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SELF‐PACED
DIGITAL
INSTRUCTION



 
 
 Tipton
County
Schools
 Angela
Christopher
 Instructional
Designer
 Fall
2009


Table
of
Contents
 Substitute
Teaching
Orientation
 Tipton
County
Schools
 
 UNIT
ABSTRACT
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
 
 IDENTIFICATION
OF
PROBLEM
…………………………………………………………………………………………...
 
 Needs
Assessment
Report………………………………………………………………………………….........
 
 
 Process
..................................................................................................................
 
 
 Planning.................................................................................................................
 
 
 Data
Collection
&
Results.......................................................................................
 
 
 Recommendations.................................................................................................
 
 Goal
Analysis...................................................................................................................
 
 Final
Ranking...................................................................................................................
 
 LEARNER
CHARACTERISTICS.....................................................................................................
 
 CONTEXTUAL
ANALYSIS

..........................................................................................................
 
 TASK
ANALYSIS
........................................................................................................................
 
 Topic
Analysis
................................................................................................................
 
 
 Facts......................................................................................................................
 
 
 Rules......................................................................................................................
 
 
 Concepts................................................................................................................
 Procedures
............................................................................................................
 Interpersonal
Skills................................................................................................
 Attitudes...............................................................................................................
 
 INSTRUCTIONAL
OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................
 
 INSTRUCTIONAL
SEQUENCE
....................................................................................................
 
 PRE‐INSTRUCTIONAL
STRATEGY
.............................................................................................
 
 APPENDICIES
 Substitute
Teaching
Survey
for
Administrators

............................................................
 Substitute
Teacher
List
(example
format)......................................................................


2
 
 3
 4
 4
 4
 6
 12
 13
 14
 
 15
 
 17
 
 19
 19
 20
 22
 24
 28
 29
 30
 
 31
 
 44
 
 46
 
 
 47
 49


1



Unit
Abstract
 Substitute
Teaching
Orientation
 The
 saying
 is
 something
 like
 this;
 “You
 think
 being
 a
 teacher
 is
 tough,
 try
 being
 a
 substitute!”
 

 Substitute
teachers
are
individuals
who
provide
replacement
for
classroom
teachers
on
leave
 or
they
are
assigned
to
long‐term
positions
to
fill
temporary
vacancies.

Substitute
teachers
 are
often
hired
with
little
training
and
may
be
required
to
“learn
on
the
job.”

The
proposed
 Substitute
Teacher
Orientation
unit
will
offer
instruction
for
the
preparation
of
substitute
 teachers
in
the
Tipton
County
school
district.


 


The
unit
will
provide
important
instruction
about
the
professional
role
and
responsibilities
of
 a
 substitute
 teacher.
 
 The
 module
 will
 acquaint
 learners
 with
 general
 policy
 and
 specific
 expectations
for
employment.


Upon
completion,
it
is
expected
that
substitute
teachers
will
be
 more
likely
to
possess
the
knowledge
to:
 
 •

Identify
and
maintain
district
and
school
procedures/policies.



Apply
appropriate
teaching
and
behavior
management
strategies.



Recognize
professional
dress,
communication
and
attitude.



The
instruction
is
intended
for
an
audience
of
newly
hired
substitutes
in
a
small,
rural
school
 district.
 
 
 Substitute
 teachers
 have,
 at
 a
 minimum,
 a
 High
 School
 diploma
 or
 GED
 and
 are
 at
 least
18
years
of
age.

They
may
also
be
retired
teachers,
local
individuals
who
wish
to
work
 on
a
part‐time
basis,
or
persons
in
need
temporary
work
due
to
lay
offs.


 


The
 computer‐based
 module
 is
 a
 self‐paced
 instructional
 unit.
 
 The
 intention
 is
 to
 provide
 participants
 with
 interactive
 learning
 activities
 that
 will
 promote
 the
 development
 of
 classroom
 management
 techniques
 and
 knowledge
 of
 district
 protocol.
 
 The
 unit
 will
 incorporate
photos,
video
and
interactive
text.

Practical
ideas
and
resources
will
be
provided
 throughout
 the
 instruction.
 
 To
 complete
 the
 unit,
 the
 learner
 will
 need
 to
 have
 access
 to
 a
 computer
with
the
instruction
installed
(or
Internet
access).


2



Problem
Identification
 Substitute
Teaching
Orientation
 Tipton
County
Schools
 
 


Substitute
teachers
are
individuals
who
provide
replacement
for
classroom
teachers
on
leave
or
 are
assigned
to
long‐term
positions
in
order
to
fill
temporary
teaching
vacancies.

Initial,
informal
 conversations
 with
 Tipton
 County
 School
 (TCS)
 district
 personnel
 suggest
 a
 small
 percentage
 of
 substitutes
 lack
 an
 understanding
 of
 job
 expectations
 and
 classroom
 management
 skills.

 Substitutes
 hired
 prior
 to
 the
 beginning
 of
 the
 school
 year
 attend
 a
 two‐hour
 orientation
 provided
by
the
TCS
central
office.

Substitutes
hired
later
in
the
year
do
not
have
an
opportunity
 to
attend
an
orientation
session
because
personnel
workload
does
not
permit
time
or
manpower
 to
offer
a
series
of
substitute
teacher
trainings
throughout
the
academic
year.

The
need
for
“any‐ time”
training
was
confirmed
by
the
results
of
a
subsequent
needs
analysis.


 
 Tipton
 County
 Schools
 has
 requested
 the
 development
 of
 a
 self‐paced
 instructional
 module
 for
 newly
hired
substitute
teachers.

Given
the
daily
need
for
substitutes
at
each
of
the
14
schools,
 and
the
responsibility
with
which
they
are
placed,
it
is
imperative
that
each
substitute
develops
 an
 understanding
 for
 district
 protocol.
 
 The
 instructional
 unit
 will
 be
 designed
 specifically
 for
 substitute
teachers
new
to
the
TCS
district.


 


3



Problem
Identification


PURPOSE
 


Tipton
County
School
district
personnel
and
principals
have
reported
that
some
new
substitute
 teachers
lack
knowledge
of
district
and
school
expectations.

A
needs
assessment
was
 conducted
in
order
to
determine
the
instructional
needs
of
the
school
district.
 


RESEARCH
GROUP
 The
 research
 group
 consists
 of
 TCS
 elementary,
 middle
 and
 secondary
 school
 administrators.
 Stakeholders
 include
 TCS
 substitute
 teachers,
 school
 and
 district
 administrators
 as
 well
 as
 TCS
 students,
parents
and
classroom
teachers.





 PROCESS
 
 Substitute
teachers’
improved
knowledge
of
district
protocol
was
the
expressed
need
of
TCS.

A
 needs
 assessment
 study
 was
 conducted
 to
 identify
 additional
 felt
 needs
 and
 to
 determine
 the
 context,
perception,
and
extent
of
the
instructional
needs.

This
section
describes
how
the
study
 was
conducted.
 


PLANNING
 TARGET
AUDIENCE
 The
target
audience
for
the
needs
assessment
consists
of
TCS
school
administrators.

 Participating
TCS
administrators
range
in
age
from
mid
30’s
to
late
50’s,
are
male
and
female,
and
 at
a
minimum,
have
earned
a
Master’s
Degree
and
administrative
licensure.


 



 


4



Problem
Identification


STRATEGY
 School
 administrators
 were
 surveyed
 in
 order
 to
 ascertain
 their
 additional
 felt
 needs
 and
 perceptions
regarding
substitutes’:
 • • •

Knowledge
of
district
and
school
protocol.
 Ability
to
manage
students
and
classrooms.


 Professionalism.


The
administrator
questionnaire
consisted
of
five
sections:

 1) Three
 questions
 to
 collect
 general
 information
 [number
 of
 substitutes
 per
 week,
 preference,
benefit
of
professional
development].
 2) Three
questions
about
protocol
and
training.
 3) Nine
questions
on
protocol
and
classroom
management.

 4) Two
questions
about
professional
clothing
and
grammar.

 5) Open‐ended
question:
What
do
substitutes
need
to
know
or
learn
more
about?


 


The
questionnaire
contained
17
close‐ended
questions.

The
first
set
of
questions
was
designed
 to
gather
general
information
regarding
substitute
use
and
preferences
by
TCS
administrators.

A
 5‐point
 Likert
 type
 scale
 was
 used
 to
 collect
 perceived
 performance
 data
 via
 the
 second,
 third
 and
fourth
sets
of
questions.

In
each
section,
administrators
were
asked
to
rate
their
responses
 for
NEW
substitute
teachers
(5
=
Extremely
Well;
1
=
Not
at
all).

The
final,
open‐ended
question
 was
 designed
 to
 collect
 data
 on
 felt
 needs
 that
 may
 have
 been
 overlooked
 in
 the
 earlier
 questions.

Each
section
concludes
with
a
text
box
for
additional
comments
or
concerns.


 


ANALYSIS

 During
 planning,
 it
 was
 determined
 that
 frequency
 counts
 would
 be
 used
 to
 analyze
 the
 needs
 assessment
 data
 for
 closed‐ended
 questions.
 
 Comments
 and
 open‐ended
 responses
 would
 be
 categorized
 under
 existing
 needs
 or
 if
 necessary,
 new
 categories
 would
 be
 identified.
 


PARTICIPANTS



 Assistant
principals
(from
elementary,
middle
and
high
schools)
who
conduct
substitute
teacher
 interviews
were
selected
as
participants.

One
administrator
from
each
of
the
district
schools
(14)
 was
invited
to
complete
the
survey. 


5



Problem
Identification
 


DATA
COLLECTION
 


PARTICIPANT
SAMPLE
 At
 the
 time
 of
 the
 survey,
 there
 were
 49
 school


TCS
ADMINISTRATORS
 Total
 Invited
 Returned


49
 14
 12


administrators
 working
 in
 Tipton
 County
 Schools.
 
 One
 
 29%
 86%


administrator
from
each
of
the
14
schools
is
responsible
for
 interviewing
 potential
 substitute
 teachers
 for
 the
 district.

 These
 14
 administrators
 were
 selected
 as
 the
 participant


Table
1:
Survey
Distribution
and
Return
 


sample.

The
sample
represents
approximately
29%
of
the
 total
TCS
Administrators.



 


DISTRIBUTION
AND
COLLECTION
 Email
 addresses
 were
 obtained
 for
 the
 14
 administrators
 and
 they
 were
 each
 emailed
 a
 link
 to
 the
questionnaire
on
Monday,
September
28,
2009.

The
survey
was
administered
via
a
Google
 docs
online
form.
See
Figure
1
for
a
copy
of
the
original
email
and
Figure
2
for
a
screen
capture
of
 the
online
Administrator
Survey.

See
Appendix
A
for
the
complete
survey.



 


Figure
1:
Email
inviting
administrators
to
participate
in
needs
assessment
survey.


Figure
2:
Google
docs,
online
Administrator
Survey




 


6



Problem
Identification


It
 was
 explained,
 via
 email,
 that
 a
 computer
 based
 instructional
 unit
 was
 being
 designed
 to
 provide
 training
 for
 new
 substitute
 teachers
 in
 Tipton
 County.
 
 Participants
 were
 invited
 to
 complete
 the
 online
 survey
 and
 share
 their
 opinions
 about
 substitute
 teacher
 knowledge
 and
 performance.
 
 Furthermore,
 participating
 administrators
 were
 asked
 to
 complete
 the
 survey
 anonymously
 no
 later
 than
 5:00
 the
 following
 Thursday,
 October
 1st.
 
 Thursday
 evening,
 nine
 surveys
had
been
returned.
A
second
email
was
sent
to
the
participant
sample
on
the
morning
of
 October
 1st
 to
 remind
 the
 administrators
 to
 complete
 the
 survey.
 
 Following
 the
 second
 email,
 one
 additional
 survey
 was
 returned.
 
 A
 third
 and
 final
 email
 was
 sent
 on
 Friday
 morning
 and
 resulted
in
a
total
of
12
completed
surveys,
86%.


SUBSTITUTE
TEACHER
QUESTIONNAIRE
for
Administrators
 GENERAL
INFORMATION
 The
 number
 of
 substitute
 teachers


needed


varies


among
 the
 14
 Tipton
 County
 schools.
 
 One
 respondent
 listed
 using
 0‐1
 substitutes
 per
week
while
the
remaining
 respondents
 reported
 that
 they
 need
 four
 or
 more
 substitute
teachers
per
week.

 Forty‐two
 administrators


percent


of


responded


that
 their
 schools
 require
 more
 than
 10
 substitute
 teachers
 during
 an
 average
 Figure
3:
General
Information,
 Substitute
Teacher
Survey
for
 Administrators
 


school
 week.
 
 
 Furthermore,
 83%
 of
 administrators
 report
 that,
when
available,






 


7



Problem
Identification


they
 have
 a
 preference
 for
 specific
 substitutes.
 
 The
 high
 frequency
 of
 principals
 who
 prefer
 specific
 persons
 indicates
 that
 there
 may
 be
 common
 characteristics
 of
 a
 quality
 substitute
 teacher.
 All
 participating
 administrators
 indicated
 that
 new
 substitute
 teachers
 would
 benefit
 from
instructional
training.
The
response
frequency
rates
are
shown
in
Figure
3.


 PROTOCOL
AND
TRAINING
 Twenty‐five
 percent
 of
 respondents
 believe
 that
 substitute
 teachers
 are
 less
 than
 somewhat
 knowledgeable
about
 TCS
expectations,
while
42%
responded
 that
 substitute
teachers
 are
more
 than
somewhat
knowledgeable
about
expectations.

Administrators
reported
similarly
for
school
 procedures;
 they
 reported
 42%
 of
 substitutes
 are
 less
 than
 somewhat
 knowledgeable
 and
 50%
 more
than
somewhat
knowledgeable.

All
of
the
respondents
indicated
that
newly
hired
substitute
 teachers
 would
 benefit
 from
 professional
 development/training.
 
 While
 only
 four
 administrators
 wrote
 additional
 comments/concerns,
 the
 comments
 were
 related
 to
 substitutes’
 lack
 of
 understanding
about
their
role
and/or
professional
behavior.

See
Figure
4.
 How
knowledgeable
are
NEW
substitutes
about…
 


Not
at
 all


Tipton
County’s
expectations
for
working
as
a
 substitute
teacher?
 
 The
substitute
procedures
for
your
school?
 
 Would
newly
hired
substitute
teachers
benefit
 from
participating
in
professional
 development/training
 


Somewhat


Extremely


0
 


3

 25%


4

 33%


5

 42%


0
 


0
 


5
 42%


0
 


6
 50%


1
 8%


YES
 12
 100%


NO
 0
 


General
Comments/concerns
 1.

Substitutes
that
are
interviewed
at
BMS
have
an
understanding
of
BMS
procedures.

Those
interviewed
by
 different
school
administrators
do
not.

Substitutes
seem
to
have
the
opinion
that
they
are
just
babysitting
‐
that
 is
not
the
case.

A
training
session
would
alleviate
that
opinion.


2.

Substitutes
are
briefed
about
our
school‐specific
procedures
during
the
interview
process.

We
use
subs
that
 have
been
interviewed
by
administrators
across
the
district
so
the
expectations
are
generalized.


3.

Professional
development/training
would
depend
on
the
person
preparing
the
training.


4.

Substitutes
need
to
understand
that
cell
phones,
eating
in
front
of
learners
and
singing
gospel
music
is
not
 professional
etiquette
for
school
leaders.


Figure
4:
Protocol
and
Training
Questions



 


8



Problem
Identification


PROTOCOL
AND
CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT
 
 Of
 the
 eight
 questions
 on
 protocol
 and
 classroom
 management,
 the
 highest
 favorable
 response
 rate
of
67%
(more
than
somewhat)
occurred
for
questions
regarding
the
safety
and
respect
with
 which
substitute
teachers
care
for
their
students.

A
high
response
rate
suggests
that
substitutes
 generally
are
not
lacking
in
these
two
areas.

The
lowest
response
rates
(less
than
somewhat)
occur
 in
 questions
 related
 to
 school
 protocol.
 
 Only
 50%
 of
 respondents
 reported
 that
 substitutes
 are
 more
 than
 somewhat
 knowledgeable
 about
 school
 wide
 procedures.
 
 To
 further
 support
 these
 findings,
 58%
 of
 administrators
 reported
 that
 substitute
 teachers
 “somewhat”
 teach
 the
 lessons
 provided
 by
 absent
 teachers.
 
 When
 asked
 about
 new
 substitutes’
 speaking
 professionally
 with
 administrators
and
others,
responses
varied
between
17%
marked
as
“less
than
somewhat,
”
25%
 selected
 “somewhat,”
 25%
 “more
 than
 somewhat”
 and
 the
 final
 17%
 reported
 that
 substitutes
 speak
 “extremely”
 professionally.
 Between
 75%
 and
 100%
 of
 administrators
 believed
 that
 these
 categories
are
necessary
for
substitute
teachers
to
succeed.

See
figure
5.
 
 Do
NEW
substitute
teachers…
 
 Maintain
the
routines
and
procedures
of
the
school
 and
classroom?
 
 Teach
the
lessons
provided
by
the
absent
teacher?
 
 Speak
professionally
with
administrators
and
others?
 
 Ask
relevant
questions
of
building
teachers
and
staff?
 
 Complete
written
reports
for
the
school
and
teacher?
 
 Keep
students
safe
in
an
emergency?
 
 Treat
students
with
respect?
 Manage
classroom
behavior?


Not
at
 all


Somewhat


Extremely


0


0
 


5
 42%


6
 50%


1
 8%


0
 


1
 8%


7
 58%


3
 25%


1
 8%


0
 


2
 17%


3
 25%


3
 25%


4
 33%


0
 


2
 17%


5
 42%


3
 25%


2
 17%


0
 


5
 42%


3
 25%


2
 17%


2
 17%


0
 
 0
 
 0
 


1
 8%
 1
 8%
 2
 17%


0
 
 0
 
 3
 25%


8
 67%
 8
 67%
 6
 50%


3
 25%
 3
 25%
 1
 8%


Figure
5:
Protocol
and
Classroom
Management
Questions


9



Problem
Identification


…PROTOCOL
AND
CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT
CONTINUED
 


The
ninth
question
about
protocol
and
classroom
management
required
administrators
to
select,
 from
a
list,
all
of
the
skills
they
believe
are
necessary
for
substitute
teachers
to
be
successful.

One
 hundred
 percent
 of
 respondents
 indicated
 that
 substitutes
 should
 maintain
 the
 routines
 and
 procedures
of
the
school
and
classroom,
keep
students
safe
in
an
emergency,
treat
students
with
 respect
 and
 manage
 classroom
 behavior.
 
 Seventy‐five
 percent
 reported
 that
 it
 is
 necessary
 for
 substitutes
 to
 teach
 the
 lessons
 provided
 by
 the
 absent
 teacher
 and
 92%
 agree
 that
 substitutes
 should
 speak
 professionally
 with
 administrators
 and
 others.
 
 Eighty‐three
 percent
 of
 the
 administrators
reported
substitutes
should
ask
relevant
questions
of
teachers
and
staff
as
well
as
 complete
 written
 reports
 for
 the
 school
 and
 teacher.
 
 None
 of
 the
 respondents
 left
 additional
 comments
 regarding
 skills
 they
 believed
 necessary
 for
 the
 success
 of
 substitute
 teachers.
 
 Three
 individuals
 left
 general
 comments
 to
 indicate
 administrators
 believe
 that
 overall,
 substitute
 teachers
do
well
in
their
schools.

One
comment
suggests
substitutes
“who
have
difficulty
are
the
 ones
trying
to
be
the
students’
friend
and
lack
classroom
management
skills.”
 Which
of
the
following
are
absolutely
necessary
for
substitute
teachers
to
succeed?
Check
all
that
 apply.
 Keep/maintain
the
routines
and
procedures
of
the
school
and
classroom?


12


100%


Teach
the
lessons
provided
by
the
absent
teacher?
 


9


75%


11


92%


Speak
professionally
with
administrators
and
others?

 Ask
relevant
questions
of
building
teachers
and
staff?


10


83%


Complete
written
reports
for
the
school
and
teacher?


10


83%


12


100%


Keep
students
safe
in
an
emergency?
 Treating
students
with
respect


12


100%


Manage
classroom
behavior?


12


100%


Other


0


0%



 General
Comments/concerns
 For
the
most
part
‐
subs
are
doing
a
great
job.

All
the
above
are
instrumental
in
the
success
of
a
sub.

The
subs
who
 have
difficulty
are
the
ones
trying
to
be
the
students
friend
and
lack
classroom
management
skills.
 
 Figure
6:
Ranking
of
Instructional
Topics

10



Problem
Identification


PROFESSIONAL
CLOTHING
AND
GRAMMAR
 
 The
majority
of
respondents
consider
professional
clothing
(58%)
and
correct
grammar
(67%)
to
be
 extremely
important
characteristics
for
substitute
teachers.

See
figure
7.
 
 When
working
as
a
substitute
teacher,
how
important
is…
 
 
 Not
at
 all
 Professional
clothing?
 
 Correct
grammar?
 


0
 
 0
 


Somewhat


Extremely


1
 8%
 0
 


1
 8%
 1
 8%


3
 25%
 3
 25%


7
 58%
 8
 67%



 


Figure
7:
Professionalism
Questions



 OPEN
ENDED
QUESTION
 Responses
 to
 the
 question:
 “What
 would
 you
 like
 substitute
 teachers
 to
 know
 or
 learn
 more
 about?”
 support
 the
 expressed
 need
 of
 the
 district.
 
 Administrators
 indicate
 that
 substitute
 teachers
need
to
know
more
about
school
and
district
policies
and
protocol.

See
figure
8.
 
 
 What
would
you
like
substitute
teachers
to
know
or
learn
more
about?
 1. 2. 3.

We
have
a
sheet
pertinent
to
our
school
that
we
give
substitutes.
 Documenting
a
note
of
exactly
what
happened
during
the
school
day.
Be
specific
about
individual's
behaviors.
 How
to
handle
emergency
situations.



 Figure
8:
Open
Ended
Question


11



Problem
Identification


RECOMMENDATIONS
 


Although
 the
 majority
 of
 substitute
 teachers
 perform
 their
 jobs
 satisfactorily,
 the
 needs
 analysis
 indicates
 administrators
 believe
 new
 substitutes
 would
 benefit
 from
 professional
 development
or
training.

In
other
words,
adequate
substitute
teacher
preparation
is
necessary
 to
provide
for
consistency
in
schools.


 


A
self‐paced
instructional
unit
will
be
designed
to
provide
instruction
in
the
following
areas:
 1. 
 2. 
 3.

TCS/school
substitute
procedures
and
policy.

 Appropriate
teaching
and
behavior
management
strategies.

 Professional
dress,
communication
and
attitude.




 


In
 order
 to
 design
 appropriate
 instruction
 to
 meet
 area
 1,
 the
 designer
 will
 collect
 additional
information
regarding
specific
substitute
policies
and
procedures
from
the
TCS
 Central
 Office
 and
 district
 schools.
 
 Data
 from
 administrators
 indicate
 expectations
 and
 procedures
 may
 vary
 from
 school
 to
 school.
 
 It
 is
 recommended
 that
 the
 TCS
 webpage
 include
 a
 list
 of
 schools
 and
 links
 to
 substitute
 protocol
 and
 information
 by
 school.

 Instruction
for
the
subsequent
areas
2
and
3
will
represent
best
practices
as
identified
by
 TCS
and
the
subject
matter
expert
(SME).
 
 
 


12



Problem
Identification



 
 


AIM
STATEMENT
 


The
overall
purpose
of
the
Substitute
Teaching
Unit
is
prepare
substitute
teachers
in
Tipton
 County
Schools
(TCS)
to
follow
school
district
protocol
and
manage
classrooms
effectively.
 
 



 PARTICIPANT
GOALS
Substitute
teachers
will:


Step
1:
SET
GOALS


Step
2:
REFINE
GOALS



 Follow
all
policies,
rules
and
procedures.
 Identify
a
substitute’s
role
and
responsibilities.
 Complete
written
reports
for
the
assigned
 school.
 Display
professionalism.

 Communicate
professionally
with
school
staff
 and
appropriate
others.
 Maintain,
as
altogether
possible,
the
routines
 and
procedures
of
the
assigned
school
and
 classroom.
 Teach
the
lesson(s)
provided
by
the
absent
 teacher.
 Maintain
student
safety.
 When
appropriate,
consult
with
 administrators
and
building
teachers.
 


FOLLOW
PROTOCOL
(policy
&
procedures)


Identify
general
student
characteristics:
 physical
and
cognitive,
by
age/grade
levels.

 Demonstrate
an
understanding
of
general
 classroom
and
behavior
management.
 Apply
appropriate
teaching
strategies
 Recognize
appropriate
lesson
plans
and
 delivery.
 Manage
student
and
classroom
behavior.
 


Identify
the
characteristics
of
students:
 physical
and
cognitive,
by
age/grade
levels.


Identify
TCS
substitute
procedures
and
policy.


Recognize
professional
dress,
communication
 and
attitude.


Maintain,
as
possible,
the
routines
and
 procedures
of
the
assigned
school
and
 classroom.


MANAGE
CLASSROOMS
EFFECTIVELY


Apply
appropriate
teaching
&
behavior
 management
strategies.


Original
goals
were
divided
into
two
groups:
“Follow
Protocol”
and
“Manage
Classrooms
 Effectively.”

Goals
were
then
grouped
by
similarities
and
combined
into
five
overall
goals. 13



Problem
Identification


RANK
GOALS
 


Goals
 were
 ranked
 according
 to
 priorities
 described
 during
 initial
 conversations
 with
 Central
 Office
 personnel.
 
 
 The
 goal
 mentioned
 most
 frequently
 related
 to
 “rules”
 or
 protocol
 and
 the
 second
most
frequently
mentioned
concern
correlated
with
classroom
management
strategies.
 



 
 
 


1.

Identify
TCS
substitute
procedures
and
policy.



2.

Apply
appropriate
teaching
and
behavior
management
strategies.



3.

Identify
the
characteristics
of
students
grades
K‐12
(cognitive,
physical,
emotional).



4.

Recognize
professional
dress,
communication
and
attitude.



5.

Maintain,
as
possible,
the
routines
and
procedures
of
the
assigned
school
and
 classroom.



FURTHER
REFINEMENT
and
FINAL
RANKING
OF
GOALS
 



 
 


Goals
one
and
five
were
combined
as
general
policy/procedures.

Goal
three
was
dropped
due
to
 breadth
of
the
instructional
unit.


 
 1. Identify
and
maintain
TCS/school
substitute
procedures
and
policy.

 
 2. Apply
appropriate
teaching
and
behavior
management
strategies.

 3.

Recognize
professional
dress,
communication
and
attitude.



RECOMMENDATIONS
 


The
second
refinement
of
goals
indicates
a
direction
and
focus
for
the
instructional
unit.


In
order
 to
 design
 appropriate
 instruction
 to
 meet
 goal
 1,
 the
 designer
 has
 collected
 additional
 information
regarding
specific
substitute
policies
and
procedures
from
the
TCS
Central
Office
and
 district
schools.

Initial
data
from
administrators
indicate
expectations
and
procedures
may
vary
 from
school
to
school.

It
is
recommended
that
TCS
include,
on
its
webpage,
a
list
of
schools
and
 links
 to
 substitute
 information
 by
 school.
 
 Instruction
 for
 the
 subsequent
 goals
 2
 and
 3
 will
 be
 grounded
in
best
practices
as
identified
by
TCS
and
the
SME.
 


14



Learner
Characteristics
 Learner
Analysis
 The
 instructional
 unit
 will
 target
 adult
 learners
 seeking
 employment
 as
 substitute
 teachers
 in
 Tipton
County
Schools.

Learners
will
be
interested
in
obtaining
knowledge
and
skills
that
will
 assist
them
not
only
in
securing
employment
but
also
in
performing
well
in
their
new
roles
as
 substitute
teachers.




GENERAL
CHARACTERISTICS
 


GENDER

 While
 the
 majority
 (%
 unknown)
 of
 TCS
 teachers
 and
 substitutes
 are
 predominately
 female,
 both
genders
will
be
represented
throughout
the
instructional
unit.
 AGE
 Participants
range
in
age
from
18
to
early
retirement
age
(60+).
 EDUCATION
 Initial
 conversations
 with
 district
 personnel
 indicate
 that
 the
 majority
 of
 substitute
 teachers
 have
high
school
diplomas
or
general
education
equivalents
(GED).

Some
substitutes
are
recent
 teacher
education
graduates
interested
in
obtaining
regular
teaching
positions
and
a
few
others
 are
retired
teachers
with
degrees
in
the
field
of
education.


 WORK
EXPERIENCE

 The
 substitute
 pool
 is
 diverse
 in
 background
 and
 work
 experience.
 
 While
 the
 greater
 part
 of
 the
 substitute
 pool
 has
 blue‐collar
 work
 experience,
 some
 substitute
 teachers
 are
 retired
 teachers
and
others
have
had
professional
careers
and
currently
want
to
work
part‐time.
 ETHNICITY

 Substitute
 teachers
 in
 TCS
 are
 white
 and
 African
 American
 with
 the
 majority
 predominately
 being
white.

Both
ethnic
groups
will
be
represented
within
the
instructional
unit.


 
 
 
 


15



Learner
Characteristics


PREREQUISITE
COMPETENCIES
 


COMPUTER
SKILLS
 The
unit
is
computer
based
therefore
the
learner
must
possess
basic
computer
operating
skills.

 If
 individuals
 lack
 basic
 computer
 skills
 a
 short
 “pre‐training”
 may
 be
 necessary
 in
 order
 to
 complete
the
instructional
unit.


 


READING
LEVEL
 A
minimum
of
a
high
school
(12th
grade)
reading
level
is
expected.
 


MATH
ABILITIES
 Mathematical
knowledge
will
not
be
vital
to
the
completion
of
this
instructional
unit.
 

 ATTITUDE
and
REQUIRED
ATTENDANCE
 The
attitude
of
participants
may
be
mixed.

Some
individuals
will
be
eager
to
learn
in
order
to
 be
 successful
 as
 substitute
 teachers.
 
 Others
 may
 view
 the
 unit
 a
 means
 to
 an
 end.
 
 It
 is
 expected
that
an
open
attitude
toward
learning
will
result
in
the
transfer
of
new
knowledge
and
 skills.
 
 


LEARNING
STYLE
 


Participants’
 learning
 styles
 are
 difficult
 to
 determine
 due
 to
 a
 range
 in
 age,
 education
 and
 experience.
 
 The
 unit
 will
 be
 designed
 to
 meet
 a
 variety
 of
 learning
 styles
 including
 but
 not
 limited
to
auditory,
visual,
inductive
and
deductive
processes.

The
participant
group
will
consist
 entirely
of
adult
learners
and
while
highly
motivated
to
learn,
they
are
likely
to
expect
the
unit
 to
improve
their
work
experience
and
make
good
use
of
their
time.




16



Contextual
Analysis
 Substitute
Teaching
Orientation
 Context
 plays
 an
 important
 role
 in
 developing
 an
 instructional
 unit.
 
 The
 context,
 i.e.
 environment,
influences
all
aspects
of
participant
learning.



 
 


ORIENTING
CONTEXT
 


LEARNER
GOALS
 Learners
will
participate
in
the
instructional
unit
as
part
of
the
hiring
process
for
Tipton
County
 Schools.
 
 It
 is
 expected
 that
 learners
 will
 be
 motivated
 to
 complete
 the
 unit
 and
 will
 want
 to
 perform
well
on
the
assessments.


 


LEARNER
PERCEPTION
 Learners
 are
 likely
 motivated
 to
 acquire
 the
 necessary
 knowledge
 and
 skills
 to
 successfully
 perform
 their
 job
 as
 substitute
 teachers.
 
 Word
 of
 mouth
 is
 also
 important
 in
 a
 small
 school
 district
and
substitutes
should
be
aware
that
reputation
is
important.

Informal
conversations
 with
 new
 substitute
 teachers
 indicate
 an
 apprehension
 of
 the
 unknown.
 
 Participation
 in
 the
 unit
 should
 alleviate
 some
 unknown
 variables.
 
 Unknowns
 include
 substitute
 procedures,
 administrative
expectations
and
methods
to
manage
disruptive
student
behavior.
 


ACCOUNTABILITY
 Substitute
teachers
who
have
not
attended
a
district
wide
training
will
be
required
to
complete
 the
self‐paced
instructional
unit.
 
 
 
 


17



Contextual
Analysis


INSTRUCTIONAL
CONTEXT
 


INSTRUCTIONAL
ENVIROMENT
 Substitute
 teachers
 will
 be
 able
 to
 complete
 the
 self‐paced,
 computer‐based
 unit
 at
 the
 TCS
 Technology
 Training
 Facility
 during
 regular
 business
 hours.
 
 The
 facility,
 consisting
 of
 15
 computer
stations,
will
open
during
the
2009‐2010
academic
year.

Should
TCS
choose
to
make
 the
unit
web‐based,
participants
will
be
able
to
complete
the
unit
in
the
comfort
of
their
home
 or
in
a
public
library
or
computer
lab.
 
 


TRANSFER
CONTEXT
 


TRANSFER
AND
PRACTICE
 The
 instructional
 unit
 will
 include
 school
 and
 classroom
 scenarios.
 
 Incorporating
 examples
 drawn
from
classroom
life
will
prepare
participants
to
make
informed
decisions
about
protocol,
 teaching
and
management.


 


SUPPORT
 Substitute
teachers,
especially
those
new
to
the
field,
will
need
support
from
the
central
office
 in
the
form
of
easily
accessible
information;
i.e.
district
and
school
protocol.

Participants
will
 also
benefit
from
support
in
the
schools
they
service.

School
administrators
might
assign
a
staff
 member
 the
 responsibility
 of
 providing
 new
 substitutes
 with
 a
 tour
 of
 the
 building
 and
 other
 necessary
 information.
 
 Teachers
 on
 leave
 might
 also
 include
 the
 name
 of
 a
 “teacher
 buddy”
 who
would
be
willing
to
answer
questions
and
assist
if
necessary.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


18



Task
Analysis
 Purpose
 The
task
analysis
defines
the
content
and
organization
of
the
unit.

It
provides
and
outline
for
 instruction
in
TCS
policy,
classroom
management
and
professionalism
for
substitute
teachers.
 


TOPIC
ANALYSIS
 
 Data
 from
 the
 needs
 assessment
 suggests
 three
 primary
 areas
 for
 instruction:
 TCS
 policy/procedures,
 classroom
 management
 and
 professionalism.
 
 Of
 the
 three
 methods
 from
 the
MRK
(Morrison,
Ross,
&
Kemp)
Model
a
Topic
Analysis
was
used
to
outline
the
instructional
 content
for
the
substitute
teacher
unit.

A
procedural
analysis
and/or
critical
incident
analysis
 may
 be
 beneficial
 for
 a
 future
 unit
 focusing
 specifically
 on
 the
 nuances
 of
 classroom
 management.

 
 The
 topic
 analysis
 was
 conducted
 via
 review
 of
 the
 Tipton
 County
 Schools
 Substitute
 Teacher
 Handbook
 (2008),
 Substitute
 Teacher
 Rating
 Scale
 (2009),
 and
 the
 knowledge
 base
 of
 the
 instructional
designer/subject
matter
expert.

Additional
subject
matter
experts
(principals
and
 a
TCS
Supervisor)
will
review
the
task
analysis
for
final
recommendations
and
approval.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


19



Task
Analysis


FACTS
 1. A
Substitute
Teacher
is
a
person
hired
as
a
temporary
teacher
to
teach
and
manage
a
school
 class
when
the
usual
teacher
is
unavailable;
e.g.,
because
of
illness,
personal
leave,
or
other
 reasons.
 a. Minimum
requirements:

 i. High
School
diploma
or
GED
 ii. 18
years
of
age
to
sub
in
grades
K‐8
 iii. 21
years
of
age
to
sub
in
grades
9‐12
 2. Substitute
 list:
 substitute
 applicants
 are
 interviewed
 as
 the
 need
 arises
 and
 the
 Central
 Office
provides
an
updated
list
of
approved
substitutes
to
each
TCS
principal.


 a. After
 completion
 of
 an
 interview,
 the
 applicant’s
 file
 will
 be
 reviewed
 and
 if
 approved,
the
applicant’s
name
will
be
placed
on
the
substitute
list.
 b. The
 substitute
 list
 will
 include
 the
 substitute’s
 address,
 telephone
 number,
 school
 preferences
and
educational
training.
 c. Revised
substitute
lists
are
distributed
at
each
of
the
principals’
meetings.
 d. There
is
no
renewal
procedure;
all
names
remain
on
the
list.


 e. Removal
from
substitute
list:
 i. Names
will
only
be
removed
for
sub‐par
performance.
 ii. Names
will
also
be
removed
at
the
request
of
the
substitute
teacher.
 3. Pay
Rate:
Substitutes
working
on
a
day‐to‐day
basis
are
paid
$60.00
per
day.
 a. Pay
Checks
are
mailed
to
the
address
on
file
with
the
TCS
bookkeeping
department.
 b. Pay
Checks:
are
mailed
twice
a
month
(15th
and
31st).
 c. Upon
 expiration
 of
 a
 regular
 teacher’s
 sick
 leave,
 the
 TCS
 Board
 of
 Education
 is
 required
to
employ
a
certificated
substitute
teacher.

The
certificated
substitute
will
 be
paid
on
the
basis
of
training
and
experience.
 4. Work
Hours:
Substitutes
work
the
same
schedule
as
the
certified
teachers
at
the
assigned
 school.


 a. Substitutes
should
check
with
the
principal
or
school
secretary
for
specific
reporting
 time.


 b. The
regular
school
day
is
7:45
a.m.
to
3:15
p.m.
 


20



Task
Analysis


5. Dress
code:
Substitute
teachers
will
present
a
professional
appearance,
which
will
serve
as
 an
appropriate
role
model
for
students.
 6. The
 Substitute
 Teacher’s
 Guide
 will
 be
 available
 in
 an
 easily
 identifiable
 location
 in
 each
 classroom.

The
Substitute
Guide
will
contain
the
following:
 a. A
class
roll/roster
to
provide
the
names
of
all
current
students
enrolled
in
the
absent
 teacher’s
class(es).
 b. Seating
Charts
will
provide

“maps”
of
students’
assigned
seats.
 c. Bell
or
class
schedule.
 d. Detailed
 instructions
 about
 the
 classroom
 routine,
 lunch,
 breaks,
 specialty
 classes,
 etc.
 e. Detailed
plan
(lesson
plans)
of
what
is
to
be
done
in
each
class,
which
materials
to
 be
used,
where
to
find
materials
and
equipment,
etc.
 f. Names
of
at
least
two
students
per
class
who
can
be
counted
on
to
give
information
 or
provide
assistance.
 g. Name
of
another
teacher
who
can
provide
assistance
if
necessary.

 h. Three
 days
 worth
 of
 extreme
 emergency
 plans
 should
 also
 be
 located
 in
 the
 principals’
office.
 7. Important
terms/vocabulary
for
substitute
teachers:
 a. Certificated
Substitute:
a
licensed
teacher
employed
as
a
substitute
teacher.
 b. Classroom
 Management:
 the
 process
 of
 making
 sure
 that
 a
 classroom
 runs
 smoothly;
 activities
 are
 well
 planned
 and
 organized,
 supplies
 are
 ready,
 rules/procedures/consequences
 are
 established
 and
 disruptive
 behavior
 is
 prevented.
 c. Classroom
Procedures:
methods
for
completing
particular
activities
or
specific
daily
 routines.
 d. Classroom
Rules:
general
expectations
for
student
behavior.
 e. Corporal
 Punishment:
 punishment
 designed
 to
 inflict
 physical
 pain
 (spanking,
 slapping,
pinching,
prolonged
physical
postures,
etc).
 f. Day‐to‐day
substitute:
a
short‐term
substitute
teacher
requested
one
day
at
a
time.


21



Task
Analysis


g. Interim
 Substitute
 or
 long‐term
 substitute:
 the
 substitute
 teacher
 fills
 in
 for
 an
 extended
absence
such
as
a
teacher
on
maternity
leave.
 h. Lesson
 Plan:
 an
 outline
 of
 goals/objectives
 and
 learning
 activities
 and
 assessments
 designed
to
help
students
achieve
those
goals.


 i.

Principal:
the
educator
who
has
chief
administrative
authority
for
a
school.
He
or
she
 reports
to
the
director
of
schools.


j.

Substitute
 Guide:
 a
 collection
 of
 information
 and
 plans
 provided
 by
 the
 regular
 classroom
teacher
in
the
event
that
a
substitute
is
necessary.

The
guide
(folder
or
 notebook)
should
be
available
in
plain
site.


k. Transitions:
 switching
 from
 one
 activity
 to
 another.
 
 Transitions,
 if
 not
 carefully
 planned
can
be
an
opportunity
for
disruption
and
loss
of
instructional
time.
 


RULES
 
 1. Report
 any
 unauthorized
 student
 absence
 to
 the
 office
 immediately;
 i.e.
 a
 student
 leaves
 class
without
permission,
does
not
return
from
the
restroom
or
lunch.

 2. Collection
of
Money:

 a. When
 money
 collection
 is
 required,
 the
 classroom
 teacher
 may
 leave
 detailed
 procedures.

If
none
are
available,
substitutes
should
obtain
procedures
for
handling
 the
collection
of
money
from
the
school
office
(principal
or
assistant
principal).
 b. Carefully
follow
the
school’s
procedure
for
handling
any
monies,
such
as
collections
 for
school
pictures,
lunch
money,
etc.

 c. All
 money
 collected
 for
 any
 purpose
 should
 be
 taken
 to
 the
 school
 office
 immediately.
 3. Instruction:
 consult
 with
 the
 school
 principal,
 department
 head/team
 leader
 before
 beginning
any
activity
or
procedure
that
strays
from
the
regular
teacher’s
plans.
 4. Grades:
 a. A
 substitute
 should
 not
 grade
 papers
 unless
 specifically
 directed
 to
 do
 so
 by
 the
 teacher
or
principal.


22



Task
Analysis


b. Students’
papers
should
be
collected
and
left
in
an
appropriate
place
for
the
regular
 teacher.
 c. If
the
principal
or
teacher
directs
a
substitute
to
grade
papers,
the
substitute
should
 not
enter
grades
in
the
grade
book.
 5. Homework:
 day‐to‐day
 substitutes
 should
 only
 assign
 homework
 planned
 by
 the
 regular
 classroom
teacher.
 6. Discipline:
 It
 is
 the
 substitutes
 responsibility
 to
 maintain
 appropriate
 control
 of
 students
 assigned
to
him/her
at
all
times.
 7. Do
NOT
administer
corporal
punishment.

Any
bodily
contact
is
NOT
permitted.
 8. The
substitute
is
responsible
for
leaving
a
written
report
for
regular
teacher.

Some
schools
 may
 require
 the
 completion
 of
 a
 specific
 form.
 
 If
 no
 form
 is
 provided,
 substitutes
 should
 leave
a
detailed
written
description
of
the
day
(assignments
completed,
student
behavior,
 questions,
etc).
 9. Unacceptable
Actions/Behavior
 a. Eating
in
the
classroom
while
children
are
present.
 b. Working
on
any
personal
projects
or
hobbies.
 c. Reading
personal
books,
magazines,
etc.
 d. Using
 the
 telephone
 for
 anything
 other
 than
 emergencies
 (includes
 personal
 cell
 phones).
 e. Leaving
the
classroom
unattended.
 f. Retaliation
of
any
kind
against
students
(mental,
emotional,
physical).
 g. Physical
 contact
 with
 student
 (e.g.,
 Do
 not
 grab
 and
 attempt
 to
 physically
 take
 a
 student
to
the
office
if
they
refuse
to
go
with
you.
).
 h. Engaging
 in
 discussion
 of
 students’
 personal
 lives.
 Any
 personal
 information
 obtained
through
accidental
means
must
remain
confidential.





 
 
 
 


23



Task
Analysis


CONCEPTS
 
 1. Professionalism

 a. Accept
substitute
assignments.
 b. Do
not
cancel
unless
it
there
is
an
unavoidable
emergency.
 c. Arrive
on
time
(early
is
best).
 d. Adhere
 to
 lesson
 plans
 and
 abide
 by
 any
 instruction
 or
 directive
 from
 any
 school
 administrator,
or
their
designee.

 e. Meet
or
exceed
all
expectations.
 f. Be
cordial
and
professional
in
all
interactions
and
communications.


 g. Keep
student
information
confidential.


 h. Do
not
discuss
school
staff
or
students
with
others
(teachers,
parents,
members
of
 the
community,
etc.).
 i.

Leave
a
written
report
for
the
regular
teacher.


j.

Before
leaving,
check
with
the
school
office
to
see
about
reporting
for
the
next
day.


2. Professional
Dress
and
Appearance
 Professional
 appearance
 is
 important
 for
 a
 successful
 learning
 and
 working
 environment.

 Professional
 appearance
 in
 clothing,
 grooming
 and
 attitude
 also
 encourages
 high
 student
 and
staff
performance.
Professional
attire
includes
collared
shirts,
slacks,
dress
coordinates,
 suits,
dresses,
and
ties.

Unacceptable
attire
includes:
 o Clothing
and/or
accessories
prohibited
in
the
student
dress
code;
 o Sunglasses
or
hats
inside
the
building;
 o Short
skirts
and
dresses
above
the
knee;
 o Shoe
thongs,
flip‐flops
or
slippers;
 o Athletic
wear,
unless
substituting
in
a
physical
education
class
or
event;
 o Inappropriately
sheer
or
tight
clothing;
 o Clothing
that
inappropriately
exposes
the
stomach,
buttocks,
back
or
breasts.


24



Task
Analysis


3. Classroom
Management
 Well‐understood
procedures
are
the
key
to
a
calm
classroom.


 a. Arrive
 in
 time
 to
 locate
 information
 about
 the
 regular
 teacher’s
 routines
 and
 procedures
 for
 distributing
 work
 &
 supplies,
 sharpening
 pencils,
 transitioning
 from
 one
class/subject
to
the
next,
lining
up,
etc.

 b. If
procedures
cannot
be
located,
find
a
trusted
student
or
adult
to
ask.


 c. If
no
procedures
can
be
found,
think
through
the
best
scenario
for
each
activity
and
 explain
your
expectations
clearly
to
the
class.
 4. Behavior
Management
&
Discipline
 A
 safe
 and
 orderly
 environment
 is
 first
 priority.
 
 Good
 classroom
 organization,
 interesting
 activities
 and
 well‐understood
 procedures
 promote
 good
 behavior.
 
 The
 substitute
 should
 be
 firm,
 sincere
 and
 above
 all,
 fair
 when
 dealing
 with
 deviant
 behavior.
 
 Keep
 students
 busy!
Problems
do
not
occur
nearly
as
often
when
students
are
on‐task.
 a. Appropriate
Control

 Administrators
want
to
see
students
working
and
learning.

They
do
not
want
to
see
 a
 classroom
 full
 of
 students
 chatting
 idly,
 horse
 playing,
 etc.
 while
 the
 sub
 reads
 a
 newspaper.
 b. The
best
discipline
is
preventative
discipline.
 i. Let
 the
 students
 know
 that
 you
 are
 in
 charge;
 be
 firm
 in
 following
 the
 classroom
rules.

 ii. Wait
for
student
attention
before
speaking.

Inform
the
students
that
you
are
 waiting
for
their
attention
(use
visual
or
verbal
cues).
 iii. Maintain
 a
 low,
 firm
 voice.
 
 A
 quiet
 voice
 often
 accomplishes
 more
 than
 shouting.
 iv. Make
 your
 expectations
 clear
 before
 each
 activity
 or
 transition
 (behavior,
 acceptable
noise
level,
etc.)
 v. Follow
the
seating
chart.
 vi. Reward
positive
behavior
with
comments
and
smiles.
 vii. Correct
inappropriate
behavior.


25



Task
Analysis


1. Move
to
stand
beside
a
student
creating
a
problem
(excessive
talking,
 off
task,
etc.).

 2. When
possible,
speak
with
misbehaving
students
privately.
 3. Be
consistent.

 c. Use
your
best
judgment
when
problems
occur.
 d. Refer
all
serious
problems
to
the
office

 i. Consistent
 deviant
 behavior,
 which
 continues
 to
 disrupt
 the
 learning
 environment.
 ii. Cursing
 iii. Fighting
 e. Refrain
from
verbal
abuse.
 f. Do
NOT
administer
corporal
punishment.

Any
bodily
contact
is
NOT
permitted.
 g. Supervise
 students
 at
 all
 times.
 Do
 not
 require
 any
 student
 to
 remain
 in
 halls
 or
 other
areas
where
they
would
not
be
under
direct
supervision.
 h. Review
 the
 classroom
 teacher’s
 discipline
 plan.
 Discuss
 discipline
 options
 with
 teachers
in
the
school.

Find
out
what
methods
are
available.
 5. Skill
Development
 To
 support
 substitute
 teachers
 growth
 and
 improvement
 in
 instruction
 and
 classroom
 management,
the
following
may
occur:
 a. As
 time
 permits,
 school
 administrators
 will
 observe
 substitute
 teachers
 and
 make
 recommendations
or
suggestions.
 b. Substitutes
may
be
invited
to
attend
in‐service
activities
held
at
local
schools.
 c. Independent
learning:

 i. There
 are
 a
 number
 of
 websites
 and
 magazines
 available
 for
 substitute
 teachers.
 ii. Talk
with
experienced
substitutes
about
their
successes.


Ask
for
suggestions
 and
recommendations.


26



Task
Analysis


6. Evaluation
 a. Substitutes
are
evaluated
informally.


 b. Principals
or
supervisors
are
to
report
in
writing
to
the
Central
Office
unsatisfactory
 performance
of
a
substitute
teacher.
 c. A
 formal
 report
 of
 unsatisfactory
 performance
 may
 result
 in
 a
 substitute
 being
 removed
from
the
approved
list.
 7. Sexual
Harassment
of
Students
–
STU
1745
 a. Sexual
harassment
activity
toward
any
person
will
not
be
tolerated.


 b. Sexual
 harassment
 is
 defined
 as
 conduct,
 advances,
 gestures
 or
 words
 of
 a
 sexual
 nature
which:


 i. Interferes
with
the
student’s
work
or
educational
opportunities.
 ii. Creates
an
intimidating,
hostile,
or
offensive
learning
environment.
 iii. Implies
the
submission
to
such
conduct
is
made
an
explicit
or
implicit
term
of
 receiving
grades
or
credit.
 iv. Implies
that
submission
to
or
rejection
of
such
conduct
will
be
used
as
a
basis
 for
 determining
 the
 student’s
 grades
 and/or
 participating
 in
 a
 student
 activity.
 c. Victims
will
report
sexual
harassment
to
the
proper
school
authorities.
 i. Confidentiality
will
be
maintained.
 ii. No
reprisals
or
retaliation
will
occur
as
a
result
of
good
faith
reporting
of
such
 charges.
 d. Investigating
alleged
sexual
harassment
conduct:
 i. All
 circumstances
 will
 be
 investigated,
 including
 the
 nature
 of
 the
 conduct,
 the
context
in
which
the
alleged
conduct
occurred.
 ii. The
 director
 or
 a
 designee
 will
 be
 responsible
 for
 investigating
 all
 sexual
 harassment
complaints.
 iii. If
 satisfactory
 resolution
 of
 the
 complaint
 is
 not
 reached,
 the
 person
 may
 appeal
the
matter
to
the
director
and
ultimately,
to
the
school
board.
 


27



Task
Analysis


8. Child
Abuse
–
Board
Policy
6,409
 All
substitute
teachers
shall
be
alert
for
any
evidence
of
child
abuse
or
neglect.

If
abuse
is
 suspected,
report
to
the
principal
immediately.
 


PROCEDURES
 
 1. General
Job
Responsibilities
 a. Report
to
the
school
principal
or
school
secretary
upon
arrival
at
the
school
building.
 b. Oversee
student
behavior
in
class,
during
lunch
and
at
recess.
 c. Instruction:

 i. Check
 with
 the
 principal
 to
 see
 if
 there
 are
 any
 special
 instructions
 or
 expectations
for
the
day
(field
trip,
assembly,
fire
drill,
money
collection,
new
 students,
etc.)
 ii. Teach
the
lessons
provided
by
the
absent
teacher.
 iii. The
teacher’s
plans
should
be
followed
as
closely
as
possible
unless
directed
 otherwise
by
the
principal.
 d. Maintain
the
established
classroom/school
routines
and
procedures.
 e. Student
Attendance:


 i. Keep
an
accurate
record
of
student
attendance.


 ii. Report
any
unauthorized
absence
to
the
office
immediately.
 iii. Make
informal
checks
after
breaks,
lunch
and
specialty
classes.
 f. Report,
 in
 writing,
 the
 day’s
 activities
 at
 the
 conclusion
 of
 each
 teaching
 day.
 
 The
 school
secretary
should
provide
the
substitute
with
a
form
for
the
written
report.
 g. Follow
all
policies,
rules,
and
procedures
to
which
regular
teachers
are
subject.
 h. Exhibit
good
teaching
practice.
 2. School
specific
procedures
 Look
 for
 written
 information
 about
 school
 procedures.
 
 If
 necessary,
 speak
 with
 a
 school
 administrator,
or
appropriate
staff,
about
the
correct
procedures
for
handling
the
following:
 a. Money
collection
 i. Writing
receipts
 


28



Task
Analysis


ii. Handling
checks
vs.
cash
 iii. Making
change
 iv. Turning
in
money
to
the
office
 b. School
wide
emergency
procedures
(tornado,
fire,
intruder,
etc.)
 c. Classroom
emergency
(injured
student,
severely
disruptive
students,
etc.)
 d. Sick
students

 3. Before
leaving
for
the
day
 a. Leave
a
written
report
for
the
regular
teacher.

Include
the
following:
 i. Material/work
covered
or
taught.
 ii. Plans
and
assignments
for
the
next
day.
 b. Check
with
school
officials
to
see
if
you
should
return
the
next
day.
 c. Return
all
keys,
etc.
 


INTERPERSONAL
SKILLS
 
 Personal
Traits
of
a
quality
Substitute
Teacher
 1. Adaptable
Temperament


 The
substitute
teacher
will
demonstrate:
 a. The
ability
to
perform
a
variety
of
duties;
change
from
one
task
to
another
without
 loss
of
effectiveness
or
composure.
 b. Responsibility
for
the
direction,
control,
or
planning
of
a
learning
activity.
 c. Professional
interaction
with
students.

 d. The
ability
to
make
generalizations,
evaluate
and
make
decisions
based
on
external
 information.
 
 (e.g.
 the
 classroom
 is
 getting
 loud,
 students
 are
 finished
 with
 their
 assignment
therefore
the
sub
should
give
additional
assignments).

 2. Pleasing
and
appropriate
voice
 3. Correct
grammar
 4. Clear
communication
of
ideas
 
 
 


29



Task
Analysis


Attitudes
 
 1. Professional
Attitude;
substitute
teachers
are
not
“babysitters.”

 2. Genuine
interest
in
students
and
people.
 3. Enthusiasm
for
learning
and
teaching.
 4. Sensitivity
in
working
with
others.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Task
Analysis
References
 
 DESIGNER/SUBJECT
MATTER
EXPERT:
Angela
Christopher
 
 SUBJECT
MATTER
EXPERT:
Harvey
Witherington,
Supervisor
of
Career
Technical
Education
 
 
 Tipton
County
Schools.
(2008).
Substitute
Teacher
Handbook.
Tipton
County,
TN.
 
 Tipton
County
Schools.
(2009).
Substitute
Teacher
Rating
Scale.
Tipton
County
TN.
 
 
 
 
 


30



Instructional
Objectives
 Purpose
 


Instructional
 objectives
 identify
 the
 knowledge
 and
 skills
 necessary
 to
 solve
 a
 performance
 problem.
 
 The
 instructional
 objectives
 serve
 to
 organize
 the
 instruction,
 guide
 the
 learner
 and
 provide
 a
 framework
 to
 evaluate
 the
 learning.
 The
 following
 objectives
 are
 necessary
 to
 accomplish
the
goals
of
the
substitute
orientation
unit.

The
content
and
performance
for
each
 objective
 are
 categorized
 according
 to
 Merrill’s
 expanded
 performance‐content
 matrix
 model
 (Merrill
 (1983),
 as
 cited
 in
 MRK
 p.
 121)
 and
 are
 followed
 by
 the
 initial
 strategy,
 generative
 strategy
and
test
items.




31



Instructional
Objectives


TERMS
AND
VOCABULARY
FOR
SUBSTITUTE
TEACHERS
 


OBJECTIVE
1


Given
a
list
of
substitute
teaching
terms,
the
learner
will
match
the
terms
with
the
correct
 definitions.
 Performance
 Classification

 Fact


Recall
 X

Application


INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Each
 term
 and
 definition
 will
 be
 presented
 as
 it
 becomes
relevant
to
the
content.

Text
and
visual
examples
such
as
graphics
 and
video
will
be
utilized
where
appropriate.


Concept
 Principle/Rule


CLASSIFICATION:
Fact
 PERFORMANCE:
Recall


Procedure


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 
 (Recall/Review)
 The
 learner
 will
 be
 presented
 with


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


repetition
 of
 terms
 and
 definitions
 throughout
 the
 introduction
 of
 the
 unit.

 The
learner
will
also
have
opportunities
for
mental
practice,
e.g.
“Which
term
 describes
 a
 substitute
 teacher
 who
 fills
 a
 two
 month
 appointment
 for
 a
 teacher
 on
 maternity
 leave?”
 
 After
 a
 three
 second
 wait
 time,
 the
 learner
 would
be
presented
with
the
correct
answer
(Interim
Substitute).




 




































TEST
ITEMS:
 Read
through
the
following
list
of
terms
and
match
the
term
with
the
correct
definition.


 


TERM


ANSWER
 DEFINITION


Substitute
teacher
 Day
to
day
substitute


f
 e


a.
 b.


Interim
substitute
 Certificated
Substitute


d
 a


c.
 d.


Principal
 Substitute
List


b
 g


e.
 f.


g


A
licensed
teacher
employed
as
a
substitute
teacher.
 The
 educator
 who
 has
 chief
 administrative
 authority
 for
 a
 school.
 He
 or
 she
 reports
to
the
director
of
schools.
 The
general
daily
schedule
left
by
the
classroom
teacher
for
the
substitute.
 The
 substitute
 teacher
 fills
 in
 for
 an
 extended
 absence
 such
 as
 a
 teacher
 on
 maternity
leave.
 A
short‐term
substitute
teacher
requested
one
day
at
a
time.
 A
 person
 hired
 as
 a
 temporary
 teacher
 to
 teach
 and
 manage
 a
 school
 class
 when
the
usual
teacher
is
unavailable;
e.g.,
because
of
illness,
personal
leave,
 or
other
reasons.
 Names
 and
 contact
 information
 of
 approved
 substitutes
 eligible
 for
 work
 in
 district
schools.



 Read
through
the
next
list
of
classroom
terms
and
match
the
term
with
the
correct
definition.


 


TERM


ANSWER
 DEFINITION


Classroom
Management


d


a.


Classroom
Rules


c


b.


Classroom
Procedures
 Corporal
Punishment


h
 g


c.
 d.

Lesson
Plan


a


e.


Substitute
Guide
 Transitions


b
 e


f.
 g.


h.


An
 outline
 of
 goals/objectives
 and
 learning
 activities
 and
 assessments
 designed
to
help
students
achieve
those
goals.


 A
 collection
 of
 information
 and
 plans
 provided
 by
 the
 regular
 classroom
 teacher
 in
 the
 event
 that
 a
 substitute
 is
 necessary.
 
 The
 guide
 (folder
 or
 notebook)
should
be
available
in
plain
site.
 General
expectations
for
student
behavior.
 
 The
process
of
making
sure
that
a
classroom
runs
smoothly;
activities
are
well
 planned
 and
 organized,
 supplies
 are
 ready,
 rules/procedures/consequences
 are
established
and
disruptive
behavior
is
prevented.
 Switching
 from
 one
 activity
 to
 another.
 
 Transitions,
 if
 not
 carefully
 planned
 can
be
an
opportunity
for
disruption
and
loss
of
instructional
time.
 Maps
of
students’
assigned
seats.
 The
 intentional
 infliction
 of
 physical
 pain
 as
 a
 method
 of
 changing
 behavior.

 Examples
include
spanking
and
painful
body
postures.
 Methods
for
completing
particular
activities
or
specific
daily
routines.


32



Instructional
Objectives



 TCS
POLICY
AND
PROCEDURES
 


OBJECTIVE
2


Given
three
substitute
teacher
application
scenarios,
the
learner
will
choose
the
applicant
 eligible
for
hire.
 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact


through
text,
audio
and
screen
captures
of
the
employment
application.


Concept
 Principle/Rule
 Procedure


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


CLASSIFICATION:
Rule
 PERFORMANCE:
Application
 
 INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Employment
 requirements
 will
 be
 presented


X


 GENERATIVE
STRATEGY:
(Integration/generate
example)
The
learner
will
be
 presented
 with
 characteristics
 of
 qualified
 and
 unqualified
 substitute
 applicants
 (age
 &
 education).
 
 Given
 a
 list
 of
 characteristics,
 the
 learner
 will
generate
an
example
of
an
eligible
applicant
by
clicking
and
dragging
 examples
 to
 a
 “qualified”
 category.
 
 When
 the
 practice
 question
 is
 completed
correctly,
the
examples
will
build
a
visual
graphic
(ideal
sub).



 TEST
ITEM
 
 Read
the
following
three
scenarios
and
choose
the
person
who
is
eligible
for
hire
as
a
TCS
 substitute
teacher.
 
 o Jessica
 


Jessica
 is
 19
 years
 old
 and
 expects
 to
 finish
 the
 requirements
 for
 a
 GED
 later
 this
 year.
 She
 has
 always
 wanted
 to
 become
a
teacher
and
she
wants
to
take
teacher
education
classes
at
the
local
community
college.

To
gain
experience
 working
with
children,
she
has
applied
to
work
as
a
substitute
teacher.



 
  Jason
 


After
finishing
high
school,
Jason
attended
two
years
at
a
Junior
College.

While
in
his
early
twenties,
Jason
worked
at
a
 local
restaurant.

The
restaurant
recently
closed
and
Jason
is
unemployed.

Having
helped
out
at
home
with
his
younger
 brothers
and
sisters,
Jason
thinks
he
might
succeed
as
a
substitute
teacher.



 
 o Mae
 
 Mae
is
42
years
old
and
loves
children.
She
has
worked
in
a
daycare,
her
church
nursery
and
volunteers
as
a
Girl
Scout
 leader.
 
 Although
 Mae
 quit
 high
 school
 at
 17,
 she
 is
 smart
 and
 great
 with
 kids.
 
 Mae
 has
 been
 looking
 for
 part‐time
 work
and
her
family
has
suggested
that
she
apply
to
work
as
a
substitute
teacher.
 
 
 ANSWER
 Jason
is
over
the
age
of
18
and
he
also
has
the
necessary
high
school
diploma/GED
requirement.


33



Instructional
Objectives


OBJECTIVE
3


Given
a
scenario
and
a
statement
about
adding,
changing,
or
removing
contact
information
 from
the
substitute
list,
the
learner
will
label
the
statement
as
true/false.

 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact


substitute
list
and
procedures.
 


Principle/Rule


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 The
 learner
 will
 be
 presented
 with
 a
 description
 of
 the


Concept


Procedure


CLASSIFICATION:
Procedure
 PERFORMANCE:
Application


X

GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 (Integration/paraphrase)
 Provided
 with
 examples
 and
 a
 procedural
question,
the
learner
will
mentally
paraphrase
the
procedures
and/or
 rational
for
adding,
changing
or
removing
contact
information
from
the
substitute
 list.
 
 Example:
 “
 James
 is
 employed
 as
 a
 substitute
 teacher
 and
 he
 recently
 purchased
a
new
home.

He
will
be
moving
from
his
apartment
in
two
weeks.

It
is
 important
for
James
to
contact
TCS
to
change
his
address
because…”
After
a
wait
 time
of
3‐5
seconds,
the
learner
will
be
presented
with
a
correct
response.



TEST
ITEMS:
 Read
the
scenarios
below
and
mark
the
following
statements
as
true
or
false.
 


A. 


After
completing
an
application
and
an
interview,
you
have
been
hired
as
a
substitute
teacher.


 Your
name
and
contact
information
(address,
phone
number,
school
preferences)
will
be
included
on
the
updated
substitute
list
 at
the
next
principals’
meeting.
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 ANSWER:
True
 Approved
names
are
added
automatically
and
the
updated
substitute
list
is
distributed
at
the
monthly
principals’
meeting.



 B. 



 C. 


As
a
substitute
for
Tipton
County,
you
have
recently
moved
to
a
new
apartment
and
your
telephone
number
has
changed.


 Since
 school
 administrators
 telephone
 to
 schedule
 substitutes,
 you
 will
 need
 to
 contact
 the
 TCS
 central
 office
 to
 change
 your
 phone
number
only.




 o True
  False
 
 
 ANSWER:
False
 It
is
important
to
keep
all
contact
information
current.

The
central
office
mails
letters
and
paychecks
to
the
address
provided
in
 your
contact
information.

Your
address
should
be
current.
 Michael
 has
 been
 a
 substitute
 for
 one
 year.
 
 He
 has
 recently
 been
 reprimanded
 for
 unprofessional
 behavior
 and
 dress.
 
 The
 principal
of
ABC
School
informed
Michael
that
he
would
no
longer
work
as
a
substitute
at
ABC
School.

Michael
is
unconcerned.



 Michael
can
continue
subbing
at
the
other
schools
in
the
district.

The
principals
at
the
other
schools
will
not
be
aware
of
the
 incident
at
ABC
School.

 o True
  False
 
 
 ANSWER:
False
 The
ABC
principal
may
contact
the
central
office
and
notify
personnel
of
the
problem
with
Michael.

Substitute
names
may
be
 removed
from
the
approved
list
for
sub‐par
performance.



 D. 


You
have
been
a
substitute
for
five
years
and
you
have
recently
accepted
a
full
time
job.

To
have
your
name
removed
from
the
 substitute
list
you
must
contact
the
central
office.
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 ANSWER:
True
 Contact
information
is
removed
at
the
request
of
the
substitute.


34



Instructional
Objectives


OBJECTIVE
4


Given
multiple‐choice
or
true/false
items,
the
learner
will
identify
components
for
the
following:
 pay
rate,
work
hours,
and
dress
code.
 


Performance
 Classification

 Fact
 Concept
 Principle/Rule
 Procedure


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


Recall
 X

Application


CLASSIFICATION:
Fact
 PERFORMANCE:
Recall
 


INITIAL
PRESENTATION:
Job
requirements
will
be
presented
through
 text,
audio,
and
photos.
 


GENERATIVE
STRATEGY:

(Recall/rehearsal)
The
learner
will
be
 presented
with
fill‐in‐the
blank
questions.

After
a
3‐5
 second
wait
time,
the
blanks
will
fill
in
with
the
correct
 answers.

Example:
“After
working
subbing
for
one
month,
 John
should
have
received
____
paychecks,
for
$_____
per
 day,
mailed
to
__________________.”



 TEST
ITEMS
 
 Choose
the
correct
response
for
the
following
questions:
 
 

=
ANSWERS



 


1.
Substitutes
working
on
a
day‐to‐day
basis
are
paid
_________
per
day.
 
 o $40.00

 o $50.00
  $60.00
 o $100.00
 
 
 
 
 2.

Pay
checks
are
mailed
 
 o weekly
  bi‐monthly
 o once
per
month
 o per
assignment

 
 
 
 
 3.

Substitutes
work
the
same
hours
and
schedule
as
the
certified
staff
at
the
assigned
school.


 
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 
 
 
 4.

Upon
arriving
to
the
assigned
school,
the
substitute
should
first
 
 o locate
the
assigned
classroom.
  check
in
with
the
principal
or
school
secretary.
 
 
 o talk
with
other
teachers
to
find
out
why
the
 o walk
through
the
entire
school
in
order
to
get
a
 regular
teacher
is
absent.
 feel
for
the
building.
 
 5.


A
Substitute’s
appearance
should
be
professional;
to
serve
as
a
role
model
for
students.
 
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 


35



OBJECTIVE
5


Instructional
Objectives


Given
a
scenario
and
multiple‐choice
answers,
the
learner
will
interpret
a
problem
and
choose
 to
locate
the
needed
information
the
Substitute
Teaching
Guide.


CLASSIFICATION:
Principle
 PERFORMANCE:
Application


Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact


INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Components
 of
 the
 Substitute
 Teaching
 Guide
will
be
presented
with
examples,
explanations
and
rational.


Concept
 Principle/Rule


X

GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:

 (Organization/categorize)
 The
 learner
 will


Procedure


be
 presented
 with
 an
 icon
 of
 a
 “Sub
 Guide
 Folder”
 and
 a
 list
 of
 text.

Using
the
mouse,
the
learner
will
grab
text
items
that
belong
 in
the
sub
guide
and
drop
the
items
on
the
Sub
Guide
icon.


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


TEST
ITEM
 


Today
is
your
first
day
as
a
substitute
teacher.

You
have
arrived
early
and
signed
in
at
the
front
office.

The
school
secretary
escorted
 you
to
your
assigned
classroom
and
left.

As
you
glance
at
your
watch,
you
realize
that
the
students
will
arrive
in
20
minutes.


You
 find
a
note
to
you
and
the
day’s
assignments
on
the
teacher’s
desk
but
there
are
no
schedules,
procedures,
or
seat
assignments
with
 the
note.

Where
should
you
look
the
information
first?
 
 o The
main
office
 o The
classroom
next
door
 
 
 o The
items
are
unnecessary
for
one
day;
you
shouldn’t
  The
substitute
teacher
guide/folder
 spend
time
looking.
 
 


OBJECTIVE
6


The
learner
will
classify
statements
about
instruction,
student
attendance,
grades,
homework,
 discipline,
money
collection,
and
departure
as
true/false.
 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Fact


Principle/Rule


Interpersonal
Skill



 Attitude
 


1.

INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Daily
 substitute
 responsibilities
 will
 be
 presented
through
examples
in
text,
audio
and
graphics.


Concept


Procedure


Application


CLASSIFICATION:
Procedures
 PERFORMANCE:
Recall


X

GENERATIVE
STRATEGY:
(Elaboration/sentence
elaborations)
 Presented
with
a
scenario,
the
learner
will
mentally
elaborate
 “why”
the
procedure
is
necessary.

Example:
A
student
does
not
 return
to
class
from
P.E.

The
substitute
should
report
the
absence
 to
the
office
immediately
because…
“


A
student
does
not
return
to
your
class
after
lunch.

You
should
report
the
absence
to
the
office
immediately.
 


o False
 
 
 
 
 2. If
required
to
collect
money,
you
should
always
inquire
about
the
proper
procedure.
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 
 Each
school
has
its
own
procedure
for
collecting
money
for
instances
of
school
pictures,
yearbook
sales,
etc.

Monies
should
 also
be
turned
into
the
office
immediately.
 
 3. The
substitute
is
encouraged
to
record
student
grades
in
the
grade
book
for
the
regular
teacher.
 
 o True
  False
 
 
 
 
 

True


36



4.

Day‐to‐day
substitutes
should
only
assign
homework
planned
by
the
regular
classroom
teacher.
 
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 
 5.

The
substitute
should
consult
with
the
school
principal,
department
head/team
leader
before
beginning
any
activity
or
procedure
 that
strays
from
the
regular
teacher’s
plans.
 
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 
 6. It
is
the
substitutes
responsibility
to
maintain
appropriate
control
of
students
assigned
to
him/her
at
all
times.
 
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 
 7. When
a
student
directly
disobeys
the
substitute,
it
is
permissible
to
issue
corporal
punishment
with
a
witness
present.

 
 o True
  False
 
 
 
 
 


OBJECTIVE
7


Given
scenarios
(photos,
text
or
video)
the
learner
will
classify
substitute
behavior
as
acceptable
 or
unacceptable.
 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact


INITIAL
PRESENTATION:
Unacceptable
behaviors
will
be
described
 through
text
and
photos.


Concept
 Principle/Rule


CLASSIFICATION:
Principle
 PERFORMANCE:
Application


X

Procedure


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 (Organization/categorize)
The
learner
will
 be
 shown
 photos
 or
 video
 of
 acceptable
 and
 unacceptable


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


substitute
 behaviors.
 
 The
 learner
 will
 drag
 and
 drop
 photos
 into
 the
appropriate
pile.


Star
=
appropriate,
trashcan
=
inappropriate.


1.

Ms.
Macklin
has
been
assigned
to
an
elementary
classroom.

She
is
pleased
that
the
students
are
well
behaved
and
are
working
 quietly
on
the
assignments
left
by
their
regular
classroom
teacher.

While
the
students
work,
she
takes
a
few
minutes
to
check
 her
cell
phone
and
personal
email.



  Unacceptable
 
 
 
 
 rd Mr.
 Jones
 has
 low
 blood
 sugar
 and
 needs
 to
 snack
 regularly.
 Before
 reporting
 to
 his
 3 
 grade
 assignment,
 he
 eats
 a
 healthy
 rd breakfast
and
takes
along
a
few
snack
crackers
and
grapes.

During
planning
time,
the
3 
graders
go
to
the
music
room
and
Mr.
 Jones
 eats
 the
 crackers
 and
 grapes
 in
 the
 regular
 classroom.
 
 He
 puts
 the
 snack
 away
 before
 picking
 up
 the
 students
 from
 music.
 
  Acceptable
 o Unacceptable
 
 
 
 
 
 th 3. Mrs.
Christians
is
substituting
for
a
9 
grade
English
class.

One
student
continually
mocks
her
statements
and
Mrs.
Christians
is
 begins
to
get
frustrated.

She
walks
out
of
the
room
and
down
the
hall
to
calm
her
nerves.

She
returns
five
minute
later
to
find
 most
of
the
students
working
quietly.
The
troublesome
student
snickers
and
Mrs.
Christiansen
retaliates
with
a
sarcastic
joke
 directed
toward
the
student.

She
has
him
stand
and
mocks
him
so
that
he
might
see
what
it
feels
like
to
be
ridiculed.

When
he
 still
does
not
comply,
Mrs.
Christiansen
takes
him
by
the
arm
and
pulls
him
to
the
principal’s
office.
 
 o Acceptable
  Unacceptable
 
 
 
 2.

o

Acceptable


37



Instructional
Objectives



 
 OBJECTIVE
8
 A)
Provided
with
two
examples
and
one
non‐example,
the
learner
will
correctly
identify
 instances
of
sexual
harassment
of
students.


 


B)
Given
true/false
questions,
the
learner
will
indicate
the
school
district
has
a
no‐tolerance
 policy
for
sexual
harassment
and
maintains
privacy
for
alleged
victims.
 
 


Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact


CLASSIFICATION:
Principle
 PERFORMANCE:
Application
 


INITIAL
PRESENTATION:
Policy
(STU
745)
will
be
presented
through
definition


Concept
 Principle/Rule


X

and
examples.

Procedures
for
victim
report
and
investigation
will
also
be
 presented.
 


Procedure


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 (Elaborative/generate
 mental
 images)
 The
 learner


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


will
be
given
a
sexual
harassment
scenario(s)
and
asked
to
think
about
why
 it
is/is
not
an
example
of
sexual
harassment.
After
3‐5
second
wait
time,
a
 text‐based
rational
will
be
displayed.


TEST
ITEMS
 Read
the
scenarios
below.

Mark
the
behaviors
that
could
indicate
sexual
harassment
as
 “Yes”
and
mark
those
that
do
not
suggest
sexual
harassment
as
“No.”

 


1. 


Sarah
notices
that
the
cute
substitute
teacher
in
her
Algebra
class
is
staring
at
her.

When
she
looks
up,
the
teacher
looks
 away.

When
Sara
raises
her
hand,
he
does
not
call
on
her.
 Yes


No
 
 
 
 William
is
uncomfortable
when
his
science
teacher
gives
him
hugs
him
for
correct
answers.

He
doesn’t
notice
her
hugging
 other
students.

The
teacher
stands
by
him
and
puts
her
hand
on
his
shoulder
often.

She
seems
nice
enough…
maybe
 lonely.

One
day,
she
offered
to
give
him
a
ride
home
after
soccer
practice.

She
told
William
that
accepting
the
ride
would
 give
him
extra
credit
in
science.


o 2.

3.

Yes


o

No
 
 
 
 Shonda
gives
her
English
teacher
her
email
address.

After
several
days
of
friendly
emails,
the
teacher
sends
a
provocative
 joke
to
the
student.

The
email
was
sent
after
school
hours.





 

Yes


o

No


4.

The
district
has
a
no
tolerance
policy
for
sexual
harassment.


 
  True
 o False
 
 
 
 
 5. If
a
claim
of
sexual
harassment
is
reported
to
the
proper
authorities,
the
district
will
investigate
all
circumstances
including
the
 nature
and
context
of
the
incident.
 
 

6.

o

True


o

False



 



 
 
 The
school
district
will
maintain
the
confidentiality
of
the
person
who
reports
sexual
harassment
behavior.
 

True


False



 
 


38



Instructional
Objectives


OBJECTIVE
9


Given
a
child
abuse
scenario
and
multiple‐choice
responses,
the
learner
will
choose
 the
response
that
corresponds
to
“report
evidence
of
abuse
or
neglect
to
the
 principal
immediately.”
 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact


CLASSIFICATION:
Rule
 PERFORMANCE:
Recall
 


INITIAL
PRESENTATION:
The
learner
will
be
presented
with
factual
 signs
of
child
abuse
and
neglect
(Board
Policy
6,409).


Concept
 Principle/Rule


X

Procedure


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 (Organization/categorize)
 The
 learner
 will


be
 provided
 with
 a
 list
 and
 three
 categories:
 signs
 of
 physical
 abuse,
signs
of
emotional
abuse,
signs
of
neglect.

The
learner
will
 use
the
mouse
to
grab
example
text
and
drag
it
to
the
appropriate
 category.


Interpersonal
Skill



 Attitude
 
 


TEST
ITEM
 


Ms.
Smith
is
a
regular
substitute
at
XYZ
Middle
School.

She
subs
for
so
many
teachers
that
she
knows
most
of
the
children
by
 name.
 
 Ms.
 Smith
 notices
 that
 Tommy,
 a
 7th
 grader,
 is
 withdrawn
 and
 has
 few
 friends.
 
 She
 becomes
 concerned
 when
 she
 notices
that
Tommy
is
jumpy
around
adults,
is
quick
to
anger
and
wears
long
sleeves
and
long
pants
on
hot
days.

Should
Ms.
 Smith…
 
 o Continue
to
observe
Tommy
over
the
next
few
weeks?
 o Call
Tommy’s
parent/guardian
that
afternoon?
  Immediately
inform
the
school
principal
of
her
observations?
 o Notify
the
police?
 
 
 
 


TEACHING
AND
CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT
 


OBJECTIVE
10


Given
choices,
the
learner
will
categorize
statements
as
classroom
rules
or
 procedures.

Provided
with
a
scenario,
the
learner
will
also
select
appropriate
 procedures.

 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact
 Concept
 Principle/Rule
 Procedure


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


X


 CLASSIFICATION:
Concept
 PERFORMANCE:
Application
 
 INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Examples
 and
 non‐examples
 of
 rules
 and
 procedures
will
be
presented
via
text
and
graphics/video.
Rational
 will
also
be
provided.
 


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:

 (Organization/categorize)
 Given
 examples
 of
classroom
rules
and
procedures,
the
learner
will
categorize
each
 example
 and
 will
 be
 asked
 to
 mentally
 reflect
 on
 the
 rational
 for
 each.

Upon
completion
of
practice,
rational
will
be
provided.




 
 
 
 


39



Instructional
Objectives


TEST
ITEMS
 
 Classify
each
statement
as
a
rule
or
procedure.

Place
a
check
in
the
appropriate
category.
 
 
 
 Rule
 Procedure
 
 
 
 
 Keep
your
hands,
feet
and
objects
to
yourself.
 
  
 
 Be
on
time.
 
  
 
 Sharpen
pencils
before
the
bell
rings.
 
 
  
 Place
completed
class
work
in
the
“To
Grade”
basket.

 
 
  
 Be
prepared.
 
  
 
 Throw away all trash before or after class. 
 
 
  
 Be
Polite. 
  
 
 
 
 Read
the
scenario.
 


Mr.
Brown
has
subbed
in
classes
where
the
students
just
“seem
to
know
what
to
do.”

He
has
been
in
other
classrooms
where
 things
feel
chaotic.

Today
is
one
of
the
chaotic
days…

 
 The
students
entered
the
room
and
most
sat
in
their
desks.

They
immediately
began
talking
to
each
other
while
Mr.
Brown
called
 the
roll
and
several
students
left
their
seats
to
sharpen
pencils.

Mr.
Brown
had
to
repeatedly
ask
students
to
quiet
down
while
 took
attendance.

Students
rummaged
through
backpacks
and
continued
to
get
up
and
sharpen
pencils
while
Mr.
Brown
gave
 directions
for
the
assignment.

Mr.
Brown
was
firm
and
the
students
were
respectful
when
he
asked
them
to
sit
and
pay
attention.

 While
passing
out
papers,
several
students
interrupted
the
substitute
for
directions.


Eventually
the
students
settled
and
got
to
 work.

The
rest
of
the
hour
was
uneventful
until
the
bell
rang
to
change
classes.

Many
students
jumped
out
of
their
seats,
pushing
 desks
around
as
they
clamored
toward
the
exit.


 
 You
have
learned
that
classrooms
run
smoothly
when
there
are
procedures.

Although
Mr.
Brown
is
a
substitute,
he
could
teach
a
 few
procedures
that
would
make
instruction
more
pleasant
and
behavior
more
manageable.


 


Mr.
Brown
wants
to
make
sure
that
the
next
class
has
fewer
interruptions.

Read
through
the
 statements
below
and
place
a
check
next
to
procedures
that
Mr.
Brown
should
establish
for
the
 next
class.
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 How
to
enter
the
classroom.
  
 How
and
when
to
sharpen
pencils.
 How
to
take
a
test.


 
 How
to
ask
the
teacher
a
question.
  
 How
to
exit
the
classroom.


40



Instructional
Objectives


OBJECTIVE
11


Offered
several
scenarios,
the
learner
will
identify
appropriate
classroom
control.

 Given
the
same
scenarios,
the
learner
will
select
teacher
behaviors
that
prevented
 management
problems.
 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact
 Concept


X

Principle/Rule


X

Procedure



 CLASSIFICATION:
Concept,
Rule
 PERFORMANCE:
Application
 
 INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Present
 the
 learner
 with
 examples
 of
 classroom
 control.


 Preventative
 management
 will
 be
 presented
 as
 an
 essential
 component
 to
 classroom
control;
examples
will
be
provided.
 


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 (Organization/categorize)
 Given
 examples
 and
 non‐

Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


examples
 of
 classroom
 control,
 the
 learner
 will
 categorize
 the
 examples
 as
 appropriate
teacher
control
or
lack
of
control.

The
learner
will
be
asked
to
think
 about
 the
 non‐examples
 and
 mentally
 define
 preventative
 strategies
 that
 could
 have
aided
in
maintaining
classroom
control.


TEST
ITEMS
 


Ms.
Gregory:
 
 Ms.
Gregory
stands
at
the
door
to
welcome
elementary
students
into
the
room.

Students
put
away
their
belongings
and
look
to
 the
white
board
for
morning
work.

They
take
out
their
journals
and
begin
the
assignment
as
the
teacher
takes
attendance
 (circulating
around
the
room).

One
student
begins
to
talk
to
another
student
and
the
teacher
moves
to
stand
by
the
student.

 The
student
returns
to
his
work
quickly.

As
the
teacher
notices
students
finishing
their
work
and
taking
out
books,
she
asks
 the
class
to
line
up
for
the
restroom.

Ms.
Gregory
reminds
students
to
line
up
in
number
order
and
to
keep
their
hands
at
their
 sides.

As
the
class
exits,
the
teacher
makes
eye
contact
with
a
student
who
tries
to
talk
with
the
person
behind
him.
 
 Ms.
Jones:


Ms
Jones
stands
at
the
door
as
students
enter
the
8th
grade
classroom.

As
students
enter,
Ms.
Jones
begins
talking
with
another
 teacher
outside
the
door.

The
students
go
into
the
room
and
complete
the
bell
work
in
3
minutes.

Once
finished
the
students
 talk
with
each
other.

Ms.
Jones
finishes
her
conversation
and
comes
into
the
room.

When
she
hears
the
noise
she
reminds
 students
to
do
the
bell
work.

She
finds
her
roll
book
and
starts
calling
names.

Students
keep
talking
and
one
boy
throws
paper
 wads
across
the
aisle.

Ms.
Jones
shushes
the
class.

She
gives
an
assignment
in
a
loud,
firm
voice
so
that
the
class
can
hear
her
 instructions
over
the
students
who
continue
to
talk.




 Which
teacher
has
appropriate
classroom
control?
 
 

Ms.
Gregory


o

Ms.
Jones



 Which
behavior
management
techniques
worked
to
maintain
classroom
control?
 
 


o

Saying
“Shh”
 
 o Raising
the
volume
of
the
teacher’s
voice
 
  Moving
to
stand
near
a
misbehaving
student
 o

 Making
eye
contact
 o o

Standing
outside
the
door


Asking
another
teacher
for
help
 
 Having
classroom
procedures



 


41



Instructional
Objectives


OBJECTIVE
12


Given
a
scenario
recounting
the
need
for
professional
growth,
the
learner
will
 identify
strategies
for
skill
development.
 Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact
 Concept


X

Principle/Rule


INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Present
 definition
 and
 examples
 of
 professional
growth/skill
development.
 


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 
 (Integration/generate
 examples)
 Given
 a


Procedure


CLASSIFICATION:
Concept
 PERFORMANCE:
Application


statement
 about
 professional
 development,
 the
 learner
 will
 be
 asked
to
mentally
generate
examples
of
professional
development
 for
 substitutes.
 
 After
 a
 3‐5
 second
 wait
 time,
 examples
 will
 be
 displayed.


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude



 TEST
ITEM
 


Ms.
Schwartz
has
been
a
substitute
for
two
months
and
is
having
trouble
managing
student
behavior.





 What
can
Ms.
Schwartz
do
to
improve
her
skills?

Check
all
that
apply.
 
 o

Give
it
time,
the
students
will
begin
acting
better
on
their
own.
 


Search
the
Internet
for
effective
behavior
strategies
for
substitute
teachers.


Seek
suggestions
from
experienced
substitutes
and
teachers.


Keep
trying
strategies
to
find
ones
that
work
for
her.


o

She
shouldn’t
worry
about
it;
students
never
behave
for
the
substitute.



 
 



 PROFESSIONALISM
&
QUALITY
 


OBJECTIVE
13


Given
three
photos,
the
learner
will
discriminate
between
photos
of
professional
 and
unprofessional
dress.

The
learner
will
also
label
scenarios
as
examples
of
 professional
and
unprofessional
behaviors,
appearances
and
attitudes.
 


Performance
 Classification



Recall


Application


Fact
 Concept
 Principle/Rule
 Procedure



 


Interpersonal
Skill
 Attitude


X

CLASSIFICATION:
Concept
 PERFORMANCE:
Application
 


INITIAL
 PRESENTATION:
 Professional
 behaviors
 will
 be
 presented
 with
examples
and
non‐examples
(text
and
graphics).
 


GENERATIVE
 STRATEGY:
 
 (Organization/categorize)
 Given
 6‐7
 unlabeled
 photos
 of
 persons
 wearing
 professional
 and
 unprofessional
 attire,
 engaged
 in
 professional/unprofessional
 behavior,
and
two
categories,
the
learner
will
drag
each
photo
to
 the
appropriate
category.


42



Instructional
Objectives



 TEST
ITEMS
 
 Select
the
photo
that
best
represents
a
professional
appearance
for
a
female
working
with
 students.
 
 


o

Photo
1:

Female
in
lounge
pants,
messy
ponytail,
no
make‐up,
t‐shirt


Photo
2:
Female
in
slacks,
buttoned
blouse,
well
groomed
hair,
neat


Photo
3:
Female
in
short
skirt,
tight
blouse,
make‐up,
neat
hair



 Select
the
photo
that
best
represents
a
professional
appearance
for
a
male
working
with
 students.
 
 
 


o

Photo
1:
Male
in
jeans,
un‐tucked
dress
shirt,
a
little
wrinkled,
soda
in
hand


o

Photo
2:
Male
in
suit
talking
on
cell
phone
(in
classroom)


Photo
3:
Male
in
slacks,
collared
shirt,
neat,
smiling



 Read
the
scenarios
below
and
label
each
as
professional
or
unprofessional.
 


The
substitute
is:
 


Professional Flexible,
changes
plans
when
necessary
and
does
not
complain.

She
 speaks
in
a
clear,
pleasant
voice.
She
seems
happy.
 
 Interested
in
the
home
lives
of
students,
parents
and
teachers.

She
 often
asks
neighbor
teachers
about
student’s
parents
employment,
 housing,
cars,
etc.

 
 Known
as
the
“fun
sub.”
He
brings
movies
and
shows
them
instead
of
 teaching
the
lesson
left
by
the
teacher.
 
 Listed
as
available
for
all
schools
but
he
often
turns
down
assignments
 because
he
is
tired.


 
 Organized
and
detailed.

He
leaves
a
written
record
of
the
behavior
 and
assignments
for
each
class
he
teaches.


 


Unprofessional


 
 
 
 
 
 


43



Instructional
Sequence
 Outline
 


The
instruction
will
be
sequenced
according
to
the
learner’s
familiarity
with
the
content
and
 concepts.

The
three
sequencing
schemes
proposed
by
Posner
and
Srike
(1976)
will
be
used
to
 organize
and
sequence
the
instructional
material.

The
sequencing
schemes
appear
as
follows:

 


I. II. III. IV.

Learning‐Related
Sequencing
will
be
used
to
introduce
the
general
job
expectations
and
 vocabulary
for
substitute
teachers.
 Concept‐Related
Sequencing
will
be
used
to
organize
the
content
associated
with
the
 substitute
teacher
guide.
 World‐Related
Sequencing
will
define
the
daily
responsibilities
of
a
substitute
teacher
in
 a.m.
to
p.m.
order.
 Concept‐Related
Sequencing
will
guide
the
remainder
of
the
seven
instructional
 objectives
because
they
are
primarily
concept
driven.






























 SEQUENCING
SCHEMES
 


44



Instructional
Sequence



 


45



Pre‐Instructional
Strategy
 Overview
 


The
instructional
unit
will
be
introduced
using
the
overview
below.

The
overview
is
casual
and
 friendly
in
tone
and
is
meant
to
welcome
the
learner.

Although
completion
of
the
unit
may
be
a
 requirement
for
newly
hired
substitutes,
the
introduction
should
read
as
an
invitation
to
learn
 more
 about
 the
 substitute
 role
 and
 job
 expectations.
 
 The
 overview
 states
 the
 rational
 for
 content
and
it
provides
a
brief
description
of
learning
topics.



 An
overview
was
selected
as
the
pre‐instructional
strategy
because
of
the
casual
nature
of
the
 introduction.

The
learner
should
feel
confident
that
the
material
to
come
is
relevant
and
within
 their
capabilities.

Pretests,
objectives
and
advanced
organizers
where
not
selected
because
the
 learner
would
need
prior
knowledge
in
order
to
be
comfortable
with
the
content.


 




















 


























Congratulations!
 
 You
 are
 participating
 in
 this
 training
 as
 part
 of
 the
 hiring
 process
 for
 substitute
 teachers.

You
are
well
on
your
way
to
becoming
a
qualified
and
knowledgeable
substitute!


 


You
may
have
been
asking
yourself,
“What
will
I
need
to
know
and
do
when
a
school
calls
me
for
my
 first
 assignment?”
 We
 have
 taken
 away
 the
 guesswork
 and
 asked
 school
 principals
 what
 they
 are
 looking
for
in
a
quality
substitute
teacher.

Our
principals
have
identified
the
following
characteristics
 as
important
to
the
success
of
substitute:

 


1.

Knowledge
of
district
and
school
procedures


2.

Appropriate
teaching
and
behavior
management
strategies



3.

Professional
dress,
communication,
and
attitude


After
 completing
 this
 unit,
 you
 will
 understand
 the
 job
 requirements,
 daily
 responsibilities,
 and
 important
terminology
for
working
in
the
field
of
education.

You
will
also
be
familiar
with
resources
 that
 are
 available
 to
 help
 you
 in
 and
 out
 of
 the
 classroom.
 
 Finally,
 you
 will
 be
 aware
 of
 important
 policy
 and
 expectations
 about
 the
 safety
 of
 students,
 managing
 student
 behavior,
 and
 professionalism.
 


As
a
substitute
teacher
you
will
have
daily
opportunities
to
touch
the
lives
of
children.

Perhaps
you
 will
also
choose
inspire,
motivate
and
encourage…
 


Let’s
get
ready
for
your
new
job! 


46



Appendix
A


Appendix
A
 



 


Survey
Instrument



 47



Appendix
A



 
 


48



Appendix
B


Appendix
B
 



 


Substitute
Teacher
List
(example
format)



 49


Profile for Angela  Christopher

Design Documentation, Savvy Substitutes  

This design documentation was compiled during the development of the online instructional unit called Savvy Substitutes. The unit was devel...

Design Documentation, Savvy Substitutes  

This design documentation was compiled during the development of the online instructional unit called Savvy Substitutes. The unit was devel...

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