Page 1

Portfolio Abigail Anacki


Table of Contents

2


Ecological Edge Condition + Industry

4-9

Ecology + Simple Machine + Spa

10-15

River + Program

16-19

Construction + Design

20-23

Existing Conditions + Grading

24-27

Accumulation + Wood

28-33

Life + Graphics

34-37

Agriculture + Graphics

38-43

Agricultural Research + Graphics

44-49

Technical

Representational

3


The New Industrial Standard A redesigned industrial park with a reshaped gradient edge and runoff wetland to preserve and improve species conditions and habitats within the park and along the industrial edge.

Plan

150’

Multipurpose Ampitheatre

20’

20’

Tree Observation Decks

LEFT & RIGHT: Illustrative plan and sections highlighting the manipulation of vegetation and topography to create smaller, intimate spaces within a larger park.

4

20’


Edge Condition + Industry Professor(s): Jason Kentner, Tameka Sims Duration: 1 Semester Completion Date: December 2016

This project started as an analysis of a variety of parks located within the greater Columbus area. Walnut Woods Metropark, located in Groveport, OH, was chosen as the medium for which an intervention for either ecology or industrialization could take place. Groveport is rapidly becoming a large industrial hub, unsurprisingly because of its proximity to Rickenbacker International Airport and various other shipping and logistics centers, not to mention a brand new amazon warehouse. Due to this inevitable expanding industry encroaching and bleeding into the edge of Walnut Woods Metropark, this design aims to marry metropark ideals with the needs of the contemporary work environment, while also maintaining and improving plant and animal species within the site. 20’

Play Mounds

5 20’


Rural (Unzoned) Park Site

Context & Site Conditions

Logistic

Topography and Hydrology

Potential Zones of Intervention

2’ CONTOUR LINES

722.9

722.7 736.8

Park

DIRECTION OF WATER FLOW

722.7

Site

1 MILE

721.4

738.8

735.3

720.9

721.4

Park Site

Park Circulation and Access

1 MILE

Zones of Intervention

1 MILE

Zoning

Residential

Industr

Circulation and Access

Industrial Rural (Unzoned) Park Site

Site Park Paths Areas of Entry Bus Stops Proposed Areas of Entry

Residential

Proposed Bus Stops

Residential Industrial

GROVEPORT RD

Rural (Unzoned)

Industrial

Park LONDON GROVEPORT RD

Site

Site LITHOLOPOLIS RD

Logistics

Potential Zones of Intervention

Rural (Unzoned) Park Paths

Areas of Entry Bus Stops

Park

Proposed Areas of Entry Proposed Bus Stops

RICHARDSON RD

Site Vegetation

Diagram

GROVEPORT RD

Vegetation Cover (acres) Park LONDON GROVEPORT RD

Zones of Intervention

Residential

Industrial/Park Overlap

Circulation and Access

LITHOLOPOLIS RD

Site

x 734.8

Park Paths

Vegetation Cover (acres)

x 730.8

Areas of Entry Bus Stops

Industrial

Forest Tree Species

x 722.9

Proposed Areas of Entry Proposed Bus Stops

GROVEPORT RD

x 724.8

Rural (Unzoned)

x 722.8

x 720.8

x 723.4

Park

LONDON GROVEPORT RD

x 720.8

Site LITHOLOPOLIS RD

x 720.9

x 721.4

x 722.8

Park Paths

x 750.9

x 746.8

Areas of Entry x 746.8

Bus Stops

x 738.9

x 740.9

Proposed Areas of Entry

x 738.9

Proposed Bus Stops

x 729.4 x 733.4

Site

Existing Dense Forest Soybeans

x 721.4

x 736.9

RICHARDSON RD

RICHARDSON RD

New Vegetation 150’

Vegetation

Diagrammatic Plan

GROVEPORT RD

Vegetation Cover (acres)

Forest Tree Species

Vegetation Cover (acres)

Forest Tree Species x 734.8

x 730.8

x 718.8

TOP LEFT: Context map.

x 722.9

x 728.8

x 736.8

ones of Intervention

x 724.8

x 722.8

x 720.8

x 723.4

TOP RIGHT: Diagram showing parks

x 720.8

LITHOLOPOLIS RD

Vegetation Cover (acres)

Forest Tree Species

x 720.9

x 721.4

x 722.8

x 750.9

within the same city that will have an

x 746.8

x 746.8

x 738.9

x 740.9

x 738.9

edge be affected by industrial growth.

x 721.4

x 729.4 x 733.4

Existing Dense Forest

BOTTOM: Zoning diagram showing

Soybeans

RICHARDSON RD

chosen site based on the vulnerable

Vegetation Cover (acres)

edge typology created by the industrially zoned lot adjacent to the park.

6

New Vegetation

Forest Tree Species

300’

x 736.9

Forest Tree Spe


RICHARDSON RD

150’

Vegetation

Diagrammatic Plan Topography and Hydrology

GROVEPORT RD

Forest Tree Species

Vegetation Cover (acres)

x 734.8

x 730.8

x 718.8

2’ CONTOUR LINES

x 722.9

x 728.8

DIRECTION OF WATER FLOW

x 736.8

722.9

x 724.8

x 722.8

x 720.8

722.7

x 723.4

736.8 722.7

x 720.8

LITHOLOPOLIS RD

Forest Tree Species

Vegetation Cover (acres)

x 720.9

x 721.4

x 722.8

x 750.9

x 746.8

721.4 x 746.8

738.8

x 738.9

x 740.9

x 738.9

735.3

x 721.4

720.9

x 729.4 x 733.4

x 736.9

Park 721.4

Existing Dense Forest

Park

Soybeans

Site RICHARDSON RD

Zones of Intervention

300’

New Vegetation

Circulation and Access

Forest Tree Species

Vegetation Cover (acres) 1 MILE

Circulation and Access

Residential Industrial Rural (Unzoned) Park Site

Site Park Paths Areas of Entry

Residential

Bus Stops

Industrial

Proposed Areas of Entry

Rural (Unzoned)

Proposed Bus Stops

Park Site

GROVEPORT RD

Logistics LONDON GROVEPORT RD

Site Park Paths

LITHOLOPOLIS RD

Areas of Entry Bus Stops Proposed Areas of Entry Park

Proposed Bus Stops RICHARDSON RD

Zones of Intervention

Vegetation

Industrial/Park Overlap

GROVEPORT RD

TOP LEFT: Existing and proposed forest and vegetation cover

Site

x 734.8

Park Paths x 730.8

Areas of Entry Bus Stops

x 722.9

Proposed Areas of Entry

TOP RIGHT: Hydrology and water flow

F

Proposed Bus Stops

GROVEPORT RD

Vegetation Cover (acres)

x 724.8

x 722.8

x 720.8

on existing site

x 723.4

x 720.8

BOTTOM: Map illustrating various LITHOLOPOLIS RD

Site

x 720.9

x 721.4

x 722.8

Park Paths

contextual factors that influence and

Areas of Entry

leverage the design.

Proposed Areas of Entry

x 750.9

x 746.8

x 746.8

Bus Stops

x 738.9

x 740.9

x 738.9

x 721.4

Proposed Bus Stops

x 729.4 x 733.4

RICHARDSON RD

150’

Diagrammatic Plan

x 736.9

7


20’

Rolex Building, Dallas Rolex Building, Dallas

Eco-city, Asia Eco-city, Asia

Chicago Public School, Chicago Public School, Marble Fairbanks Architects Marble Fairbanks Architects

Experiential Studies

Play Mounds

Vegetative and Topographical Typologies

DENSE FOREST

MEADOW/WILDFLOWERS

LOW VEGETATION/ MOWED GRASS

20’

Trail Types

Observation Methods

Building Parti and Expirimentation

Walkway types BETWEEN A BARRIER

Walkway types

Edge conditions

NATURAL

NATURAL

CURRENT CONDITION

MANICURED

FROM A DISTANCE

CURRENT CONDITION

MANICURED

Pipilo erythrophthalmus Tyto alba

WITHIN RAISED

RAISED

Spizella pusilla

80

20

INDUSTRY ABUTTING

ABOVE

INDUSTRY ABUTTING

80

Thamnophis

Regina septemvittata

Anaxyrus americanus

20

Sternotherus odoratus

PROPOSED GRADIENT

PROPOSED GRADIENT

Lithobates catesbeianus

8

5


Observation Methods

Building Parti and Expirimentation

Edge conditions

TOP LEFT: Experiential studies

Walkway types BETWEEN A BARRIER

Edge conditions

diagramming the user interface between

NATURAL

different levels of topography and vegetation. TOP RIGHT: Diagrams investigating the

CURRENT CONDITION

MANICURED

FROM A DISTANCE MEADOW /WILDFLOWERS

different ways in which a user can ob-

CURRENT CONDITION

serve a habitat or environment. Diagrams WITHIN

also show how different path type and

RAISED

material can affect the user interface of LOW VEGETATION/ MOWED GRASS

20

80

a park design. 20

80

INDUSTRY ABUTTING

BOTTOM: Section perspective illustrat-

ABOVE

INDUSTRY ABUTTING

ing sun deck and eating area for both site Trail Types

workers and park goers. A grass mix and

Observation Methods

Building Parti and Expirimentation

wetland ecology provide an ample and

Walkway types BETWEEN A BARRIER

Walkway types

Edge conditions

20

80

NATURAL

NATURAL

PROPOSED GRADIENT

80

20

rich environment for plant and animal species.

PROPOSED GRADIENT

CURRENT CONDITION

MANICURED

FROM A DISTANCE

CURRENT CONDITION

MANICURED

50

50

50

50

WITHIN RAISED

RAISED

20

80

INDUSTRY ABUTTING

ABOVE

INDUSTRY ABUTTING

20

80

PROPOSED GRADIENT

Ammodramus henslowii

PROPOSED GRADIENT

50

50

50

6’

9


nkbush sumac)

Perspective of Final Phase

Lemna minor (Duckweed)

Buttes are carved from limestone

New grade from site cut

Various ferns and forbs Typha augustofolia (Cattail)

Aronia (chokeberry)

10


Floating Pools

Ecology + Simple Machine + Spa The edge of the pool is occupiable. It is filled partially with air to that the pool floats and rises with the level of the river.

Professor(s): Jake Boswell, Justin Parscher Duration: 1 Semester Completion Date: May 2016

This project was developed over the course of 4 phases. The Dirty river water is filtered through various permable layers in the pools lining

projects goal was to develop a personal lexicon of ecological processes with an understanding of how to incorporate these systems into a final design. By weaving together ecology, passive systems, and program, the project sought to examine how landscape functions as a system of interconnected pieces emphasizing an integration of performance and aesthetics.

A loose system is attatched to the pools lining in order to allow the pool to fluctuate with the river water

Ceratophyllum (Hornwort)

11


Ecology Steep, north -facing cliff

The first phase was an in depth study of four ecological groups from the document Plant Communities of the Midwest. By the end of this phase, specific hydrological, soil, climatic and vegetative conditions that work together to comprise that specific

Adoxa moschatellina

ecology must be understood. NORTHERN ALKALINE TALUS Abby Anacki

Cystoperis bulbifera

Steep, north -facing cliff

Circaea alpina

Adoxa moschatellina

Cystoperis bulbifera

Circaea alpina

Different rock layers exposed due to erosion

Rocks crack and fall from cliff wall due to freeze/thaw

Different rock layers exposed due to erosion Area is dominated by forbs, ferns, and mosses

Rocks crack and fall from cliff wall due to freeze/thaw

30’

Area is dominated by forbs, ferns, and mosses

12

30’


Simple Machine The second phase aimed to be able to understand, diagram and build a specific simple machine.

dashed line (4pt)

dashed line (4pt)

RAM PUMP NORMAL EFFICIENCY RANGE 60

RAM PUMP NORMAL EFFICIENCY RANGE

55 60

55

45

50

Efficiency (%)

Efficiency (%)

50

40

45

40

35

Source Elevation = 1.5m

35

30

Source Elevation = 1.5m 6

7

8

9

10

11

12 30

13 6

14 7

8

15

16

9

10

Delivery Head (m)

17 11

18 12

19 13

14

20 15

16

17

18

19

Delivery Head (m)

ale of hydrams varies from small garden use, to providingScale of hydrams varies from small garden use, to providing ter for whole neighborhoods. An advantage to smaller water for whole neighborhoods. An advantage to smaller hydrams is the portability. drams is the portability. ABOVE: The ram pump is used to pump water from a lower elevation to a higher

elevation through the manipulation of a series of valves and air pressure. BOTTOM LEFT: Diagram showing the different scales and uses of the ram pump.

Efficient

The higher the feed pipe is, the more efficient the pump will function. Higher feed pipe = increased potential energy in the water.

The higher the feed pipe is, the more efficient the pump will

13

20


Ecology + Simple Machine Phase two combines two randomly selected ecologies into an unknown contextual area by incorporating one or more simple machines. The herons fountain pumps water up into deep, great lakes marsh “pods� to show vegetative variation within an ecology. When the herons fountain stops, a drinking bird powers a gear system which refills the herons fountain, starting the process over from the beginning.

ABOVE: Rocky mountain forest buttes jut out into the marshy area to incorporate the two ecologies and experiment with the riparian edge between the two.

14


Ecology + Simple Machine + Spa Phase three was a combination of the previous two ecologies into a specific site in Columbus to create a relaxing spa for elite

CONTEXT

Columbus clientele. By selecting a site next to a river with a lot of existing elevation change achieving the balance between the butte and marsh ecology was seamless.

CENTER: Research into the history and of floating pools led to an incorporation of this re-imagined, updated technology into the project.

Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine)

Rhus trilobata (Skunkbush sumac)

Lemna minor (Duckweed)

Buttes are carved from limestone

New grade from site cut

15 Various ferns and forbs

Dirty river water is filt permable layers in the


16


River + Program Professor(s): Paula Miejerink, Karla Trott Duration: 6 Weeks Completion Date: December 2015

This final project continues the investigation into space making and movement. The project site is a dynamic environment which lies between the recently restored Olentangy River environment which includes a wilder and more spontaneous vegetation and the controlled landscape environment of OSU’s Cannon Drive. The site includes topography, flood zones, public access, flora and fauna.

17


TOP LEFT: The design strategy focuses on program structured by a subtractive and additive grid in order to bring the river into the site and the people out to the river. CENTER: The project site is situated in an unused and underutilized space on Ohio State’s West Campus.

18


ABOVE: A grove of Ginkgo bilobas brings a feeling of untamed forest to the site while also maintaining order and linear views to the river. A gridded seating area adds volumetric interest as well as a place for people to relax. Gracious ramps allow for easy site access.

19


20


Construction + Design Professor(s): Theirry Budoin, Karla Trott, Ethan McGory Duration: 3 Weeks Completion Date: May 2016

Given a rendering of a constructed snow fence, a set of construction decouments were created. These documents are an interpretation of what the correct materials, sizes, dimensions should be. Research had to be conducted about foundation techniques, joints, materials, and graphic conventions.

21


Scale: 1-1/2"=1'

D

BENCH CONNECTION

5" WOOD SCREW

4-1/2" WOOD SCREW Dimensions were decided by experimenting with different angle arrangements in Auto Cad. Cedar was decided on because

5"

the snow fence was going to be constructed near sand and salt water, which cedar resists quite well. Foundation was poured below the frost line. Screw piles were chosen for their efficiency at anchoring things in sand.

Scale: 1-1/2"=1'

3" WOOD SCREW 2"x6" CEDAR

Scale: 1"=1'

Snow Fence Construction Drawings

1" 1'-102

5" WOOD SCREW

1" 27'-112

B

22'-11"

A

C D

Scale:1/4"=1'

1/2" NUT & BOLT

16'-9"

Abby Anacki

22

2"x 2" CEDAR

Knowlton School of Architecture

2

A

1" 22

2"x4" CEDAR

The Ohio State University


B

FOUNDATION

TOP LEFT: Detail showing specific materials and method of connection.

METAL SCREW PILE

BOTTOM LEFT: Elevation drawing showing frontal connections, foundation,

5'

and materials. TOP RIGHT: Detail showing dimensions

1" 2'-112

and specifics of foundational screw piles. BOTTOM RIGHT: Section showing

1'

dimensions, materials, and angles of

Scale: 3/8"=1"

construction pieces.

C

GROUND ANCHOR

A The Ohio State University

5" 3" WOOD SCREW

CROSS SECTION

METAL 1/2"POST NUT & BOLT ANCHOR

1" 52

METAL T BRACKET

1/2" NUT & BOLT

1

B

F

MET SCR

2"x6" CEDAR

Snow Fence Construction Drawings

Knowlton School of Architecture

5" 1" 42

1" 12

Scale: 1-1/2"=1'

Scale: 3/8"=1"

A

18'-3"

C

G

71°

Scale: 1-1/2"=1'

D

1" 14'-102

BENCH CONNECTION

5" WOOD SCREW

2"x2" CEDAR

4-1/2" WOOD SCREW D

70°

1" 17'-02

1/2" NUT & BOLT

6'

Scale: 1-1/2"=1'

5"

C B

D

141°

5" WOO

1" 5'-102

Scale: 1-1/2"=1'

5"

Abby Anacki

Scale: 1-1/2"=1'

Scale: 3/8"=1"

23


Rain Garden

Rain Garden

Permeable Concrete Limestone sub-base Subgrade

Green Roof

Permeable Concrete

Green Roof

Permeable Concrete

24

Permeab


Existing Conditions + Grading Professor(s): Jake Boswell, Ethan McGory Duration: 4 weeks Completion Date: November 2015

Grading, storm water management, and practical planting were all topics that had to be considered in this project. Students were given a realistic check list from a client who had purchased a piece of land and wanted to put a particular house on that land. One of the clients was handicapped and ADA accessibility had to be met around the house. As well as additional wishes like a lap pool, entertaining areas, paths, and gardens.

Permeable Concrete Limestone sub-base Subgrade

ble Ramp to Silver Brook Dr.

Permeable Ramp to Silver Brook Dr.

25


Gingko biloba

Amelanchier arborea Amelanchier arborea

Gingko biloba

Amelanchier arborea

Gingko biloba

Amelanchier arborea

Ac sa

Gingko biloba

Quercus Bicolor

Acer Palmatum

Amelanchier arborea

Nyssa Sylvatica

Gingko biloba

26


Acer saccharum

Acer saccharum

cer accharum

Various program elements, access requirements, grade accommodations and style of home the client selected lent to a dynamic and challenging grading plan. The house is situated into Nyssa Sylvatica

the hill to make the home feel incorporated into the landscape as well as maintain views to the ravine below. Integration of architecture and landscape was a key focus of this design. The pool has an infinity edge to further enhance the integration of nature by creating an ambiguous edge between the outside and inside of the pool, much like that of the house that has a blending of outside and inside. Permeable concrete, a rain garden near the entrance of the house, and an inaccessible roof garden efficiently manage storm water, while also adding visual appeal. 27


28


Accumulation + Wood Professor(s): Paula Meijerink, Karla Trott Duration: 1 Month Completion Date: September 2015

This new project continues the investigation into space making and movement, focusing on three dimensional imagination and projection through model making. Spatial manipulation allowed for develop in three dimensional aptitudes related to movement through space while addressing topographical manipulation/ grading, spatial sequencing, landscape transformation, space organization and orchestration of movement/path making. This project follows a process of iterative moves which transform the project according to a set of actions, each building upon the previous while ultimately working towards a spatial complex in later phases. The model has to evoke a designed landscape; an intentionally shaped ground; by arranging the wood members in such a way that a constructed or intentionally formed ground is produced and the intention legible.

29


ABOVE: Side profile of model. Toothpicks were selected due to their allowance of subtle manipulation in order to produce great variation. Manipulation of the height of the toothpicks creates an undulating ground plane. RIGHT: Top view of model showing the reaction of the medium to light and shadow.

Toothpicks To develop a physical model evoking “ground�. The model was not supposed to represent a real existing landscape (ground), rather it was supposed to elicit a sense of landscape. The model had to be designed in such a way that it showed we had intentionally shaped it and arranged the wood members so that a constructed formed ground is legible.

30


31


Pieces + Sectional Relationships The next phase sought to develop and transform the first model by introducing access, program, and vegetation to further establish a richness in our three dimensional environment. The first model was the base of our new iteration, the template to interpret into a real physical landscape. The original model still had to remain legible in our final model. A series of maquettes experimenting with materiality, dictated the use of a layered wood with a series of small incisions on the top in order to mimic the small components used in the first project. A labyrinth-inspired path created access throughout the space as well as a large gathering space in the center. As one moves through the space, they are woven in and out of a tall forest. This creates a contrast between a dark, dense space and a light, open space, enhancing the experience of the guest.

32


33


34


Life + Graphics Professor(s): Kristi Cheramie, Karla Trott Duration: 1 Semester Completion Date: December 2015

This project served as an atlas of life over the course of one semester. Notes about everyday, ordinary events or patterns were analyzed and recorded. At the end of the semester these observations were graphically organized into a booklet in order to share with others.

35


Colors of My Outfits: Mondays 11 Mondays 18/26 Outfits

11 mondays 19/26 Outfits 7 Mondays 7/26 Outfits 3 Mondays 4/26 outfits 2 Mondays 2/26 Outfits 1 Monday 1/26 Outfits

1 Monday 1/26 Outfits 4 Mondays 4/26 Outfits

2 Mondays 2/26 Outfits

7 Mondays 10/26 Outfits 11 Mondays 14/26 Outfits

NOVEMBER STRESS

Field Trip:Scioto Mile Home for the weekend

Veterans day

Michigan Game

Studio deadline

Studio Deadline

Earth unit midterm

WI Tutorial

WI test plots due

Sister visiting

TOP: Manipulated, hand painted watercolors give the effect of clean messiness, representative of the patterns realized through the atlas. BOTTOM: Colors and textures represent stress throughout the month of November

36

Thanksgiving break WI Review


Weekend Activity Watching sports Laundry

meeting with friends

Grocery store Wake up

going out

Family Visiting Sleep

Cleaning

Netflix

Gym Homework

Homework

Sleep

Eating Cooking

Morning Commute

(9/15/15-12/14/15)

Walked 73/90 Days Distance-.7 Miles Time-11 Min # of times walked- 13 Total Distance- 8.4 miles Total Time-2.4 hours Distance-.8 Miles Time-10 Min # of times walked- 25 Total Distance- 20 miles Total Time-4.2 hours Distance-1 Miles Time-20 Min # of times walked- 25 Total Distance- 25 miles Total Time-8.3 hours

Car/other 17/90 Days Distance-1 Miles Time-6 Min # of times Driven- 17 Total Distance- 17 miles Total Time-1.7 hours

TOP: Activity and energy mapped through use of positive and negative boundaries, as well as color. BOTTOM: Data taken about transportation and circulation is represented through use of size, color, and texture.

37


38


Agriculture + Graphics Professor(s): Kristi Cheramie, Karla Trott Duration: 4 Weeks Completion Date: May 2016

This project was an exercise enhancing the ability to communicate processes graphically. A specific crop was selected from a list and researched for the various operations that were required to be able to efficiently produce the crop in large quantities. Things such as pruning, pesticides, soil, harvesting techniques, and machinery.

LEFT: This diagram shows an overview of

the pecan, including anatomy, growth, united states production, and production from a unique pecan farm in Texas.

39


TOP: An ephemeral rendering shows the

machinery and process behind harvesting the pecan BOTTOM: A section shows the different

machinery and processes needed to grow the pecan

40


41


TOP: An ephemeral rendering shows the

machinery and pesticides being used in order to keep the pecans healthy from pests prior to harvest BOTTOM: This section further explores

the irrigation techniques and chemicals used to keep pecans healthy

42


43


Beginning With the End in Mind Size

Color: Screen vs Paper

Small

Selecting the Right Binding

Pantone Matching System

(<8.5’x11’)

Typical novel size. Good for mass market

Most common and economical binding method. Created

production and mass market consumption.

Standard

(8.5’x11’)

A proprietary color space used in a variety of industries, primarily printing, though

by punching wire through the document’s outside spine,

sometimes in the manufacture of colored paint, fabric, and plastics. Adobe suites has

then bending the wire flat on the

a specific color system that recognizes Pantone colors to include in designs so that

Used for the Waterman Book due to its ease of

inside center fold to grip all the pages.

to select color.

be easily read.

Utilizes a smooth round coil to hold pages together. Allows book to lie flat when open or

PANT ONE ®

172 C

(> 8.5’x11’)

Pantone 172C was selected for the Waterman Book due to its ability to pop graphically

pages can be turned all the way around to the back if

on the page, and appeal better to green hues which were included in most of the

Usually used for photography or art books. Harder to

$$

Spiral

the color, when printed, is accurate. Color swatches released by Pantone are used

production and larger size which allows graphics to

Large

$

Saddle Stitch

desired. Can sometimes look cheap if not used properly.

Perfect

students existing drawings and renderings.

produce. Good as coffee table or shelf books.

$$$

Sections of folded pages have their spines trimmed off

Planning the Layout: Creating Hierarchy

and roughed up to improve bonding with glue. All sections are collated and glued to its wrap-around cover.

1/4”

The Waterman Grid System

1/8”

Why create a grid system? The foremost purpose of a grid in graphic design is to establish a set of guidelines for how elements should be positioned within a layout. The grid provides rhythm to a document as well as establish hierarchy within the information given. Learning to choose the right grid for a design is crucial to its success.

1/4”

Bleed The Waterman Book is almost 200 pages. I used a 1/2” margin in order to allow for a 1” gutter space. When bound this should give enough room in order for the reader to see the content on both pages comfortably.

Gutter and Margin The Waterman Book uses a 1/8” bleed. This is the small standard bleed size for printing documents with a lot of full bleed images.

Flow lines help subtly organize elements on a page. Grid modules are the spaces within the grid boundaries that hold images or text.

1/2”

Typeface & Text Flow Choosing a Typeface Choosing the right typeface is another way of creating a visual structure throughout a document. Typefaces can set the tone and feel of a particular piece of work and effectively communicate information.

Mixing Typefaces

The Baseline Grid: Fine Tuning Text

Pairing fonts is easy when looking at their specific properties.

Waterman Book Waterman Book

Elegant and modern. Mostly used in headings.

Century Gothic

Waterman Book

type and spacing. A baseline grid organizes

Waterman Book

Big Caslon Organic structure resembling handwriting with a pen. Used for setting body text.

Serif vs San Serif Serif

Serif fonts are easier to read in printed works because it makes individual letters more distinctive and therefore easier for our brains to recognize.

Waterman Book Waterman Book

San serif fonts are clean and recognizable because of their simple shape. This is good for works with more images than text.

Franklin Gothic, Regular, 30 pt Baskerville, Regular, 20 pt

The Waterman Book achieves heirarchy through a single

still organizes information while maintaining continuity.

Waterman Book

As a land grant university, The Ohio State University’s mission is to promote and provide educational and agricultural outreach to the public. Waterman Agricutural & Natural Resources Laboratory (WANRL) is a vital facility for agriculture and related research.

No Grid Rarely recognized but extremely critical, the baseline grid gives proportion and structure to type

and spacing. A baseline grid text

typeface in a variety of weights, sizes, and postures. This

Waterman Book

San Serif

and organized feel.

Futura, Medium, 20 pt

Typeface Families

Waterman Book

between lines, which gives text a balanced

Bodoni, Bold Italic, 30 pt

Classically geometric and spacious.

44

baseline grid gives proportion and structure to

Times New Roman, Regular, 20 pt

all text in a document to have equal spacing

Bodoni Bold

a a

Rarely recognized but extremely critical, the

Georgia, Bold Italic, 30 pt

Brandon Grotesque, Medium, 40 pt

Brandon Grotesque, Bold, 30 pt Brandon Grotesque, Medium, 20 pt

Brandon Grotesque, Light Italics, 10 pt

Grid Rarely recognized but extremely critical, the baseline grid gives proportion and structure to type and spacing. A baseline grid text


Agricultural Research + Graphics Professor(s): Paula Meijerink, Andrew Cruse, Kristi Cheramie Duration: 9 Months Completion Date: January 2017

The development of a study that was introduced in the interdisciplinary course titled, Land as Laboratory offered by the Knowlton School of Architecture, explored the value of Waterman Farm, a 266-acre piece of land located on Ohio State University’s west campus. The class examined a problem that has recently come into question: should the land continue to be utilized for full-scale landscape testing or should the farm be reconfigured for agricultural didactics: an urban space dedicated to the demonstration of production techniques used to feed campus. The research objective was to consolidate the studio’s production into a cohesive, organized and graphically designed document. The process included collecting projects, critically analyzing the studio’s production, editing, adjusting, advancing, and consolidating the content in a comprehensive document. This document highlights the beneficial research produced by the students, and is a valuable tool to enrich the discussion within OSU on the future of the Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory. Its content of addressing the role and potential of land as research in a land-grant institution is valuable for other land-grant institutions as well.

45


Revisualizing Graphics

1

2

3

4

TOP LEFT: The beginning graphic (top left) was choppy and hard to understand. The information is more consistent without a break in the middle of the page. Solid colors and patterns delineate information. Leader lines and boxes organizing information makes the time-line more crisp and digestible. Alone, this graph conveys three different sets of information on one spread. TOP RIGHT: These two spreads had very good content. However; the information was spread too thin and needed to be condensed into a more comprehensible spread. The first step in transforming the spreads was typically changing the color to match the color scheme of the book. Here you can see the original colors used by the students. These colors did not fit into a particular scheme and can make the content feel hectic and unorganized. BOTTOM RIGHT: Here you can see updated graphics, varying line-weights, and a tighter feel. The information has been filtered for the most important information. The text is more legible by fitting it into the specific typeface sizes and postures selected. The second spread was condensed into a simpler graphic with text beneath to further explain the diagram. Sometimes diagrams can easily be understood with captions or text instead of visually cluttering the page with lines and unneeded information.

46


Combining Information

1

2

Soil Culture vs. Soilless Culture

Crop Yields and Space: Soil vs. Soilless

AGRICULTURE “FIELD CULTURE”

Soil culture is reliant upon nutrient and mineral rich soil to produce a specific yield of crops. Seasonality, precipitation and temperature cannot be controlled or regulated. Soil culture is reliant upon the minerals in soil to retain water, give structure, and feed necessary nutrients to the vegetation.

HYDROPONICS “WATER-WORKS”

Hydropponic farm practices revolve around the science of growing plants with an intert medium to replace the structure of soil, such as gravel, sand, peat, vermiculite, pumice, perlite, coco coir, sawdust, and rise hills. Soil science is replaced with a nutrient rich solution containing what the nutrients found in soil and is essential to the successful growth of plants anad is then added to any one of these inert mediums.

The highlighted area reflects the amount of space necessary to grow equal amount of products. In soilless greenhouses you can grow almost twice the amount of product in an area 1/5 the size of a field. SOILLESS CULTURE FOOD PRODUCTION

WINTER

FALL

SPRING

SO

IL

CU

U LT

R

O EF

OD

PR

OD

UC

T IO

SUMMER

FALL

SOILLESS CULTURE PRODUCES FOOD AT A CONSTANT THROUGHOUT THE SEASONS, AS SEASONALITY DOESN’T PLAY A FACTOR.

SUMMER

N

SPRING

WINTER

SOIL CULTURE REQUIRES: SOIL RICH IN MINERALS AND NUTRIENTS

76

3

SOILLESS CULTURE REQUIRES: IRRIGATION AND WATER

FERTILIZERS AND INSECTICIDES

TEMPERATURES ABOVE FREEZING

ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY

GREENHOUSE STRUCTURE

WATER SOURCE

PLANTING CONTAINERS

77

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The project began in May 2016 and is currently in the process of being printed. The first meeting was spent delineating a project timeline, going over specific roles and requirements, information about the studio and its organization, and overall goals. The next gathering discussed specific layout guidelines, the overall feel of the book, pantone color swatches, typeface families, and printing strategies. The layout of the book was organized on a wall in the studio by chapters and sections, using 11 x 17 spreads of the book to showcase the growing advancement of the content. Each section in the book was analyzed and discussed, locating gaps in information that needed to be filled and research that had yet to be done. Over the course of a couple months, sections were worked and reworked, marked up, and corrected. 49


Resume

Education The Ohio State University B.S. in Landscape Architecture Columbus, OH

Revere High School Akron, OH

Awards

and

Achievements Studio Book Award December 2015 Undergraduate Summer Research Grant Deans List 2014-2017

Academic Affiliations Architecture Scholars Landscape Architecture Honors Program Landscape Architecture Mentor Program Secretary of the Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (SCASLA) Architecture Scholars Social Committee 50


Work Experience May 2016-Present

The Ohio State University Undergraduate Research Graphics, communication, corrispondence, payment organization, file management.

June 2014-August 2015

Gardens Limited of Bath Grounds Crew Member Pruning, weeding, planting, watering, mulching, water feature maintenance, customer service.

August 2013-August 2015

Menchies Frozen Yogurt Team Member Sales, cashier. Highly customer service based. Hollister Co.

January 2012- August 2013

Stock Associate Sales, cashier, displays, inventory control, customer service.

Skills Autocad Rhinoceros

Adobe Indesign ArcGIS

Microsoft Office Suite Adobe Illustrator Adobe Photoshop

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Landscape Architecture Portfolio  
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