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T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E F O R PA S TA P R O D U C E R S

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Eggs: let’s see how many…

Tariffe R.O.C. Poste Italiane - Spedizione in abbonamento postale - D.L. 353/2003 (cov.in L. 27/02/04 n°46) Art. 1 comma 1 DCB Bologna

Legumes for new pastas

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N. 1 January / March 2020

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Year XXV


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Year XXV - N. 1 January / March 2020 Editor in Chief Claudio Vercellone Scientific and technical committee Maurizio Monti Wheat and flours technician Roberto Tuberosa Agricultural Genetics Editing Coordinator Delia Maria Sebelin ufficiostampa@avenue-media.eu Advertising Massimo Carpanelli carpa@avenue-media.eu Edition, management, editorial, advertising and administration Avenue media Srl Viale Aldini Antonio, 222/4 40136 Bologna (Italy) avenuemedia@avenuemedia.eu www.avenue-media.eu Subscriptions office abbonamenti@avenue-media.eu Subscription Ue countries € 45,00 Outside Ue € 60,00 Back issues, except for availability: € 15.00 each plus postage Print MIG - Moderna Industrie Grafiche Srl Via dei Fornaciai, 4 - Bologna (Italy) Registration N. 7875 of 9/9/2008 Court of Bologna All coprights belong to Avenue media Srl May not be used without permission Responsibility of the advertisements belongs to the firms Personal data processing in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2016/679. Privacy Policy is available on Avenue media website www.avenuemedia.eu on “Privacy Policy - Publishing” page: www.avenuemedia.eu/en/privacy-policy-specialist-publishing/

29 EDITORIAL

The new CAP and the future of Italian pasta

5

by Dario Casati

DEPARTMENTS

Facts & news

8

FEATURES PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES

Legumes, the new challenge of innovation in pasta

10

by Daniela Spandri

PASTA & HEALTH

Healthy & tasty pasta: is it a possible mission?

18

by Antonio V. Gaddi

FOOD TECHNOLOGIES

Eggs: an ingredient that “makes the difference”

30

by Stefano Zardetto and Delia Maria Sebelin

EVENTS

We, food, our Planet: a virtual path on food paradoxes

40

by the Editorial Staff

BUYERS’ GUIDE

Supplier news

43


EDITORIAL

The new CAP and the future of Italian pasta by Dario Casati Agricultural Economist University of Milan

January / March 2020

2

020 has begun and the world of agribusiness wonders whether this will really be the year in which the complex preparation of the new EU agricultural policy - the CAP - will come to an end and what the consequences will be. According to the forecasts by the European bodies, the answer should be positive, but it is hard to say since the scenario within the EU has changed. The first wild card is the unresolved issue of Brexit, whose conclusion is nowhere near. In fact, it will take a long period of negotiations to define the huge amount of detailed questions.

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The second wild card is related and concerns the definition of the UK participation in the common budget. A decision is needed because the Multiannual Financial Framework - the MFF - which lasts 7 years, expired in 2019. The only certainty is that financial resources will decrease and the UK will require a different draft of the MFF with a cut in the total amount and new shares from the 27 remaining states. The third wild card is the part of the budget to be allocated to the CAP. Despite everything, the CAP reform is progressing. The legislative framework is based on a

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EDITORIAL

A grain improvement policy is needed maxi regulation that reframes the whole CAP; its implementation and operational management is covered by a "CAP Strategic Plan", which provides for an agriculture planning based on the dialogue between Member States (and their regions) and the Commission. The above-mentioned regulation has given rise to numerous objections because it would pave the way for the renationalization of the CAP. In particular in Italy - the homeland of pasta - it is considered as a complete disaster for fear that, due to the state of public finance, there would be no additional resources to be allocated to agriculture and, consequently, to food, for the benefit of intracommunity competition which could take advantage of additional state resources. If we consider the Italian grain farming sector, we realize that over a period of twenty years the area under wheat has decreased and so has the production nearly in parallel. The explanation is to be

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found in the fact that production yields have not substantially changed for about 15 years, while the 4,000 kilos /ha have only been exceeded twice, in 2012 and 2016. The shortage of soft and durum wheat means that imports have increased more and more in recent years. On the other hand, exports - particularly of durum wheat pasta are developing. The credit balance of the pasta sector ranks second in Italian food exports after wines; it supports a typical sector of Italian food production. This raises an issue that needs to be clearly addressed. As it is well known, imports of durum wheat are necessary for two reasons: the lack of national product and its quality. In order to obtain high quality durum wheat pasta, it is necessary to mix domestic and imported pasta. The quantity produced in Italy is not enough to cover domestic and international demand. Attempts to work with specific contracts to call for a better domestic supply have not given the expected results and do not change the problem of insufficient production. Here again, the country confirms itself as a processing country, but the difference between the agri-food industry and the rest of the Professional

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manufacturing sector is crystal clear. This is why a more researchoriented CAP to increase productivity and improve the quality of products - in this case durum wheat - is an agricultural policy choice of strategic interest for Italy. In addition to all this, there are 6 Member States among the top 10 Italian pasta importing countries, as well as 5 Member States in the list of the top 10 exporters to Italy, so these flows are mainly interesting for the EU. In a nutshell, the sector does not need a policy - like a large part of the Italian agriculture - providing general support, but rather tools for productivity increase and quality improvement to face international competition. The tireless efforts to promote the Made in Italy for the benefit of typical products and denominations of origin must be able to rely on an adequate domestic offer in terms of quantity and quality, otherwise those efforts risk being translated into an advantage for countries that export raw materials to Italy or that compete with products that imitate ours. Not laws, but a strong policy will defend the market. Dario Casati

January / March 2020


FACTS & NEWS

Grain foods for infant diets

In Russia Barilla is… fashion

Italian pasta manufacturer Barilla and digital agency, Isobar Moscow - which forms part of Dentsu Aegis’ Russian network - have released a new ad campaign titled #Pastaisart. The campaign shows Barilla pasta in an new way inspired by art and fashion. Daria Likhovidova, marketing director at Barilla Russia & CIS, says: «When a brand talks about authentic Italian pasta, we most likely visualize a plate with spaghetti. We decided to rethink this visual connotation. Thus, our ad concept is based on Barilla’s rich heritage and its constant commitment to a perfect taste as well as look of our pasta. It’s not by chance that fashion has become creative ground of the campaign emphasizing the philosophy of the brand and its special approach to pasta making».

Spaghetti to replace Australia’s national dish For years, the humble meat pie, the Chiko roll and hamburger with beetroot have vied for the coveted title of Australia’s national dish. But now, meals like laksa soup and spaghetti alle vongole are overtaking these Australian classics in popularity, according to esteemed chefs. Italian-born chef Lucio Galletto, who runs Lucio’s in Sydney’s Paddington, said the humble “spag bol” was slowly being replaced by a more luxurious pasta dish. He said spaghetti alle vongole (with clams), might be overtaking spaghetti bolognese in popularity.

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A new study recently published in Nutritients, a Us peer-reviewed medical journal of human nutrition, highlights the importance of grains as part of a healthy infant diet - and the potential risks of excluding them. Undertaken to inform the development of the firstever Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2020-2025) to include specific recommendations for infants and toddlers, the study analyzed infant data from the 2001-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (Nhanes) to assess grain food relationships with nutrient and energy intakes, diet quality, and food group consumption in infant grain consumers relative to non-consumers. «This study is the first to examine grain consumption patterns among Us infants using Nhanes and clearly provides evidence for what organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC, have been suggesting for decades: grains support the backbone of a healthy infant diet», says study author Yanni Papanikolaou, MPH, of Nutritional Strategies. For information http://www.GrainFoodsFoundation.org

Asda is getting greener Asda has announced plans to launch a new “sustainability store” where customers can refill containers with food products including pasta, coffee and cereal. From May, the supermarket‘s branch in Middleton, Leeds will become the first Asda store in the Uk to offer shoppers refill stations. When consumers bring their own containers to the store, they will be able to fill them up with Asda own-brand coffee, rice and pasta, in addition to Kellogg’s cereals and PG Tips tea.

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Legumes, the new challenge of innovation in pasta by Daniela Spandri Food Technologist

How to obtain a good product using protein flours

F

or some time now, the food industry has been focusing its attention on the alternative use of legumes, in many fields of application ranging from the manufacturing of pasta, to bakery, beverage, meat and to supplements. Particularly in the pasta sector, this innovation began about a decade ago, when the first formulations of pea flour appeared on the market. Currently, there are numerous products on the market, both industrial and artisanal, which contain flour from legumes or their derivatives. Pasta is simply to cooking, is an interesting source of slow-release carbohydrates, and has a low glicaemic index (GI). As most cereals products, pasta is deficient in lysine and threonin, two of the eight essential amino acids. These essential amino acids can be found in other sources of

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Barilla Red Lentil Penne with butternut squash

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vegetable proteins such as legume seeds. So, to enhance its nutritional composition, pasta can be fortified with non-traditional ingredients such as legume flours. In this context, pasta is one of the most studied and most suitable product for the fortification and the production with legumes flour. This for 2 reasons. First: it is of a nutritional nature; whereas the second reason is linked to the growing interest of consumers, who buy healthy products containing high fibers and proteins.

Table 1

Main nutrients present in legume flours compared to soft wheat flour (% on dry matter) Proteins (%)

Starch (%)

Beans

23.1-26.6

36.8-40.3

32.4-36

9.1-10.3

Peas

25.6-26.8

46.6-49.4

10.1-14.7

7.7-8.2

Chickpeas

20.7-25 42.9-46.25

Lentils Soft wheat

Humidity (%)

3.1-6.4

7.4-7.5

28.7-31.5

46-47.1

14.4-14.9

8.6-8.8

13.1

61.2

nd

12.8

(Patterson et al., 2010)

From lentils Currently, the most commonly used flours to produce pasta are the ones derived from red and yellow lentils. The latter are obtained through the decortication process of green lentils, a process aimed to remove the external integument. Subsequently, the flour is precooked and mixed with water, and later extruded and dried. Usually legume flours, fibers or protein extracts are obtained by grinding dry, decorticated or whole seeds. Subsequently, flours, fibers or proteins are obtained by using different separation and extraction techniques. In general, legumes are ground with a fine granulometry size (17-23 Âľm) or coarse (150-204-190 Âľm), with the exception of pea flour, which is generally finely ground. The fine granulometry increases the percentage of damaged starch and consequently the absorption of water. This causes a rise of viscosity in the dough, and a decrease of extensibility. Consequently, the finished product experiences a greater hardness. The large granulometry decreases both the viscosity and the extensibility of the dough, and this characteristic is accentuated when using lentil flour. In addition, legumes flours result in a darker color, depending on the type of botanical variety from which they

January / March 2020

Resistant starch (%)

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derive. This is due to the enzymatic oxidation of the pigments (anthocyanidins) contained, during the mixing phases of the mixture and during the first drying steps of the pasta. Herewith attached, there is a summary table with the main nutritional characteristics of the various legumes flours (TABLE 1).

What happens to pasta? In pasta, the use of legume flours represents a challenge, because gluten lacks in legumes flours, but at the same it is the base of the formation of the dough; we can say that there are some technological limitations in this regard. In order to reduce these problems, it is important to adapt the level of hydration of the mixture, during the various mixing phases. As the percentage of legumes flour increases in the recipe to the detriment of the semolina, it is necessary to lower the level of hydration, and increase the speed of mixing, in order to avoid the agglomeration of the proteins. For example, in some studies conducted on spaghetti, the semolina was replaced with 30% of chickpea flour. In this case the absorption of water has decreased, but the time to develop the mixture has increased. This is because the glutinic matrix is weakened and diluted.

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and beans) with various commercially available gluten free pastas (made of a base of corn flour, rice, millet and brown sugar syrup). Pasta made of flours of legumes had less cooking time than commercially available gluten free pasta. Water absorption, on the other hand, had a superior result, because starch is released more slowly, thanks to the particular structure and to the interactions of gluten previously described (TABLE 2).

Good products

Chickpeas

In fact, as we will see later, legume proteins are mostly soluble (globulins and albumins), to the detriment of the sulfur fractions (prolamines and glutelins). Moreover, the weak interactions between the wheat and the legumes proteins further limit the formation of a viscous elastic dough. Finally, the presence of soluble non-starch polysaccharides, and the elevated quantity of fiber, increase the stickiness of the dough. Other researches, always conducted on spaghetti, tested recipes in which 5-10% of the semolina was replaced with the same amount of pre-germinated pea flour. Germination reduces the anti-nutritional factors (phytic acid, alpha galactosides, tannins,

Pasta 100% legume flours has a less cooking time than other gluten free pasta

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Other studies focused on the GI, demonstrated that fortification of pasta with 25% chickpea flour decreased their GI healthy volunteers (from 73.0 for durum pasta to 58.6 for chickpea pasta). It was also demonstrated that the

Chickpea flour

Table 2

Comparison of cooking parameters in gluten free pasta 100% Broad beans

100% Lentils

100% Beans

Commercial Pasta

Cooking time (min)

9.5

9.8

6.6

11.0

Water absorption (% on dry pasta)

165

154

124

103

Loss in cooking (% on dry matter)

14.35

12.96

10.35

18.34

(Laleg et al., 2016)

saponins, trypsin inhibitors), and simultaneously increases the amount of amino acids present and the digestibility of proteins and starch. In all the cases mentioned above, at a sensorial level, the pasta was comparable to the one, normally available on the market and used as a control. Other critical factors regarding the quality of the pasta are the cooking loss and the optimal cooking time. These issues were the subject of a study of comparison of three pastas produced exclusively with 100% legume flours (broad beans, lentils Professional

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introduction of 7.5% of insoluble pea fibres in pasta, increased the susceptibility of starch to digestive enzymes, due to the disruption of the protein network entrapping starch granules. Also in gluten-free pasta, other studies have shown, as the proportion between 40% bean flour and 60% rice flour, provides good results in terms of final texture, cooking time and water absorption, without having excessive losses in cooking. The combination, maize flour, added with 15% chickpea flour, and 2% guar gum, allows to improve the elasticity and the

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PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES

family or Fabaceae (PICTURE 1). They are consumed both in a fresh state and in a dry state. In the first case, given the high water content (from 60% to 90%), they are considered vegetables and will not therefore be the subject of this discussion. In the second case, the water content reaches a maximum of 15%, and are classified as actual and real legumes. Now let’s see what the main nutritional characteristics of such foods. Obviously, it is important to underline the fact that the nutritional values listed here are referred to the average legume, since, in each category (for example beans) there are different species and varieties, in which for briefness reasons, we will not discuss in detail (TABLE 3). homogeneity of the dough, and in the finished product: the color, the taste and the digestibility. These are just a few examples, but food research on this issue is constantly and rapidly evolving.

Picture 1

Classification of different legumes

Focus on legumes But, in order to better understand why legumes are so re-evaluated each day, let’s see in detail what they are, and what their main nutritional characteristics are. Legumes are defined as edible seeds, coming from a vast number of spontaneous or cultivated plants, herbaceous, shrubby or arboreal plants that belong to the legumes

Source: Advances in Nutrition, Vol. 1, Issue 1, November 2010, Pages 17-30, https://doi.org/10.3945/an.110.1006 © 2010 American Society for Nutrition, Oxford Press.

Table 3

Legumes & nutritional values Proteins (g)

Fats (g)

Carbohydrates (g)

Starch (g)

Sugars (g)

Total Fiber (g)

Beans

23.6

2.0

47.5

40.0

3.5

17.5

Peas

21.7

2.0

48.2

41.2

2.9

15.7

Broad beans

27.2

3.0

54.8

45.4

4.9

7.0

Chickpeas

20.9

6.3

49.6

39.3

3.7

13.6

Lentils

22.7

1.0

51.1

44.8

1.8

13.8

(Inran, 2009)

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Table 4

Comparison of the average nutritional composition (g/100g edible part) - legumes - wheat - animal protein sources Proteins (g)

Fats (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Carbohydrates (g)

Energy (kcal/kJ)

Beans

23.6

2.0

0.0

47.5

291/1216

Peas

21.7

2.0

0.0

48.2

286/1195

Broad beans

27.2

3.0

0.0

54.8

341/1428

Chickpeas

20.9

6.3

0.0

49.6

316/1323

Lentils

22.7

1.0

0.0

51.1

291/1219

Soft wheat

12.3

2.6

0.0

65.2

0.2

Chicken (whole. raw)

19.0

10.6

93.0

0.0

171/717

Beef (back cuts)

21.5

3.4

52.0

0.0

117/488

Blue fish (mackerel)

17.0

11.1

95.0

0.5

170/710

3.3

3.6

11.0

4.9

64/268

12.4

8.7

371.0

traces

128/535

Cow's milk (whole. pasteurized) Chicken's eggs (whole. raw) (Inran, 2009)

In addition, the average nutritional values of the main legumes and their comparison with other foods are reported (TABLE 4-7).

In conclusion, the interest in beans, peas, broad beans, lentils, chickpeas, and in a less significant way, lupins and grass

peas, is therefore both nutritional and technological. This means that the use of legumes and their derivatives in the production of

Table 5

Legume proteins Beans

Peas

Chickpeas

Lentils

Proteins (total) (%)

18-25

15-32

22

27.9-32.1

Globulins (%)

55-80

65-85

42

51

Albumins (%)

10-20

20-35

16

11-16

Glutelins (%)

10

0

9.9

9.9

Prolamins (%)

<1

0

0.48

3.5

(Patterson et al., 2010)

Table 6

Fiber in whole dried legumes (average% values) Total Fiber

Insoluble Fiber

Soluble Fiber

Beans (%)

23-32

20-28

3-6

Peas (%)

14-26

10-15

2-9

Chickpeas (%)

18-22

10-18

4-8

Lentils (%)

18-20

11-17

2-7

(Patterson et al., 2010)

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Ministero delle politiche agricole alimentari e forestali, Dipartimento delle politiche europee e internazionali e dello sviluppo rurale, Direzione Generale delle politiche internazionali e dellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Unione Europea, I legumi da granella, 2016.

Table 7

Reduction of insoluble fiber (% on dry matter) during grinding Whole seed

Flour

Peas (%)

11.3

5.3

Chickpeas (%)

10.0

6.5

Lentils (%)

11.4

4.1

(Patterson et al., 2010)

Picture 2

Worldwide production of legumes (year 2014) @>L=? H>ON? E>EN? H>LN? <=>LH?

@D><D?

89#:; /9#; 1%ABC$9#; +9:FG; 8"I#J&89#:; +K$A:; )M%9" Tot. 76,8 mil/T

'@>=D?

Source: I legumi da granella, Ministero delle Politiche agricole, alimentari e forestali, 2016

pasta, represents one of the new challenges for both the market and the professionals in the sector. It is therefore the job of the professionals to innovate and to adapt the current processes to the characteristics of the new ingredients, in order to obtain safe, nutritious and eco-sustainable products. Daniela Spandri

References Advances in Nutrition, Volume 1, Issue 1, November 2010, 17-30, https://doi.org/10.3945/an.110.1006. Bonvissuto E., Novel food: quando il legume si traveste da pasta, Igiene degli alimenti, Marzo-Aprile 2019. Laleg K., Cassan D., Barron C., P., Micard V., Structural, Culinary, Nutritional and Anti-Nutritional Properties of High Protein, Gluten Free, 100% Legume Pasta, PloS one, 2016.

Patterson C. A., Maskus H., Bassett C. M. C., Fortifying foods with pulses, Cereal foods world, March-April, 2010. Petitot M., Barron C., Morel M.H., Micard V., Impact of legume flour addition on pasta structure: consequences on Its In vitro starch digestibility, Food Biophysics 5:284299, 2010. Rebello C. J., Greenway F. L., Finley J. W., Whole grains and pulses: a comparison of the nutritional and health benefits, Journal of Agricoltural and Food Chemistry, 2014. Sozer N., Holopainen-Mantila U. and Poutanen K., 3 VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Traditional and new food uses of pulses, Cereal Chemistry Journal, 2016. Sykes R., Pastas made from lentils, mung beans and carrots are suddenly popular - but do they taste any good?,The Guardian, 2018. Tosh S. M., Yada S., Dietary fibres in pulse seeds and fractions: Characterization, functional attributes, and applications, Food Research International, March 2010. Wood J.A., Texture, processing and organoleptic properties of chickpea-fortified spaghetti with insights to the underlying mechanisms of traditional durum pasta quality, Journal of Cereal Science, 2009, 49, 128-133.

Chickpea Pasta

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PASTA & HEALTH

Healthy & tasty pasta: is it a possible mission? by Antonio V. Gaddi MD, PhD

What to pay attention to if you want a perfect product

P

astaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s composition is complex. In contrast with other foods like greens, meat, or fish, pasta have no whole cells in it. In cellular, complex foods, the quality and the organoleptic features strongly depend on conservation process. Fresh fish, meat or vegetables, for instance, have a better taste and nutritional contents than canned or frozen food. When it comes to pasta, instead, the production and the conservation process go through a number of stages that differs from those of cellular foods, and each phase can strongly affect the final result.

The way wheat is processed can change the quality of pasta

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As a consequence, for a very highquality pasta, three main characteristics make the difference: a - the quality of the raw material; in this case the durum wheat semolina1, that depend on the genetic stream of the wheat used, the cultivation or harvesting methods and so on. b - how the semolina is processed. c - how the product is conserved; the conservation process starts immediately after the harvesting of the wheat and ends when the packages of pasta are opened before cooking.

Whereas point (a)2 and (c) affect the final quality of all foods, point (b) strongly characterizes pasta; the way wheat is processed and the way flour is kneaded in a dough are the phases that have the major impact on what we eventually eat. Starting from the same ingredients, in fact, we can have very different results: many events can happen during each step of pasta production; every one of these contribute to create different varieties of pasta each one with its peculiarities. Scientific studies in the past properly identify the two main variables of the working process - namely humidity and temperature - that primarily influence the drying phase (1), and consequently the quality of the final product; those findings have been widely presented in this journal (2). On the other hand, there are many other processes that may influence the quality of the final product. These passages do not only contribute to the development of the organoleptic properties of the different varieties of pasta, but are crucial in determining the nutritional value of this food. In other words, the way pasta is produced may have an impact on health and wellbeing.

Additives: pros and cons In order to have a healthy & tasty pasta several approaches have been tried. Commercial R&D labs and food technologists focuses mainly on those additives that may be added to the dough in the different steps of production3. We can cite among the others the olive pomace oil, lyophilized tomato, tomato juice, amaranth flour and other (3-6).

The way pasta is produced may have an impact on health and wellbeing We cannot censure this approach, but we cannot stand neutral: the pasta produced with the use of these technologies may be different from what consumers want. In addition, those products hardly resemble the traditional Italian food, with its taste, versatility and nutritional value. Thus, the use of the proper producing techniques should be fostered, in order to improve the quality of pasta from a scientific, nutritional and economic point of view. The key point is that the production processes should not do violence on the dough. We use the word violence not light-heartedly. Every step of the process in fact can disrupt the quality of the pasta, hardly stressing the dough and its fine molecular balance. Machines used in pasta production exert forces (like pressure or heat) that may alter the fragile binding present in the molecules that form the dough, like amides or gliadin. The equilibrium among those forces is fragile as well, and it is very difficult to find and calibrate. The tertiary and quaternary structure of the glutenin depend on pre-production factors (as the genetic characteristics of the wheat used, or the molecular weight and number of subunits). But it also depends on the conformational changes induced by treatments, like the level of hydration, the temperature, the

A coarse-ground wheat that produce a high-quality flour especially used for pasta. The quality of the wheat remains crucial when pasta is considered as the quality of the dough and therefore of the final product deeply depend of the type of grain used; every producer can choose a different variety of wheat to obtain different quality of pasta. 3 We reported just some of these studies as an example of the different approaches tried to obtain a better product. These examples show how many kind of additives - some of them particularly peculiar - have been tried. 1 2

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final result. Each process has an effect on the final result so to severely affect what we eventually eat. The use of the wrong forces in the different phases of production can alter the outcomes in term of taste and amount and quality of the nutritional components.

Into the lab

kind and amount of the forces (mechanical energy, and mechanical forces, like pressure, stretching and so on) used. A number of reliable studies underline how these processes impact on how gluten is shaped (7, 8). The interaction between gluteins and gliadins form gluten with the proper hydration (namely a 1:2 ratio) and thanks to the application of mechanical energy. Those permit the macromolecular mixing and have an effect also on finer level: during the kneading, these micro-forces, among other effects, create and destroy disulfide bridges, and alter the hydrophobic bindings that condition the three-dimensional arrangement of the macromolecules in the presence of water. The amount and quality of proteins is crucial (9). Of course the actual process is much more complicated than that, and this is only one of the many processes that contribute to create a good pasta. The best product is the one with a perfect structure where intact granules of starch4 float inside the almost foamy structure of gliadin.

Thanks to Pasta Pietro Massi - a pioneer in pasta production5 holding a number of patents6 related to different production we discovered that all the processes have an impact on the

The scanning electron microscopy can give an experimental demonstration of this idea. The scan of pasta made with traditional methods and that of pasta made with futuristic technologies has been conducted in three different Italian universities. The studies show how the different types of pasta have a different microscopic structure. FIGURE 1 shows a pasta made with durum wheat semolina, produced with standard techniques. It clearly

Figure 1 Scanning electron microscopy (100 µ marker) of durum wheat semolina treated with conventional processes (University of Parma)

The Greek word for starch is α−µψλοσ that literally means “without mill”; starch in fact is formed after the maceration of unground wheat. http://www.foodaccademia.it/it/portfolio/pietro-massi/ 6 https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=it&as_sdt=0%2C5&q=%22Pietro+Massi%22&btnG= 4 5

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granules, which, as mentioned above, must be perfectly intact. As a matter of fact, correcting all the processing phases you can obtain an almost perfect pasta. FIGURE 4 refers to a Pasta Pietro Massi obtained with patented technologies (durum wheat semolina pasta and egg).

When the microstructure of the pasta is intact, the molecules are better presented to digestive enzymes

Figure 2 Scanning electron microscopy (100 Âľ marker) of durum wheat semolina treated with conventional procedures

shows the damages on the granules of starch, with granules partially destroyed or fuses together, secondary to compression forces. In FIGURE 2 the damage is even more evident, because of an improper rolling phase: in this example the structure of pasta is almost completely subverted; there is no integrity of the granules of starch; they merge into indistinct masses, losing the characteristic quaternary structure. FIGURE 3 shows another kind of structural alteration: it highlights micro-fractures that appear on the flat surface, without the presence of micro-cavities and canaliculi that permit the correct hydration of the pasta. In this example, the gliadinic component and the regularity of the starch granules cannot be detected. The characteristics of the final mixture (starch and protein component) and in particular its rheological characteristics of

24

viscosity, elasticity, toughness, etc. depend on the protein structure of gluten and on how it covers and contains the individual starch

The structure of the granules of starch is almost perfect: they are intact and coated and immersed in the glutinous protein component. That forms bridges and integral interconnections that support the whole structure. The micro-cavities that allow the passage of water are present. No part of the surface is smooth, compressed or flattened. Similarly, FIGURE 5 shows the structure of a durum wheat

Figure 3 Scanning electron microscopy (2000 linear markers at 50 Âľ) of durum wheat semolina pasta treated with conventional technologies, with low-temperature drying and slow-processing certification (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia; courtesy of Italiana Pastifici)

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PASTA & HEALTH

semolina pasta processed during the whole production with Pasta Pietro Massi’s machines and technologies: the starches are perfectly intact; there are cavities for the passage of water, but there are no fractures coming from the working process; the surface is widely wrinkled and not flat; the protein component that binds the granules of starch is very well outlined. In both photos of pasta

The production processes should not do violence on the dough produced with these innovative technology (4 and 5), the granules of starch are perfectly evident; those are perfectly shaped and most of them are protected by the protein matrix assuming three-dimensional plasticity. Based on our experience we believe that the ultrastructural

Figure 4 Scanning electron microscopy of durum wheat semolina pasta (CWAD) and egg treated with Pietro Massi technologies (2000 linear markers at 50 µ (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia; courtesy of Italiana Pastifici)

characteristics found in the different type of pasta can influence the chemical-physical characteristics of the dough (as elasticity, viscosity, mellowness,

Figure 5 Scanning electron microscopy of durum wheat semolina pasta treated with Pietro Massi technology (long pasta rolled at 0.8 with LAR 350, 1500 linear marker at 20 µ (University of Rome “La Sapienza” - courtesy of Italiana Pastifici)

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PASTA

etc.); that consequently produce valuable effects on the physiology of digestion and therefore on health.

Wellness at the table In fact, in extreme synthesis, the pasta’s ultrastructure influences the loss in the cooking water of important components, and play a role in “how” the food is presented to and processed by the human body. When the microstructure of the pasta is intact, the molecules are better presented to those digestive enzymes (like ptyalin and pepsin) that treat the food so to properly extract nutrients. The structure permits the exposure of proteo-glucid macromolecules on the taste buds improving also the taste. The sense of satiety is also positively affected. Moreover, the progressive and slower demolition of starches has a positive effect on blood glucose level and on insulin resistance. A quality pasta has a better glycaemic index (GI) than other carbohydratebased foods like bread or potatoes (10); we believe that a pasta with these structural characteristics may

January / March 2020


PASTA & HEALTH

results in even better IG values. This has important effect on human health as it reduces the hyperinsulin stress that happen when the assimilation of sugars is too fast or whenever there is a glycaemic peak. In conclusion, pasta is one of the most eaten food in the world; its market is expanding. The consumption of this unbroken starch floating into a gliadin matrix (namely the pasta) strongly affects our health. Governments across Europe are asking industries to provide healthy products for everyone. However, to achieve appreciable results on human health, food must be tasty and appealing. Otherwise, people simply will not eat it. The time of restrictive-buthealthy diets versus spontaneous nutritional patterns has come to an end. Pasta, in fact, can be tasty and healthy at the same time: this is up to us. The right mix between technology, wellness and health, taste and production of comfort food, took years and the developing of properly designed technologies. Yet, we achieved it. Therefore, yes, the mission is possible. Antonio V. Gaddi

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References (1) Sicignano A, Di Monaco R, Masi P, Cavella S. From raw material to dish: pasta quality step by step. Journal of the science of food and agriculture. 2015; 95(13):2579-87. (2) Di Bello A. The drying phase and the qyality of pasta. Professional Pasta. 2019; 3:12-20. (3) Cecchi L, Schuster N, Flynn D, Bechtel R, Bellumori M, Innocenti M, et al. Sensory Profiling and Consumer Acceptance of Pasta, Bread, and Granola Bar Fortified with Dried Olive Pomace (Pate): A Byproduct from Virgin Olive Oil Production. Journal of food science. 2019. (4) Pasqualone A, Gambacorta G, Summo C, Caponio F, Di Miceli G, Flagella Z, et al. Functional, textural and sensory properties of dry pasta supplemented with lyophilized tomato matrix or with durum wheat bran extracts produced by supercritical carbon dioxide or ultrasound. Food chemistry. 2016; 213:545-53. (5) Kowalczewski P, Lewandowicz G, Makowska A, Knoll I, Blaszczak W, Bialas W, et al. Pasta Fortified with Potato Juice: Structure, Quality, and Consumer Acceptance. Journal of food science. 2015; 80(6):S1377-82. (6) Martinez CS, Ribotta PD, Anon MC, Leon AE. Effect of amaranth flour (Amaranthus mantegazzianus) on the technological and sensory

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quality of bread wheat pasta. Food science and technology international = Ciencia y tecnologia de los alimentos internacional. 2014; 20(2):127-35. (7) Rasheed F, Newson WR, Plivelic TS, Kuktaite R, Hedenqvist MS, Gallstedt M, et al. Macromolecular changes and nano-structural arrangements in gliadin and glutenin films upon chemical modification: Relation to functionality. International journal of biological macromolecules. 2015; 79:151-9. (8) Rasheed F, Plivelic TS, Kuktaite R, Hedenqvist MS, Johansson E. Unraveling the Structural Puzzle of the Giant Glutenin Polymer-An Interplay between Protein Polymerization, Nanomorphology, and Functional Properties in Bioplastic Films. ACS Omega. 2018; 3(5):5584-92. (9) Khatkar BS, Barak S, Mudgil D. Effects of gliadin addition on the rheological, microscopic and thermal characteristics of wheat gluten. International journal of biological macromolecules. 2013; 53:38-41. (10) Huang M, Li J, Ha MA, Riccardi G, Liu S. A systematic review on the relations between pasta consumption and cardio-metabolic risk factors. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases: NMCD. 2017; 27(11):939-48.

January / March 2020


FOOD TECHNOLOGIES

Eggs: an ingredient that â&#x20AC;&#x153;makes the differenceâ&#x20AC;? by Stefano Zardetto* and Delia Maria Sebelin * Food technologist

Tips to meet food safety requirements for pasta

F

resh pasta can be made of durum wheat, just as orecchiette from Apulia, in the South of Italy or soft wheat flour and/or semolina and eggs. Just think about the dough for tortellini and lasagne. Fresh pasta, born in Italy, has become increasingly popular also across the border. The reference markets include Great Britain, France, Spain and the United States. In fresh pasta, be it filled or not, eggs account for 16.7% to 27%. In fact, this ingredient is extremely important, since it provides the

The egg makes the dough more elastic and softer dough with unique characteristics, due to its structuring, colouring and emulsifying capacity, as well as its nutritional and organoleptic properties. Its composition, quality, health and safety characteristics have an impact on

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FOOD TECHNOLOGIES

(Figure 1)

the final result and, subsequently, on fresh pasta quality.

Pay attention toâ&#x20AC;Ś Therefore, quality eggs are essential. When purchasing eggs, the company shall pay attention to its microbiological, chemical and composition requirements. It is advisable to consider the product characteristics as well, as consumers pay attention to treatment methods of laying hens, which is an ethical aspect, but the environment in which the hens live and how they are treated have also an impact on the composition and quality of production. Particular attention shall be paid to the egg shell, which is made of calcium carbonate with small percentages of magnesium carbonate and tricalcium phosphate, with a porous structure to permit the exchange of gas and water vapour between the inside and outside of the shell. Immediately after laying, the shell has a high level of protection against the microorganisms that, through the porosity of its structure, might reach and contaminate the egg inside. In

January / March 2020

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PASTA

fact, in the first hours of life, the egg shell is covered by an external cuticle which deteriorates fairly rapidly and is completely removed by washing. The best protection against the penetration of bacteria that can usually be found on the outer surface of the egg is made of an inner double membrane (Inner & Outer Shell Membranes), fitting close to the shell (FIGURE 1). The inside of the egg is also protected by a strong natural bactericide in egg white, the lysozyme, an enzyme capable of making bacteria cell walls soluble. Unfortunately, the lysozyme is thermally sensitive and therefore it is de-activated during the pasteurization of the liquid egg. The effectiveness of natural barriers against microbial contamination inside the egg gradually decreases over time, the faster the higher the storage temperature. Therefore, table eggs should be eaten within approximately 20-25 days from laying, provided that they are stored in a refrigerator at a temperature below 8° C. External contamination of the shell, in

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FOOD TECHNOLOGIES

contamination is the period after laying which is subject to the hygienic conditions of the farm and the methods applied to prevent and reduce contamination. Therefore, the risk can be reduced at reasonable safety levels, although it is still impossible to eliminate it altogether. In this stage of possible contamination, the bacteria involved are Bacillus, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Escherichia and other coliforms. The main problems related to the health of the egg are the contact of the egg with the external surface of the shell, whether due to accidental causes (cracks, microcracks, crevice) or to processing operations (shelling). It is clear that the pasteurization of the liquid egg (i.e. shelled and homogenised) is intended to kill the microbial load that is present because of the contamination caused by the breakage of the shell. In order to limit the level of contamination, it is clear that shelling must be preceded by other operations capable of reducing the contamination risk, by means of specific cleaning and sanitisation methods.

Tips for shelling addition to the transit through the henâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cloaca during the laying, is due to the contact with the outside environment. The microbial load of egg shell is on average 105 UFC per square mm2, with values ranging from 103 to107 UFC.

Health and safety Except in exceptional cases, the content of the egg by healthy hens from rationally organized and managed poultry farms is virtually sterilized. However, there may be cases of transovarial contamination, i.e. by microorganisms ingested by laying eggs (feed and, above all, water). These micro-organisms reach the egg

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that is under construction through blood and contaminate it internally. Transovarial contamination concerns pathogenic micro-organisms, e.g. salmonella. In any case, it should be made clear that, for this kind of contamination to occur, feed and water contamination must be very high, since the ingested microorganisms are mainly destroyed by the gastric juices of laying hens. The microbial load of the shell is different, since it is contaminated during the transit through the oviduct. The most common contamination concerns Lactobacillus and Micrococcus strains of bacteria, whereas the actual risk of further Professional

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For the pasta makers who prefer to shell the eggs immediately before preparing the dough, the abovementioned rules apply, but they are adjusted to different application methods: the shell must be accurately washed and cleaned before shelling, preferably with lukewarm water (about 45° C), if it contains an alkaline detergent, and then with a disinfectant (e.g. with water containing bleach in small percentages).

Pasteurization of liquid egg kills the microbial load January / March 2020


FOOD TECHNOLOGIES

There are a number of factors taking into account the usefulness, effectiveness and timeliness of washing shells immediately before breakage in order to reduce the potential contamination of the egg: water temperature, washing time, temperature and storage time before washing, contamination of the shell, etc. For this reason, it is difficult to recommend such an operation at all times and in any case (Source: The Efsa Journal, 2005, 269, 1 of 39, Microbiological risks on washing of table eggs). In fact, if the washing operation is not carried out, the risk is that any Salmonella spp. present on the shell surface can penetrate more easily - as it is facilitated by water - inside, through the pores of the shell. In any case, washing and disinfection, if any, should be carried out separately, bearing in

34

mind that the germicidal effect of chlorine contained in the bleach is drastically reduced if it comes into contact with organic residues (for example, faecal residues still present on the egg shell after washing), which means that eggs must be thoroughly cleaned before the shell is disinfected. The washing water shall never be reused after coming into contact with the egg shells. For the pasta makers who prefer to shell eggs directly, rather than using homogenised and pasteurised eggs, the most difficult problem is to avoid that during shelling small fragments of shells end up in the collecting vessel, especially if no suitable filters are used. The systematic cleaning and sanitisation of all shelling tools is compulsory, as well as the need for washing and sanitising the hands for people who shelled the eggs, even if they wear protective Professional

PASTA

gloves, before any further work is carried out.

Controls and protocols A delicate problem with the use of egg in pasta production is the possible presence of residues of chemical products used for both therapeutic and prophylactic purposes in laying hen farms. The most frequent case concerns antibiotics used in the farm to treat laying hensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; infections with bacteria and viruses. The major pasta companies take protective measure against this, imposing strict limits and controls in the purchasing protocols signed with their supplier of homogenised and pasteurised egg products, as well as whole eggs, where they provide shelling directly.

Ingredient analysis The egg consists of two fractions, yolk and white, in different

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FOOD TECHNOLOGIES

quality, it shall meet the following requirements: • the content of 3-hydroxy-butyric acid must not exceed 10 mg/kg of egg product as dry matter; • the lactic acid content must not exceed 1 g/kg of dry matter. Detectable amounts of uracil show the presence of both a microbiological spoilage before pasteurisation and the use of incubated eggs. If this substance is detected in fresh egg pasta, it means that poor quality eggs have been used (Alamprese et. al, 2004).

Technological properties

compositions that determine the technological, nutritional and qualitative properties. White is an aqueous protein solution (11% protein content) and accounts for two-thirds of the edible part of the egg. The yolk is a viscous matrix, containing 35% lipid and 16% protein. This is the main source of coloured pigments in pasta, mainly consisting of carotenoids and xantophylls (lutein and zeaxanthin). The colour of the eggs is measured by determination of the pigment content as ß-carotene extract in acetone. The colorimetric parameters (L*, b*, a*) of pasta vary depending on the egg content, expressed as the egg/flour ratio, and the ß-carotene content of the egg (Zartal & Since Rosa, 2006).

36

The amount of egg added to the recipe makes the difference in organoleptic and rheological terms, since proteins also improve the mechanical properties and the cooking behaviour of the finished product (Alamprese et. al., 2009).

Egg product In the pasta factory, the egg is replaced by a corresponding quantity of liquid egg product made with whole eggs and adequately heat-treated. Pasteurisation of liquid eggs is wrongly considered as a tool to repair low-quality, old or altered eggs. In fact, the use of old or incubated eggs for the production of egg products can be assessed by certain analytical characteristics. If the ingredient is of good Professional

PASTA

The egg added to the dough plays important technological functions thanks to the increase in the overall protein content of the dough, which is then reinforced, softer and elastic. As to technological properties, it improves the cooking characteristics of pasta by reducing the dispersion of the residues into the cooking water and the surface glutinosity of the product; this is very important when the dough is prepared with common wheat flour (in whole or in part) in place or in addition to semolina, for the preparation of fresh pasta. The most critical component for this technological function is albumin contained in egg white. However, the ingredients of the yolk, in particular the phospholipids, also play an active role, since they contribute to strengthen the chemical links governing the protein matrix of the dough, thereby increasing its strength and elasticity. As anticipated, the technological properties of the egg relate to the coagulating and emulsifying factor, the colouring and flavouring property. The coagulation of proteins contained in both egg white and yolk is irreversible (denaturation) and occurs at the relatively low temperature for proteins in egg white (62° C), slightly higher for those contained in yolk (65° C).

January / March 2020


FOOD TECHNOLOGIES

It is important to know and keep in mind these values to set the drying parameters for dry pasta, as well as, of course, for the pasteurisation of the fresh product.

Nutritional properties Egg proteins are complete from a nutritional point of view, since they contain all essential amino acids, which is extremely important, since such availability effectively compensate for what wheat (and its derived products) lack, in particular in relation to certain essential amino acids such as lysine and leucine.

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The minerals and vitamins contained in the egg also integrate the nutritional value of pasta, compensating for its limitations as a consequence of a low extraction rate from the wheat grain during its milling; such an operation is necessary to prevent the presence of a bran and cellulose (which is indigestible) in the semolina and - we would like to add - also to remove air pollutants on the surface and in the integumentary layers of wheat grain. Stefano Zardetto, Delia Maria Sebelin Professional

PASTA

References Alamprese, C., Rossi, M., Casiraghi, E., Hidalgo, A., Rauzzino, F. (2004). Hygienic quality evaluation of the egg product used as ingredient in fresh egg pasta. Food Chemistry, 87, 313-319. Alamprese, C., Casiraghi, E, Rossi, M. (2009). Modelling of egg fresh pasta characteristics for egg content and albumen to yolk ratio. Journal of Food Engineering, 93, 302-307. The Efsa Journal (2005), 269, 1 of 39, Microbiological risks on washing of table eggs. Zardetto, S., Dalla Rosa, M. (2006). Influenza delle materie prime e dei parametri di processo sul colore di pasta fresca allâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;uovo. Tecnica Molitoria, 57, 6, 659-664.

January / March 2020


EVENTS

We, food, our Planet: a virtual path on food paradoxes by the Editorial Staff

T

he ribbon-cutting ceremony that kicked off the celebrations of Parma 2020 Italian Capital of Culture was led by the Mayor of Parma, Federico Pizzarotti, and Luca Barilla, for the Barilla Foundation. The event coincided with the opening to the public of the exhibition “We, food, our Planet: feeding a sustainable future”, promoted by the Barilla

40

An interactive path on good education about food and the environment Foundation and set up with the collaboration, among others, of National Geographic Italia, Sustainable Development Solutions Network Mediterranean (Sdsn Med), with the contribution of a multidisciplinary scientific advisory board and in collaboration with the Municipality of Parma. From January 11, until April 13, the Galleria San Ludovico and

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Portici del Grano will host an experiential journey which aims to illustrate the strong link between protecting both our own health and that of the planet, starting with what we put on our plate every day. A multimedia path that enriches the “We, food, our Planet” educational program included in a memorandum of understanding with the Italian Ministry of Education.

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EVENTS

The challenge «Food, nutrition and environmental protection are strongly linked and can contribute, directly and indirectly, to the achievement of the Sdgs. If properly fed, children can learn, people can lead a healthy and productive life and societies can ensure their prosperity. By taking care of our land and adopting sustainable agriculture, existing and future generations will be able to feed a growing population and mitigate climate change, using less water and producing less greenhouse gases. Through this exhibition, we want to cultivate a sense of active citizenship and growing awareness in people, young and old, that will lead to a rethink of our agri-food systems. In order to bring about this change, our aim is to raise consciousness, focusing on proper education about food and the environment», said Anna Ruggerini, Operations Director of the Barilla Foundation.

Food production Food production is in fact the human activity that contributes most to climate change (up to 37%), more than the heating (23.6%) and transport (18.5%). This is why we need to rethink the way we produce food. A need that also arises from the forecast that within thirty years there will be around 10 billion people on the planet, which will require more food to be produced. However, by continuing to do so at the current rate and in this way, the damage we will cause to the planet will be incalculable. «There is an emergency that is there for all to see, our way of life

Food production is the human activity that contributes most to climate change January / March 2020

From the left: Luca Barilla, Riccardo Valentini, Federico Pizzarotti, Michele Guerra

is no longer sustainable. Thousands of kids are asking adults, politicians and anyone with the power to act to do something effective. There is a real risk of animal and plant species becoming extinct and at the same time greenhouse gases have almost doubled compared to 1980, leading to a temperature increase of around 0.8° C compared to the beginning of the century. Climate change, which affects our crops, causes fires, floods or even other environmental catastrophes, is largely caused by the way we produce, distribute and consume food. Every year we use the equivalent of 1.7 planets to live and in the meantime, our agriculture alone is producing 37% of the greenhouse gases, now Professional

PASTA

warming up the planet. We need to reverse this trend, giving rise to a real food revolution starting from schools, teachers and young people», explained Riccardo Valentini, member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Ipcc, Nobel Peace Prize 2007, a distinguished guest at the event. «In thirty years there will be ten billion mouths to feed on Earth. Through the exploitation of natural resources, occupation of the land, reduction of biodiversity and activities that dramatically affect the climate, we have already brought the planet to the brink of collapse. To give future generations the prospect of health and well-being, it is essential to rethink the entire food system,

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EVENTS

Barilla Foundation exhibition during the event.

An immersive journey

from farm to fork. “We inspire people to take care of the planet" is the motto of the National Geographic Society, which is why we have accepted the opportunity to collaborate on this initiative with conviction and enthusiasm with the aim of raising greater awareness of the challenges that lie ahead in both individuals and institutions», said Marco Cattaneo, Director of National Geographic Italia who acted as guide to the

The exhibition is designed to create a real immersive journey, divided into several parts. The first one, in the Galleria San Ludovico, is a virtual path intended to highlight the global paradoxes of the food system: hunger vs obesity because for every malnourished person in the world there are two who are obese or overweight; food vs fuel because one third of the cereal crop is used to feed animals or produce biofuels, despite the problem of hunger and malnutrition and waste vs hunger, because, from the field to the fork, 1.3 billion tons of edible food is wasted every day, four times the amount needed to feed the over 820 million malnourished people worldwide.

The aim is to raise consciousness about food and the environment

The interactive exhibition aims to explore the different connections that food has with the world around us: it moves from “Food and Culture” to “Food and Cities”, then discussing the profound link between “Food and Sustainable Development Goals” until the section dedicated to the “Virtual Plate”, where we find out if our diet is actually sustainable, for us and for the environment. The path to understanding and gaining awareness of our food systems then moves on to the Portici del Grano, where visitors can view the photos of the exhibition created with National Geographic Italia and dedicated to the many different food cultures of the world. Professional photographers have contributed to a journey through exotic places, near and far, highlighting the centrality of food. “We, food, our Planet: feeding a sustainable future” also offers in-depth courses for children: for schools there is an even more formative experience that includes a guided tour and the exhibition, plus educational activities to suit different age groups and aimed at further consolidating the knowledge covered by the exhibition. For reservations and details, visit: www.noiilciboilpianeta.it/parma2020 The Editorial Staff

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January / March 2020


SUPPLIER NEWS

Omnia line by Storci lands in Japan

W

e are glad to publish this very interesting interview to Mr. Tsuchiya Yoshikazu, Managing Director of Nikkoku Seifun Corp. Limited, a Japanese Company headquartered in Nagano and a leading wheat producer in the country, that has recently purchased a multiformat Omnia line by Storci for the production of short, long and special shapes pasta.

Could you introduce your company to us? Our company was founded in

January / March 2020

1945 to manufacture cereal based products in Nagano, Nagano province, a town in a mountainous area of Japan where the Olympics where held in 1998. In the beginning, we used to deal with wheat flour only, but later in 1972 we started a new business using also buckwheat for noodles process. In 2011 we started the production of buckwheat pasta too. Why did you choose Storci? In 2011 we started the buckwheat pasta process but we were just testing it and the system was not

Professional

PASTA

completed yet. We were considering the possibility to find machinery able to produce differentiated quantities of some products. During that period, your Agent in Japan came visit us and, after being told about the characteristics of your products, we were so interested we started travelling frequently to Italy to visit your company and see with our own eyes if your machines could meet our requirements. What struck you most about Omnia line? Among the several advantages

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SUPPLIER NEWS

obtained with your machines, there is certainly that one of the pre-drying of short and long pasta that is carried out by one machine only. Our company has had a long experience in drying buckwheat and we surely know how important the pre-drying phase is for both large and small

productions. All this was offered by your company, only. What are your projects for the future? We would like to promote buckwheat products from a nutritional and operational point of view because the attention

given to these aspects is very high in Japan. We would like to witness an increase of the consumption of buckwheat products developing new ones, also abroad. For this reason, we believe that all our efforts will be supported and endorsed by your plants and experience.

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS ANSELMO www.anselmoitalia.com BÃ&#x153;HLER www.buhlergroup.com

2-3 BACK COVER

LANDUCCI www.landucci.it MININNI www.molinomininni.com

9 INSIDE BACK COVER

CAPITANIO www.capitanio.it

25

NICCOLAI www.niccolai.com

CASTIGLIONI www.castiglioninedo.it

33

PASTA TECH. GROUP www.pastatechgroup.com

DE MARI www.demaripastadies.com

15

PAVAN www.pavan.com

INSIDE FRONT COVER

DEMACO www.demaco.com

13

STORCI www.storci.com

FRONT COVER - 7

FAVA www.fava.it FOODTECH www.food-tech.it

22 - 23 35

IMPERIA & MONFERRINA www.la-monferrina.com 37

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4 29

TECALIT www.tecalit.it

27

TRAFILE TURCONI www.trafileturconi.it

21

ZINDO www.zindo.it

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PASTA

January / March 2020


Profile for Avenue media

Professional Pasta N. 1 January/March 2020  

The International Magazine for pasta producers

Professional Pasta N. 1 January/March 2020  

The International Magazine for pasta producers

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