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USC School of Architecture Watt Hall, Suite 204 Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291 http://arch.usc.edu

USC School of Architecture

Honoring the Past. Inventing the Future.

2011-12

SCS-COC-001005


Contents

“The architecture program helps you become a problem-solver. You learn to create something out of nothing. Those skills become highly valuable.� Julie Quinnan (B.Arch. 2002), LC, Associate AIA, Kaplan Gehring McCarroll Architectural Lighting

Message from the Dean 2 About USC Architecture 6 About USC and Los Angeles 8

Academic Programs Undergraduate Programs 10 Minor Programs 13

USC School of Architecture

Graduate Programs 14 Ph.D. Program 16

HONORING THE PAST. INVENTING THE FUTURE.

Graduate Certificates 16

Faculty 17 Study Abroad 18 Facilities and Services 20 Scholarships and Financial Aid 23 Alumni and the Architectural Guild 24 Our Mission

Admission Requirements Undergraduate Admission 25 Graduate Admission 27 Graduate Portfolio Form 28

To train professionals

To advance

To address social

To be a stimulating

within the context

knowledge

and cultural issues.

environment for

of a humanistic

about the theory

academic tradition.

and practice of

learning.

architecture.

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Dean’s Message

Honoring the Past. Inventing the Future. The USC School of Architecture is continuously being renewed and transformed. The most recent sign of change is my appointment as the dean of the school. As such, my mind has been occupied by nothing but successes: the school’s past success, its success today and the level of success I hope to achieve during my tenure. It is said that success rides on time. The USC School of Architecture has achieved a more than 90-year tradition in educating and cultivating some of the finest architectural minds in addition to contributing to the development and construction of the city of Los Angeles. This tradition is built on a foundation that integrates exemplary instruction, design, research and technology. This tradition is demonstrated by some of the most critical discourses initiated by USC graduates and faculty including Pierre Koenig, Craig Ellwood, Conrad Buff, Donald Hensman, Konrad Wachsman and Ralph Knowles, to name a few. Their success, as highlighted by the Case Study House Program, for example, has significantly changed the course of contemporary American architecture and building industries. Their legacy is evidenced in the rigorous investigation of the built environment, an active pursuit that continues in our studios today. The fire of tradition continues to burn brightly in our alumni Frank O. Gehry and Thom Mayne, both Pritzker Prize winners, who have brought a global perspective and their distinctive mark to the architectural scene in Los Angeles, putting it on par with New York and Chicago. Success also rides on moments in time. There is no better time than now to be an architecture student at USC. For now is the time when Los Angeles claims a double frontier in both America and the Pacific Rim, as a center of tremendous creativity and diversity. Now is the time when Trojans are reaching afar to new territories and cultures. This is also the time when the school is launching new initiatives in cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary discourses including the new Graduate Studies Abroad Summer Programs in China. Additionally, success stands on the shoulders of giants. The school has reached great heights under the leadership of previous deans Arthur Weatherhead, Arthur Gallion, A. Quincy Jones, Sam Hurst and Robert Harris who, with their vision and dedication, have defined the school by incorporating urban diversity, social responsibility and technological integrity into the program over the years. My gratitude goes to my predecessor, Robert H. Timme, whose legacy will forever be memorialized in the Robert H. Timme Architectural Research Center in Watt Hall. The space houses our four graduate programs and also serves as a place for research and collaboration, encouraging scholarly debate and investigation. I am ready to grasp this critical moment in time and, together with our students, staff and faculty, create a community that is innovative and harmonious and a platform that celebrates intellect and individuality. Most importantly, I wish to create a pathway for preparing young minds and future leaders who will be able to navigate the world of tomorrow. Confucius claimed, “The best leader does nothing.” It is my belief that his wise saying has been misunderstood for centuries. My interpretation is that a great leader does nothing that goes against the river of time, does nothing that would leave irrevocable traces behind. Confucius believed the highest state of human enlightenment is to: “Change as time does. Do as time demands.” Indeed, there is no better time than now. The school’s past successes and rich tradition lay an excellent foundation enabling us to move forward and to embrace change. It is my hope that you will join me as we continue to push architectural boundaries and design technologies, strengthening ties in the community and around the world.

“Architecture is a media to participate in social reform, a device to enhance urban transformation and the mixture of cultural differences.” QINGYUN MA,

Dean of the School of Architecture Della and Harry MacDonald Dean’s Chair in Architecture

Qingyun Ma Dean of the School of Architecture Della and Harry MacDonald Dean’s Chair in Architecture

PHOTO (top right): Walt Disney Concert Hall, Frank O. Gehry, B.Arch. 1954 (bottom left) Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Albert C. Martin, B.Arch. 1936

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MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE


USC SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Founded 1914 550 Undergraduate Students 48% Female 52% Male 218 Graduate Students 55% Female 45% Male 3 Undergraduate Degrees 2 Undergraduate Minors 5 Master’s Degrees 1 Ph.D. 2 Dual Degrees 4 Graduate Certificates 100 Full- and Part-Time Faculty 7:1 Student/Faculty Ratio 4,843 Alumni


USCMESSAGE SCHOOL FROM OF ARCHITECTURE THE DEAN

USC School of Architecture


USC Architecture In Their Words From faculty to alumni to students, each finds meaning and inspiration

At the USC School of Architecture, we offer a solid foundation for success throughout your college years and beyond. How do we do this? Consider some of the many benefits we provide:

from a different aspect of the School of Architecture. CREATIVITY “The school really opens your eyes to what architecture is all about. The program allows a lot of latitude to be creative and gives students the opportunity to develop their own thinking processes,” says Jay

Connections We maintain strong relationships with the community of practicing architects in Southern California. Q Internships Our highly regarded program features opportunities with a wide range of local firms. Q Industry Support Our nearly 600-member Architectural Guild sponsors educational and networking events, scholarships and traveling fellowships and provides a link to the professional community. Q Mentoring Our Architectural Guild matches students with professionals to help guide them in their academic and career development. Q A Faculty of Practicing Professionals Many of our faculty currently work in the field and are principals of their own firms. Q Study Abroad Programs Our students have opportunities to study in Asia, Spain and Italy. Q Diversity in Teaching Our faculty offers a broad perspective of ideas and a variety of specialties providing students with a well-rounded view of architecture. Q Degree options Our undergraduate students may choose a minor from more than 150 options; our graduate students may choose from a Ph.D. program, five master’s degrees, two dual degrees and four certificate programs. Q A Strong Alumni Base Our graduates have gone on to make great strides in architecture including winning the Pritzker Prize and many other honors. Q University Support There are numerous members of the Trojan Family who are ready and willing to assist our students and graduates. Q

Our Network Numerous graduates have testified to the strength of the Trojan network, which is a key advantage that sets our school apart. “A benefit of studying at the USC School of Architecture is the Trojan Family. The connections are so strong, I got a job the day after I graduated,” says Andrea Cohen Gehring, a 1985 graduate who is a partner/design principal for Widom Wein Cohen O’Leary Terasawa.

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Clark, a 1981 graduate and vice president

Elizabeth Valmont, a recent architecture graduate who earned two degrees at USC, admires our networking. “The networking is amazing. Through the school, there is a link to every major architectural firm in Los Angeles,” says Elizabeth, who currently works for Arup.

for RTKL. STRENGTH Professor Emeritus and former Dean Robert S. Harris asserts, “The strength of the field and the school is the ability to learn how to enjoy complexity and ambiguity.”

Our Curriculum The USC School of Architecture, which started with an architecture curriculum in 1914, became a department in the School of Fine Arts in 1919 and later became its own school in 1925, has a long history of meeting students’ educational needs. We understand that our students’ professional careers will span 40 years or more and many seasons of the economy. We make sure they are equipped with an education that prepares them for anticipated as well as unforeseen changes. Our curriculum offers both a well-rounded, highlevel architecture education, as well as a strong general education program.

LEADERSHIP USC Life Trustee Gin D. Wong, FAIA, appreciates that “USC is presently the leader in the educational field in the Asian world,” particularly since he has worked extensively in the Pacific Rim.

“The educational preparation that I received at the School of Architecture has been the point of departure for my entire career,” the 1950 graduate and principal of Gin Wong & Associates adds.

According to Professor Kara Bartelt, who is partner and founder of design think tank Lettuce, a USC architecture education “offers a lot of opportunity.” “You can work in literally any facet of the profession,” she adds. “Students come out prepared for any type of work in the field. Architecture offers the best training for any artistic field.”

PERSONAL CONTACT Fifth-year undergraduate student Chris Sanford thinks the school’s strengths are “its emphasis on design and composition, the close personal contact with professors and the constant feedback on projects.” LOCATION For Visiting Professor Scott Johnson, FAIA,

Our Reputation Our graduates are so well-prepared and successful that they are known throughout the world and are among the foremost designers, practitioners and faculty in architecture today. Pritzker Prize laureates Frank Gehry and Thom Mayne have established worldwide reputations for creative, groundbreaking architecture. The late landscape architect Emmet Wemple as well as Jon Jerde, Robert Kennard, Pierre Koenig, Raphael Soriano, Carl Maston, Don Hensman, Conrad Buff and Cal Straub have left indelible imprints on the architectural field. Albert Martin, Bill Blurock, Gin Wong, Bob Langdon, Ernest Wilson and MacDonald Becket are also renowned nationally and internationally.

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design partner of Johnson Fain, “The school offers a number of salient virtues, one of which is its location in Los Angeles, which is arguably the largest and most futurist metropolitan city in the country.” OPPORTUNITY “There are extraordinary opportunities at USC. For example, if you want to customize a degree, you can make it happen here,” says Professor and Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient Victor Regnier (M.A. 1973). “There are more choices and options than you could possibly imagine.”

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USC ARCHITECTURE U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE


The University and Los Angeles UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Founded 1880 17,000 Undergraduate Students 50% Female 50% male

The USC Advantage

18,000 Graduate and Professional Students 47% Female 53% Male 150 Undergraduate Majors 150 Undergraduate Minors

Just as there are many benefits to studying at the USC School of Architecture, there are numerous advantages to being a part of the University of Southern California. But just what makes USC so special? First, USC is one of the premier, private research universities in the country. Its exceptional reputation is known across the globe. It is worldrenowned in the fields of communication and multimedia technology and has received national acclaim for its innovative community partnerships. Second, USC offers students countless opportunities and options to enhance their academic careers. For example, you can pursue degrees from 17 different professional schools and can choose from 150 minors—the broadest selection of any U.S. university.

340 Master’s, Certificate, Doctoral and Professional areas of study Named College of the Year in 2000 by Time Magazine/Princeton Review Students from all 50 states, 7 territories and 150 countries 3,200 Full-time Faculty Members

“The program offers a wonderful opportunity to study architecture within the context of an urban laboratory. The location is in an invaluable and indelible part of the region. Living and studying in Los Angeles offers exceptional opportunities.”

Los Angeles: The Ultimate Laboratory With its variety of urban and environmental components, Los Angeles has been described as the perfect laboratory for our architecture students. Its proximity to mountains, beaches and deserts make Los Angeles an ideal location. Dean Qingyun Ma describes it as “a double frontier” with Eastern and Western influences reflected in the city’s flexibility and diversity of landscape and its “multiplicity in all aspects.” “These conditions make it the perfect laboratory where architecture starts to challenge its boundaries,” he says. “In this city is where the USC School of Architecture should be. But to be in it is not enough. It should be connected to it and immersed in it.”

USC also fosters opportunities for creativity as demonstrated through the university-wide arts and humanities initiative, Visions and Voices. As part of this program, professors Amy Murphy and Kim Coleman showcased the work of USC architectural alumni, receiving numerous accolades.

RONALD A. ALTOON, FAIA, (B.Arch. 1968),

Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient and partner of Altoon + Porter Architects FOCUS “One of the biggest advantages to

We provide you with many opportunities to become immersed in the city of Los Angeles and its culture. Our students take regular field trips to local museums and other architectural points of interest. Student design projects often focus on city projects. These have included historic preservation of the Pasadena City Hall; reuse of St. Vibiana’s Cathedral; studies of mixed-use developments in the mid-Wilshire, downtown Los Angeles and Santa Monica areas; reexamination of urban schools; and studies of open space and urban landscape in the center of downtown Los Angeles and around the Los Angeles River. Student projects have also touched the local communities. Students have saved historic structures from demolition by developing a restoration plan and have helped beautify the city by designing community gardens and parks.

According to Murphy, studying architecture at a major research university provides many such benefits. “The USC School of Architecture is plugged into a vibrant university setting. To study architecture at such a high-level university is a huge bonus,” she says. This vibrant setting is also filled with numerous opportunities for you to get involved on campus. With more than 700 student organizations, you can explore your passions and interests — leadership programs, recreational sports, religious groups, student government, multicultural organizations, greek life, community service opportunities and much more.

studying at the USC School of Architecture is the focus on urban planning and the urban environment, which is becoming more and more important, particularly in Los Angeles.” KEVIN POLLEM (B.Arch. 1993), principal,

Faktura Architecture PREPARATION “The School of Architecture offers a diverse program that really prepares you for future fields related to or beyond architecture. The program helps you understand project management and offers you a set of tools that you learn through the process.” TOM WULF (B.Arch. 1992, Master of

Real Estate Development 1993), SVP, Lowe Enterprises Real Estate Group RESPECT “The USC School of Architecture is one of the country’s most respected and qualified sources for those interested in entering

From the moment you become a student at USC, you are part of the Trojan Family, a unique and prestigious designation. With more than 190,000 alumni, a strong support system is readily available to you.

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architecture or its related fields.” ARTHUR C. DANIELIAN, FAIA, (B.Arch. 1963),

principal, Danielian & Associates

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THE UNIVERSITY AND LOS ANGELES

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Frank O. Gehry, B.Arch. 1954

U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE


Degree Programs

Undergraduate The USC School of Architecture delivers comprehensive preparation for entry into competitive, challenging and diverse careers. Bachelor of Architecture Our NAAB-accredited professional undergraduate program is designed to provide an exceptional university education. Students study architecture as well as other basic disciplines throughout the five-year program. We encourage students to pursue minors to combine their interest in architecture with fields such as business, history, fine arts or urban planning.

learn to create something out of nothing. Those skills become highly valuable.”

The curriculum features two levels of study. In the first level (three years), students gain a foundation in understanding architecture. During the second level (two years), students explore many aspects of architecture and develop individual strengths and interests. To conclude the program, students complete a comprehensive project that they help define. Throughout the 10-semester program, students participate in the design studio, where they work on projects to develop the skills, knowledge, understanding and judgment to create appropriate and exemplary architectural designs. At the end of the third year, students complete the foundation program by creating a studio project, which helps them summarize what they have learned and transition toward the more independent studies of the next level. This special integrative semester also helps students develop a deeper understanding of becoming an architect.

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FRANK O. GEHRY, FAIA, (B.ARCH. 1954),

The school’s way of delivering education is working, says Chet Widom, a 1962 graduate, Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient and founding partner of Widom Wein Cohen O’Leary Terasawa: “The students who are graduating are coming out with good thinking processes and the ability to put order and reason to complex problems. They are helping firms to change with the times.”

principal, Gehry Partners

NATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL ACCREDITING BOARD STATEMENT In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of

Adds Professor Doug Noble, “Through the undergraduate program we are really training and educating the students to take over the profession, not just enter it. We teach philosophies of architecture and how to manage business, not just to draw lines and drafts.”

School of Architecture Courses Design Technology History/Theory Design Communication Professional Practice Professional Electives

Julie Quinnan, a 2002 graduate who also works at KGM, values these skills as well: “The architecture program helps you become a problem-solver. You

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The second level of the program, the advanced level, is designed to encourage students to complete their basic education in architecture and to develop their own interests and professional directions. The advanced program includes elective opportunities inside and outside the School of Architecture and culminates with the fifth year comprehensive studio. During this final semester, students explore special interests and also develop a comprehensive architectural proposal that demonstrates their full range of skills and knowledge.

degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a six-year, three-year or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Degree Requirements

As students progress through the program they learn important skills that not only help them in their future profession but also in other facets of life. Says Mike Gehring, a 1981 graduate and principal of Kaplan Gehring McCarroll (KGM) Architectural Lighting, “Through the program, you learn how to solve problems and think creatively. All projects are real urban problems, and you are solving real urban issues.”

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“I am obsessed with architecture. Through my work, I hope to make a difference, to enlighten and to enrich the human experience, to penetrate the barriers of misunderstanding and to provide a beautiful context for life’s drama. I am proud that my initiation into the field was through my undergraduate education at USC’s School of Architecture.”

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Other Courses General Education (incl. PHYS 125L) Diversity Writing Requirement Mathematics Free Electives Total Units Required

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Master’s degree programs may consist of a

112 Units 58 21 13 2 6 12

pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

48 Units 24 4 8 4 8

The USC School of Architecture Bachelor of Architecture program and the Master of Architecture “+2” program are accredited by the NAAB.

160 Units

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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE


Degree Programs I Undergraduate

Five-Year Curriculum for the Bachelor of Architecture Program FIRST YEAR

UNITS

First Semester

ARCH 102aL

Second Semester

Architectural Design I

4

ARCH 105L

Fundamentals of Design Communication

2

ARCH 114

Architecture: Culture and Community

2

General Ed.

Social Issues

4

MATH 108*

Introductory College Mathematics, or

WRIT 140*

Writing and Critical Reasoning

4

ARCH 102bL

Architectural Design I

4

ARCH 214a

History of Architecture

4

PHYS 125L

Physics for Architects (satisfies GE Category III)

4

General Ed., or WRIT 130*

Analytical Writing

4

TOTAL

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16

SECOND YEAR

First Semester

ARCH 202aL

Architectural Design II

6

ARCH 213a

Building Structures and Seismic Design

3

ARCH 214b

History of Architecture

4

General Ed. Second Semester

4

ARCH 202bL

Architectural Design II

6

ARCH 211

Materials and Methods of Building Construction

3

ARCH 213b

Building Structures and Seismic Design

3

General Ed.

4

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THIRD YEAR

First Semester

ARCH 215

Design for the Thermal and Atmospheric Environment

3

ARCH 302aL

Architectural Design III

6

ARCH 313

Design of Building Structures

3

General Ed. Second Semester

4

ARCH 302bL

Architectural Design III

6

ARCH 315

Design for the Luminous and Sonic Environment

3

ARCH 411

Architectural Technology

3

General Ed.

4

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FOURTH YEAR At any hour of the day—or night—you

First Semester

can find students pursuing their projects in state-of-the-art facilities. Our students not only benefit from the expertise of our

ARCH 314

History of Architecture: Contemporary Issues

3

ARCH 402aL

Architectural Design IV

6

ARCH 525

Professional Practice: Pre-Design, Project and Office Administration

faculty but also from interaction with their

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Electives

creative and energetic fellow students.

Second Semester

“Today, those coming out of the school promise to be a great part of the future. They are helping firms to change with the times.”

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ARCH 402bL

Architectural Design IV

ARCH 526

Professional Practice: Legal and Economic Context, Project

WRIT 340

16

6

Documentation

3

Advanced Writing

4

Electives

3

16

FIFTH YEAR

First Semester

ARCH 402cL

Architectural Design IV

6

Electives

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CHESTER (CHET) WIDOM, FAIA, (B.S.ARCH.

Second Semester

1962), founding partner, Widom Wein Cohen O’Leary Terasawa (WWCOT)

ARCH 501

Comprehensive Studio Support and Enrichment

2

ARCH 502aL

Architectural Design V

6

Electives

8

TOTAL MINIMUM UNITS REQUIRED

16 160

students must enroll in WRIT 140 in fall except those who are required to take MATH 108. These students *mustAll take WRIT 130 the following spring.

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Minor Programs

The curriculum includes a core program in the first two years identical to the Bachelor of Architecture professional degree program. In the second two years, students explore many aspects of architecture and related fields and develop individual strengths and interests. Students take a specialization course in the second year, which introduces them to related fields and alternative degree options. Students, who do not wish to pursue the five-year Bachelor of Architecture, can elect to move into the four-year, non-professional Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies (B.S. in A.S.) program with a degree plan identifying electives that fulfill an area of concentration. The four-year program concludes with a seminar, which allows all degree candidates to work collaboratively on areas of common interest. Degree Requirements School of Architecture Courses Design Technology History/Theory Design Communication Professional Practice Capstone Seminar Professional Electives

89 Units 20 21 15 2 6 4 21

Other Courses General Education (incl. PHYS 125L) Writing Requirement Mathematics Free Electives

39 Units 24 8 4 3

Total Units Required

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Bachelor of Landscape Architecture The degree program in landscape architecture provides students with the ability to critically examine and creatively respond to a wide array of environmental issues and purposes. Because new professionals face challenges such as working in interdisciplinary fields, mediating between the goals of diverse groups and generating creative solutions, the program helps students develop the skills and abilities necessary to flourish in such a setting.

Minor in Architecture A minor in architecture provides students with the option of enhancing a major with an area of specialization. Since the USC School of Architecture is one of the top-rated schools in the country, students not only benefit by gaining rich theoretical knowledge and valuable skills, but also learn from some of the region’s top architects, designers and writers, many of whom balance teaching with active practices. The minor is not available to architecture majors.

The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture is a fouryear program of lectures, seminars and studio courses in conjunction with general university studies. Through academic research, personal participation and group projects, students learn about historic and contemporary issues in landscape architecture. To take advantage of our location in the very heart of an exuberant and dynamic metropolitan area—Southern California—their projects will focus on designing spaces in the urban landscape.

See http://arch.usc.edu/Programs/Undergraduate/

Degree Requirements School of Architecture Courses Design Technology History/Theory Design Communication Professional Practice

93 Units 44 26 18 2 3

Other Courses General Education Writing Requirement Free Electives

37 Units 24 8 5

Total Units Required

Minors for the course requirements for this 20-unit minor.

Minor in Landscape Architecture The landscape architecture minor provides students with the ability to integrate the natural and cultural profession of landscape architecture into their course of study. Students learn about natural resources and their importance in the built environment as well as the art of the garden in literature, music, painting and sculpture. This is an excellent emphasis for students in environmental studies, civil engineering, planning and anthropology, as well as anyone who is interested in the relationship between nature and the built environment. The minor is not available to architecture majors. See http://arch.usc.edu/Programs/Undergraduate/ Minors for the course requirements for this 23-unit minor.

130 Units

128 Units

For complete degree requirements, see http://arch.usc.edu (choose Programs).

U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE

MINOR PROGRAMS

Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies This four-year, non-professional architectural studies degree program provides specialization in related fields and an alternative path to graduate studies in architecture and other design fields. Students accepted into the professional Bachelor of Architecture program are eligible to elect this degree option at the end of the second year of study.


Degree Programs

Graduate We offer interrelated graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture, building science and historic preservation, as well as dual degree programs with the USC School of Policy, Planning, and Development.

Thesis or directed research option In addition to the opportunity to initiate an independent thesis, students have the option to undertake independent design research related to important urban projects already in progress within the school. Whichever option students choose, they are supported in their work by a three-member faculty advisory team including a principal critic.

The Master of Architecture program will: s 0ROVIDE STUDENTS WITH A COMPETITIVE EDGE OF advanced knowledge and skill. s /FFER STUDY CHOICES THAT SUPPORT CAREER INTERESTS and address societal issues. s -AKE THE ,OS !NGELES REGION FULLY AVAILABLE AS A laboratory for advanced architectural studies.

These programs are designed for students who hold either pre-professional or professional degrees in the appropriate fields. Within an overall framework that includes environmental, social and cultural imperatives, each of the graduate programs emphasizes issues of architecture and urban design. The graduate programs help prepare the next generation of urban architects, urban landscape architects and urban designer-planners by equipping them with a strong set of principles that will help them form inspiring visions of the future. The school’s faculty works closely with students to cover topics of mutual interest including: historic preservation, housing, specific building types, design process, digital communications, building technology, urban place design and landscape architecture. Master of Architecture Two programs are offered: 1. Master of Architecture in American Architecture and Urbanism Track: The +2 Program, which is NAAB-accredited, is for students with preprofessional architecture degrees. 2. Master of Architecture: Post-Professional program is for students who already hold a professional degree such as the Bachelor of Architecture or its equivalent. These programs focus on architecture in cities throughout the world where conditions of increasing density require creative ways to support amenity, sustainability and cultural meaning. This can prove a serious task given modern cities’ issues with disconnectedness, haphazard development and wastefulness of natural resources.

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16 units of approved electives. The typical length of the program is one-and-a-half years.

Master of Architecture in American Architecture and Urbanism Track: The +2 Program To be eligible for this program, students must already hold four-year architectural studies degrees from U.S. schools with accredited professional architecture programs or from international programs that are deemed equivalent. All students must start their studies in the fall semester and must be in residence for a minimum of two years (four semesters). Students must meet established standards for graduate study at USC, and complete 64 credit units, including prerequisite basic studies, and 48 units of graduate-level courses including advanced studies and approved electives. The typical length of the program is two years. Thesis or directed research option M. Arch. +2 students may elect to do an independent thesis or Directed Design Research project (DDR). The independent thesis or DDR option allows students to substitute ARCH 693abL or ARCH 695abL for 12 units of electives. This option requires residency of a minimum of five instead of four semesters.

Master of Architecture/Master of Planning Graduates of this dual degree program are especially qualified for careers in major urban development, planning and urban design, redevelopment, traditional professional practice, research and teaching. Candidates for admission must already possess a professional degree in architecture. Qualified students who are admitted to the graduate programs in both the School of Architecture and the School of Policy, Planning, and Development may complete both degrees in a highly integrated five-semester program. Completion of the dual degree requires 72 units, including 36 units in architecture and 36 units in planning. Master of Building Science Our building science and technology program recognizes that designing exemplary buildings requires good judgment and the knowledge to creatively use architectural technology. The program emphasizes: s INTEGRATING PLANNING DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY FOR the appropriate construction of urban sites. s RECOGNIZING THE ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE OF energy-conscious design and construction and the high social value of places where natural forces and systems are being used. s DEVELOPING RESEARCH AND DESIGN METHODS SUITED to the complexity of building in urban settings. Studies revolve around each student’s thesis and are supported by research seminars and electives from architecture, engineering and other related fields.

Master of Architecture: Post-Professional Candidates for admission must hold a five-year Bachelor of Architecture degree or its equivalent. To earn the degree, students must complete 48 units, including 20 units of specified courses, 12 units of thesis or directed design research and

The Master of Building Science program is intended for students with degrees in architecture, engineering or related areas. The typical program length is two years and requires 48 units, including 16 units of specified courses, one research seminar, 17 units of elective courses and 15 units of thesis.

For complete degree requirements, see http://arch.usc.edu (choose Programs/Graduate Degrees and Certificates). See page 10 for the NAAB accreditation statement.

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For students who have completed a four-year Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, or the equivalent, with no prior degree in landscape architecture, architecture or environmental design, the typical program length is three years and requires 96 units, including 62 units of specified courses and 24 units of electives. Students who have completed a non-accredited, pre-professional undergraduate degree in architecture, landscape architecture or environmental design may be granted advanced placement in a 64-unit, two-year sequence of studies. Those who hold an accredited Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree or the equivalent may be granted advanced standing in a post-professional 48-unit, three-semester sequence of studies. Master of Landscape Architecture/ Master of Planning Graduates of this dual degree program are especially qualified for careers in major design firms, urban development companies, planning and design agencies, and research and teaching. Qualified students who are admitted to the graduate program in both the School of Architecture and the School of Policy, Planning, and Development may complete both degrees in a highly integrated five-semester program.

Completion of the dual degrees requires 66 units, including 32 units of landscape architecture courses, 24 units of courses in urban planning and 10 units of directed research option I or thesis option II. Master of Historic Preservation Because of the city’s diversity of cultures and exciting architectural history, Los Angeles presents an ideal laboratory for students to explore new approaches to historic preservation. Students can research areas such as the recent past and the preservation and economic revitalization of communities and cultural landscapes. Ongoing activities at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Freeman House and Greene and Greene’s Gamble House, both of which are operated by the USC School of Architecture, also provide students with exciting opportunities for hands-on study of preservation philosophy and cutting-edge conservation technologies.

ELIZABETH VALMONT (B.Arch. 2003, M.B.S.

2005), associate, Arup “The School of Architecture is very dedicated to the graduate program. It built an entirely new facility for graduate students. Everyone at the school is really willing to work with us and listen to our ideas.”

The primary objective of the Master of Historic Preservation is for students to become familiar with the philosophy, theory and practice of the historic preservation movement. Through this program, students gain a broad practical knowledge of the laws, regulations and policies that apply to preservation practice in the Southern California region and the United States. Students also learn how to apply the appropriate government standards for documenting, designating, preserving and rehabilitating a broad range of historic and cultural resources, including structures, districts and landscapes.

BRAD ZUGER (M.Arch. 2008)

“Every urban project is an integral part of the city. The school is extraordinarily positioned at the center of Los Angeles. For architecture, this is particularly consequential.” PROFESSOR EMERITUS ROBERT S. HARRIS,

FAIA, former Dean of the School of Architecture

Students are taught to understand American and Southern California architectural history and the critical methodological tools necessary to investigate, interpret and evaluate these built environments. They also learn the criteria and processes necessary for listing a property in the National Register of Historic Places or as a state or local landmark. In addition, they gain a working knowledge of the fundamental economic strategies, standards and guidelines that apply to financing and developing historic preservation projects. The typical program length is two years, although students may apply for advanced standing. Completion of this degree requires 48 units, including 21 units of specified courses, 8 units of thesis preparation and thesis, and 19 units of elective courses as approved by the program director.

U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Master of Landscape Architecture At the center of an unparalleled multicultural region, USC offers an international laboratory for the study of place in an extraordinary landscape within a great urban university. Our landscape architecture program focuses on urban placemaking in relation to three principles: s /UR PROGRAMS ARE GEARED TOWARD STUDENTS WHO already have earned a first degree or the equivalent in landscape architecture or architecture, and students who have obtained a degree in another field. s 7E EMPHASIZE URBAN LANDSCAPES AND THE REsponsibility of design professions to create quality and meaning for our urban futures. Students learn that landscape planning and design must address projects at every scale from the garden to the region. s 7E BELIEVE THAT PLACE MAKING IS FUNDAMENtally a collaborative responsibility that requires leadership from professionals across the entire domain of planning and design.

“Nothing parallels my experience in the Master of Building Science program. We had a small program with faculty dedicated to us. It was almost like private tutoring. Our instructors were gurus in the field. It was the graduate building science program that really made me an architect.”


Degree Programs I Ph.D.

Certificates

Ph.D. in Architecture

Certificates

Our certificate programs offer graduate students the opportunity to supplement their master’s emphasis with an additional specialization. Completion of these programs requires a minimum of 16 units.

The USC Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Architecture addresses the rapidly growing global demand for leaders in environmental design research. The USC Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Architecture addresses the rapidly growing global demand for leaders in environmental design research. Our highly qualified faculty guide students through a rigorous and highly demanding program of advanced study and original research. The program is committed to the highest standards of academic achievement. Admitted students are exceptionally well-prepared to structure and communicate ideas and to make scholarly contributions to the built environment discipline. Re-established in 2008, the Ph.D. program is an umbrella degree designed to grow into additional areas of specialization as the graduate program positions appropriate course work, faculty and research support. As we develop the program, we will build in the strengths of the previous Doctor of Building Science degree that was established in the mid-1960s.

Certificate in Building Science This certificate is a supplementary credential for graduate students studying architecture, landscape architecture, historic preservation, urban planning or related disciplines. Practicing design and planning professionals with undergraduate or graduate degrees and related experience can also benefit from this program. Certificate in Historic Preservation This certificate is geared toward practicing professionals who wish to obtain an academic credential and graduate students who wish to obtain a complementary credential to a degree. Students examine the history and philosophy of historic preservation, and learn about a broad range of issues associated with the conservation of our cultural heritage. To help working professionals, required classes are scheduled as evening sessions.

The Ph.D. program encourages an attitude that USC President Steven B. Sample describes as “breadth with depth.� Students are expected to have a broad education, skills and experience. We actively seek candidates from around the world, and we encourage participation in our graduate overseas programs.

The program is structured around intensive seminars and an individualized course of study. Students will gain a fundamental knowledge of building science and technology including advanced analytical and research methods. Students are expected to master a defined field of scholarship that enables critical inquiry required by research. Graduate certificate programs offer students the opportunity to establish additional areas of expertise. After completion of course work, the program culminates in the development of a dissertation of original scholarly research guided by a faculty team. The Doctor of Philosophy is awarded to students who complete a substantial dissertation of original research that adds new knowledge to the field.

Certificate in Landscape Architecture Studies Students study the local urban development including design and construction on previously undeveloped sites and the redevelopment of highly urbanized areas. Students learn about microclimate in medium- to high-density environments; plant materials suitable to urban conditions; urban utility and transportation systems relating to natural drainage and pathways; social and community organization; wildlife and plant communities; as well as concerns about policy, design and the development process.

Ph.D. candidates are colleagues of the faculty and are expected to contribute to and foster the intellectual community of the USC School of Architecture. Candidates will be prepared to function in research, academic and professional environments as university faculty, consultants, professionals and scientific researchers. Faculty and students are held to the highest standards of academic excellence and environmental ethics that help create the quality of experience expected at one of the world’s finest universities. The Ph.D. degree in Architecture requires a minimum of 72 units of graduate level course work including the dissertation and has a minimum residency requirement of three years. Students must complete all required course work within five years, and the maximum time for the completion of all requirements for the doctoral degree is eight years.

The Ph.D. program seeks to address serious challenges and global implications. Examples of current research interests by the USC School of Architecture faculty include: s 3USTAINABILITY s $IGITAL MEDIA > GO

s 3OLAR ACCESS s "UILDING SKINS s 3EISMIC DESIGN s &ABRIC STRUCTURES s $IGITAL FABRICATION s 0ERFORMATIVE ARCHITECTURE s -ATERIALS AND ASSEMBLIES s ,IGHTING$AYLIGHTING'LARE s "UILDING INFORMATION MODELING s (ISTORIC STRUCTURES TECHNOLOGY s #ABLE SUSPENDED GLASS SKINS s !RCHITECTURAL SCIENCE EDUCATION s )NTEGRATED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

Certificate in Architecture and Urbanism This certificate is on architecture in cities throughout the world where conditions of increasing density require creative ways to support amenity, sustainability and cultural meaning. This can prove a serious task given modern cities’ issues with disconnectedness, haphazard development and wastefulness of natural resources.

For complete degree requirements, see http://arch.usc.edu (choose Programs/PhDinArchitecture).

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Faculty Here’s what our students say about their faculty members’ dedication, enthusiasm

Leading Urban Architecture Its Los Angeles location gives USC a competitive edge in attracting faculty who combine professional expertise with innovative research.

and knowledge: “The quality of the faculty has been beyond my expectations,” says Rayah Al-Sabah, a recent graduate from Kuwait. Fifth-year undergraduate Alex Whitehead draws inspiration from his instructors. “The professors are really excited about teaching and are really passionate about architecture,” he says. “They care a lot about the students.”

The majority of our faculty are active members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), 15 are distinguished Fellows of AIA (FAIA), two belong to the Royal Institute of British Architects and three to the American Society of Landscape Architects. Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient Chris Martin, FAIA, says: “The outstanding quality of the school’s faculty coupled with the opportunity of being located in Los Angeles, one of the

most important international cities in the world today, creates the ideal architectural education experience.”

Nathan Thome, a recent graduate, appreciates the encouragement and the insights. “The school and the instructors really encourage freedom of ideas,” says

The school employs 28 full-time faculty members who specialize in design, history and technology. They teach in their specialty area and each has a unique profile of creative work and/or scholarly research.

Nathan, who is from Hollister, California. “You are not taught just how to build a building but how to design a building.”

The numerous outstanding practitioners in the Southern California region make it possible for us to recruit top professionals to teach in parttime positions. These part-time faculty members bring topical and important new projects into the classroom.

FACULTY

At the USC School of Architecture, students work with an internationally distinguished faculty of practicing professionals and scholarly researchers. Most are active in their professional practices or head important research programs.

Our Faculty PROFESSORS

VISITING ASSOCIATE

ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE

LECTURERS

Leonard Marvin

Kim Coleman

PROFESSOR

PROFESSORS

Carlo Aiello

Lauren Matchison

Diane Ghirardo, Ph.D.

Jennifer Siegal

Gerdo Aquino, ASLA

Michael Arden

Lisa Matthiessen

Kara Bartelt

Victoria Behner

Scott Mitchell

VISITING ASSISTANT

Jeff Guh, Ph.D.

Vinayak Bharne

Brendan Muha

PROFESSORS

Yo-ichiro Hakomori,

Justin Brechtel

Aaron Neubert

Laurel Broughton

Sandra Novales

Michael Hricak, FAIA

Daniel Carper

Jay Platt

Michael Lehrer, FAIA

Mina Chow, AIA

Linda C. Samuels

Qingyun Ma, AIA John V. Mutlow, FAIA, RIBA Victor Regnier, FAIA

Kristine Mun

Goetz Schierle,

Troy Peters

Ph.D., FAIA

Ph.D., AIA

Marc Schiler, FASES, LC

PROFESSOR OF

Doris Sung

Mario Cipresso, AIA

Susanna Seierup

James Steele, Ph.D

PRACTICE IN

Paul R.Tang

Victoria Coaloa

Colin Sieburgh

ARCHITECTURE

Warren Techentin

Christopher Coe, FAIA

Joe Sturges

Stefano de Martino

Olivier Touraine

Rick Corsini

Christopher Warren

James Tyler, FAIA

John Dutton, AIA

John Wilson

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Dimitry Vergun

Liz Falletta

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Charles A. Lagreco, AIA Graeme Morland, AIA, RIBA

OF PRACTICE IN

Ed Woll, Ph.D., AIA

Michael Ferguson

EMERITUS PROFESSORS

Amy Murphy

ARCHITECTURE

Eui-Sung Yi

Hunter Fleetwood

Frank Dimster, FAIA

Douglas Noble,

Alice Kimm, FAIA

Miller Fong

Robert S. Harris, FAIA

Ph.D., FAIA

ADJUNCT ASSISTANT

Emily Gabel-Luddy

Ralph L. Knowles

ASSISTANT

PROFESSORS

Sophia Gruzdys

Roger Sherwood

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

PROFESSORS

Andrew Atwood

Eric Haas

Rachel Berney, Ph.D.

OF PRACTICE IN

Valery Augustin

Peyton Hall, FAIA

VISITING CRITICS

Gail Peter Borden, AIA

ARCHITECTURE

Tigran Ayrapetyan

Ying-Yu Hung, ASLA

Hagy Belzberg, FAIA

Kenneth Breisch, Ph.D.

Lee Olvera

Michael Chung

Jeffrey Kim

Kevin Daly

Anders Carlson, Ph.D.

Selwyn Ting, AIA

Janek Dombrowa

Christine Lampert,

John Frane

John Enright, AIA

Anthony Guida

David Gerber, D.Des.

ADJUNCT PROFESSORS

Victor Jones

Douglas A. Campbell,

Karen Kensek Greg Otto VISITING PROFESSORS Scott Johnson, FAIA

Christoph Kapeller,

AIA, NCARB

Stephan Henrich

Steffen Leisner

Mia Lehrer

Andrew Liang

John Lesak

Geoff Manaugh

Regula F. Campbell, AIA

Erik Mar

Edward Lifson

Lorcan O’Herlihy

Mark Cigolle

Anna Neimark

Rebecca Lowry

Hadrian Predock

Robert Perry

Alexander Robinson

Esther Margulies

Francois Roche

David Martin, FAIA

Roland Snooks

ASLA

David C. Martin, FAIA; Scott Johnson, FAIA; and Michael Lehrer, FAIA.

David Gray, AIA

Kenny Lee

AIA, ZT

Faculty members include (top to bottom):

Neil Leach U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE


Study Abroad

Extending Boundaries With our international focus, we give our students the tools they need to succeed in an increasingly global practice and economy. Fall Program in Asia: Emphasis on China and Urbanism The Asia Architecture and Urbanism program provides fourth- and fifth-year students the opportunity to engage and comprehend the full depth and global ramifications of the rapid changes that are taking place in China and other cities in Asia. Though the program will be anchored in Shanghai, China, urban/design workshops will take place in Tokyo, Japan; Seoul, South Korea; Hong Kong; and Shenzhen, China. Enrichment excursions will also take the students to Sendai, Yokohama, Kyoto, Paju, Beijing, Nanjing, Suzhou and Xi’an.

Barcelona is a city committed to a culture of visual design that has realized many ambitious urban plans, growing from its commitment to representing national pride. It is a dynamic site for the study of ancient and contemporary urbanism, as it has achieved world-class status among cities as a locus for new world architecture. The program will combine fieldwork, precedent analysis and discussions with the broader design community in Barcelona.

Fall Program in Spain: Barcelona The Barcelona program provides a course of study in urbanism and architecture of the city for fourth- and fifth-year students. The goal is to provide a broad overview of that city’s major urban and architectural sites, topography and systems of urban organization. Students will be immersed in the issues of urban design and architecture that have shaped the city and will develop critical thinking and methodologies of analysis by designing in the urban context. The course of study will examine Barcelona’s fascinating culture, which is committed to design and architectural practices that engage and challenge European traditional and modernist orthodoxies.

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“My education at the USC School of Architecture not only gave me confidence in my profession but also the direction to find answers. These tools are the greatest part of my education.” ANTHONY A. MARNELL II (B.Arch. 1972), principal, Marnell

Corrao Associates, Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient

Students will engage in the transformative forces of urbanism and built environments to mediate the spectrum between universal civilization and the indigenous particularities of place and culture. Students will be taught to observe and synthesize the similarities and differences that exist between their own social/cultural norms and the critical means for thinking about architecture and the city. This challenges their assumptions and expands their horizons, which is the very essence of an exceptional education. Students will bring this knowledge and point of view back to the school after their semester away and expand the discussion of urbanism to the larger community of students and faculty at the School of Architecture.

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The program offers strong relationships with the place, its people and its culture and allows time for study in Rome, Florence and Venice, as well as travel and study opportunities in Austria, Switzerland, France and Germany.

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Examples of public space and architecture from antiquity to the 21st century will be studied as part of the context of a city that has successfully projected its future without neglecting its past and present. Visits are planned within Spain (Madrid, Northern Spain and Southern Spain) and throughout Europe (Amsterdam, Utrecht, Rotterdam and Paris) to expose students to the full range of historical and contemporary architecture. Spring Semester in Italy: Milan-Como Anthony A. Marnell II Italian Architecture Studies Program The spring semester program in Como, Italy, offers fourth- and fifth-year students an opportunity to study in classrooms and studios in the Villa Olmo, a beautiful 19th century neoclassical building overlooking Lake Como. Como, a small town that dates back to the Roman era, is located about 30 miles from Milan. It has the form and appearance of a medieval city but includes significant modern work, including that of Giuseppe Terragni, a pioneer of the Italian rationalist movement. Instructors conduct classes in a highly integrated studio format reminiscent of the great European design studios. Students study the spatial organization of European cities, which introduces them to new concepts of urbanism and gives them a sense of how history and culture influence patterns of settlement. The contrast with conventional U.S. cities is dramatic and powerful. These differences often emerge later in students’ studio work as new ways of conceptualizing design solutions.

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and sponsor of endowed scholarship for Semester in Italy program

Summer Semester in Asia: Emphasis on Southeast Asia and Development Established in 1998, the summer program in Asia includes two weeks in Japan; two weeks in Shanghai, China; and the balance of the semester in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Recent graduate Merissa Periana says the Asia trip was the highlight of her USC experience: “It was the best thing I have done in college.” Accompanied by USC faculty, students first visit Japan for two weeks, beginning in Kyoto to study the rich history of the nation there. They move to Tokyo for the second week, visiting the offices of several important architects, and then go to China for 10 days, starting in Beijing and then moving to Pingyao, Shanghai and Suzhou before going to Hong Kong. A week in Vietnam, split between Hanoi and Saigon, is followed by three days in Siem Reap, Cambodia, where students visit the Khmer monuments, such as Angkor Wat. Arriving in Malaysia in late June, students join their counterparts from the Universiti Malaya to work on a studio project chosen from the local context. While in Malaysia they take field trips to Penang, Malacca and Singapore and visit many local firms.

Please note: Specific locations for the School of Architecture international programs are subject to change. Please see arch.usc.edu/ Programs/Undergraduate/StudyAbroad for additional information.

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Valencia, Spain

Como, Italy

Bergenz, Germany

STUDY ABROAD

ASIA: Penang

U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE


Facilties and Services

State-of-the-Art Facilities Students have 24-7 access to their studios and personal workstations. The Architecture Campus Located in the Harris Hall and Watt Hall complex, the School of Architecture comprises over 50,000 square feet of design studios, classrooms, galleries, workshops and laboratories specifically designed to offer a stimulating learning environment and support our activities.

where students have the space to construct fullsize and scale representations in metal, plastic and wood. The school also operates a state-of-the-art photography facility with a variety of equipment, darkrooms and a model shooting room for student use. Computer Facilities The School of Architecture believes strongly in using computers as tools for studying architecture. Computer applications can augment students’ drawing and model-building skills and support additional design exploration.

From the first day of design studio until graduation, all our students have their own design workstations. The workstations provide personal storage, a task chair, access to highspeed computing via both wired and wireless connections, and shared school-supplied peripherals and electrical service. Students have 24-hour, seven-days-a-week access to their studios and workstations.

In spring 2006, construction was completed on the Robert H. Timme Architectural Research Center. This 22,000-square-foot addition to Watt Hall provides much needed space for the graduate programs. In addition to studio space, the new third floor provides faculty offices, research suites, “sky gardens” and review spaces. Recent graduate Yunnan Allen appreciates the facility: “With all the graduate programs on the third floor, there are a lot of opportunities to interact with other graduate students and take part in different seminars.”

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The Gamble House, a national historic landmark, is recognized internationally as a masterpiece of the turn-of-the-century Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. The house, built in 1908 for David and Mary Gamble of the Proctor and Gamble Company, is the most complete and bestpreserved example of the architecture and interior design work of brothers Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene. Describing her experience, recent graduate Michelle Costamagna says: “Living in the Gamble House was an amazing, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The architecture of the house is really inspiring. I found something new every day.” The Freeman House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, is one of the most interesting examples of his textile block period. Given to the School of Architecture by Harriet Freeman in 1984, it contains one of the best collections of custom-designed Rudolph Schindler furniture. continued on page 22

Helen Topping Architecture and Fine Arts Library Watt Hall features the Helen Topping Architecture and Fine Arts Library, a fully computerized facility that contains one of the most comprehensive architectural book, journal and slide collections in

In addition, our facilities include a workshop for model-making, a welding facility and a yard,

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Our facilities feature computer output centers equipped with large-format printers to print students’ presentation materials and CAD drawings. Students can easily connect to the Internet, thanks to our wireless network infrastructure throughout the studios and campus, and can access CAD software, antivirus and online security software via the school and university systems. They also have the convenience of computer labs, scanners and printers right in the design studios. Resources such as input and output devices, highend computer systems and special interest hardware are also available. Students also have access to software such as 3D Studio, AutoCAD, FormZ and Sketch UP as well as a wide range of leading-edge technologies for simulations of sun, wind and seismic conditions.

The complex also features the Helen Lindhurst Architecture Gallery, the Verle Annis Gallery and the Rosendin Atrium, which display architectural exhibitions and host student presentations and reviews.

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Historic Landmarks The Greene and Greene Gamble House and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Freeman House are two jewels in our historic preservation program. Both landmarks are available to students and faculty for study, research and events. Each year, two USC architecture students are awarded fellowships to live at the Gamble House as part of the Scholar in Residence Program.

“Computer applications are fully integrated into the curriculum and are used from the first day students attend class,” says Professor Douglas Noble. “We are solidly digital and expose the students to a wide variety of design software. We want to graduate people with lots of knowledge about different software programs.”

The Harris and Watt Hall complex is situated around three landscaped courtyards that provide outdoor spaces for socializing and relaxing. The courtyards are often the setting for design studio meetings, drawing class sessions or facultystudent coffee breaks.

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the United States. The library houses over 75,000 volumes including many original rare books. The slide library is in the process of digitizing many of its more than 300,000 slides. The collection is particularly strong in modern, Renaissance and Southern California architecture. Homer, the library’s online catalogue, provides access to the library system’s holdings from any branch on campus as well as from a student’s personal computer. Students can access more than 300 electronic databases, such as the Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals, art and popular culture indexes, and many journals online.

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U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE

FACILITIES AND SERVICES

Greene and Greene Gamble House


Facilities and Services

ORGANIZATIONS Students serve on many committees, actively participating in the school’s direction and development. USC School of Architecture’s organizations include:

The house has been the subject of research grants from the Getty Foundation, the Andy Warhol Foundation and the Domino Foundation. The school recently completed a $1 million-plus structural and seismic upgrade on the home. When restoration work is completed, the Freeman house will function as a residence for students and distinguished visitors as well as a setting for small seminars and meetings.

and field trips, the program also exposes them to some of the most dramatic and impressive architecture of Los Angeles.

Student Support Services Through our Student Advisement office, two academic advisors counsel students on degree requirements for their majors and minors. Our academic advisors also provide information and assistance with financial aid, general university policies and programs, and act as liaisons between students and other university offices to resolve problems.

According to program director and alumnus Paul Tang, students learn what it takes to go to the USC School of Architecture. “They learn that the program is not just about making buildings but about creating spaces and learning ways of creative problem-solving,” says Professor Tang, who is also the second-year undergraduate coordinator.

The goal of the program is to help students make educated decisions regarding their career directions while providing them with a wide exposure to the diverse and colorful surroundings of Los Angeles.

Since 1982, this highly successful program at the USC School of Architecture has developed into one of the most comprehensive and rewarding programs of its kind.

Mentor Program Since 1993, the Architectural Guild Mentor Program has paired students with professionals in the field of architecture.

s !LPHA 2HO #HI !08 A PROFESSIONAL COED architecture fraternity s !MERICAN )NSTITUTE OF !RCHITECTURE Students (AIAS) s !SSOCIATION OF 'RADUATE !RCHITECTURE

Career Resources We provide students and alumni with numerous resources to assist them with their professional development and employment efforts including counseling, electronic job listings, workshops, an internship program and firm fairs. A unique opportunity we provide each year to graduates is a résumé book. Our graduates submit their résumés, which are collated into books with degree- and region-related indexes. We then mail the books to over 2,000 firms nationally.

Mentors promote students’ academic, social and career development and foster an association between education and the industry. Mentors such as Tom Wulf, alumnus and senior vice president of Lowe Enterprises Real Estate Group, speak highly of the program: “The mentor program can be a great benefit and a great asset.”

Students s !SSOCIATION FOR 7OMEN IN !RCHITECTURE (AWA) s )LLUMINATING %NGINEERS 3OCIETY )%3 s 3TUDENT #OUNCIL OFlCERS ELECTED BY THE student body) s 4AU 3IGMA $ELTA (ONOR 3OCIETY s 53# !RCHITECTURAL 'UILD 3TUDENT Representatives

The Mentor Program provides students with opportunities to learn about the profession and to meet mentors outside the classroom who can offer guidance, share personal and professional experiences, and serve as role models. Students can seek advice from their mentors about the direction they would like to take in their profession or request assistance with résumés, cover letters and portfolio preparation.

The Student Council president, vice president and a representative from each design studio attend faculty meetings, allowing the faculty to regularly hear student concerns and viewpoints. In addition, the students elect a Student Council representative to attend meetings of the Executive Committee, which oversees policy-making, budget and faculty hiring for the school. Student members of the

Through the USC Architectural Guild, students can participate in Lunch with the Guild, an event that helps them build relationships with practicing professionals. The Guild also sponsors résumé and portfolio workshops and partners with our Student Affairs office to match students with mentors.

Curriculum Committee give their input on curricular matters. Students are also

Exploration of Architecture Summer Program for High School Students The USC Exploration of Architecture summer high school program provides students from across the country and the world with an in-depth introduction to the world of architecture and the architectural education experience. High school students live on campus in a USC residence hall during the two- and four-week programs. They participate in studio classes with professional critics and present their ideas in review sessions attended by parents and friends. Through case studies, sketching exercises

chosen to sit on the board of the USC Architectural Guild. The USC Chapter of AIAS provides a forum for students to interact outside the classroom while reinforcing their education. The chapter includes non-members in its activities and maintains a strong commitment to serving the community. They participate in university-sponsored programs as well as their own.

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We are committed to helping students understand the numerous career opportunities available to them. We can help them tailor career plans and job searches to meet their needs and make connections with the numerous members of the Trojan Family—members who understand that a USC Architecture degree gives our graduates the skills necessary to be leaders and to make significant contributions.

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Scholarships

Financial Aid

Scholarships at the USC School of Architecture

s 4HE !LTOON 0ORTER !RCHITECTS Scholarship s %LIZABETH 2EED !NNIS %NDOWED Scholarship s 6ERLE , !NNIS -EMORIAL Scholarship s 6ERLE AND %LIZABETH !NNIS 'RANT s 0ROFESSORS #LAYTON "ALDWIN AND Raymond Kennedy Memorial Scholarship

USC has a long tradition of fully meeting the USC-determined financial need for undergraduate students who satisfy all eligibility requirements and deadlines.

s 4HE $OROTHY 3 "LESSINGTON Memorial Scholarship s $R &RED "LOCK AND (UGO "LOCK Scholarship s 4HOMAS / "YERTS -EMORIAL

USC offers a variety of ways to pay for college, including installment plans, prepayment plans and long-term financing options. Students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and must meet all other eligibility requirements, to be eligible for federal, state and university financial aid programs.

Scholarship s #ANNON $ESIGN %NDOWED Scholarship s !DOLFO #RUZ -EMORIAL Scholarship s !RTHUR # %CKNER -EMORIAL Scholarship s -ARTIN " 'ELBER &!)!

Most domestic graduate students who demonstrate financial need and meet all eligibility requirements and deadlines may qualify for low-interest loans and work-study programs. International graduate students are not eligible for university financial aid. The School of Architecture awards substantial scholarships for both domestic and international students. All applicants to our programs are automatically evaluated for scholarship consideration.

Scholarship s 'ENSLER53# !RCHITECTURAL Guild Scholarship honoring the professional legacy of Marvin Taff, FAIA s "ARRY 'ITTLESON !WARD s , !NTHONY 'REENBERG Memorial Scholarship s 4 'EORGE (AYAKAWA Commemorative Scholarship s $AMON (EIN 3CHOLARSHIP IN Landscape Architecture

Individuals or groups fund many awards to honor or memorialize an alumnus or a school faculty member. Endowed funds provide annual student awards at the school in perpetuity. USC School of Architecture students may apply directly to several outside agencies, which also provide scholarship awards.

s 4HE &RANZ (ERDING -EMORIAL Fellowships s (/+ %NDOWED 3CHOLARSHIP IN Sustainable Design s *%,$ 7EN )NC 'RADUATE Fellowship s #AREY + *ENKINS -EMORIAL Scholarship

In addition to applying for need-based aid through the USC Office of Financial Aid, our continuing undergraduate students can apply for various donor supported scholarships each year through the School of Architecture Scholarship Application.

s 3 +ENNETH *OHNSON -EMORIAL Scholarship s 1UINCY *ONES -EMORIAL Scholarship s 2OBERT ! +ENNARD -EMORIAL Scholarship s *AMES ! +NOWLES -EMORIAL

s 'ERALYN ,AMBSON %NDOWED Scholarship s 7ILLIAM ,ANDWORTH -EMORIAL Prize s !LVIN 9 ,EE 3CHOLARSHIP s !NTHONY ! -ARNELL ))  Architectural Guild Scholarship Endowment s 'EORGE ( -AYR &OUNDATION Scholarships s 3ALVATORE -ERENDINO Scholarship s 2ICK AND .ANCY -UTH Scholarship Fund in Memory of Mike Rhodes

ENDOWED TRAVELING FELLOWSHIPS s 4HE !VI %FRAIM 'ESUNDHEIT Traveling Fellowship s *ON !DAMS *ERDE &!)!  53# Architectural Guild Traveling Fellowship s #HASE , ,EAVITT 4RAVELING Fellowship s 'EORGE ( -AYR &OUNDATION  USC Architectural Guild Traveling Fellowship s 7ILLIAM AND .EOME 4IMME Traveling Fellowship in Landscape Architecture

s 0ROFESSOR *OHN 6 -UTLOW Scholarship in Housing s /RANGE #OUNTY 4ROJAN ,EAGUE Internship at the California Science Center s *OHN 0ARKINSON -EMORIAL Scholarships s ,OWELL 3 0IDGEON -EMORIAL

ANNUAL AWARDS s *OHN # !BSMEIER )NTERNATIONAL Student Travel Award s !RCHITECTURAL 'UILD 3CHOLARSHIPS s (ENRY "UMSTEAD !WARD s &RIENDS OF THE 'AMBLE (OUSE Scholar in Residence Fellowships

Scholarships s 2UTH %LAINE 2EED -EMORIAL Scholarship s 6ICTOR 2EGNIER %NDOWED Scholarship s 4HE 2OCKEFELLER  (RICAK 0RIZE s 2OBERT 2OSE AND 3TAN

AWARDS AND PRIZES FROM THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE s !LPHA 2HO #HI -EDAL s !MERICAN )NSTITUTE OF !RCHITECTS School Medal s 4HE ,EE "UCKLEY %NDOWMENT

Alan Sackley Architectural

s 4HE 0HILLIP * $ANIEL !WARD

Scholarship

s 4HE #ARLOS $INIZ 0RIZE IN

s 6ICTOR 3 3AUER 3CHOLARSHIP s 'EORGE -ORGAN 3PENCER Scholarship s 7INIFRED 4 3TOCKWELL Scholarship Endowment s 4HE 4ERNSTROM %NDOWMENT s 4ED AND 2OSEMARY 4YLER Endowed Scholarship

Drawing s 4HE *OHN 2 (OLLINGSWORTH Drawing Award s 2AYMOND 3 +ENNEDY !WARD s 2OBERT !LLEN 2OGAFF -EMORIAL Award for Excellence in Delineation s 2OMA $ESIGN &ELLOWSHIP

s 5NIVERSAL 2EPRODUCTIONS -ARK Gerson Memorial Scholarship s -ARILYN -C#ARRON 5RMSTRON Scholarship s 7IDOM 7EIN #OHEN /,EARY

Terasawa Endowed Scholarship s 2OBERT AND 'RETA 7ILKENSON Scholarship s %DWARD 7ONG %NDOWED Cross-disciplinary Fellowship s 'IN 7ONG 3CHOLARSHIP

Scholarship

> GO

For more information, see http://arch.usc.edu/Resources/StudentServices.

U S C S C H O OL OF ARCHITECTURE

SCHOLARSHIPS

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS

USC administers a robust financial aid program, which includes need-based grants, merit scholarships, low-interest loans and work-study programs for undergraduates.


Alumni and the Architectural Guild PRITZKER PRIZE WINNERS The School of Architecture is extremely proud of its two Pritzker Prize laureates (and USC Architectural Guild Distinguished

Our Trojan Network

Alumnus Award recipients): Frank Gehry (1989) and Thomas Mayne (2005). “They are the last two North Americans to

Through the Architectural Guild, students make contacts, earn scholarships and gain industry knowledge.

win the prize and they are both from USC. It is an extraordinary honor,” says Professor Douglas Noble, FAIA. Often referred to as the Nobel Prize of architecture, the Pritzker Prize is awarded

The Architectural Guild Founded in 1958, the Architectural Guild not only functions as a support group for the School of Architecture, it also forms a unique link between our students and the professional community. Its members come from all aspects of the architecture, design, construction and real estate development industries.

In addition, each year the Guild chooses students to sit on the board, which meets once a month to discuss forthcoming initiatives. Student representatives organize events designed specifically for them such as office tours, construction site visits and career development programs on campus.

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presented by the Hyatt Foundation and is considered the world’s premier architecture prize.

Past Recipients of the USC Architectural Guild Distinguished Alumnus Award 1985 Jon Jerde, FAIA (B.A. 1966) 1986 Raphael S. Soriano (B.S.Arch. 1937) 1987 Frank O. Gehry, FAIA (B.Arch. 1954), Pritzker Prize Laureate 1989 1988 Emmet L. Wemple, FASLA (B.F.A. 1947) 1989 Carl Maston, FAIA (B.S.Arch. 1937) 1990 Albert C. Martin, FAIA (B.S.Arch. 1936) 1991 Robert Kennard, FAIA (B.Arch. 1949)

While attending USC, architecture students pay only $10 for an annual membership; professional members pay $250. Student members are notified of all Guild events and receive special discounts. All graduating seniors receive a complimentary membership for the year after graduation. Many continue their membership throughout their careers, finding it an excellent way to stay in touch with both the school and the professional community.

Founding member of the Guild Clinton C. Ternstrom, FAIA-E, greatly values the Guild and his education from the USC School of Architecture. “As a student at USC, I was given the tools, material and impetus to weave a rich, fulfilling fabric, which is still in my loom,” says Clinton, a 1940 graduate.

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run by the Pritzker family, the award is

“The Guild is a really strong support network that creates a bridge between students and professionals,” says John Watters, a recent graduate who received the Jon Adams Jerde, FAIA / USC Architectural Guild Traveling Fellowhip in 2006 for summer study in China, Thailand and Malaysia.

Student membership in the Guild provides opportunities for students to interact with industry professionals. “Participating in the Guild is a good way to meet the movers and shakers of Los Angeles. It gives you the opportunity to get to know professionals and for them to see you as a marketable person,” says Julie Quinnan, a 2002 graduate who works for Kaplan Gehring McCarroll Architectural Lighting.

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Created in 1979 by Jay A. Pritzker and

ALUMNI AWARDS

Says alumnus John Danielian, who works for his father’s firm Danielian and Associates: “Through the Guild I have met a lot of great people. Members are from all walks of life and disciplines so it is an incredible mix of professionals.”

The Guild sponsors a number of educational events and scholarships as well as annual traveling fellowships that allow students to study architecture and urbanism in a country of their choice. Guild events throughout the year include an annual dinner that honors a distinguished alumnus; a forum that addresses current “hot topic” issues affecting the city; the Parkinson Spirit of Urbanism Award, which is given to an individual or organization that has significantly transformed and enriched the urban fabric of Southern California; and the annual golf tournament, which supports the school’s computer-aided design programs.

annually to honor a living architect.

1992 Arthur F. O’Leary, FAIA (B.Arch. 1951) Toshikazu Terasawa, FAIA (B.Arch. 1949) 1993 William E. Blurock, FAIA (B.Arch. 1945) 1994 Conrad Buff III, FAIA (B.Arch. 1952) Donald Hensman, FAIA (B.S.Arch. 1952) Calvin Straub, FAIA (B.S.Arch. 1943) 1995 Thom Mayne, FAIA (B.Arch. 1968), Pritzker Prize Laureate 2005 1996 Chester A. Widom, FAIA (B.S.Arch. 1962) 1997 Randell Makinson, Honorary FAIA (B.Arch. 1956) 1998 Pierre Koenig, FAIA (B.Arch. 1952) 1999 Ronald A. Altoon, FAIA (B.Arch. 1968) 2000 Edward A. Killingsworth, FAIA

“The Guild is the ideal model for alumni associations. What that means for students is that whatever they need, they can get from the Guild,” says alumna Andrea Cohen Gehring, a partner/design principal in Widom Wein Cohen O’Leary Terasawa.

(B.Arch. 1940) 2001 Edward R. Niles, FAIA (B.Arch. 1963) 2002 Marvin Taff, FAIA (B.Arch. 1957) 2003 Bernard Zimmerman, FAIA (M.U.D. 1969) 2004 Henry Bumstead (B.F.A. 1937) 2005 Anthony A. Marnell II (B.Arch. 1972)

“The people who have made great strides in architecture, both in Los Angeles and internationally, have been from USC.”

2006 Christopher C. Martin, FAIA (B.S.Arch. 1974) and David C. Martin, FAIA (B.Arch. 1966) 2007 Victor A. Regnier, FAIA (M.Arch. 1973) 2008 Boris Dramov, FAIA (B.Arch. 1966) 2009 Mark Rios, FAIA, ASLA (B.S. 1978) 2010 Philip Enquist, FAIA (B.S. 1974, M.Arch. 1979)

VISITING PROFESSOR SCOTT JOHNSON, FAIA, design partner

of Johnson Fain

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USC SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 1. University Application Submit a complete application and fee to the University of Southern California Office of Admission. 2. Portfolio An online portfolio submission is required of ALL freshman and transfer applicants by the university’s application deadline. 3. Other Required Materials SAT and ACT USC requires either SAT or ACT scores (with the optional Writing test) from: s All freshman applicants attending high school in the United States (recommended for students in Canada) s All freshman applicants who attend overseas American or international schools that follow the U.S. education system s Any other freshman applicant who would like to be considered for merit scholarships s Transfer students who have accumulated fewer than 30 transferable semester units since finishing high school s For students who take the SAT more than once, USC records the highest scores for each section – Critical Reading, Mathematics and Writing – even if achieved in different sittings. For students taking the ACT, USC will record the highest composite score. SAT Subject Tests We only require SAT Subject tests from freshman applicants who do not attend a regionally accredited high school (e.g., home school, some non-accredited parochial or community based programs, even some newer schools). These students must submit three SAT Subject exams, including one in mathematics. For all other applicants, these exams are optional, but recommended.

TOEFL USC defines an international student as anyone who is not a citizen or permanent resident of the United States. American citizens who reside in other countries or who attend foreign schools are NOT considered international students. International freshman applicants whose native language is not English must take either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the SAT or ACT. International transfer applicants must take the TOEFL unless they have successfully completed, or are currently taking, a college course equivalent to USC’s freshman English composition (WRIT 130). USC does not accept the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) or the TOEIC (Test of English for International Communication). Counselor or Teacher Recommendations Transfer applicants must submit at least one and no more than three letters of recommendation directly to the School of Architecture. Freshman applicants should submit Form 4: Counselor/Teacher Report from the Part II Application to the university’s Office of Admission. Separate letters are not required for the School of Architecture.

PORTFOLIO SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS Freshman Applicants Content We are interested in learning about your creative interests, experience and abilities. Examples selected for inclusion in the portfolio should demonstrate the breadth of your creative pursuits and do not have to be limited to architectural work. Projects from school courses, extracurricular activities or independent work may be included. Please refrain from submitting examples of CAD drafting unless they demonstrate clear design intent rather than technical skill. Free-hand drawing, sketching, painting, ceramics, graphic design, photography and furniture design are some examples of what could be included. The portfolio should contain an edited selection of work representing what you consider your strongest creative efforts. Include a concise description of each project (title, size, media, etc.). If the work was part of a group effort, please indicate your specific contribution. Format The portfolio submission should consist of a minimum of 10 and up to 25 digital image files uploaded online by December 1, 2010, if applying for Freshman Scholarship Consideration or January 10, 2011, for Regular Freshman Consideration. Other electronic formats or CD/DVD submissions will not be accepted. Please do not send original or bound materials. Submit your portfolio online at https://uscarch. slideroom.com. The School of Architecture is committed to sustainable design practices and discourages the use of excessive printing, binding and shipping processes.


USC SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Transfer Applicants Transfer students have the opportunity to be considered for the USC School of Architecture at one of three levels; First Year, Summer Transfer Studio or Second Year of the Bachelor of Architecture program. On an individual basis, students are carefully evaluated by members of the school’s admissions committee for academic and creative accomplishments at their previous institutions, how the experience of their previous course of study has prepared them for our program as well as future promise at USC and the School of Architecture. Students considered for transfer admission to the first-year program have a high level of academic accomplishment and demonstrate a level of general exposure to issues of design and architecture but have not yet achieved the comprehensive breadth of foundational skills presented in the School of Architecture firstyear program. These basic skills range from design fundamentals of 2D and 3D composition, conceptual problem-solving, research and analysis of historical precedent, principles of spatial order, free hand drawing, computer drafting and 3D modeling. Although a student’s portfolio may communicate a high level of skill on certain issues, the full range of the year-long experience our first year offers may be missing.

Students considered for admission directly to second year have a demonstrated high level of academic accomplishment and creative experience from their previous program(s) of study. The projects presented in the portfolio represent an advanced level of design analysis, creative problem-solving and a range of visualization skills, all required as part of the comprehensive awareness and understanding of the fundamental principles presented in the first year. Format The portfolio submission should consist of a minimum of 10 and up to 25 digital image files uploaded online by February 1, 2011. Other electronic formats or CD/DVD submissions will not be accepted. Please do not send original or bound materials. Submit your portfolio online at https://uscarch.slideroom.com. The School of Architecture is committed to sustainable design practices and discourages the use of excessive printing, binding and shipping processes.

Students considered for transfer admission to the Summer Transfer Studio have a generally high level of previous academic and creative accomplishment and experience. However, these students require an accelerated review of the fundamental principles described above to fill any gaps in their knowledge presented by their portfolio and transcript review. The Summer Transfer Studio is an accelerated and comprehensive course and requires students to have the ability to excel rapidly and at a high level through all the design issues presented by the projects. This Summer Transfer Studio must be completed with grades of Bs or better in order to accelerate to the second year in the fall.

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USC SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Applying for Graduate Admission to the USC School of Architecture is a two-part process. PART ONE The following documents must be submitted to the University’s Graduate Admission Office, using the online application system. PLEASE NOTE: USC prefers that students apply online. However, a credit card is required to complete the online application. If you do not have a credit card, or do not wish to use your card number to apply online, you must use the paper application. 1) The USC online application for admission 2) Three letters of recommendation, as required by the School of Architecture. The School of Architecture does not have a separate form for the recommenders to fill out, but there is an optional form found on the USC online application for admission. Recommenders may submit their letter online or directly to the School of Architecture on paper. 3) Statement of Intent, as required by the School of Architecture. Please clearly describe your study intentions and interests. Please upload this information directly onto the USC online application for admission. 4) Resume and/or Curriculum Vitae, as required by the School of Architecture. Please upload this information directly onto the USC online application for admission. 5) GRE test scores. Test scores that are more than five years old at the time of application are not acceptable. USC’s institution code is 4852 and the Departmental Code is 4401. The GRE is not required of applicants to the certificate programs.

6) TOEFL scores (photocopy of scores and electronic submission by ETS), as required for international applicants. USC’s institution code is 4852 and the Departmental Code is 12. You must have taken the TOEFL test within the last two years. 7) Academic records (transcripts) from all post-secondary schools you have attended. These records must be stamped and sealed by the institution and unopened by the applicant. Transcripts and degree certificates/diplomas must be written in the language of your home country. All documents must be accompanied by a wordfor-word English translation. 8) International applicants only: Confidential Statement for Financing Studies at USC 9) Application fee. The application fee must be paid before an application is processed. Fee waivers are not granted for international applicants.

PART TWO The items below must be sent directly to the School of Architecture: USC School of Architecture Graduate Admission Watt Hall 204 Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291 1) Portfolio 2) Any information submitted in the part one process as outlined above that you are unable to submit electronically 3) International applicants only: copy of passport with your name, date of birth, country of birth and country of citizenship Please ensure that all materials are submitted directly to the School of Architecture.

Portfolio Submission Instructions If you are applying to a program that requires a portfolio, please review the guidelines below. While the visual work you are presenting is the most important element, don’t forget to proofread the text for typing and grammar errors. 1) A design portfolio is a compilation of one’s own work, which demonstrates past creative and graphic ability. It should include drawings and photographs of models from past architectural or design studios as well as any professional work you have done. Applicants to the Master of Historic Preservation program may submit a portfolio consisting of writing samples, articles, published essays or case study examples. Applicants to the Master of Building Science program may submit a portfolio consisting of papers, projects, computer programs, Web sites or other materials, which demonstrate technical competence, research skills, or appropriate knowledge or talents. A portfolio is not required of applicants to the certificate programs. If a portfolio is submitted, it will be reviewed. 2) All work must be submitted in a bound format. The portfolio should not be larger than 8.5” x 11”. All work submitted should be reproductions of the original work and any three-dimensional work, such as sculpture or models, must be presented in photographs. Do not submit original drawings, slides, loose sheets or oversized binders. Portfolios for the Master of Building Science program may be submitted in electronic format or posted to an accessible Web site of the applicant’s choice. 3) Label the portfolio with your name, address, student ID number and email address. Include a table of contents listing everything being submitted. Also, each project should be labeled indicating when and where the work was produced, such as semester and year, studio level, project duration, where the project was built, etc. 4) Include the portfolio cover page. 5) Please remember that the selection committee will be reviewing the portfolios for the quality of work, not the quantity. It will be very important to present your work in a clear and coherent manner, and it is wise to limit the number of projects to a maximum of 10 projects, showing your best and indicative work. 6) Think of your portfolio as a design problem. You want it to look good but also to be easy to look at. The images should be clear. Orient the pieces in the same direction.


USC SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO COVER PAGE Complete this form and return with portfolio to: USC School of Architecture Graduate Admission Watt Hall 204 Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291

LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

USC ID NUMBER

DATE OF BIRTH

MIDDLE INITIAL

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP/POSTAL CODE

COUNTRY

PHONE NUMBER

EMAIL ADDRESS

STUDENT INFORMATION Intended Program (please check) Ph.D. in Architecture (Code 1347) Master of Architecture +2, First Professional Degree (Code 1049) Master of Architecture, Post-Professional Degree (Code 860) Master of Architecture / Master of Planning Dual Degree (Code 1134) Master of Building Science (Code 861) Master of Historic Preservation (Code 1200) Master of Landscape Architecture (Code 859) Master of Landscape Architecture / Master of Planning Dual Degree (Code 1136) Certificate in Building Science (840) Certificate in Historic Preservation (1011) Certificate in Landscape Architecture Studies (1319) Certificate in Architecture and Urbanism (1373) Intended Term

Fall 20___

Please return my portfolio. I have enclosed a self-addressed, stamped envelope. I do not want my portfolio returned.

I certify that the information on this form is complete and correct.

SIGNATURE

DATE


Administration Qingyun Ma, M.Arch., AIA Dean Della and Harry MacDonald Dean’s Chair in Architecture

Joe Hardesty, M.F.A. Graduate Admissions Coordinator

Amy Murphy, M.F.A. Vice Dean

Alexandra Hypolite, B.A. Budget Analyst

Douglas Noble, Ph.D., FAIA Chair of Ph.D. Program John V. Mutlow, FAIA, RIBA, M.Arch. (U.D.) Chair of Graduate Studies

Stefano de Martino, A.A.Dipl. Director, Master of Architecture Programs Anders Carlson, Ph.D. Director, Chase L. Leavitt Graduate Program of Building Science Kenneth Breisch, Ph.D. Director, Historic Preservation Programs Robert S. Harris, FAIA, M.F.A. Director, Landscape Architecture Program

Patty Mallan, B.A. Executive Secretary Ian McCully, M.F.A. Facilities Coordinator Eric Moore, B.A. Programs Coordinator Dottie O’Carroll, B.A. Director of Development Jennifer Park, M.S. Executive Director of Student Services

Edward Bosley, M.B.A. James N. Gamble Director

The University of Southern California admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other schooladministered programs.

Jane Ilger, B.F.A. Administrative Services Coordinator Raul Lopez Facilities Assistant

Alice Kimm, FAIA, M.Arch. Chair of Undergraduate Studies

USC (USPS #077-820), Volume 107, Number 3/September 30, 2010 published by the University of Southern California, University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90089. Published once in August, 15; twice in September, 10, 30; once in November, 15. Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles, CA 90052. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to USC, University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90089.

Megan Flagg, B.A. Administrative Assistant

Staff

Liz Romero, B.S. Business Manager

Gennaro Avolio-Toly, B.A. Webmaster

Luisa Sanchez Administrative Assistant II

Enrique Barajas Information Technology Director

Lisa Shimabukuro, M.A. Student Services Advisor

Chris Beas, M.F.A. Shop Director

Adam Smith Manager of Annual Giving

Kay Chang, M.F.A. Executive Assistant to the Dean

Marie Tran Assistant to the Dean for Business Affairs

Anjie Emeka, M.A., M.S. Student Services Advisor

Zelda Wong, B.S. Architectural Guild Director/Special Events Program Coordinator

School of Architecture University of Southern California Watt Hall, Suite 204 Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291 Tel: 213-740-2723 Fax: 213-740-8884 Web site: http://arch.usc.edu

Produced by the USC School of Architecture and the Division of Student Affairs, Office of University Publications, 2010 DESIGN: Jane Frey PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHY: Philip Channing;

photo of Walt Disney Concert Hall (p. 9) courtesy of Mathew Imaging School of Architecture EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF STUDENT SERVICES: Jennifer Park


Administration Qingyun Ma, M.Arch., AIA Dean Della and Harry MacDonald Dean’s Chair in Architecture

Joe Hardesty, M.F.A. Graduate Admissions Coordinator

Amy Murphy, M.F.A. Vice Dean

Alexandra Hypolite, B.A. Budget Analyst

Douglas Noble, Ph.D., FAIA Chair of Ph.D. Program John V. Mutlow, FAIA, RIBA, M.Arch. (U.D.) Chair of Graduate Studies

Stefano de Martino, A.A.Dipl. Director, Master of Architecture Programs Anders Carlson, Ph.D. Director, Chase L. Leavitt Graduate Program of Building Science Kenneth Breisch, Ph.D. Director, Historic Preservation Programs Robert S. Harris, FAIA, M.F.A. Director, Landscape Architecture Program

Patty Mallan, B.A. Executive Secretary Ian McCully, M.F.A. Facilities Coordinator Eric Moore, B.A. Programs Coordinator Dottie O’Carroll, B.A. Director of Development Jennifer Park, M.S. Executive Director of Student Services

Edward Bosley, M.B.A. James N. Gamble Director

The University of Southern California admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other schooladministered programs.

Jane Ilger, B.F.A. Administrative Services Coordinator Raul Lopez Facilities Assistant

Alice Kimm, FAIA, M.Arch. Chair of Undergraduate Studies

USC (USPS #077-820), Volume 107, Number 3/September 30, 2010 published by the University of Southern California, University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90089. Published once in August, 15; twice in September, 10, 30; once in November, 15. Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles, CA 90052. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to USC, University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90089.

Megan Flagg, B.A. Administrative Assistant

Staff

Liz Romero, B.S. Business Manager

Gennaro Avioli-Toly, B.A. Webmaster

Luisa Sanchez Administrative Assistant II

Enrique Barajas Information Technology Director

Lisa Shimabukuro, M.A. Student Services Advisor

Chris Beas, M.F.A. Shop Director

Adam Smith Manager of Annual Giving

Kay Chang, M.F.A. Executive Assistant to the Dean

Marie Tran Assistant to the Dean for Business Affairs

Anjie Emeka, M.A., M.S. Student Services Advisor

Zelda Wong, B.S. Architectural Guild Director/Special Events Program Coordinator

School of Architecture University of Southern California Watt Hall, Suite 204 Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291 Tel: 213-740-2723 Fax: 213-740-8884 Web site: http://arch.usc.edu

Produced by the USC School of Architecture and the Division of Student Affairs, Office of University Publications, 2010 DESIGN: Jane Frey PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHY: Philip Channing;

photo of Walt Disney Concert Hall (p. 9) courtesy of Mathew Imaging School of Architecture EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF STUDENT SERVICES: Jennifer Park


USC School of Architecture Watt Hall, Suite 204 Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291 http://arch.usc.edu

USC School of Architecture

Honoring the Past. Inventing the Future.

2011-12

SCS-COC-001005

Architecture Bulletin  

Architecture Bulletin

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