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AWARENOW AWARENESS TIES PRESENTS

ISSUE 02

OFFICIAL MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR CAUSES

CANCER & WHAT FOLLOWS SURVIVORS AND SUPPORTERS EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS WITH:

CALY BEVIER

SINGER, SONGWRITER & CANCER SURVIVOR

CARRIE LITTLEWOOD BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR & MOTHER

MADELINE STUART

SUPER MODEL, INTERNATIONAL ADVOCATE

OFFICIAL AMBASSADOR FOR DOWN SYNDROME AWARENESS

DESMOND CLARK

FORMER NFL PLAYER, SPEAKER, AUTHOR

OFFICIAL AMBASSADOR FOR CANCER AWARENESS


We can’t change the past. We can only change the future. That change begins with awareness. This begins with you. This begins with me. This includes everyone. Welcome to The TIE Movement. (TIE = This Includes Everyone) It’s no longer a choice. It’s now our only chance to make things right. 2

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JOIN THE MOVEMENT ONLINE

WWW.AWARENESSTIES.US

Jack McGuire Co-Founder of Awareness Ties (Find me on LinkedIn.)


CALY BEVIER SINGER, SONGWRITER & CANCER SURVIVOR

CONTENTS INTERVIEWS

FEATURES

TIES

06 HER FIGHT SONG Interview with Caly Bevier

10 HAIR (& PATIENT) LOVE Oscar Winning Short Film on Love, Hope & Hair

04 SOUND OF SILENCE A Statement on Sharing, A PSA for Hearing

12 IN HIS WORDS Interview with Desmond Clark

14 CANCER: WHY SO HARD TO CURE? Lesson by Kyuson Yun

20 SELFIE TO SUPPORT A National Campaign to Raise Awareness

16 IN HER WORDS Interview with Carrie Littlewood

22 MADELINE STUART Red to Raise Awareness for Heart Disease

26 ONE TIE AT A TIME Ties to Raise Awareness & Funds for Causes

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SOUND OF SILENCE UNTIL WE SHARE There's always 'that line'. In a song, there's always that line that sticks and stays. For me, in 'Sound of Silence' that line goes as follows...

"Silence like a cancer grows." Like cancer, until we are aware we have it, we can't treat it. Let's be aware of causes that affect ourselves and others. And once aware, let's take action to support these causes. Sometimes that action is in going and doing. Sometimes that action is in simply 'sharing'. Let's share what we know. I'll start. This song, 'Sound of Silence, resonates with me on another level, as I have moderate hearing loss. In addition, I have severe Tinitus (ringing in the ears). I can't hear external sounds like I used to. What I can hear is a constant internal ringing. I can't remember what silence sounded like. I took for granted the comfort of silence. I take a moment now to share this with you so that you might enjoy your audibly silent moments and appreciate them, seldom as they may be with these busy lives we lead. My advice to share is this... Turn down your music and take care of your ears.

Sincerely,

Allié McGuire Co-Founder of Awareness Ties (Find me on LinkedIn.)

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CALY BEVIER SINGER, SONGWRITER & CANCER SURVIVOR

Caly is an 20 year old, stage 3 cancer survivor who made her television debut on Ellen DeGeneres following a viral video of her singing while going through chemo. She followed up her Ellen appearance by getting Simon Cowell's golden buzzer on America's Got Talent where she was a semi-finalist. Now living in LA, Caly is working with Bonnie McKee (Katy Perry), Joe Garrett (Zayn), Drew Pearson (Kesha), Mike Green (5 Seconds of Summer), Jocelyn Alice (Kiiara), Kinetics OneLove (Hailee Stienfeld) and more. She has also become the face of overcoming youth cancer and has been booked on events all over the country. Photo Credit: Shawn Corchado

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HER FIGHT SONG AN INTERVIEW WITH CALY BEVIER ON SURVIVING CANCER & SONGWRITING Before the treatments, came the news. What was your very first reaction? When I was first diagnosed I kind of went into a state of shock. I was just told I had cancer… I don’t think anyone is prepared to receive that news. Any information I got that day went into one ear and out the other. About a week later I had a meeting with my oncologist and the most important question I had for her was ”will I lose my hair”, out of everything I was about to endure… I cared the most about my locks.

After receiving treatments to battle stage 3 cancer, you sung 'Fight Song' at a benefit to support another who was battling cancer. From there, you performed the song on America's Got Talent earning yourself a Golden Buzzer nod from Simon. Now, here you are singing your own songs and releasing your own albums. As an independent artist and cancer survivor, what advice do you have for new, young artists? And what advice do you have for those newly diagnosed with cancer? Advice I have for new artists is to do as much research you can and practice your craft everyday. Your brain is like a sponge. It can lay there all dry and not have any use, or you can let it soak up tons of new information that will help you down the road of being an artist, and it gets bumpy sometimes! For newly diagnosed cancer patients I always say to stay positive. You are going to be physically weak… definitely if you’re getting treatments. There’s no avoiding that. But you have the power over your brain. You may be physically weak, but try as hard as you can to be mentally strong. And of course there will be very hard days.. Days where you don't feel like trying, and that's okay. Just remember how strong you really are, even if you've never had to be before. 7

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'Fight Song' was your song then. Is it still your song now? Or is there another that better defines where you're at?

Fight Song will always be a part of my journey. But, there is one song that was one of my favorites growing up and I didn’t realize the impact it would have on my life now. The Middle-Jimmy Eat World.

“It just takes some time, little girl you’re in the middle of the ride, everything will be alright, everything will be just fine.” Those lyrics really help put a pep in my step when I need it… when I feel like everything should be moving and happening at once, when in reality it's all cultivating slowly for the future. 8

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Speaking of songs... Between fight songs and love songs, you have a collection of beautiful work. Your newest release 'See You Now' is amazing. Tell us about your inspiration and the impact you hope it has?

So, when I met my boyfriend, we were both living out in Los Angeles. It started so so well! We were with each other every day. Then about 6 months into our relationship, he had to move to Florida… But we decided to stay together and try long distance. We knew it would work, but it still sucked not being able to physically touch each other and come home to one another. See You Now is about our time during the long distance relationship and how it made me feel. It also shares some of his fears in the second verse. I hope that people missing anyone anywhere can listen to this and sing it loud AF and find a little bit of peace. Learn more about Caly at www.calybevierofficial.com. Follow her on Instagram (@calybev).

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HAIR (& PATIENT) LOVE AN OSCAR WINNING SHORT FILM ON LOVE, HOPE AND HAIR A haircut is never 'just' a haircut. Women know this very well: we change our hair color to feel more “ourselves,” to shout to the world something we have inside—to sometimes delude ourselves that by lightening our hair color we can wash away other things. We get a haircut or new style to turn the page, as if everything we want to forget, together with our precious hair, would stay on the hairdresser’s floor.

Because yes, hair is sacred, and we only change it when we need to recognize ourselves again when we look in the mirror. Thinking about losing our hair— something so frivolous and yet so decisive for our identity—disconcerts us. It’s something that even men hate—and they fight with baldness problems much more than we women! When it’s an illness that takes away your sense of dignity, your identity, and makes you start all over again, it’s even more painful: at least, if we still had our hair, we could think of styling it, coloring it, cutting it, and trying to rediscover ourselves in that mirror where, instead, we can’t recognize ourselves anymore.

Thinking about our hair in such a difficult moment is something so trivial and silly, the last on the list of “real” problems.  Yet, an animated short, which has also become a book because of its success, reminds us that even something apparently frivolous, like taking care of our hair, can be a gesture of love...

(Click HERE to read the rest of this beautiful article by Giovanna Binci.)

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You may have cancer but cancer does not have you. Be strong and live on. DESMOND CLARK FORMER STAR NFL PLAYER, ENTREPRENEUR, AUTHOR, & SPEAKER AWARENESS TIES AMBASSADOR FOR CANCER AWARENESS

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IN HIS WORDS AN INTERVIEW WITH DESMOND CLARK ON CANCER AWARENESS What made you get personally involved in supporting cancer? The passing of my mom from breast cancer. I don’t think it was necessarily getting involve with cancer. It was more about getting involve with the PEOPLE who have cancer. There’s enough resources being given to fight cancer. I’m looking to help be a support for the people who are fighting through, fought through, or support those people who are the support system for those fighting cancer. With early detection, cancer rates are lessened by 50%. However, there has been a decrease in routine screenings. What are your thoughts on how we get people to go and get screened - be it breast cancer or prostate cancer? Awareness is one key. We have to keep spreading the word through our individual channels. Second, people have to believe in our healthcare system. With so much political jabbing going on around our healthcare system, I believe people are losing faith in it. I believe there needs to be an overhaul on how we practice medicine in the U.S. that sides with real people/patient care and not metrics and dollars. If we can turn the tide everyone will have more faith and hope. What does it mean to you to be the Awareness Ties Official Ambassador for Cancer Awareness? My mom was a warm caring person. One of her future plans was to be a person other people with cancer could call on to get the good message of hope. She wanted to let them know there is a good life to be lived. She would say, “I have cancer, cancer doesn’t have me”. I believe that’s powerful. I want to carry on her message and legacy.

Connect with Desmond on LinkedIn. Follow him on Instagram (@dezclark88).

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WHY IS CANCER SO HARD TO CURE? A LESSON BY KYUSON YUN, DIRECTED BY ARTRAKE STUDIO

We’ve harnessed electricity, sequenced the human genome, and eradicated smallpox. But after billions of dollars in research, we haven’t found a solution for a disease that affects more than 14 million people and their families at any given time. Why is it so difficult to cure cancer?

Watch the video found to the left as Kyuson Yun explains the challenges. Want to learn even more? Click HERE for the full TED-Ed lesson.

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CARRIE LITTLEWOOD BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR & MOTHER

Carrie Littlewood was 35 in 2017 and had estrogen positive, progesterone positive and HER2+ invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. She had chemo, antibody therapy, radiation therapy, a bilateral mastectomy and is currently on endocrine therapy. She shared her story with grace and compassion for those who have walked or will walk in her shoes. Her story is one to empower others to live in the present with confidence and with comfort that you are not alone. Our conversation ended with this advice, "You need to be and stay present."

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IN HER WORDS AN INTERVIEW WITH BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR CARRIE LITTLEWOOD

"I don't know that the fear ever goes away, but I learned to cope." What did you do to help you meet the challenges of your treatments? I did a number of things... I educated myself before, during and continue to now. I listened to the advice from the oncology nurses. They always had a trick up their sleeve. I slept - a lot! I thought outside of the box regarding ways to cope with difficulties in lack of appetite. Foods that used to not appeal to me suddenly did. It was easier and more appealing to drink water with a straw. I never went to an appointment alone. The extra set of ears helped clarify the conversation with the doc and helped my tired brain remember. What did others close to you do for you that made a difference? Those closest to me showed up without me asking; they seemed to know exactly what I needed and when. They came with me for treatments. They sent daily text check-ins and anonymously picked up the bill for a week of daycare. They even snuck onto the porch to leave necessities like toilet paper and paper towels. There was a community wide meal train for me and my family. One friend knew where I liked to go for massages and called ahead of an appointment to pre-pay.

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How did you overcome your fears of treatments? Of side effects? Of the possibility of death? I don't know that the fear ever goes away, but I learned to cope. Talk therapy helped, and I still check in regularly with my therapist. I chose to focus solely on treatment and recovery and did not work during chemo until I was recovered from surgery and radiation. This left me with more time than I was used to. I learned quickly that my mind doesn't like idleness. I made plans with friends on 'good days' and tried my best to maintain normalcy for my children (ages 4 and 8 at the time). I listened to my body and slept when I needed. I ate the best I could to stay strong. Did you join a support group? If so, how did it help? At the time of my treatment, I felt like the only young woman with this. Breast cancer at 35 is rare and it was difficult to find a friend that had the same challenges as me. That said, I've made it my mission to connect with other women that are newly diagnosed in my community. After treatment, I learned of an organization called 'The Breasties'. It's a nonprofit supporting young women affected by breast and reproductive cancer. I attended a camp last spring and connected with so many powerful women. In addition, I have found that Instagram has been a great resource for connecting with others. Now that you are a survivor, how are you living your life differently and why? I try my hardest to be mindful and present in each moment. I did not return to my profession as a radiologic technologist. Instead, I work at a local boutique part-time. I miss the healthcare setting to an extent, but I'm on the other side now - as a patient. Simplifying my life was essential. I am more careful about what products I use at home and on my body (my children's too). We are conscious of chemicals and toxins for our health and for the future of Mother Earth. 18 AWARENOWÂ / CANCER EDITION


As a survivor, what would you do differently when going through your diagnoses and treatments? I wanted instant answers, as anyone in this situation would. I would tell my 2017 self that it takes time to diagnose and accurately plan treatment. At that time, mentally I wanted chemo and surgery ASAP. I would not spend so much time wondering 'why' or feeling like it was something I did to cause this. Certainly, there are steps we can take to directly cause cancer, but some of us are more predisposed than others. What three things would you tell a person who just yesterday learned of their cancer diagnosis?

1

Stay off of Google. Educate yourself when necessary, but from trusted sources - not outdated medical journal articles and especially not internet forums.

2

Find a team of doctors that you trust and feel a natural connection with. It is imperative that you feel comfortable asking any question without feeling like a burden or that it's a silly question. It all matters to the patient, so it should matter to the team.

3

Accept help when offered. If people did not want to help they would not offer. Don't feel guilty. Try to accept and learn early on that asking for help is not a sign of weakness. Remind yourself that when you are in a place to help someone, you do and you will.

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'SELFIE TO SUPPORT' A NATIONAL CAMPAIGN & A PERSONAL INVITATION Some prefer to put a face to a name. We prefer to put a face to a cause. Selfie To Support is a national invitation to raise awareness for your cause by submitting your selfie. It's easy. 1) Upload your selfie 2) Select your cause We'll email you with your 'Official Selfie To Support' with your cause color. Then there is just one more step: 3) Share your 'Selfie To Support' via social media These selfies will not only be featured on social media. They will be used in print ads, videos and billboards as part of the 'My Cause My Tie' campaign. Be seen. Be heard. Help others be aware. Consider this article as your personal invitation. Join the camapign at www.selfietosupport.com.

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FEBRUARY 7 NATIONAL WEAR RED DAY

MADELINE STUART WEARING RED TO RAISE AWARENESS FOR GO RED FOR WOMEN In addition to being a Super Model, the world's first with Down Syndrome, Madeline Stuart is an international advocate for multiple causes. Madeline, like all of us perhaps, is tied to more than one cause. In addition to Down Syndrome, serving as the Awareness Ties 'Official Ambassador for Down Syndrome Awareness', she also supports Heart Disease Awareness. Just over a year ago she had open heart surgery. Today, with a strength and a style all her own, she walked the runway for the American Heart Association Go Red For Women 2020 Red Dress Collection during New York Fashion Week. “It was such a honour to support the American Heart association, as a heart survivor myself the cause is very dear to me, I feel blessed to have a platform to be able to spread awareness on a disease that is 90% curable.” - Madeline Stuart

MADELINE STUART W/MEGHAN TRAINOR BACKSTAGE AT THE GO RED FOR WOMEN 2020 RED DRESS COLLECTION RUNWAY SHOW

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Follow Madeline on Instagram: @madelinesmodelling_


MADELINE STUART ON STAGE AT THE GO RED FOR WOMEN 2020 RED DRESS COLLECTION RUNWAY SHOW

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@madelinesmodelling_


IT IS ESTIMATED THAT EVERY

20 SECONDS

1 PERSON IN THE U.S. WILL BE DIAGNOSED WITH

CANCER #BEAWARE


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RAISING FUNDS & AWARENESS ONE TIE AT A TIME FUNDRAISING TO PROFIT WITH PURPOSE As the ‘Official Symbol of Support for Causes’, Awareness Ties™ are designed to raise both awareness for causes and funding for organizations. Each tie comes in a color corresponding to the cause it represents. Designed for men, women and children, these symbols of support are 'zipper ties'. Simply slip it on and zip it up.

It’s a fact. Fundraising is a necessity. We can’t change that. What we can change is how we do it and why. Let’s educate and empower. Let’s instill a sense of purpose and pride. Let’s do the right thing with a fundraiser that promotes awareness and personal growth. Join us and so many others as we change the landscape of fundraising to raise more than just funds one tie at a time. The Awareness Ties Fundraising Program™ offers schools and organizations an opportunity to raise funds and awareness with profit and purpose. Earn $10 for each Awareness Tie, while raising awareness for the cause with a visual symbol of support. Request Awareness Ties Programming & Guest Speakers for events and assemblies. To learn more, visit www.awarenessties.us/fundraising

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VIEW & SHARE THE GUIDE

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CANCER AWARENESS GUIDE GET HELP. GIVE HELP. We've done the homework. Here are six incredible resources to get support from and give support to.

American Cancer Society www.cancer.org Whether you want to learn about treatment options, get advice on coping with side effects, or have questions about health insurance, the American Cancer Society is there to help - even to find you a free ride to treatment or a free place to stay when treatment is far from home.

SURVIVEiT www.surviveit.org SURVIVEiT® is the world’s first and only non-profit cancer care rating resource. Cancer is complex. It doesn't slow down for us to find the best treatment options. SURVIVEiT® is committed to empowering anyone affected by cancer with the knowledge they need to survive.

CanCare www.cancare.org CanCare is a mighty community of survivors who lift up and inspire cancer patients and caregivers through one-on-one support, empathy, and hope. Their 600+ trained volunteers have survived cancer, and they want to help you do the same for yourself – or a loved one.

Prevent Cancer Foundation www.preventcancer.org The Prevent Cancer Foundation® is the only U.S.-based nonprofit organization solely dedicated to cancer prevention and early detection. Their mission is saving lives across all populations through cancer prevention and early detection. Their vision is to Stop Cancer Before It Starts!®

LIVESTRONG www.livestrong.org LIVESTRONG provides direct services to anyone affected by cancer; connects people and communities with the services they need; and calls for state, national and world leaders to help fight this disease.

The V Foundation www.v.org The V Foundation is a charitable organization dedicated to saving lives by helping to find a cure for cancer. The V Foundation seeks to make a difference by generating broad-based support for cancer research and by creating an urgent awareness among all Americans of the importance of the war against cancer.

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30 to 50% OF CANCER CASES ARE

PREVENTABLE #BEAWARE


Have a story to share? Want to be part of ours?

Let's connect. info@awarenessties.us

What's next?

Stay tuned for our next edition...

Down Syndrome Awareness

Profile for AwareNow

AwareNow: Issue 02: Cancer Edition  

Presented by Awareness Ties, AwareNow is the 'Official Monthly Magazine for Causes'.

AwareNow: Issue 02: Cancer Edition  

Presented by Awareness Ties, AwareNow is the 'Official Monthly Magazine for Causes'.