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Sub-District 60B

Youth (Lions Opportunities for Youth) RESOURCE Guide 2013-2014


LOFY COMMITTEE Sub-District 60b | Lions Clubs International July 15, 2013 Lions and Omega /Alpha Leo Club Presidents Sub-District 60B Lions Clubs International Dear Lions and Leo Presidents: Congratulations as you assume the responsibilities of President for the fiscal year 2013-2014. Please also convey heartiest congratulations to the members of your Board of Directors. As a newly-elected officer, you will be in an excellent position to build on, create and promote opportunities for youth, that is, Leos and other young individuals in your club and community, and encourage Lions and Leos to serve those individuals who are most in need of care, employment, education, support and recognition. Our District Governor, Lion Izett McCalla, MJF, has asked me to serve as your District Youth (Lions Opportunities for Youth (LOFY)) Chairperson and I share this responsibility and the management of the programme with Leo Anton Jardine and Lion Stephen Aymes, MJF. Our team undertakes to give you our fullest support in locating resources and explaining our flagship programme, most of those programmes that are a part of the collage of Lions Clubs International’s (LCI) Youth programmes, and extend an invitation to you to keep the lines of communication positively engaged during the fiscal year. The details of the District Governor’s goals for Youth Development are included in this guide along with various resources for the youth development programmes promoted by LCI and your respective countries. Please peruse the details and see how best your club can execute projects or activities in the area of Youth Development. We wish for you and your Club a very successful year. Yours in Lionism,

Ava-Loi Forbes Youth – Lions Opportunities for Youth (LOFY) Chair Sub-District 60B

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MEET THE DISTRICT LOFY TEAM Youth - Lions Opportunities For Youth (LOFY) Chair Full Name: Ava-Loi Forbes Home Club: Lions Club of Downtown Kingston Tel.: Home: 876-631-5654; Cell: 876-468-5148 E-mail address: leoavaloi@gmail.com

Youth – Lions Opportunities For Youth (LOFY) Associate Chair Full Name: Stephen Aymes Home Club: Lions Club of Bridgetown Tel.: Home: 246-428-6716; Cell: 246-253-1808; BB Pin: 28AC2C11 E-mail address: saymes@gmail.com

Youth – Lions Opportunities For Youth (LOFY) Associate Chair Full Name: Anton Jardine Home Club: Leo Club of St. Vincent Tel.: Home: (784) 456-2939; Cell: (784) 494-5634; BB Pin: 23045543 E-Mail Address: antonjar@gmail.com

LOFY Team Members: Name Leo Junior Toussaint Leo Timora Peters Lion Christine Thorpe

Club Leo Club of Dominica Leo Club of St. Vincent South Lions Club of Montego Bay

Zone 2C 3C 1A

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Foreword District Governor Goals for Youth Development Lions Opportunity for Youth (LOFY) Chairperson Information

iv v vi

LOFY Flagship Programme: Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards

1-3

Lions Clubs International Youth Programmes: Engaging Our Youth Global Service Action Campaign The Lions International Youth Exchange Lions/UNICEF School-In-A-Box Reading Action Programme (RAP) Campaign International Club Twinning Scouts & Lions Lions Recreation Camps for Children and Adults with Disabilities and/or Special Medical Conditions Lions Services for Children Lions Quest Leo Club Lions International Peace Poster Competition Lions International Essay Contest

4-20 5 6-8 8-9 10-11 12 13-14

Lions Clubs International Youth Awards

22-25

National Youth Programmes in Sub-District 60B: Anguilla Antigua & Barbuda Barbados British Virgin Islands – Tortola, Virgin Gorda Cayman Islands – Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac Dominica Grenada Jamaica Montserrat Netherland Antilles – Saba, St. Eustatius St. Kitts & Nevis St. Lucia St. Maarten St. Vincent & the Grenadines US Virgin Islands – St. Thomas, St. Croix, St. John

26-39 27-28 28 29 29 30 30 31 31-35 36 36 37 37 38 38-39 39

District Governor’s Focus on Youth Education Programmes

40-42

LOFY Important Dates

43-45

15-16 16-17 18 19 20 21

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FOREWORD Young men and women under the age of 30 currently make up over 60 per cent of the Commonwealth’s population. By 2015, there will be three billion young people in the world, with 2.5 billion living in developing countries. Indicators as well as recent global events highlight the fact that young women and men will be exposed to more challenges…than any other social group.... - Katherine Ellis, Director and Head of Youth Affairs, Commonwealth Secretariat

How can the Lions get involved? How can we ensure that we play our part in alleviating the challenges that our young people in our organization and our various communities face? How can we ensure that they are least affected? We can help by (i) Expanding the opportunities for young individuals, particularly when our largest demography (or growing demography) is below the age of 30; (ii) Leveraging the talent and energy of our young people to create higher levels of equality, prosperity and social stability;(iii) Building young people’s skills, not only through academics but through other areas such as sports – highlighting their strengths and developing their weak areas; (iv)Acknowledging young people’s aspirations; and (v)Empowering young people with opportunities to reach their full potential. Of course there are more ways but these are a few that we can look to incorporate. Why should we get involved? By getting involved we will build stronger relationships with our communities; build stronger partnerships and ties with the various national youth programmes and this will foster or provide greater avenues for better impact on nation building; create visibility for our clubs and our causes; plant roots for future membership or future funding; and create the avenue to be recognized for our impacting work with the youth. Katherine Ellis (2013) writes that [the] negative perceptions of youth, the failure to help them develop to their full potential, the inability to recognise that investing in youth benefits national development, and the consequent unwillingness and incapacity of society to fully involve young people in a meaningful way have effectively deprived the world of a resource of inestimable value.

We, the Lions, are prepared this year to help young people follow their dreams; to find meaningful ways to uplift our youth; to increase their opportunities and their chances for a better life and a better future. The resource guide provides some basic information on our LCI youth programmes well as some of our national youth programmes. Let’s combine our efforts to create and implement programmes that will positively affect our youth and our societies.

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DISTRICT GOVERNOR’S GOALS for YOUTH DEVELOPMENT 2013-2014

Lion Izett McCalla, MJF District Governor Sub-District 60B

“A Passion for Compassion” i. To provide young people with opportunities for learning, skill acquisition and achievement ii. To empower our youth to contribute meaningfully in building and strengthening the communities to which they belong. iii. To plan programmes in conjunction with the Engaging our Youth Global Service Action Campaign iv. To implement programmes to integrate young individuals in your community to serve in various areas such as environment, literacy and education, children public health, disaster relief, elderly people, safety community improvement, homeless/hungry people, and drug abuse/awareness. v. To collaborate with other groups (such as Scouts, Girl Guides, Special Olympics, church-/community- youth clubs) or other organizations with youth development activities to improve the lives of our youth vi. To support national youth programmes in your respective country as it relates to youth protection, prevention and development programmes. vii. To assist in the employment of ten (10) or more young individuals in each Zone during the year viii. To provide youth with opportunities for meaningful involvement in preventing youth violence such as bullying, cyber-bullying, etc.

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LIONS OPPORTUNITIES for YOUTH CHAIRPERSON INFORMATION All Lions youth programmes at the club, district and multiple district levels are coordinated under the umbrella of Lions Opportunities for Youth (LOFY). The mission of Lions Opportunities for Youth is: To provide the young people of the world with opportunities for achievement, learning, contribution and service, individually and collectively, through sponsorship of activities identified as best practices in the field of youth development. Lions Opportunities for Youth activities include the following: Leo clubs, international youth exchanges and youth camps, International Peace Poster Contest, Lions Quest, drug awareness, youth volunteerism, Scouting, Special Olympics, speaking and essay contests, scholarships, and Young Leaders in Service Awards. LOFY Chairperson Duties: • • • • •

Become familiar with the various youth programmes in your district. Arrange meetings for youth chairpersons to exchange ideas and coordinate activities. Encourage Lions clubs and districts to support youth activities. Provide guidance to club and district level Lions Opportunities for Youth committees. Promote youth awards available from Lions Clubs International, including the Leo of the Year Award, Leo Club Excellence Award, District/Multiple District Leo Club Chairperson Award, 100% Leo District/Multiple District President Award, Top Ten Youth Camp and Exchange Chairperson Award, and the Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards. Excerpt from LOFY.EN

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LIONS OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH (LOFY)

FLAGSHIP PROGRAMME: LIONS YOUNG LEADERS IN SERVICE AWARDS PROGRAMME

“Young people who volunteer become adults who serve. Through the Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards, your Lions club encourages youth in the philosophy and habit of service to the community.” ~ Lions Club International

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LIONS YOUNG LEADERS IN SERVICE AWARDS PROGRAMME CHALLENGE YOUTH TO SERVE “The Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards program[me] is part of the Lions Opportunities for Youth initiative. The goal of Lions Opportunities for Youth is: To provide the young people of the world with opportunities for achievement, learning, contribution and service, individually and collectively, through sponsorship of activities identified as best practices in the field of youth development.” Programme Summary: The Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards recognize young people (suggested ages 12-18) for their community service within a 12-month period. Frequently Asked Questions: How does the programme work? Lions clubs invite local schools, Leo clubs and other youth groups to participate. A Lion coordinates with school personnel, Leo advisors and adult youth group leaders who certify young people’s service and submit award forms to the Lions club. The Lions club requests the award from Lions Clubs International, and a congratulatory letter from the International President, along with a certificate, are sent for each recipient. How many hours are required for awards? 50 hours of service = Silver Seal Award 100 hours of service = Gold Seal Award What are the benefits of the awards programme? Youth will experience the rewards of community service, achieve significant levels of community involvement and receive recognition. The community will improve through young people’s service; become more aware of service opportunities and nurture on-going service by young people and others. The Lions club will build community partnerships, introduce young people to future service and leadership opportunities 2|Page


and encourage young people to serve their communities and recognize them for their efforts. Materials Available: • Kit 860YL Young Leaders in Service Kit • IAD 132 Young Leaders in Service Informational Brochure Awards Available: • Lions Young Leaders in Service Silver Award (50 hours of community service) • Lions Young Leaders in Service Gold Award (100 hours of community service) Here are some other resources. Press the control command on your keyboard then click on the hyperlinked areas for further details:     

Youth Programmes Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards (iad132.pdf) Lions Young Leaders in Service Club Guide (iad133.pdf) Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards Poster (iad134.pdf) Young Leaders in Service Awards Form

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LIONS CLUBS INTERNATIONAL

PROGRAMMES

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“ENGAGING OUR YOUTH” GLOBAL ACTION SERVICE CAMPAIGN A growing number of studies show that youth who engage in meaningful service projects experience a host of positive outcomes. Lions have an incredible opportunity to engage youth by developing programmes they can relate to, and by encouraging their input and participation in the planning process. Allowing youth to develop and lead a service project helps them learn valuable life skills while emphasizing the role of service. Take Action During August, we invite you and your club to join Lions around the world in recognizing the power of youth involvement. Help us shine a light on youth by planning activities in connection with United Nations International Youth Day, recognized each August. Or, organize projects throughout the month that engage and mobilize youth in the process of helping communities. Resources The following resources are available to plan and promote a future “Engaging Our Youth” Global Service Action Campaign project.  Press Release: Send a press release to local media to encourage them to publicize your “Engaging Our Youth” Global Service Action Campaign.  Call to Action Flyer: Get an overview of the “Engaging Our Youth” Global Service Action Campaign – and ideas to jumpstart your project.  Planning Guide: Use this step-by-step approach to organize your very own “Engaging Our Youth” Global Service Action Campaign.  Project Ideas: Review ideas you and your club can use to partner with youth to develop a signature service project during the month of August that will make a big impact on your community. The opportunities are endless! Please let us know if you need any assistance with this campaign. You can contact any member of the LOFY team for further details.

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THE LIONS INTERNATIONAL YOUTH EXCHANGE “The Lions International Youth Exchange Program[me] fulfills the First Object of the Lions: To create and foster a spirit of understanding among the peoples of the world.� The programme was officially introduced in 1961. Since then, thousands of young people (ages 1521) have experienced life in another culture as Lions youth exchangees. Unlike some exchange programmes, the Lions programme does not involve tourism, academic studies, or employment. Instead, the Lions youth exchange programme provides young people with a unique opportunity to: participate in everyday life in another culture; reside with a host family; serve as an ambassador for international understanding; participate in local customs. Programme Summary: Each year, Lions Clubs International offers thousands of young people the opportunity to experience life in another culture through the Lions International Youth Camp and Exchange (YCE) Programme. Since the first Lions international camp was formed in Sweden in 1963, Lions throughout the world have welcomed thousands of Lions-sponsored campers between the ages of 16-22. Lions camps are at least one week in duration, held in countries where Lions clubs exist and offer a variety of activities to promote international goodwill. In addition to participating in international camps, Lions-sponsored youth from 15-21 years of age have the opportunity to stay with Lionsapproved host families. Youth exchanges often occur before or after Lions international camps and can last between two to four weeks. Frequently Asked Questions: Who can participate in the programme? Any youth between the ages of 15 and 22 that agrees to meet all of the requirements of the YCE Programme, host Lions club and host country. All camp and exchange participants must be sponsored by a Lions club, even if the club is not providing financial assistance. How does a district or multiple district participate in the programme? 6|Page


A certification form (that verifies and provides contact information on youth camp and exchange chairpersons) signed by the respective district governor or council chairperson and YCE chairperson/s is submitted to the Youth Programs Department at headquarters. Upon receipt and review, the district/MD camp and exchange programme and contact information is posted on the YCE Directory on the Lions Web site – if the programme meets the criteria outlined in the Youth Programs Chapter of the Board Policy Manual. Who pays for expenses? Financial arrangements vary and costs to participate in a camp or exchange may be paid by the sponsor Lions club, host Lions club, the youth, his or her family, or a combination of these sources. However, generally, the sponsoring Lions club, or the youth and his or her family, are responsible for the cost of the participant’s international travel and insurance. Costs incurred while in the host country are generally the responsibility of the host Lions club. Participants should have adequate personal funds for incidentals, telephone calls and souvenirs. Who facilitates the exchanges? Exchanges are facilitated directly between YCE chairpersons. Chairpersons also act as liaisons between host and sponsor Lions clubs. Can youth use exchanges for purposes of employment or education? No. Unlike some exchange programmes, the Lions programme does not involve academic studies or employment. Lions youth exchanges provide an opportunity for young people to learn first-hand about another culture, and international camps allow youth to meet other young people from around the globe. Some camps and exchanges provide an opportunity for youth to participate in service activities and attend Lions clubs’ meetings to learn more about Lions and the work they do. For further details on the responsibilities of the Lions Club and the Host Club please visit the following brochure http://www.lionsclubs.org/EN/common/pdfs/ye1000.pdf. Materials Available: Here are some other resources. Click on the hyperlinked areas for further details:         

Youth Camp and Exchange Programme Youth Exchange Programme (ye1000.pdf) Youth Exchange Host Family Guide (ye102.pdf) Youth Exchange Visitors Guide (ye101.pdf) Camp and Exchange Directory (yce_directory.pdf) Youth Camp & Exchange Participant Application (ye1401.pdf) Lions Youth Exchange Host Family Application (ye1402.pdf) Sample Waiver and Release of Liability (YCE_liability_waiver.pdf) Annual District Youth Camp and Exchange Report Form (yce510d.pdf)

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Annual Multiple District Form (yce510md.pdf)

Youth

Camp

and

Exchange

Report

YOUTH CAMP AND EXCHANGE PROGRAMME • Youth Camp & Exchange Directory (available on Lions Web site) Awards Available:  The Top Ten Youth Camp & Exchange Chairperson Award Important Dates:  August 31: Annual District/Multiple District Youth Camp & Exchange Report Form (YCE 510A) due to Youth Programmes Department • November 15: Deadline for Top Ten Youth Camp & Exchange Chairperson Application Form (YCE 110) • December 1: Annual District/Multiple District Youth Camp & Exchange Activity Report (YE 1450) due to Youth Programmes Department

LIONS/UNICEF SCHOOL-IN-A-BOX Programme Summary: In 1996 Lions Clubs International signed a memorandum of understanding with UNICEF to support the School-in-a-Box Programme. Since then, LCI has seen an increasing rate of contributions to LCIF from Lions clubs and districts in response to this collaboration. School-in-a-Box enables teachers to set up temporary classrooms anywhere in the world during and after disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, and civil unrest. The box contains culturally neutral school supplies and materials for a teacher and up to 40 students, while supplemental books in local languages are customized for the specific area affected. Frequently Asked Questions: How can I make a donation to Lions/UNICEF School-in-a-Box? Complete and sign the School-in-a-Box Banner Patch Application (IAD-306A), which is available for downloading on the Lions Web site, and send to Lions Clubs International Foundation, with the notation of “School-in-a-Box” on your remittance. Contributions are accepted in any amount. How much does a School-in-a-Box cost? Each box costs approximately US$257.00. More information about the programme is available on the LCI Web site.

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How does LCI recognize clubs and districts for their donations? For a donation of US$500 or more, the free patch will be sent to the club or district, and their names are announced at Lions Day with the United Nations. They are also recognized on the School-in-a-Box “honour roll,” located on the LCI Web site. Leo clubs are also encouraged to participate in the programme. Is there any recognition for contributions that clubs or districts may send in subsequent years? Each subsequent annual donation of US$500 or more will result in the receipt of a free dated chevron patch. Can I direct my donation to be used in a specific area? No. All donations are sent to UNICEF, who determines where the boxes are most needed. Materials Available: • School-in-a-Box Fact Sheet (iad306.pdf) • Lions-UNICEF School-in-a-Box Banner Patch Application (iad306-a.pdf) • Lions/UNICEF School-in-a-Box general brochure • Lions may borrow a sample School-in-a-Box, which weighs about 50 lbs. and measures 80 x 60 x 25 cm, for promotional purposes for district or multiple district conventions and events. Contact the Health & Children’s Services Department for information. NOTE: Shipping fees are the responsibility of the district or multiple district. Awards Available: • “School-in-a-Box Banner Patch Recognition” – to be presented by LCI to a club or district donating US$500 or more to the program during fiscal year in which the donation was made. • “School-in-a-Box banner chevron” – to be presented by LCI to a club or district donating US$500 or more to the program in each subsequent year • District Lions Services for Children Chairperson Award certificate to be presented by the district governor.

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READING ACTION PROGRAMME (RAP) CAMPAIGN “The more you read, the more things you’ll know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” Dr. Seuss, author of children’s books

There are nearly 800 million people around the world today who cannot read. This fact is astonishing given how important one’s ability to read is for learning and development. Literacy not only forms the basis for individual academic, occupational, and social success, but it can also empower communities to fight poverty, reduce child mortality, achieve gender equality, and ensure peace and democracy. Reading and School Readiness Reading aloud to young children is one the most effective ways to prepare children to succeed in school. However, many children, particularly those living in poverty, are not exposed to books and reading until they begin attending school. Research shows that books contain many words that children are unlikely to encounter frequently in spoken language. Children's books actually contain 50% more rare words than primetime television or even college students’ conversations. How can you help a child succeed in school? Serve as a volunteer reader or organize a book drive. Reading and Special Needs Based on US statistics, only 10 percent of blind children are learning Braille. While audio devices are useful sources of information for blind people, only Braille offers complete command of written language. However, 85 percent of blind children attend public schools where few teachers know Braille. This percentage is even greater in developing countries that lack access to resources and teachers with Braille knowledge. Find organizations that you can work with to reverse this trend. Access to Information and the Digital Divide Access to technology notably affects literacy rates. The Internet provides opportunities for people to improve their lives. When people go online, they can get health information, use government services, manage finances, look for jobs, and do research for school. For most people in developing and transitioning countries, quality Internet access is not available or affordable. There is a great inequality in the global distribution of information technology. Worldwide, approximately 5 billion people—nearly 90 percent of the world’s population—do not have an opportunity to use computers connected to the internet. Learn what the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is doing to bridge the digital divide and how you can help. 10 | P a g e


Technology for Facilitated Learning Technology provides a wide variety of tools which can be used by people who are blind or have low vision to access information. The American Foundation for the Blind's goal is to provide the information you need to learn about available technology and even discover new ways to use technology to enhance your everyday life. Learn about assistive technology products for individuals with visual impairments. Books and Learning Resources Before children can be taught effectively; schools or other educational institutions must be created and stocked with adequate teaching materials. Rural schools in many poorer countries are severely limited in their supplies. They may lack textbooks, paper, desks, blackboards, chairs – even pencils. Without good textbooks or other classroom resources, more teachers cannot necessarily improve the quality of learning (UNESCO).Learn about ways you can help get resources into classrooms. Project Ideas The following are a few project ideas that members of your club and district may consider taking on:  Serve as a volunteer reader  Promote Braille literacy  Provide support to your local library  Help build a classroom for underserved children  Organize a book drive Resources Use the resources below to plan and promote your reading action projects.  Call to Action Flyer: Get an overview of the Reading Action Programme.  Project Idea Sheet: Refer to this sheet to get ideas for a possible project.  Planning Guide: Use this step-by-step approach to organize your project.  Press Release: Send a press release to local media to help publicize your project.  Service Activity Report: Use the online service activity report to share what your clubs is doing as part of the Reading Action Program and qualify for a special award.  Artwork: Download artwork to print your very own bookmarks or diploma. For more information or resources go to www.lionsclubs.org and keyword search “Reading Action Program” or contact the Service Activities Division at programs@lionsclubs.org or (630) 468-6893.

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INTERNATIONAL CLUB TWINNING Programme Summary: The International Club Twinning Programme encourages Lions and Leo clubs to establish friendships with clubs in other countries in order to learn about other club traditions and customs. Lions and Leo clubs from different countries that enter into formal club-to-club friendship agreements are known as International Club Twins. Lions and Leos can participate; however, twinning must occur between like clubs (i.e., Lions with Lions, Leos with Leos). Club twins actively illustrate the Third Purpose of the Association, To create and foster a spirit of understanding among the peoples of the world. Frequently Asked Questions: How do clubs begin to twin? Often, an international friendship begins with electronic and mail communications. Later, the friendship expands to include the exchange of club pins, banners, newsletters, local newspapers, music CDs, recipes, art, and literature. On-site visits are common. A list of clubs that have expressed interest in twinning is located on the Lions Web site. What is a formal club twinning agreement? Once the two clubs have established a friendship, both club presidents may decide to sign an International Club Twinning Agreement (IAD 603). Often, this form is completed at a formal ceremony. Then, the form is sent to Lions International Headquarters to request an official International Club Twinning Award. What is the purpose of club twinning? Twinning is intended to actively illustrate the Third Purpose of the Association, To create and foster a spirit of understanding among the peoples of the world. Twinning is not intended to persuade other clubs to adopt one’s ways nor is it to be entered into for financial or material assistance. Materials Available: • International Club Twinning Recognition Application (IAD 603) • Club twinning guidelines • The Web site includes a club twining list of Lions and Leos interested becoming club twins. Awards Available: • International Club Twinning Banner Patch Award (submit form IAD 603 to International Headquarters)

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SCOUTS & LIONS The relationship between Lions Clubs International and Scouts dates back to the early 1900s. As of December 31, 2009, U.S. Lions sponsored more than 2,522 Boy Scout units which included 70,384 Scouts. The cooperation that exists between Scouts and Lions benefits both organizations. Young people (such as Scouts) need the guidance and mentoring of quality adult role models (Lions). When Lions clubs charter a Scouts unit, they provide Scouts with adult role models. In addition, the chartering of a Scout unit provides a quality programme for the youth of the community. There is a video about Lions Clubs International and the Boy Scouts of America. The video features Lions Past International President Jim Ervin. A fourcolor brochure entitled "Scouting: Community Outreach for your Lions Club" and a new Scouts unit kit are also available. These resources are available from the Boy Scouts of America. Lions Award for Scouts Lions clubs can present the Lions Clubs-Boy Scouts of America Community Service Award to Scouts who participate in joint Lions/Scouts service projects. Scout troop leaders can request the award from their sponsoring Lions club for every Scout who fulfils the following criteria.        

Meets with the Scoutmaster and Lions to discuss community needs and identify joint service project possibilities. Selects an issue/need which can be addressed together. This can be a long-term on-going project or a short-term, one-time project. Sets goals for the service project. Develop a timeline. Obtains permits, authorizations, or materials necessary to complete the project. Works together to carry out the service project. Documents the service project with photos, videotape, or written notes to demonstrate the successful completion of the service project. Meets with the Scoutmaster and Lions after the project is completed and organize an awards ceremony.

Suggested joint Lions/Scouting service projects include:  Food or clothing collections for the needy;  Roadway or beach clean-up campaigns;  Hospital or nursing home visits;  Playground equipment repairs or installation.

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Lions clubs can order the Lions Scouting Service Patch (A-65). Each award costs US$3.15 plus shipping and handling. Banner Patch for Lions clubs Lions clubs that sponsor a Boy Scout troop can receive the Lions Boy Scout banner patch award. The colourful 3" (7.62 cm) square embroidered patch award identifies your club as a proud advocate of the Scouting movement. The Lions Scouting Patch (A64) is available for purchase (US$5.15 plus shipping and handling). Eagle Scout Award (applies to some Sub-District 60B countries) A Lions certificate is available for presentation to young men who have attained the highest US Boy Scout rank – the Eagle Scout. Scout leaders may contact their local Lions club and request the suitable-forframing certificate. After verifying that the young man is indeed an Eagle Scout, forward the request to the Youth Programs Department at international headquarters. An award certificate and a letter from international headquarters will be sent to your club for formal presentation to the Eagle Scout. Award for Girl Scouts A Lions award is available for purchase for Girl Scouts of the USA (item number A 66; cost is US$3.15 each from Lions Club Supplies). Lions clubs can purchase the badge for Scouts who participate in joint Lions projects. Lions clubs are active Girl Scout troop sponsors. Currently, there are more than 3.2 million Girl Scouts of the USA. There are more than 10 million members of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGS) which exists in 145 countries. Additional Scouting Information Visit the Scouts, the Boy Scouts of America and the Scouts Canada for more information. You can also visit the Lions Club International by clicking on the following link: Scouts and Lions.

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LIONS RECREATION CAMPS FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES AND/OR SPECIAL MEDICAL CONDITIONS Programme Summary: Throughout the world, Lions have established or sponsored various types of recreational camps serving children and adults. Lions camps offer programmes for people who: (i) have diabetes; (ii) are deaf or hearing impaired; (iii) are blind or visually impaired; and (iv) are living with other disabilities. Lions involvement at the club and district levels is important to provide continued support to each local Lions or Lions-sponsored camp. Lions activities may include: cleaning and preparing the facilities for the camping season, preparing and serving meals at campsite, providing transportation for campers, fundraising, or sponsoring a child or adult for camp. Frequently Asked Questions: How can I find the nearest Lions-sponsored camp? The Health and Children’s Services Department has compiled a list of Lions or Lions sponsored camps. It can be downloaded from the LCI Web site. However, more camping locations are needed: Lions in every constitutional area are encouraged to provide news and contact information about their camps, so that they may be included on the list. How can I find a camp for children with diabetes? The camp list on the Web site provides the camp locations of those camps serving children who have diabetes. Lions may also explore camps listed on the Diabetes Education & Camping Association (DECA) web site www.diabetescamps.org. DECA is one of Lions Clubs International’s partners. How can I get involved with a Lions camp? Simply call your local Lions camp or access the list posted on the Web site to obtain contact information. Inquire about the types of volunteer services that may be needed. How can I start a Lions camp? Contact local agencies serving children and adults with disabilities or diabetes to determine camping needs in the surrounding area. Meet with Lions district and/or multiple district leaders to propose the new camp and gauge the level of interest and support. Many Lions camps are willing to share information about the necessary procedures for camp formation. You may also contact the Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA) for information and courses in camp leadership and development.

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How can I obtain needed supplies and equipment for a Lions camp? • Place your inquiry on the Lion-2-Lion: Resource Assistance Database, which can be accessed from the LCI Web site. • Apply for LCIF grant funding Materials Available: • Lions Recreation Camp List For more information about Lions Recreation Camps for Children and Adults with Disabilities and/or Special Medical Conditions please contact our SubDistrict 60B Lions Diabetes Awareness & Action Chairperson Lion Dr. Carlisle Goddard, MJF or the representative who manages that programme in your region. You can also contact the Youth (LOFY) team for assistance as well.

LIONS SERVICES FOR CHILDREN Programme Summary: The Lions Services for Children (LSC) Programme was adopted in 2003 to improve the lives of children and adolescents in adverse circumstances through health and education services, locally and internationally. After a three-year pilot phase ending June 30, 2008, the Lions Services for Children Worldwide Symposium Programme was adopted as an official service programme on July 1, 2008. The symposium provides Lions with a format to collaborate with concerned government agencies, health care organizations, educators and citizens to meet critical needs of underprivileged children. Lions-UNICEF School-in-a-Box programme provides educational supplies to teachers in areas affected by civil unrest, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tsunamis, ensuring the continuation of children's education in the first 72 hours of an emergency. The “Lions Children First” Programme, adopted by the board in March 2009, encourages Lions to organize hands-on projects to assist children in need such as implementing food or clothing drives, providing health screenings and immunizations, collecting books and toys or mentoring at-risk youth.

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Frequently Asked Questions: How do I begin a club service project for local children in need? Lions clubs are encouraged to review the Lions Children First Information Kit (KITCFEN) obtained through the Health and Children’s Services Department. It contains essential information to help a club organize a Lions Children First project. The club can then form the appropriate committee of active club members and set goals for project development. Children’s hearing, vision and dental screenings are excellent projects for Lions clubs and districts, too. Clubs are encouraged to involve Leos in their service activities for children. What types of projects could serve the needs of children and adolescents living in adverse circumstances? Food, shelter or clothing; immunizations; vision, hearing, dental screenings; assistance in coping with illness or disabilities; literacy programmes; drug and alcohol abuse education; provision of safe drinking water; recreational and social programs; vocational programmes; upgrade schools or children’s centres; or Lions missions to underserved areas. How can I hold a district or multiple district children’s symposium? The district or multiple district should submit to Lions Clubs International Headquarters a completed and signed children’s symposium application available for downloading on the Web site (LSC-9) as soon as possible. Four Two symposiums in each constitutional area will be selected to receive up to US$2,000 expense assistance, each fiscal year. Applications are first come, first-served, and a response will be issued within 30 days after receipt of the application. Further information is available in the symposium “Rules of Audit” form (LSC18), also on the Web site. The district and multiple district Lions Services for Children chairpersons can help to organize and promote a children’s symposium. How can I find out more about children’s symposiums that have been held in my Constitutional area? Contact the Health and Children’s Services Department to get in touch with Lions who have organized successful symposiums in collaboration with other organizations, health care agencies or educators to address issues involving health and educational needs. For more information about Lions Services for Children please contact our SubDistrict 60B Services for Children – Lions Quest Chairperson Lion Wally Havertong, MJF or the representative who manages that programme in your region.

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LIONS QUEST

Lions Quest is a life skills and prevention programme of Lions Clubs International Foundation, implemented in 65 countries throughout the world. For more than 25 years, Lions Quest has provided educators with training and curriculum materials that support positive youth development and school-to-work competencies. Lions Quest believes the most effective way to implement positive youth development programmes and bring about lasting improvements in school climate is to equip educators with current research, materials and strategies for addressing critical issues facing youth. All three Lions Quest programmes – I. II. III.

Skills for Growing (grades K-5), Skills for Adolescence (grades 6-8), and Skills for Action (grades 9-12)

– help foster in young people important life skills, healthy attitudes, strong character, positive relationships, and active citizenship through easy-to-use classroom materials, superior professional development, and important community partnerships. Lions Quest research-based programmes support school-community partnerships by linking local schools with the largest service organization in the world - Lions Clubs International. For more information about Lions Quest please contact our Sub-District 60B Services for Children – Lions Quest Chairperson Lion Wally Havertong, MJF or the representative who manages that programme in your region.

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LEO CLUB Coach Jim Graver started the Leo ball rolling in 1957 and chances are that ball was a baseball. Graver was the baseball coach of the Abington High School in Pennsylvania, USA and an active member of the Glenside Lions Club. With help from his fellow Lion, William Ernst, the first Leo club was charted on December 5, 1957. As the world's first Leo club, the Abington High School Leo Club created the Leo acronym – Leadership, Equality, Opportunity – and they chose their school colours, maroon and gold to serve as the Leo club colours. Later, Equality was changed to Experience. In October 1967, the board of directors of Lions Clubs International adopted the Leo Club Programme as an official programme of the association. The Leo Club Programme has been growing strong for over 50 years. Community service remains the cornerstone of the programme. Like their Lion counterparts, Leo club members enjoy serving their neighbours and watching positive results unfold. Sponsor a Leo Club When you start a local Leo club, young people in your community have a unique opportunity to develop into humanitarians and leaders. Leo clubs encourage young people to develop valuable skills and to serve others in their neighbourhoods and around the world. Whether school-affiliated or community-based, Leo clubs provide their members with the camaraderie and growth that come from participation in community service projects, social functions and leadership development activities. For Young People Who Care Leo clubs are open to young people with good character who have an interest in serving their communities. Based in schools or in the community, Leo clubs are divided into two tracks: Alpha and Omega. ALPHA LEO CLUBS are designed for youth between 12 and 18 years old. This track focuses on the individual and social development of teens and preteens. OMEGA LEOCLUBS are tailored for young adults between 18 and 30 years old. This track is designed for the personal and professional development of young adults. Energize Your Lions Club Through involvement with a Leo club, you can energize your Lions club and inspire members. What’s more, the Leo Club Program can increase your Lions club’s community exposure, attracting potential members such as young professionals, parents and families. For more information about sponsoring a Leo club contact our Sub-District 60b Leo & Youth Outreach Chairperson Lion Debra Rigg or representative who manages that programme in your region.

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LIONS INTERNATIONAL PEACE POSTER COMPETITION An Annual Art Contest for Kids Each year, Lions clubs around the world proudly sponsor the Lions International Peace Poster Contest in local schools and youth groups. This art contest for kids encourages young people worldwide to express their visions of peace. For 25 years, more than four million children from nearly 100 countries have participated in the contest. The theme of the 2013-14 Peace Poster Contest is "Our World, Our Future." Students, ages 11, 12 or 13 on November 15, are eligible to participate. Promoting the Arts Each year's art contest for kids consists of an original theme incorporating peace. Participants use a variety of mediums, including charcoal, crayon, pencil and paint, to express the theme. The works created are unique and express the young artists' life experiences and culture. Spreading Peace and International Understanding Twenty-four international Peace Poster entries are selected each year, representing the work of approximately 400,000 young participants worldwide. Posters are shared globally via the Internet, the media and exhibits around the world.

Children Know Peace" 2011-12 Grand Prize Winner

Materials Available:  Peace Poster Contest  Peace Poster Contest Brochure (pr775.pdf)  Peace Poster Kit Order Form (pr785.pdf) Peace Poster Contest Participant Information To learn more about the Lions International Peace Poster Contest, please contact our Sub-District Peace Poster Chairperson Lion Paula C. Bartley or the representative who manages the programme in your region.

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LIONS INTERNATIONAL ESSAY CONTEST Lions clubs around the world are encouraged to sponsor students in the Lions International Essay Contest. This essay contest was created to offer an opportunity to visually impaired young people to express their feelings of peace. The theme of the 2013-14 Lions International Essay Contest is "Our World, Our Future." Students who are visually impaired and who are ages 11, 12 or 13 on November 15, are eligible to participate. Work with your fellow Lions, local schools and area families to identify young people who are interested in participating and who could benefit from this programme. One grand prize winner will receive an award and US$5,000. Essay Contest Guidelines Each essay must be submitted with a completed entry form. Essays must be no longer than 500 words in length, submitted in English, type-written in black ink and double-spaced. Read the complete essay contest rules and entry form. View past grand prize winning essays:  2012-2013 "Imagine Peace" by Maura Loberg, age 11  2011-2012 "Children Know Peace" by Mikaela Smith, age 12  2010-2011 "Power of Peace" by Amy Bosko, age 12

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LIONS CLUBS INTERNATIONAL

AWARDS

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LCI YOUTH AWARDS If we DREAM boldly and pursue our dreams, we will achieve more than we ever believed possible. This is our time to LEAD. This is your time to ACHIEVE. – International President, Barry J. Palmer

Leo of the Year Award honours Leos who have demonstrated superior achievement. A multiple district council of governors or a single district (that is not part of a multiple district) may nominate one Leo each year for this gold medallion and certificate award. Applications must be submitted to the Youth Programmes Department by April 1. 100% Leo Club President Award may be presented by the Leo club advisor, with approval of the sponsoring Lions club president, to a Leo club president who meets specific requirements during his/her year in office. Award criteria categories include leadership development, membership extension, administration, and Leo club activities. Certificates are mailed to Leo club advisors in March. Leo October Membership Growth Award may be presented to any Leo who recruits three or more new members in October. To obtain this award, Leo club advisors must submit a nomination form to the Youth Programmes Department by November 15. Congratulations to all current award recipients! Leo Award of Honour recognizes a Leo member who has achieved outstanding accomplishments during the year and who is nominated for the award by their fellow Leos. The lapel medal can be purchased from Club Supplies. Leo Completion of Service certificate recognizes a Leo's service to the club and community. The certificate may be used to waive the US$25 international entrance fee or the US$30 charter fee assessed when a former Leo joins a newly formed Lions club. To obtain a certificate, former Leos need to submit a requisition form to the Youth Programmes Department. Leo Club Advisor Outstanding Service Award recognizes Leo club advisors who have demonstrated outstanding service in guiding and developing their Leo clubs. A club advisor who meets specific requirements may be awarded this certificate by the sponsoring Lions club president. Certificates are mailed to the presidents of Lions clubs who sponsor a Leo club in February.

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Leo Club Advisor Five-Year Service Award honours Leo club advisors who successfully completed five years of dedicated service. Sponsoring Lions clubs presidents need to complete the application for this pin and certificate. Congratulations to all the current winners! Leo Club Extension Award for Leo Club Sponsorship certificates are issued to the president of the sponsoring Lions club and the Leo club advisor when a Leo club is certified. The certificates are sent from the Youth Programmes Department upon receipt of official notification of a new Leo club. The sponsoring Lions club can request additional certificates for anyone it wishes to thank for assisting in organizing the new Leo club.

Leo Spotlight on Children Award – Leo clubs that complete a Spotlight on Children project to help children in adverse circumstances can apply for this banner patch award. Individual Leos who provide a high level of support to a Spotlight on Children project are eligible to receive a Certificate of Recognition. Requirements for the award appear on the application. Leo Lion Serving Together Award – A banner patch featuring the Leo club and Lions club logos shall be issued to both the Leo club and its Lions club sponsor for successful completion of joint projects and other types of activities supporting Leo-Lion collaboration. Requirements for the award appear on the application. International Club Twinning Award – Leo clubs that participate in the International Club Twinning Programme are eligible to apply for a special certificate or banner patch as recognition of their participation. Leo club and Sponsoring Lions club Anniversary Patches – Patches for the Leo club and sponsoring Lions club are automatically sent from the Youth Programmes Department at International Headquarters to Leo and Lions clubs that have achieved the fifth anniversary of their certification. Patches are sent at anniversaries in multiples of five years thereafter. Leo Club Sponsorship Patch – A sponsorship banner patch is issued from the Youth Programmes Department at International Headquarters to each Lions club upon sponsoring a Leo club.

Leo Club Excellence Award – All districts (single or sub) may endorse one Leo club to receive this prestigious award. The district Leo club chairperson must endorse the nomination. Submit applications to the Youth Programmes Department by August 15. Winners will receive a banner patch and chevron in Leo colours. Congratulations to all the current winners!

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100% Leo District President Award – A Leo district president who meets specific requirements during his/her year in office may be awarded this certificate by the district Leo club chairperson with the approval of the district governor. Award criteria categories include leadership development, club or membership extension, administration and district Leo activities. Certificates are mailed to district Leo club chairpersons in April. Leo Club Extension Award – Recognizes Lions and Leos who contribute to the organization of new Leo clubs in their district or multiple district. Certificates are awarded to district governors, district Leo club chairpersons and Leo district presidents who achieve a net gain of 3 new clubs in their district and to council chairpersons, multiple district Leo club chairpersons and Leo multiple district presidents who achieve a net gain of 5 new clubs in their multiple district by June 30. Congratulations to the current district and multiple district winners! Top Ten Leo Club Extension Award – A gold lapel pin will be issued to district Leo club chairpersons and Leo district presidents of the ten districts with the highest net gain growth of new Leo clubs during a Lions fiscal year. Multiple district Leo club chairpersons and Leo multiple district presidents who supported the Leo club extension efforts of a Top Ten District will also each receive a lapel pin. Congratulations to the current Top Ten Districts! Leo Club Chairperson Achievement Award – Officially appointed district and multiple district Leo club chairpersons who meet specific criteria may be awarded this certificate by the district governor or council chairperson. Award criteria categories include extension, leadership development, district/multiple district Leo activities, administration and promotion. Certificates are mailed to district governors or council chairpersons annually. Lions Young Leaders in Service Awards recognize young people for their community service within a 12-month period. Youth who complete 50 hours of community service will receive a silver seal certificate. Youth who complete 100 or more hours of community service will receive a gold seal certificate. A programme guide and fact sheet is available to Lions clubs interested in the award programme. Lions Clubs International will issue a congratulatory letter from the international president and a certificate for each award recipient submitted. LCIF Awards– Leo club members are eligible for a number of awards and recognition presented by the Lions Clubs International Foundation (LCIF). These include a certificate of appreciation, LCIF Chairperson’s certificate, Melvin Jones Fellowship, banner patch and club plaque award. Contact LCIF for more information.

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NATIONAL

YOUTH PROGRAMMES in Sub-District 60B

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Anguilla Population: 15,754 (est. July 2013)1 Percentage of Population between13-30: approx. 28.88%2 For details about Anguilla’s national programmes the Senior Programme Officer for Youth Development in the Ministry of Social Development – Education, Sports, Youth and Culture has shared the following with us: 1. The Anguilla National Youth Council (ANYC) is a registered nongovernment umbrella organization for youth and youth organizations on Anguilla. Its founding year is variously documented as 1976 or 1977 and it was established as a national body to protect the interests of all youth, youth groups, and affiliated organizations: and to advance and promote the general welfare and social progress of not only the youth, but also the people of Anguilla. At present, the ANYC has a membership of 24 youth organisations and is affiliated with the Government of Anguilla’s Department of Youth and Culture which provides support for its development and the implementation of its Strategic Plan. Please contact Mr. Kasseem Forde at 1-264-5846353 2. The National Youth Ambassador Corps (NYAC) is a component of the Department of Youth and Culture’s Youth Participation programme and is a committee of the Anguilla National Youth Council. The programme seeks to mainstream the perspectives of Anguilla’s young people at all levels of the decision making process and enable young people to contribute to community and nation building. The NYAC creates a structured opportunity for young people to participate in the policy development and implementation process, it also focuses on building the capacity of youth leaders for effective leadership and advocacy and assists in the development of a national framework for the integration of young people and their perspectives into national programming. Please contact Ms. Rochelle Rogers at 1-264-5819297 3. Job Link-Up is an initiative targeted at young people from the ages of 15 and 24 who are considered ‘at-risk” of remaining unemployed. Within the framework of this initiative, “at-risk” refers to those young persons who, due to particular socio-economic factors may experience greater difficulty in finding a job and integrating into the job market; thus they are considered to be involuntarily out of work. Each Young person attached to the programme is assisted in developing action plans that plot their entry into the workforce. These 1

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/wfbExt/region_cam.html. All population data taken from the World Factbook except indicated. 2 http://www.thecommonwealth.org/Internal/153027/153111/153114/member_countries/. All age population data taken from the commonwealth secretariat for youth affairs except where indicated.

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action plans includes individual counselling, group counselling, job shadowing, mentorship, job placement, academic and skills training coupled with ongoing personal development sessions. The concept behind Job Link-Up is that by completion of each programme cycle, participants would have been fully integrated into the job market. Each programme cycle runs for 6 months and targets 20 at-risk youth per cycle. 4. Community and youth development centres (Volunteer for at min, 1 hour per week). Please contact: Mrs. Romney, 1-264-584-2860; Ms. Harrigan, 1-264-584-4242; or Ms. Duncan, 1-264-582-2773 5. The Anguilla National Trust. Please contact Ms. Farah Mukhida at 1-264584-2173 Information received from: Ms. Hyacinth Augustine Senior Programme Officer-Youth Development Department of Youth and Culture Ministry of Social Development -Education, Sports, Youth and Culture Government of Anguilla Canon Ball Complex, Airport Road. P.O. Box 60 The Valley, ANGUILLA

Antigua & Barbuda Population: 90,156 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 24 years: 16.7%3 For further details about national youth programmes, please direct your queries to: Ms. Cleon Athill, Director of Youth, Ministry of Sports, Youth Affairs & Carnival, P.O. Box 1930 Cassada Gardens, Cecil Charles Building, Cemetery Road, St John's, Antigua and Barbuda Tel#: 268-460-5522 / 562-6233 / 562-1680 |Fax #: 268-562-1681 Mobile: 783-6858 |E-mail: tijani@candw.ag

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Barbados Population: 288,725 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: approx. 24% For further details about national youth programmes, please direct your queries to: Halley Haynes Director, Youth Affairs Mailing Address: Elsie Payne Complex, Constitution Road St. Michael, Barbados Tel#: 246-430-2914 / 430-2805 | Fax#: 246-436-2411 436-8909 Mobile#: 246-231-1874 | Email: dbys@sunbeach.net Or The Ministry of Education, Youth Affairs & Culture Email: mined1@caribsurf.com | Tel #: 246-430-2700

British Virgin Islands Population: 31,912 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: approx. 22.93% For further details about national youth programmes, please direct your queries to the: Ministry of Education and Culture mec@gov.vg 284-468-3701 ext 215, 3358

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Cayman Islands Population: 53,737 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: approx. 21.76% For further details about national youth programmes, please direct your queries to the Office of the Honourable Minister of Health, Sports, Youth and Culture Osbourne Bodden (also a Past President of the Lions Club of Grand Cayman). You can contact the following persons who are directly involved with the programme: i. ii.

James Myles: James.Myles@gov.ky, and Catherine Whittaker: Catherine.Whittaker@gov.ky.

Address: 5th Floor, Government Administration Building, 113 Elgin Ave., George Town, Grand Cayman Mailing Address: c/o Ministry of Health, Sports, Youth & Culture Government Administration Building Grand Cayman KY1-9000 CAYMAN ISLANDS Telephone: (345) 244-2318 |Fax: (345) 949-1790 Website: www.ministryofhealth.gov.ky

Dominica Population: 73,286 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: approx. 23.2% For further details about your national programmes, please direct your queries to: Mr. John Roach Chief Youth Development Officer (Ag) 3 Charles Avenue, Goodwill, Commonwealth of Dominica Telephone: 767-449-8012 / 767-266-3766 | Fax: 1-767- 448-5235 E-mail: tccentre@cwdom.dm

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Grenada Population: 109,590 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: 30% Some of Grenada’s national youth programmes include the: i.

Imani programme – this programme helps place youth in institutions for jobs. Companies who participate pay half of the young individual’s salary while the government pays the other.

ii.

Youth parliament – this “… provides a chance for young people to experience and participate in the parliamentary process and create avenues whereby young people can air their views, raise concerns and ultimately influence the national decision making process.”

Website: http://www.gov.gd/ministries/youth_sports.html Address: Ministry of Youth, Sports & Ecclesiastic Affairs Ministerial Complex 3rd Floor Botanical Gardens Tanteen, St. George's Tel: (473) 440-6917/ 6918 | Fax: (473) 440-6924

Jamaica Population: 2,909,714 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: approx. 29.07% Three organizations that offer most of the national youth programmes in Jamaica are:

1. NATIONAL CENTRE FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT (NCYD) Contact person: Ms. Takeisha Barnes, Director, National Centre for Youth Development (NCYD), 4-6 Trafalgar Rd Kingston 10 Jamaica Telephone: 876-978-7654. http://www.youthjamaica.com

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The National Centre for Youth Development (NCYD) is responsible for facilitating the cooperation and integration of programmes, services and activities geared towards youth development, and recommending and designing programmes to enhance and propel youth development in Jamaica. The NCYD is responsible for developing, coordinating and implementing youth development programmes that enhance the capacities of young people to participate in societal processes and provide spaces and opportunities to increase youth participation. In an effort to further strengthen the nation’s thrust towards youth empowerment the NCYD since 2003 has coordinated, implemented and or managed the following core programmes: 1. National Secondary Students' Council (NSSC) 2. Jamaica Union of Tertiary Students (JUTS) 3. National Youth Council of Jamaica (NYCJ) 4. Jamaica Youth Ambassadors Programme (JaYAP) SCHOLARSHIPS There are several scholarships offered by the Government of Jamaica as well as private sector organizations both locally and internationally. Visit here for more information: http://www.youthjamaica.com/content/scholarships SOCIAL INTERVENTION PROGRAMMES: http://www.youthjamaica.com/programmes/social-interventions CAREER DEVELOPMENT There are several agencies and organizations that are charged with the mandate to provide Career Guidance to young people. Listed below are some of the main Career Guidance and Development Agencies in Jamaica:     

HEART TRUST/NTA CHOICES Career Advise Job Bank National Centre for Youth Development (see Youth Empowerment Officers Listing) Ministry of Education/ Guidance Department.

Other Links to Career Development:  Entrepreneurship o Start a Business o Financial Assistance

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          

Choosing a Career Preparing for Interviews Employment Opportunities (LMIS) Workforce Information o HOT JOBS Training & Certification Student Loans Scholarships Youth Labour Market Survey Ministry of Labour Youth Training Programmes Youth Mainstreaming Youth Upliftment through Employment (Y.U.T.E)

Read more: http://www.youthjamaica.com/career-development

2. NATIONAL YOUTH SERVICE (NYS) Contact person: Ms. Naketa West, Programmes Manager, The National

Youth Service, 6 Collins Green Avenue, Kingston 5. Tel #: 754-9819 http://www.nysjamaica.org

In 1973, the Government of Jamaica (GoJ) formed the National Youth Service (NYS) to help with manpower needs in various sectors of the economy as well as to help school leavers develop a sense of nationalism and proper socialisation. According to Mrs. Heather Murray, Principal of the Hampton High School, “In those days, you served without any travelling been refunded because it was service for the sake of service and it was from service that I learned from those whom I served.” Since then, young people, ages 17 – 24 years, have been equipped with life coping skills needed to foster their personal and career development as well as enhance their contribution to community and national development. The programmes offered at the NYS focuses on Volunteerism, Character Development and Work Experience. We have provided contact person(s) that are responsible for the NYS programme in your parish.

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3. GOVERNOR GENERAL OF JAMAICA’S I BELIEVE INITIATIVE (IBI)

The I Believe Initiative (IBI) is values- based initiative developed on the concept that there is nothing wrong in Jamaica which can be fixed by the things that are right with Jamaica. The Initiative was born out of the inaugural speech given by His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, GovernorGeneral of Jamaica, at his swearing-in ceremony on February 26, 2009.Following two years of broad-based consultations, the character of the IBI was developed and was officially launched in May 2011 at King’s House. Mission To create pathways through partnerships and to promote programmes that restore hope, belief, and sound values in Jamaica’s families, youth and education. The purpose of the I Believe Initiative is to respond to Jamaica’s crisis and the citizens’ concerns with meaningful initiatives and measurable results. The IBI seeks to achieve its vision by creating, contributing and endorsing Projects that fall under the IBI pillars of Youth, Education and Family. While the group seeks to effect change across Jamaica, it specifically targets the age cohort of 15-35 years. All Projects created and/ or endorsed seek to bring about positive changes in our island. 

 

Youth: under the Pillar of Youth, the IBI seeks to give youth a chance to air and be heard on issues affecting them, to encourage adoption of core values and encourage personal and professional development through mentorship and training programmes, effect behavioural change and reduce the numbers of unattached youth. Education: the IBI promotes quality and excellence in academic pursuit and; Family: the focus is on Parents and values-based parenting to build strong family foundations.

The IBI is committed to helping Jamaicans believe in themselves, develop their unlimited potentials so they can achieve their personal objectives then positively help others and Jamaica at large to be a wonderful place "to live, work, raise families and do business. “Every one of us has to participate in the healing, restoration and ultimately, the prosperity of this nation.” – His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, ON, GCMG, CD The initiative has, to date, launched many programmes including the i. Summer of Service competition (which the District participated and created programmes in which young individuals could utilise), ii. Animations Workshop which got very huge press in late June and July 2013. The District recommended 5 young candidates of which 3 successfully completed the workshop. There are more programmes to come especially in the areas of mentoring and youth development. As we are kept abreast of the programmes we will continue to communicate these initiatives to you. In the meantime, please send your queries to: Lion Ava-Loi Forbes at leoavaloi@gmail.com.

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Montserrat Population: 5,189 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: 18% Some of the programmes highlighted on the government of Montserrat’s site are:  Governor’s Delegated Fund 2013/2014 (deadline has passed for this year’s disbursement but you could contact Mr. Tom Regan via email at thomas.regan@fco.gov.uk for more information on this fund).  Montserrat Grassroots Youth Development Programme: Rising Stars Cricket Club (RSCC) founded in 2010 by The Hon. Colin Riley and David Lane conduct the Grassroots Cricket Programme for the Montserrat Cricket Association (MCA). The MCA Grassroots Programme is sponsored by DIGICEL through the West Indies Cricket Board. To date, the club has provided equipment sponsorships to six (6) of its youth cricketers and four (4) Montserrat national team players For further details about your national programmes, please direct your queries to the: Ministry of Youth Affairs, Culture, Tourism and Sports |Telephone: (664) 491-5703.

Netherland Antilles Population: 201,000 (July 2010 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: N/A For further details about your national programmes, please direct your queries to the: Island Council Office Saba Telephone: 599 416-3311 x226 | Email: island.council@sabagov.nl

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St. Kitts & Nevis Population: 51,134 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 24years: 15.6%4 For further details about your national programmes, please direct your queries to: Mr. Geoffrey Hanley, Director for Youth Mailing Address: Church Street Basseterre St. Kitts & Nevis Tel#: 869-465-2521/1393 |Fax#: 869-466-7443 | Email: aghanley@hotmail.com

St. Lucia Population: 162,781 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 24 years: 16.9%5 Director of Youth: Ms Fortuna Belrose Ministry of Social Transformation, Human Services, Family Affairs, Youth and Sports, Olympic House, Bernard Hill, Castries, ST. LUCIA Tel#: 758-468-5141/5410 | Fax#: 758-453-6672/7921 | Mobile: 758-285-2756 |Email: fbelrose@hotmail.com National Youth Council/Agency: St. Lucia National Youth Council Contact: Jimmy Clavier [General Secretary] or Silas Wilson [President] Address: 9 Peynier Street, Castries, Box 1232 St. Lucia Tel#: 758-452-2626 Fax#: 758-452-2626 Email: nyc@candw.lc

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St. Maarten Population: 39,689 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: approx. 16.3%6 Youth Affairs 721 542-2233; 721 542-2534

St. Vincent & the Grenadines Population: 103,220 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 30 years: 35% St. Vincent and the Grenadines have several youth programmes. Some include the (i) Youth Empowerment Service (YES) Programme: One flag-ship programme for young persons in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines has been the Youth Empowerment Service (YES). This service was instituted in 2001 with an objective to provide training opportunities for young people between the ages of 16 and 30 years who are out of school. It is one of St. Vincent and the Grenadines' major active labour market policies and is promoted by the government as an on-going commitment to young people. The Youth Affairs Department welcomes all and asks only that the persons recruited must be trainable, willing and able to work. Those interested in taking advantage of the programme must register in person at the Department. Every year more than four hundred young persons are recruited for apprenticeship training and citizenship molding. Currently, each volunteer is paid a monthly stipend of $450.00. The programme was strengthened in 2010 when training was offered in the areas of financial literacy and occupational safety. In 2011 the inservice YES training will be broadened to include opportunities focusing on enhancing the entrepreneurial spirit and better attitudes to work and production among its volunteers. In strengthening involvement of private sector entities in the programme, tax benefits will be offered as incentives for active participation in the YES programme.

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Managers of private business, community and other non-governmental organizations that wish to participate in the YES programme can call the programme's management at telephone 456-1111 ext 517 or email them at yadsvg@gmail.com. Please also visit www.youthaffairsdepartmentsvg.com for more information. (ii). (iii). (iv). (v).

4H Programme (in schools and communities) Youth on the Block - Targeting Young Men. Shows young men a DVD / presentation with problems in society and have them to interpret the info presented and think of solutions / feedback) MAP- Male as Partners – Discuss and educate about healthy lifestyles sexual, health etc) Soft Skills Training (work ethics, finance etc.)

For information you can visit http://www.mobilization.gov.vc/ or telephone (784) 456-1111 ext 517 Additional Contact The ministry is located in the 2nd and 3rd Floors of the DMG Building on Halifax Street next to Scotia Bank. Address The Ministry of National Mobilisation, Social Development, Local Government, Gender Affairs, Family Affairs, Persons with Disabilities and Non-Governmental Organisations, Halifax Street, Kingstown ST. VINCENT Tel: (784) 456-1111 ext. 395/396 |Fax: (784) 457-2476 email: office.socialdevelopment@mail.gov.vc

US Virgin Islands Population: 104,737 (July 2013 est.) Percentage of the population between 15 and 24 years: 10.6%7 Department of Education ideas@doe.vi 340-774-0100

7

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/vq.html

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DISTRICT GOVERNOR’S FOCUS ON

EDUCATION PROGRAMMES

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN YOUTH DEVELOPMENT WORK Offered by: The University of the West Indies, Open Campus The BSc in Youth Development Work is the first degree programme of its kind in the Commonwealth Caribbean. It was designed by the Undergraduate Programmes Department and the Social Welfare Training Centre (SWTC) of the UWI Open Campus in collaboration with the Commonwealth Youth Programme (CYP) Caribbean Centre to fill a need in Commonwealth Caribbean countries for standardised professional training for youth workers in government service, non-governmental organisations and community groups. The courses are designed to support student acquisition of a set of regionally agreed Level IV competencies for Youth Work. The programme will provide specific competencies required for effective youth development work that will enable beginners as well as experienced practitioners to develop and/or refine their skills in Youth Development Work. Who is this programme for? The programme is suitable for professional youth workers, including graduates of Diploma or Associate Degree programmes in Youth Work, as well as students with no prior experience who wish to pursue a career in Youth Development Work. The degree is expected to become the standard qualification for youth workers within the public and private sector. The programme is offered in 16 countries across the Commonwealth Caribbean. Using a mix of guided online/web-based instruction, tutorials, seminars and face-toface discussions as well as fieldwork exercises‌. Read more from the virtual Open Campus site as the aforementioned is an excerpt from the UWI Open Campus.

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MASTER OF EDUCATION IN YOUTH GUIDANCE Offered by: The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus Young people comprise an important part of our human resource potential. An important aim of education is to enable them to maximize their potential for learning and personal development so that they can lead healthy, fulfilling and successful lives, and contribute meaningfully to society. It is important, therefore, to have an understanding of the factors that facilitate or hinder this process. The aim of the Youth Guidance programme, therefore, is to build the social, intellectual and technical capacities of teachers and educators to help young people develop positive attitudes to self and others, become more knowledgeable about their own development, develop the skills to manage their emotions, make appropriate lifestyle and career choices, and build positive relationships. It will not prepare teachers to become full-time counsellors or guidance officers, but, rather, will enable the mainstream classroom teacher to support students in facing various challenges of everyday life, as well as in identifying and realising their fullest potential. Programme Structure Students enrolled in the MEd programme in Youth Guidance are required to complete eight semester courses (or the equivalent) and a research project. The courses are each worth four credits. The research project report should not exceed 15,000 words and is worth ten credits. Students are also expected to attend Graduate Research Seminars and to present their research proposal at one of these seminars. The programme runs for two years on a part-time basis. For further details on the concentration in Youth Guidance, read more or contact: Ms. Rena Sookdeo at rena.sookdeo@sta.uwi.edu or via phone: 1(868) 662-2002 Extensions: 82227 & 83337 or via fax: (868) 662-6615.

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LOFY IMPORTANT DATES

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JULY – SEPTEMBER 2013 JULY 2013 July 1:

Beginning of Period 1 for the Dream Achiever Awards Lions Services for Children Symposium applications for grant funding during fiscal year 2013‐2014 open to districts and multiple districts in all Constitutional Areas, plus the Continent of Africa. Lions districts and multiple districts may apply for 2013‐2014 Lions Services for Children Worldwide Funding Programme. Lions districts and multiple districts may apply for 2013‐2014 Leo Leadership Grant Programme funds.

AUGUST 2013 Membership Focus: Students and Leo Lions August 15: August 31:

Launch a Reading Action Programme activity in your community Leo Club Excellence Award applications due Close of Period 1 for the Dream Achiever Awards

SEPTEMBER 2013 September 1:

Membership Focus: Students and Leo Lions Beginning of Period 2 for the Dream Achiever Awards

OCTOBER – DECEMBER 2013 OCTOBER 2013 October 1:

Leo Membership Growth Month Deadline to purchase Peace Poster Contest kits from Club Supplies Sales

October 9:

World Sight Day (second Thursday in October)

NOVEMBER 2013 November 15: Postmark deadline for a club to send one winning Peace Poster (per contest) to the District Governor November 15: Leo October Membership Growth Award nominations due November 15: Top Ten Youth Camp and Exchange Chairperson Award applications (YCE-110) due DECEMBER 2013 December 1: Postmark deadline for a district governor to send one winning Peace Poster entry to the multiple district council chairperson and for clubs not belonging to districts and districts not belonging to multiple districts to send one winning Peace Poster entry (per contest sponsored)to the Public Relations and Communications Division Postmark deadline for a district governor to send one winning essay to the multiple district council chairperson and for clubs not belonging to districts and districts not belonging to multiple districts to send one winning essay (per contest sponsored) to the Public Relations and Communications Division December 5: International Leo Day December 15: Postmark deadline for the multiple district council chairperson to send one winning Peace Poster to the Public Relations and Communications Division Postmark deadline for the multiple district council chairperson to send one winning essay to the Public Relations and Communications Division December 31: Close of Period 2 for the Dream Achiever Awards December“Relieve the Hunger” LCI global service action campaign January: 44 | P a g e


JANUARY – MARCH 2014 JANUARY 2014 Relieving the Hunger Global Service Action Campaign January 1: Beginning of Period 3 for the Dream Achiever Awards January 15: Peace Poster Kits go on sale from Club Supplies Sales FEBRUARY 2014 February 1: International Peace Poster contest winners will be notified on or before this date MARCH 2014 March 1: Lions Services for Children Symposium funding for fiscal year 2013‐2014 opens up to districts and multiple districts in all Constitutional Areas, plus the Continent of Africa, based on availability. March 31: Close of Period 3 for the Dream Achiever Awards

APRIL – JUNE 2014 APRIL 2014 April 1: April 22: April 26:

Leo Club Awareness Month Protecting Our Environment Global Service Action Campaign Beginning of Period 4 for the Dream Achiever Awards Earth Day Lions Worldwide Induction Day

MAY 2014 May 11‐17: May 15: JUNE 2014 June 1: June 5: June 20: June 20: June 30:

Strengthen Membership Month Recycle for Sight Month White Cane Week Annual Leo Club Officers and Membership Report Form (Leo‐72) due Leo of the Year Award applications (Leo‐LOY) due World Environment Day Deadline for 2013‐2014 Charter Applications Application deadline for Lions Quest grants to be reviewed at the August 2014 LAC meeting Close of Period 4 for the Dream Achiever Awards

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Please contact the LOFY team for any assistance. For • Regions 1 & 4: Lion Ava-Loi Forbes • Region 2: Lion Stephen Aymes, MJF, and • Region 3: Leo Anton Jardine.

LIONS OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH  

Need more details on sub-district 60B's programme on Youth? Then take a look at its Resource Guide for 2013/2014.

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