to the world of wine was as a pool porter at the Steenberg Hotel in Constantia.

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CAPE TOWN


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“At the time, I just needed cash to keep me going,” says Luvo who indulge joined the hotel at age 20. “I didn’t have any interest or knowledge of wine. My family had never been big wine drinkers. I just needed a job.” After six months working as a pool porter, he recounts a humbling moment that would forever change his life. “I remember waiting on an English family that was staying at the resort,” says Luvo. “At that time, most of our guests would just order a glass of wine from the bar but this particular family ordered a bottle. I had never opened a bottle of wine before and after trying repeatedly, I finally had to ask the family for help. The next day I went to the winemaker John Loubser – I wanted him to teach me all there was to know about wine.” Under Loubser’s mentorship, the young porter gained a comprehensive understanding of both the production and the tactical side of winemaking. In 2003, Luvo left the Steenberg Hotel to accept a job as a glass washer at the Twelve Apostles in Cape Town – a more affordable commute from his home. It was again during a chance encounter that he was propelled further towards his destiny as head sommelier at One&Only. “I was polishing the wine glasses during a wine seminar with the staff of Twelve Apostles when the winemaker offered me a taste,” says Luvo, who had hesitantly accepted. “They were all admiring the wine, commenting on the flavours and textures – when they asked me what I thought – I said quite certainly that the bottle was corked.”

While training for the competition, Luvo was exposed to more than 5000 wines from across the globe and enjoyed regular trips to High Street Kensington in the UK to study with some of the best sommeliers in Europe. Despite the slew of awards that have come his way over the past few years and with his international education, Luvo is a humble man, clearly excited by the scope of the wine world that he so comfortably inhabits.Cementing his expertise, his appointment as Head Sommelier at One&Only Cape Town in June 2011 comes at an important time in the industry where mavericks are being celebrated and boutique operations praised for their purist approach to their craft. Ntezo passion remains embedded in new wineries and emerging terroirs from South Africa.“I fell so deeply in love with wine and its diversity that I never imagined doing anything else apart from what I do now. ”It’s more a lifestyle really than just a job.” Luvo himself spends much time exploring the lesser-known wine producing regions of the Cape in search of interesting offerings to add to One&Only’s, impressive tri-level wine loft housing more than 5,000 bottles – one of the largest collections in Africa. Although on a personal level, he does not do as much… “I do very little when it comes to collecting wines, I perhaps have few hundred, or perhaps well over a 1000 bottles I have been stashing over the years. Wines deserve that opportunity to mature and reach a certain peak when their improvement in texture becomes broader. There is that market of “investment wines” in South Africa and it is quite important to have this as archives to our wines from the past. South African wines are known for their fruit and structure. We make global market related wines that are unique to our terroir without trying to duplicate other countries. South African wines are more fresh – the fruit is upfront and are made to develop well over time, yet not a complete murder to enjoy them in their youth.

“It’s more a

lifestyle really than just a job.”

Luvo went on to educate the group on the wine’s faults – the brown colour, TCA taint and tart flavours. He was right. The bottle was in fact corked. Impressed by Luvo’s knowledge, understanding and inherent talent for tasting wine, Clive Bennett, then the General Manager of the Twelve Apostles, offered to send him to school and become a certified sommelier for the hotel. Luvo readily and graciously accepted. From 2006-2008, Luvo went on to study at the Cape Wine Academy in Stellenbosch while working as a sommelier at the hotel. In 2008, he agreed to participate in the prestigious Young Sommelier’s category in the national Chaîne des Rôtisseurs competition in South Africa – he has won first place every year since. Luvo went on to compete in the international competition held in Vienna in August 2008 and placed an impressive fourth in the world.

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At some point in my life, I do believe that I will make my own wine, being a Sommelier however, gives me that unlimited opportunity to taste a vast range of wines from across the globe, which, at this stage, gives me joy.” Passionate about sharing his knowledge with others, Luvo works closely with the One&Only Cape Town sommelier team, helping them hone their skills and sharing academic material wherever he can. “It’s my job to introduce our guests and students to new tastes and to help them celebrate their favourites – there are no golden or unbreakable rules


with wine in my opinion. We want to encourage people to explore their own taste preferences. If we can show them something new to enjoy along the way, we’ve done a good job.” “I’ve taken quite a number of young lads under my wing and really spent some time teaching them about the culture of wine. I spend a fair amount of time in academic institutions where I speak about wine to Hotel Management students and aspiring chefs.” Being in this field, there is also a certain fascination for centuries old wines that are discovered on occasion and come up for auction. “From across the globe, there are those wines I never tasted that I always wish I can go back in time to taste, like the 1953, 1959, 1961 and, most recently, the 1982 Lafite-Rothschild and those fascinating shipwreck Champagnes like Veuve Clicquot. But late last year, at the Nederburg Auction, I tasted a 1930 KWV Port – what a stunner! It fascinates me. I love tapping into history and tasting these very rare wines.” In his spare time, Luvo tends to be less complicated than maybe some of his customers sitting down for dinner. “At home I tend not to invade those bottles with spiderwebs, I tend to go towards wines that are more simplistic rather than aggressive, and I always have a New World bottle of Pinot Noir at bay – whether it be from Oregon, Walker Bay or Malborough. I love the minerality of the Sancerre, however nothing beats a South African Chenin Blanc. The best rosé I have tasted so far are from the Rhone region.” If Luvo were to host his dream dinner party, what would he serve? What would be the very best he would serve his ultimate guests? “Whatever dish my wife and I might serve, I’d be sure to accompany it with a bottle of Domaine dela Romanee-Conti and finish with my absolute favourite a South African Dalla Cia grappa”. Nothing but the best for a guestlist that would include his late mother Kristina Ntezo, the late golfer Payne Stewart and Meat Loaf. But for now Luvo enjoys his daily walk to and from the ‘office’ and the world’s very best wines at his fingertips. A fairytale, indeed. /

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COOL HAND LUKE

H

aving honed his considerable skills in some of the most renowned kitchens in the world, since coming to Cape Town, Luke has consistently proven his mettle with a string of awards and accolades, the most recent being Chef of the Year at the prestigious 2011 Eat Out Dstv Food Network Restaurant Awards.

Luke Dale-Roberts is a name The Test Kitchen, located in the trendy Biscuit Mill complex in Woodstock, synonymous with the finest, was also named number two restaurant in South Africa at the awards, which to honour the best restaurants and chefs in the country. The Test Kitchen, most creative and innovative food. seeks which opened in November 2010, sees the chef cooking his distinctive style CAPE TOWN

of cuisine in an intimate space that also delights design aficionados.

As its name implies, The Test Kitchen, though primarily a restaurant, affords Luke the opportunity for maximum innovation as a chef, as well as being a space to use as “the creative hub” for a variety of different projects, including regular cooking demonstrations. “It symbolises a stage in a creative process,” he says. The intimate 40-seater restaurant provides guests with the option of a casual or more formal dining experience, but always a taste of Luke’s apparently limitless culinary imagination and exquisite presentations.

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Following the Eat Out Awards, Luke not only went on to collaborate with leading food innovators Woolworths on a gourmet Christmas range but in a recession which has sadly seen so many establishments closing their doors, he took the bull by the horns and opened a new dining concept – The Pot Luck Club – at the end of last year. Located next door to the Test Kitchen, this new venture is another source of culinary and visual inspiration for diners. Part eatery and part contemporary art gallery with a dedicated cocktail bar and an accompanying list of boutique wines, The Pot Luck Club features a menu consisting of a multitude of “small plates” of modern global dishes.

While Luke’s remarkable talent, as well as consistency and innovation, continue to push culinary boundaries without losing sight of the expectations of diners and ensure his eateries are fully booked months in advance, he remains humble. “I think the secret to the success of the restaurants so far is that every single person who works here is completely and utterly committed to doing their level best every single day – from the selection of the produce we work with, to presenting each dish on the plate,” says Luke. “We all want the same thing – for the diner to be blown away by the combination of flavours and the taste experience that we have put so much effort into creating.”

Luke’s most recent development is a dedicated food lab located across the road from these two restaurants where he and his team will develop, design, conceptualise and create new concoctions to further delight diners. The path to these two exceptional restaurants has been a long and winding one: British born Luke trained at Baur Au Lac Hotel in Zurich, Switzerland– at the time recognised as one of the top five hotels in the world. He returned to London where he honed his skills in the art of French fine dining at Elenas L’Etoile under Roux brothers protégé Kevin Hopgood. This was followed by a move to Australia where he explored Pacific Rim fine dining. Returning to London, Luke continued his career working at the Bali Sugar (member of the Sugar Club restaurants in the UK), learning fusion cuisine at its best. From there he moved to the famous Soho House Media Club as executive sous chef where he cooked for the rich and famous; regular diners included film and pop stars Madonna, Kevin Spacey, Kylie Minogue and Oasis. Luke then headed for to Asia for a five year stint, launching several restaurants from Singapore to Seoul. He continued to expand his global cooking styles opening venues from modern fine dining to Japanese-style and French bistros.

In 2006 he took up the position of executive chef of La Colombe at Constantia Uitsig, lifting the restaurant not only to the highest local standards, but bringing it international recognition too. This included two Eat Out restaurant of the year awards, Eat Out chef of the year, and culminated with 12th position in the San Pellegrino world’s 50 best restaurants. Luke’s culinary creations are for the discerning diner in search of imagination and superb technique. He starts with t he thought that a dish has to be understandable and have bold flavours. “From there I build it and add textures and presentation. I’m always tweaking and refining to find a dish’s full potential,” says Luke.

“My mantra is : taste,

taste!”

taste,

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BENTLEY EXP9 LONDON MOTOR PRINCESS 40M MUSEUM

engines


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1949 Mercury 350 Chevy


JUST LOOKING Grown ups’ favourite field trip,

the LONDON MOTOR MUSEUM.

Photographed by Bernard Campbell.

Visiting the only custom car museum in Europe opens up a world of possibilities and temptations. A well known destination for many footballers who need more imaginative customizing than that usually on offer; the museum is a working garage where a motor dream can become the ultimate reality. The fantastic collection of over 100 cars includes some cult show protagonists such as the orange Ford Torino from Starsky and Hutch, cars from the 50s to the 80s and the great classics, of which we are super fans. Sharing the passion with the founder London born Cameroonian Elo, who for many is the face of fashion campaigns of the 90s, we have found that there is nothing better than a little past revisited. 109 |


1939 Lincoln Zephyr Day white Viper

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2009 Dodge Challenger Wide body


1939 Lincoln Zephyr Night Black Viper

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2008 Spyker C8 Laviolette


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1964 Ford Thunderbird Cabriolet


engines

BENTLEY EXP 9 F: A LUXURY CONCEPT

Bentley offered a vision of the future with a dramatic new Sport Utility Vehicle concept, EXP 9 F, at the 2012 Beijing International Automotive Exhibition. The Company’s designers and engineers have created a compelling new take on the Grand Touring Bentley – a vehicle that feels equally at home at an opera gala performance, on the sand dunes and the overtaking lane of the autobahn. Unmistakably a Bentley – yet a Bentley like none before it – the EXP 9 F could herald a third Bentley model-line alongside the bespoke Mulsanne and the high performance Continental GT, GTC and Flying Spur. Today a global luxury brand with a network of 160 dealers from Shanghai to Beverly Hills, Bentley has an increasingly diverse customer base spanning every continent. For many customers, a dramatically styled, Bentley all-wheel drive SUV which combines a spacious, versatile cabin and commanding driving position, with Bentley’s hallmark power, performance, advanced technology and hand crafted luxury, would be a natural choice both on and off-road.

Wolfgang Dürheimer, Chairman and Chief Executive of Bentley Motors: “We are very excited by the potential of a high performance, ultra-luxury Bentley SUV. Since we first showed EXP 9 F at Geneva, the response has been overwhelming. Everyone seems to agree that an SUV is a natural fit for Bentley. An exciting range of drivetrain options including a hybrid V6 are under active consideration but one thing is for sure, any Bentley SUV would offer the thunderous performance for which the marque is renowned.” From a designer’s perspective, EXP 9 F was a dream project, the chance to create a completely new type of Bentley. From the very beginning, the design team had a clear vision for the new Bentley SUV, as Dirk van Braeckel, Director of Design, explains: “EXP 9 F had to represent the absolute pinnacle of the sport utility sector, setting a new benchmark for this type of vehicle.

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The style had to reflect Bentley’s sporting character despite its radically different package and purpose together with sculptured, flowing surfaces in keeping with the Bentley tradition.” Bentley is renowned for its fusion of extremes – technology and craftsmanship, luxury and performance – and the interior of EXP 9 F expresses the resolution of apparent opposites in its use of materials, techniques and technology, as Dirk van Braeckel explains: “The challenge for the interior design team was to create a cabin which provides a blend of luxury and utility. The result is a light and airy environment with a commanding view of the road and a versatile layout which showcases Bentley’s craft and design language in an innovative and contemporary way.” As befits a Bentley, the EXP 9 F design concept features a near-infinite choice of driver information and entertainment options. However the design and electrical engineering teams sought to avoid creating a cluttered or confusing driver and passenger environment, presenting only the information that each user needs, when they need it. As a result, EXP 9 F places key driver information such as 3D navigation in a central TFT panel directly in the driver’s line of sight, where it is flanked by two analogue reverse-read dials. Meanwhile, controls that are shared between driver and front seat passenger, such as cabin temperature, air vents and entertainment, are presented in the central touchscreen and console. The TFT screen deploys from the full-width metal trim to provide a fully integrated extension to the glass surface of the centre console. According to Alasdair Stewart, Member of the Board, Sales and Marketing: “A Bentley Grand Tourer doesn’t necessarily have to be a coupé, a convertible or a saloon – it could equally well be an SUV. What’s important is that it should be true to Bentley’s brand values and in line with the desires and needs of our customers.” /

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engines

A NEW BOLD ERA

FOR PRINCESS

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T

hese are indeed exciting times for Plymouth boat builder Princess Yachts.

The company quite literally stole the show at London this year with the launch of the V39, their smallest vessel for over a decade, and work has now begun on developing the recently acquired South Yard site into a world class superyacht production facility in a £35m investment by the organisation. Now their largest vessel, the new Princess 40M, is nearing completion and briefly took to the water for the first time last week for initial tests.

This magnificent new superyacht quietly slipped into the water from the historic ‘number 1 slipway’ at South Yard and made a short trip into Plymouth Sound to conduct initial engine and systems tests. The whole event took place without drama or fanfare but the moment was still monumentous all-thesame. Managing Director Chris Gates was on board to oversee the trip. “It was quite something, and a demonstration as to just how much we have achieved with this incredible craft. She is truly wonderful and performed impeccably, we couldn’t be happier with her performance at sea.”

The new 40M was not in a completed state for this inaugural run with protective coverings fixed to the hull and numerous parts still to be fitted yet she still proved to be very much the head-turner in the rare March sun. Gates continued “We have of course studied all the drawings and the CGIs and watched her take shape inside the shop but it is not until you see her on the water for the first time you realise just how beautiful she is. Even incomplete as she is at the moment she looks magnificent so she’ll certainly be stunning when she offically launches for the first time next month.”

The Princess 40M is the first tri-deck yacht built by the company and she comfortbly accommodates up to 12 guests in exceptional luxury and up to 8 crew in separate quarters. The first yacht, “Imperial Princess”,has now returned to the production shop and it’s full steam ahead for the team as she moves into the final completion stage.

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www.porschelagos.com

Porsche recommends

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Your purchase at Porsche Centre Lagos comes with:

• Exclusive savings and maintenance benefits

• A 45,000 km or 2 year complimentary service plan*

• An optional third year extended warranty of up to 200,000 km or 9 years*

• Competitive trade-in rates on your existing Porsche

• Full service and parts facilities at Lagos and Abuja

Make the most of these benefits, and get the global Porsche advantage right here.

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0807 4 911 911 0807 5 911 911


PATRICK MAVROS ULYSSE NARDIN PIAGET MASERATI BLANCPAIN ERICKSON BEAMON

treasure


JEWELLERY SPECIAL FEATURE MODELLED BY NOテ記LA COURSARIS-MUSUNKA Photographed by Bernard Campbell

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ALCHEMY BRACELET, ANTIQUEd GOLD PLATE & CRYSTAL £481, ERICKSON BEAMON SPELLBOUND CUFF, ANTIQUEd GOLD PLATE & CRYSTAL £583, ERICKSON BEAMON OXIDISED SILVER PLATE NECKLACE WITH CRYSTAL £767, ERICKSON BEAMON FOR MARIA GRACHVOGEL RING, MODEL’S OWN

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CRododile curled and wire choker £690, PATRICK MAVROS CROC SKIN CUFF BANGLE £820, PATRICK MAVROS


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NDORO GRADUATED WITH WIRE CHOKER £300, PATRICK MAVROS

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CRododile STUD EARRINGS £130, PATRICK MAVROS

MODEL- NOELLA COURSARIS-MUSUNKA PHOTOGRAPHER- BERNARD CAMPBELL STYLIST- JUDY KOLOKO MAKE UP ARTIST- BUNNY HAZEL-CLARKE

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Giving yourself a treat, the moon would do The moon, stunning sphere of light, illuminates a sense of mystery. Changing every evening – from the delicate shadow of a new moon, to the jagged “D” formation of a waxing moon as it grows from new to full, to the smooth “C” shape of a waning moon as it minimizes from full to new – its lure has affected and fascinated the natural world for millenniums. Honoring the moon’s majesty is the new Ulysse Nardin Classico Luna for men and women. A traditionally styled timepiece, the Classico Luna draws inspiration from the moon in a different way. Similar in principle to the limitededition Moonstruck’s indication of the moon’s phases and based on a development with Ludwig Oechslin DNA, the Classico Luna precisely depicts the moon’s rotation in a realistic representation. The moon reflects the light of the sun as it rotates clockwise around the earth, and the Classico Luna depicts its angle of illumination as its moon rotates around the center of the timepiece – a portrayal of earth – making one rotation in 12 hours. In its speed to fulfill its moon phase circle in 29.5 days, the color of the moon phase disc will change, increasing and decreasing as the moon wanes or waxes. A self-winding watch, the Classico Luna makes reading the moon’s phases simple. The moon phase is set over a corrector at the 4 to 5 o’clock position. Available for men and women The Classico Lady Luna is available in stainless steel and gold, with or without diamonds, and with one dial version made from the beautiful and enduring mother of pearl.

TIME FOR ELEGANCE “You can never be too rich or too thin”

Wallis Simpson

In 1960 Piaget launched Calibre 12P, the world’s thinnest automatic movement at just 2.3 mm thick, and described by the influential Journal de Genève as a “milestone event in watchmaking history”. If you are looking for traditionally inventive watches, there is nothing like the new numbered editions of Piaget iconic Altiplano line. Freshly emerged from its workshops, these models are inspired by the vintage watches with hard stone dials: miniature jewellery masterpieces equipped with a 430P movement, the descendant of the legendary 9P calibre, for the 34 and 38 mm versions. At just 2.1 mm thick, it is one of the thinnest calibres in its category. What A:L loves

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The watches powers given by specific energy of the crystals. The colour of a stone is determined by the part of the light spectrum that it reflects. Each colour thus corresponds to a different vibration, ranging from the most soothing to the most energising. Opaque Ruby radiates warmth and beauty. A dark red shade verging on burgundy, it is said to be as precious as wisdom. Available in other powerful stones, find the timepiece also in Opal, Lapis Lazuli and Malachite


A marriage made in Brand Heaven Refinement, prestige, innovation and sheer emotion reach the top when two of the world’s most prestigious Italian brands combine their founding values. Bulgari and Maserati have chosen to share their ideals, now admirably epitomised in the Octo Maserati. Their parallel histories have been marked, by innovations that have modified the very perception and definition of Luxury. Octo Maserati expresses the quintessence of a vision of excellence. The Octo Maserati is powered by an Haute Horlogerie movement representing a refined mechan ical heart: Calibre GG7800. But now let’s look at the important specifications: MOVEMENT: Mechanical self-winding Calibre GG7800,integrated column-wheel chronograph, “aged gold” décor Frequency: 21,600 vph (3Hz) Power reserve: 38 hours 45 jewels FUNCTIONS: Jumping hour, retrograde minutes and date, central chronograph seconds hand, retrograde chronograph hour and minute counters at 3 and 9 o’clock. CASE: Steel case, 45 mm in diameter, brushed steel bezel with tachometric scale, scratch-resistant glareproofed sapphire crystal, transparent sapphire caseback adorned with the Maserati Trident symbol. DIAL: Finely crafted champlevé blue-lacquered dial, hand-applied inner bezel ring, snailed chronograph hour and minute counters, satin-brushed minute counter. WATER RESISTANCE: 100 metres.

SPEED THRILLS

Blancpain’s winning the style race The latest addition to the L-evolution collection features a flyback split-seconds chronograph mechanism and a large date. This watch, combining carbone fibre and cutting-edge technology, reflects Blancpain’s strong commitment in GT racing. Having decided to adopt such an extreme attitude, Blancpain had to choose carbon fibre in creating this timepiece. Its lightness and sturdiness, combined with its aesthetic appeal, provide a wealth of development options. Features we love: - The split-second chronograph function is a major horological complication that enables readings of “split” or intermediate times thanks to a so-called split-second (rattrapante or “catch-up” in French) hand that is superimposed on the chronograph sweep seconds hand. -At the heart of this new model beats Calibre 69F9 with its 409 parts including 44 jewels, ensuring a 40-hour power reserve.

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Pelledacqua, the bathing suit for sauna. An extremely innovating product, which is suitably created for the well-being in the sauna baths. It satisfies the requirements of lightness, versatility, typical of the relax situation in beauty farms and thermal stations, where it is required, for strictly hygienic-sanitary rules, the use of the bathing suit. Pelledacqua, made by lycra material in Italy, dresses men and women. Pelledacqua is an international registered trade-mark.

daguas

indossare il benessere

Suitably studied for the use in Spa-well-being centre, Pelledacqua is not a mono-use bathing suit. Created in one-size by a high quality lycra material for the use in the beauty farms, thermal stations, hotels with Spa centre where the sauna’s high temperatures do not damage neither the form nor the colour of Pelledacqua product, keeping the elasticity unchanged.

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JOHNSON

GIACOMINI

JOYA

refine


refine

Kat Starr Johnson*

M

odern Nutrition has become very confusing. The average woman will try 61 diets before the age 45 to try and shed pounds.

We are living in a highly pressurized media culture of sensationalism based on image, which in my opinion clouds substantial fact. I have spoken to hundreds of women over the years who have come to me of all ages, heights, weights and ethnicities to ask me in various ways not to help them be healthier but to be thinner. I have explained thousands of times these women that being thinner is a very complex issue. Appearing thin as in some of the images we aspire to in magazines is based on a lie. Some people appear thin but in actuality are holding an unhealthy amount of body fat. My job as a personal trainer has often been confusing to people because actually when I say I can help people with weight loss what that means is I can assist in transforming your fat tissue into lean muscle mass. Which in turn can raise your BMR (BASE METABOLIC RATE). An increase in your BMR will allow for a fairly small change in caloric intake. The only way to affect the development of lean muscle mass is to do resistance training. The only way to see muscle tone is by changing your diet. Many people have lost touch with why we eat. Each culture has its own tastes food preparation techniques, times of eating and types of food but in that there are common themes amongst all human beings and this is because outside of the social aspect of food we need it to fuel our biochemical mechanics. I’m not suggesting you have to study biology but when we say, “healthy,” I think it’s important to emphasize we are really talking about both physical and mental function, and maintaining the body’s immune system to ward of disease, recover from illness, heal from injury and maintain the body’s incredibly powerful natural balance. Basically we need nutrients to stay alive.

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photograph: Othello De’Souza-Hartley


Get your mind & body: :

around modern nutrition DIET CHECKLIST? HEALTH CHECKLIST! CONSIDER THE SOURCE: Always consider the source of the information you receive about a diet. I have become so passionate about this topic over the years and have tested things out and looked into a number of fad ideas, but the fundamental question is: What is in the food you consume? CALORIES RULE THE DAY But Not ALL Calories are Created Equal! Calories are made up of PROTEIN, FAT AND CARBOHYDRATE! Let’s talk about how these work, because at the moment most people I speak to are confused. People are taking in either too much or too little protein, too much or too little carbohydrate and too much or too little fat. This is directly related to the modern Myths of Low carbing or no carbing, or high protein diets or the worst one: LOW FAT! I think it was around the early 80’s in the United States, and perhaps later in the UK, that fat is considered the ultimate enemy. This is absolutely not true. It is true that fat is the most energy dense of all the macronutrients at 9 calories per gram. Not all fats are the same: we have Saturated Fats, Unsaturated Fats, Trans fats. Before you start avoiding Fat at all costs, remember why it is necessary: • For the ABSORPTION OF VITAMINS AND MINERALS • It is a hunger depressor • It provides thermal insulation which protects the vital organs from trauma • It regulates hormones • It is absolutely necessary for brain development and function.

: The real issue is

SATURATED FAT,

found in mainly animal sources but also in 34% from plant. An excess of Saturated fats has been linked to a variety of conditions such as heart disease. Saturated fats is the enemy, because: • It inspires the production of negative cholesterol • When you carry too much fat, especially around the organs, it can trigger an inflammatory response. There is an easy way around the saturated fat trap; Health professionals recommend replacing saturated fats and trans fats with non hydrogenated

monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat. Good fats are cold pressed oils: olive oil, sesame oil. Omega 3’s are a great supplement to add into your diet. The total calories you need are based on BMR (Basal Metabolic rate), gender, age, muscle mass, exercise and voluntary movement.

:

CARBOHYDRATES (The modern dilemma)

This is the area of greatest concern to me at the moment and it has everything to do with the way food is being packaged and sold to you as a consumer. Let’s just first outline what a carbohydrate is and what it does. Carbohydrates come in 2 categories based on the number of glucose molecules contained with its chemical structure: simple and complex. We sometimes refer to simple carbohydrates as simple sugars which include: glucose, galactose and fructose, sucrose (table sugar), maltose (malt sugar) and lactose (milk sugar) Complex Carbohydrates are groups of carbohydrate known as polysaccharides, which are 20 or more sugar units stuck together in chains which take longer to break down by the body. We need carbohydrate to fuel most of the important functions in the body including the utilization of protein! Some of the biggest problems in the modern diet are the enormous amounts of simple sugar consumption. Simple sugar consumption in excess has vastly negative effects on one of the most important hormones responsible for stabilizing blood sugar levels and hormone balance, insulin. It’s not just about being overweight it’s about illness. Too many of the issues with overconsumption of carbohydrate are occurring because foods are being filled with sugar to bring down the cost and prolong shelf life. In reality we do not physically or biologically need simple refined sugar. Simple refined sugar is a man made empty nutrient that is reeking havoc with our health. The body needs Whole grains and fiber because they play and essential role in the health or gut and immunity. Simple refined sugar has no essential vitamins or minerals it has minimal to no fiber and plays tricks on our insulin levels. Some of the worst culprits in the for ill health and Calorie dense foods are where you see our 2 worst enemies come together: trans fat and simple sugar. Examples of this are:

white bread, croissants, biscuits, cakes,desserts chocolate milkshakes,ice-cream candy or sweets and sadly meals with sauces, table sauces, Mustard, Gravy (packaged) the list is long... So what carbohydrates are good for you? Whole grains: Oatmeal 100% Rye Quinoa Barley Beans of every kind Brown rice Vegetables of every kind Fruits, but in moderation due to fructose sugar!!!!

: PROTEIN!

The Indespensible Nutrient! 10,000 proteins create and maintain you! Protein has to be consumed because your body has no other way of getting it. Proteins are built from essential and non essential amino acids which use your genetic code as a blue print to repair and build various aspects of your body and function. We need it for muscle contraction, enzyme synthesis and immune function. The body needs a daily supply of amino acids to make new protein because we can store fat and carbohydrate in our muscles and liver but we cannot store protein. LOSS OF PROTEIN CAN REPRESENT LOSS OF FUNCTION! Beware that over consumption of protein can lead to excess fat and calories and overwork the kidneys. In this first mini guide I have given the basic information for anyone to turn food from a nightmare fattening threat into a friendly source of health and fun. / * Kat Starr Johnson is a professional athlete winning trophies for Britain in Power lifting and trained at Olympic level. Kat has been competing in a number of different sports over the years and been working as a Personal Trainer in New-York, London, South Africa and Brazil. She has studied Optimal Nutrition and has a Psychology degree.

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refine

RISE & SHINE

Good Morning Africa!!! Far away from your busy city lifestyle, take advantage of what Africa offers you and wake up nice and early to revamp your body, clear your mind and purify your spirit with this Rise&Shine Routine. Beginning each day with some deep breathing exercises and gentle stretches is the best way to restore your energy. Take a step outside in the crisp morning air, take your mat with you and be ready to lubricating your joints, toned your arm, legs and core.

Mental focus is essential. Putting your mind into your body is what you need to be beautiful inside out. Make sure you full up your morning with a nutrition breakfast. Go seasonal and allow yourself to some tropical local delights adding some le an protein and health fat into your meal.

Rise & ShineCoffee or Green Tea? Both a

great choice, the important thing to remember is moderation. Are you ready? Let’s do it!

Stay tuned in!

Francesca Giacomini* * Francesca Giacomini is a Pilates Specialist, Fitness Model and Writer. Originally from Rome Italy, she now lives in London where she dedicate her working life to her devoted clients and enjoy a clean lifestyle spicing it all up with a big smile and her love for sharing the beauties of life! fg@fgpilates.me , www.fgpilates.me

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1

Stand in neutral position with your feet hip distance apart at 1 o’clock position. Drop your chin and gently roll down vertebra by vertebra until your arms are reaching the floor, bend your knees if necessary. Walk your hands away from your feet into the elephant position. Keep this position as you lower and lift one hill at the time, marching on the spot. Repeat 10 times. Repeat again with both heels, up and down together 10 times and the hold it down to stretch your hamstrings further. Morning Hamstrings!

LET’S START

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PUSH UP

From the elephant, move into push up position. If you are a beginner, please bend your knees! Perform the push up, legs straight, by flexing and extending the elbow. 15/20 repeats.

3

CHILD POSE

Moving into the child pose, bring your bottom back towards your heels. Keep your elbows off the floor with your fingers reaching forward. Take 20 breaths: it’s the time to relax and feel your body! Ahhhaaaa...

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refine Lie down on your tummy, legs apart and arms bend into a W position Inhale to prepare lifting your chest, head and arms. Make sure to draw your navel into your spine. Exhale as you extend your arms forward and then out to the side, in a circular motion: welcome breast stroke! Repeat 15/20 times. It’s the perfect rehearsal for you, before to dive into the African Ocean!

5

REVERSE PLANK

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SIDE PLANK

4 SWIMMING

Sit up tall with the palms of your hands on the floor behind your back on either side of your body. Inhale as you lift your bottom of the floor; keep a strong centre with your legs straight in front of you and together. With arms straight and toes pointed, exhale kicking one leg up without dropping your pelvis. Keep your pelvis lifted and your bottom tight. Repeat 10/15 times x leg.

Lie on your side with your elbow bend below your shoulder and legs straight Exhale bring your pelvis off the floor in perfect alignment Lift your top leg up and hold for 1min Repeat on the other side.

(BACKSTROKE)


7

DOUBLE LEG STRETCH

Lie on the floor with your upper body flexed, imprinted position, knees bend and apart, heels together, toes apart, feet in flexed position and hands resting on your knees. Exhale extending both legs away from you and point your feet, while reaching your arms back into alignment with your ears. Keep you tummy in and spine flat into floor. Repeat 20 times. Repeat all the routine again for 4/5 times. Take a break of 30sec up to 1 min between routines. Please perform the exercises in perfect sequence and harmony. Once completed, allow your body to relax with this meditation technique. Lie on your back, keens bend and relaxed on the side with the sole of your feet together. Arms relaxed on either side of your body. Focus on your breathing, inhaling through the nose and out the mouth. Let your body relax and let go of all tensions.

Just think about yourself and the wonderful day to come. Let it go. This is YOUR time. By focusing on your breathing and allow your body to loosen up, you will develop a sense of well being and peace of mind. You are the architect of your own destiny. Make it happened today and most important: enjoy your holiday! Beautiful Body, Sharp Mind and Clear Soul.

In health and Fitness, Francesca Giacomini. PS Always consult a doctor prior starting any new diet or exercise routine.

8 MEDITATION

PREVIEW! Try out Francesca’s stretching exercises on

www.awayluxury.com

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HOPING YOU HAVE ENJOYED GETTING TO KNOW US ON OUR FIRST GLOSSY ISSUE, WE INVITE YOU TO READ US AGAIN IN JANUARY, WHERE YOU WILL BE ABLE TO WELCOME THE NEW YEAR IN STYLE WITH OUR ARTICLES. FROM PROSPER PROFILE TO POWERFUL ENGINES THE A:L TEAM IS COMMITTED TO BRINGING YOU THE BEST. TILL THEN, ENJOY DISCOVERING OUR WEBSITE :

WWW.AWAYLUXURY.COM


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YOU HAVE ASKED YOUR ACCOUNTANT, YOUR BANKER AND YOUR LAWYER THEIR ANSWERS ARE ALWAYS FULL OF PROBABILITIES. SO HOW ABOUT ASKING THE PLANETS? THEY ARE PROBABLY RIGHT. FIND OUT WHAT THE HOROSCOPE HAS IN STORE FOR YOU AND THE CELEBS SHARING YOUR FATE. 137 |

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ARE THE STARS SHINING OVER YOUR FINANCES?

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Hard working and focused you have created some solid bases for your ventures at the beginning of the year that means you should be covered for all adverse conditions. Unfortunately these are about to start as Saturn, the judgemental planet with an attitude, is going in opposition in October. The troublesome planet will block projects and prevent them from moving at the pace you like, but do not worry. You are not in a hurry, just advance at a conservative tempo and things will change C frustrated in due time. This time toN get M is not the right C E A G or kiss all your business partners goodbye, temptation is great we know but watch out because the new avenues may turn out even less profitable.

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Kofi Annan Diplomat, Ghana 8 April 1938

Let’s be honest, the beginning of the year made you think 2012 was the one to forget about. From the Queen to the athletes, everyone has been celebrating good news, and you were left thinking ‘what about me?’. Your time has come. You are going to be able to find solutions to old problems and even the most stubborn counterparts will soften to your smile and start negotiating. You will feel like you have regained your magic touch, but to be honest, it is also thanks to Saturn, who is finally moving away and letting you explore ways to success. You may have decided to change company or start something new within your company, oppressing partnerships are ending in October. Many lucky moments will come to you between October and December but the planests are giving a boost to your finances on the 15th, 19th and 24th of November.

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Venus Williams Tennis Star, USA 17 June 1980

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Put that glass of champagne down already! You have been celebrating since June, or shall we say since the momentous arrival of auspicious Jupiter in your sign. Don’t worry they are not shutting the party just yet. This is the year that you will never forget, because luck has come your way and you have not missed opportunities to make things happen. You have made new alliances and signed contracts during the summer, now all eyes are on E that they have put their you and it is time to showI them U R T A 13th A bets on the best twin. Best money week of the year to 20th October, enjoy those profits you really deserve them.

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Yaya Touré Footballer, Cote d’Ivoire 13 May 1983

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Can you take a bit of advice? Don’t be so critical with your self, allow yourself a little mistake here and there, it will not cause you any harm because contrary to your firm belief: you are not perfect. Some little imprudent choices have been made in and you are busy fixing the problems these may have caused. Substantial funds have had to be spent for family and business matters. Although you may feel tired of the constant battle towards worldI supremacy you may regainR energy when B SC O L you hear that fierce Saturn is on your side from the beginning of October. In particular the 17th October is a very lucky day. November and December are perfect for consolidating alliances. Start building on those projects you always dreamed about.

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Giorgio Armani Designer, Italy 11 July 1934

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2011 left you a little broke but this year has demonstrated that although bad markets influence your life, you have the strength and the skills to pick yourself up and make great things happen all over again. You have been very capable in fixing all legal difficulties still pending at the beginning of October and this should have given you the basis and the boost to start reconstructing again. You should be getting more confident, this will probably be the last year you have to make very heavy and boring we know how difficult these may be to Leos, U M NC Asacrifices, E A G C who like to spend and enjoy with their entourage. Trust the stars, they have not forgotten about you, it will all be worth it, and by the end of the year you will start roaring with enthusiasm again.

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22 June - 20 July

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We know you have suffered, your family knows you have suffered and your bank account has been crying. The good news is that the cause of all your despair, the reason why everything was so complicated and not rewarding has finally changed position. Saturn who has been bothering you and your finances since mid 2010 is leaving you alone. But it gets better, Saturn may have been a very unwelcomed guest but it is leaving you an unforgettable present. From October you are starting a three year bonanza of contracts, start ups, bonuses I R andtimes L toE O V Some thanks also your great intuitions. you feel you are pretty psychic when it comes to business, and you are right. You will see the effects pretty quickly because already from November you will start receiving some rewards that will make you and your bank manager smile. Enjoy!

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Warren Buffett Philantropist,USA 30 August 1930

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You are definitely closing the year with a positive attitude and bank balance. You will be in the limelight thanks to the outcome of a project that becomes reality in October. This is also a very favourable month for all sales and acquisitions. Be careful not to get too distracted in November as your social life will get an unexpected boost and you will still have some financial commitments you are required to concentrate on. A possible work relocation, during this month of surprises, will bring you very good luck. C have been working your way through the corporate R of NYou L EseenOand heard, and by the V Iend world to make yourself the year you will enjoy being protagonist.

24 September - 23 October

24 October - 22 November

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In the recent past you have not been very stable. All problems created have left you unsettled but don’t dispair important planetary alignments are putting an end to all uncertainties. Fabulous things are about to happen and this Autumn marks your rebirth. On the 5th of October Saturn is moving back into your sign after a 25 years absence, not to destroy but to consolidate. Its favourable alignment with Jupiter means that big projects will take off and will be profitable for the next three years. What ever you may have tried to achieve and failed in the I C next three, past two years I will T T become possible inP Rthe CA SAG so start working at it. From the 17th November some extra luck is being thrown at you, don’t miss out on new opportunities. A

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WIll Smith Actor, USA 25 September 1968

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Anxiety levels are high and although investments in 2010 were necessary and appropriate they have left you a little worried about when you would smile over balance sheets again. Those decisions are still dictating your life. Running away and starting anew from a beach-front villa in some remote village town is not the solution. For as much as you want to, the best solution is to stay, put up a fight and save up. The cosmo has some legal challenges to throw at you in November so it would be most advangeous to be conservative and spend on expensive R R O 19th S Cthe L I BMark in your diary but sound legal advice. October, it will be an exceptionally good business day.

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Zahara Singer/Poet, South Africa 9 November 1987

23 November - 21 December Tahar Ben Jeloun Novelist, Morocco 1 December 1944

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Liya Kebede African Top Model, Ethiopia 3 January 1987

The real secret to your success is: believe in yourself. Your bright and charming ways will strike the right chord in all negotiations and your intuitions will save you and your partners some very big mistakes. All the stars are asking you to do is to face your reflection in the elevator that is taking you all the way up for that important meeting and see that you got it! Recent investments will start to show C results and especially on Ithe Iyou R T T 17th and 18th October PR A S C Owill witness a new positive L IB C SAG financial trend taking shape. Be careful the last two weeks of December, do not take sudden decisions, you may spend the Holidays trying to console yourself. Oprah Winfrey Media Personality, USA

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Your life does not look anything like it did this time two years ago. You have had to face some complex situations and some of you cannot forget the strong disappointments of summer 2011. It is time to turn page because you have proved capable of standing no matter the difficulties and the stars are ready to reward you financially for it. The great change will happen, like for the fellow earth signs, with Saturn long awaited new positioning starting in October. You will feel your personal spring awakening all your senses and especially your bank balance. Many situations are changing in your company and around you, UA S C feel the stars Q P I will giving you Aa platform to succeed. You are particularly generous to your investments between the 25th and the 31st of October, when you will receive some unexpected cash bonus.

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21 January - 19 February

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29 January 1954

PISC

20 February - 20 March

October marks for you the beginning of a great economic season that will develop in the next three years. You will love the changes are coming your way, some you are self starting others are being brought to you with chance meetings. This is not the time to be shy, it is the time to explore the possibilities that new business partners and contacts that will create. New ideas will come very quickly from October and you will have a fresh approach to old problems and stimulate you towards profitable opportunities. New markets will not be difficult to conquer from December especially on the 23rd, 24th , 28th and 29th that will bring an extra dose of luck. Quincy Jones Music Producer, USA 14 March 1933

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ADDRESS BOOK

SHOPPING Alice Temperley

Joansu Gold Prism

http://www.temperleylondon.com

http://www.thedesignerlb.com/designers/joansu/

ALPHA GALLERY

Kofi Ansah

23 Cork Street­ Mayfair, London, W1S 3NJ United Kingdom

P.O.BOX CT2620, Cant nments, Accra, Ghana

http://www.ralphlauren.co.uk Sass & Bide http://www.sassandbide.com Sholay Jaay @Soboye

http://kofi-artdress.com

13 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP United Kingdom

Leo Featherman @Soboye

http://www.samsonsoboye.com

Anita Quansah

13 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP

Soboye

http://www.anitaquansahlondon.com

United Kingdom

13 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP

BENTLEY MOTORS

http://www.samsonsoboye.com

United Kingdom

UK: 0808 100 5200 US: +1 800 777 6923 Europe: +44 (0) 1270 653 653 Rest of the world: +44 (0) 1270 535 032

LUKE DALE-ROBERTS’ TEST KITCHEN

http://www.samsonsoboye.com STWO Boutique

http://www.bentleymotors.com/

Shop 104 A, The Old Biscuit Mill, 375 Albert Road, Woodstock, Cape Town

Caroline Chinakwe @ Soboye

+27 021 447 2337

Victoria Beckham

13 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP United Kingdom

reservations@thetestkitchen.co.za

http://www.victoriabeckham.com

Mary Katranzou

Zaeem Jamal

http://www.samsonsoboye.com

Studio unit 68, 190A New North road, Canonbury business central, London N1 7BJ United Kingdom http://www.marykatrantzou.com

273 New kings road London SW6 4RD United Kingdom

020 7494 9272 contact@alphagalleryuk.com

Calvin Klein http://www.calvinkleininc.com Christie Brown 1st Osu Lane Accra, Ghana http://christiebrownonline.com Daniela Ribeiro @ Alpha gallery 23 Cork Street, Mayfair, London W1S 3NJ United Kingdom http://www.danielaribeiro.co.uk Diane Von FuRstenberg http://uk.dvf.com Ella Boutique 137 Fulham Road London SW3 6SD United Kingdom

Marc Jacobs 56 Audley Street, London W1K 2RR United Kingdom http://www.marcjacobs.com Matthew Williamson 46 Hertford Street, London W1J 7DP United Kingdom

United Kingdom

Moss Bros Savoy Taylors guild, 172 Kensington high street, London W8 7RG United Kingdom http://www.moss.co.uk Moxham http://www.bengtfashion.com/designer/moxham/ Patrick Mavros 104- 106 Fulham road London SW3 6HS United Kingdom http://www.patrickmavros.com PRINCESS YACHTS INTERNATIONAL plc

Finsk

Newport Street Plymouth Devon PL1 3QG United Kingdom

http://www.finsk.com

Tel: +44 (0) 1752 203888

Issa

Ralph Lauren

http://www.issalondon.com

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Rue Sidi Belyout 20000 Casablanca, Morocco (+212)5/22456200 - (+212)5/22542218

3 Nestle’s Avenue Hayes, Middlesex, UB3 4SB United Kingdom

http://www.moschino.it

http://ericksonbeamon.com

Hotel Sofitel Tour Blanche

LONDON MOTOR MUSEUM

112 Jermyn Street St. James SW1Y 6LS United Kingdom +44(0)20 7925 1299

38 Elizabeth Street, London SW1W 9NZ United Kingdom

474-476 Fulham Broadway London, SW6 1BY United Kingdom

13 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP

Moschino

Erickson & Beamon

BROADWAY HOUSE MEMBERS CLUB

h6811@sofitel.com

Emmett London

http://www.emmettlondon.com

LOCATIONS

Miquella Zebrini @ Soboye

http://www.samsonsoboye.com

4 Eldon Street City EC2M 7LS United Kingdom +44 (0)20 7247 1563

http://www.zaeemjamal.com

http://www.matthewwilliamson.com

www.ellaboutique.co.uk

380 Kings Road Chelsea SW3 5UZ United Kingdom +44 (0)20 7351 7529

76 Raymond Njoku, Ikoyi, Lagos Nigeria

0800 195 0777 Maison Blanche Casablanca, opposite the Arab League Park. Rue Mohammed abdou Casablanca, Morocco Ocean View Cabestan 90, Boulevard de la Corniche, Casablanca, Morocco The milestone hotel 1 Kensington Court, London W8 5DL United Kingdom Talent D1 models A: Unit 12, Union Wharf, 23-25 Wenlock Road, London, N1 7SB www.d1models.com T: +442074908009 info@d1models.com Bunny Hazel Clarke Make Up artist www.bunnyhazelclarke.com


w w w . z e n i t h b a n k . c o m

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Away Luxury Magazine - 1st Issue  
Away Luxury Magazine - 1st Issue  

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