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JUNE 2016

a u s t r a l i a n

your heart in your hands

CRA

BEAUTIFUL STITCH CRAFTS

MAGAZFT INE

OF THE YEAR

MAKE IT MODERN MAKE IT EASY MAKE IT YOURSELF

YOU CAN DO IT!

Inspiring ideas and easy steps for beginners and experts

No. 157 (Vol. 17.06) AU $9.95* NZ $12.20* (Both incl. GST)

Create your own

QUILTS • TOYS • KNITS • EMBROIDERY OIDERY • CUSHION • BAG


Let your creativity run free with the

Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 All it takes is one look at its unique design to understand that the Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 is a sewer’s dream. With Pfaff’s original IDT system guaranteeing even fabric feed from top and bottom, a unique selection of perfectly stitched high-quality 9mm stitches, extra large work space and longest free-arm, the Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 will fulfill every quilters’ needs and give your imagination free rein.

Find your nearest dealer at www.pfaff.com/au or phone (02) 4337 3737 BLES-570-PF


LOOKING FOR THE PATTERN SHEETS TO START YOUR HOMESPUN PROJECT?

Registration is easy! 1

2

1 Simply go to www.homespun. net.au/wp-login/ and click the “register” link to create your account, or you can log in with Facebook. Note: this is a different account to your Zinio/Apple/ Google account.

YOU’RE INVITED

2

3

Once you’ve logged in, just go to the “Patterns” section of the Homespun site, or direct link www.homespun.net.au/ homespun-patterns/ and click on the project you’re after to download the PDF.

Become part of the Homespun family by: * SUBSCRIBING to our monthly magazine (see page 127) * CHECKING OUT OUR WEBSITE at www.homespun.net.au * FOLLOWING US ON FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/homespunmag * BROWSING ON PINTEREST www.pinterest.com/homespunmag * TAPPING INTO INSTAGRAM @homespunmagazine

Don’t forget when printing PDFs, print on plain A4 paper, with page scaling turned off (or at 100%).

It’s sew easy!

Any questions? Contact us at homespun@universalmagazines.com.au


OUR PROJECTS THIS ISSUE

32

48 Sweet justice

60

68 Boy toys

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Homespun

Beatrice beaver

Northern knits


72

82 Picture perfect

Fatima’s fashion

100

92 Back to the future

Case study: luggage tags

118

108 All ears!

Foxley village BOM Part 5 Homespun

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a u s t r a l i a n

omespun your heart in your hands

Editor Susan Hurley Deputy Editor Elizabeth Newton Technical Editor Megan Fisher Writer/Online Editor Emma Bradstock Writer/Researcher Janai Velez Senior Designer Martha Rubazewicz Pattern Artist Susan Cadzow Photographer Ken Brass Stylist Sandra Hinton

Advertising Rob Jordan (NSW and Qld) ph: (02) 9887 0359, fax: (02) 9805 0714, mob: 0411 424 196 Angelos Tzovlas (Vic, WA, SA, Tas and NT) ph: (03) 9694 6404, fax: (03) 9699 7890, mob: 0433 567 071 Advertising Production Hannah Felton Advertising Senior Designer Martha Rubazewicz Associate Publisher Karen Day Subscriptions & mail orders 1300 303 414 or +61 2 9887 0317 Editorial enquiries homespun@universalmagazines.com.au Advertising enquiries rjordan@universalmagazines.com.au atzovlas@universalmagazines.com.au Subscription enquiries www.universalshop.com.au or 1300 303 414

Leanne Beasley has once again invited you into her garden, with her latest range for Ella Blue. The Potting Shed will inspire your sewing creations, with a subtle colour palette that can also be coordinated with fabrics from Leanne’s previous ranges. Dig into the cooler greens, lavenders, blues and earth tones; or enjoy the warmer yellow and gentle peach tones. Use the entire range together for a look that will delight you no matter what the season!

Printed by KHL Printing Co Pte Ltd, Singapore Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia NZ Distributors Netlink – ph: (09) 366 9966 Needlecraft Distributors Ltd – ph: 0800 909 600, www.needlecraft.co.nz UK Distributor Manor House Magazines – ph: +44 167 251 4288 USA Distributor Brewer Quilting & Sewing Supplies – ph: toll free 1 800 676 6543 Singapore Distributor Car Kit Pte – ph: +65 6 282 1960, fax: +65 6 382 3021 Circulation enquiries to our Sydney head office (02) 9805 0399. While every effort has been made to ensure that the projects featured in Homespun are the original work/s of the respective artist/s, no responsibility is taken by the publisher in the event that originality is disputed, and all proof of original design, or otherwise, lies with the artisan/s. Inspiration from other sources and the reworking of traditional patterns and designs in new and unique ways is, however, regarded as constituting ‘originality’ as acknowledged by the artisan/s and the publisher. No patterns may be reproduced (except for personal use). If a project is taught in a class or workshop, each attendee is required to have their own copy of the appropriate Homespun issue/s. Projects may not be produced for commercial gain without the written permission of the designer.

Chairman/CEO Publisher Chief Financial Officer Associate Publisher Associate Publisher Circulation Director Creative Director Editorial & Production Manager Marketing & Acquisitions Manager

View the full collection at www.craftproject.com.au For stockist details, please contact info@craftproject.com.au

Prema Perera Janice Williams Vicky Mahadeva Emma Perera Karen Day Mark Darton Kate Podger Anastasia Casey Chelsea Peters

Homespun is published by Universal Magazines, Unit 5, 6-8 Byfield Street, North Ryde NSW 2113. Phone: (02) 9805 0399, Fax: (02) 9805 0714. Melbourne office, Level 1, 150 Albert Street, South Melbourne Vic 3205. Phone: (03) 9694 6444, Fax: (03) 9699 7890. This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the publishers. The publishers believe all the information supplied in this book to be correct at the time of printing. They are not, however, in a position to make a guarantee to this effect and accept no liability in the event of any information proving inaccurate. Prices, addresses and phone numbers were, after investigation, and to the best of our knowledge and belief, up to date at the time of printing, but circumstances may have since changed. It is not possible for the publishers to ensure that advertisements appearing in this publication comply with the Trade Practices Act, 1974. The responsibility must, therefore, be on the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisements for publication. While every endeavour has been made to ensure complete accuracy, the publishers cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions. This magazine may have some content that is advertorial or promotional in nature. Please pass on or recycle this magazine. *Recommended retail price ISSN 1443-4792 Copyright © Universal Magazines

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MMXVI ACN 003 026 944 www.universalmagazines.com.au


CONTENTS June 2016 Stitching

Showing & telling 12 READERS’ SHOWCASE Homespun readers share their successes 26 SELVEDGE Designer Edge: Hillary Waters Fayle remarkable handembroidered leaves 28 SALVAGE Tiny fabric remnants repurposed into practical home items

Shopping 22 PATTERN & PALETTE PLAY Honey fabrics – From hive to home 126 ON THE ROAD Craft shopping in West Victoria and Melbourne 134 MARKET PLACE Product browsing from your armchair

Sourcing 14 PIN INTEREST A feast of crafty ideas and Diary Dates 20 BOOK NOOK Read to succeed 59 WHAT A CUTE IDEA! Pick-of-the-litter knitted kittens 137 STOCKISTS & CONTACTS 138 NEXT MONTH A crafty teaser for Homespun’s July issue

JUNE 2016

your heart in your hands

a u s t r a l i a n

32 QUILT Sweet Justice Vicki Knight 48 SOFTIE Beatrice Beaver Jennifer Goldsmith 60 COT QUILT Boy Toys Leanne Milsom 68 KNITTED CHAIR COVERS Northern Knits 72 BAG Picture Perfect Minki Kim 82 DOLL Fatima’s Fashion Allison Dey Malacaria 92 QUILT Back to the Future Jemima Flendt 100 LUGGAGE TAGS Case Study Roslyn Mirrington 108 CUSHION All Ears! Amy Sinibaldi 118 BLOCK OF THE MONTH PART 5 Foxley Village Natalie Bird

CRA

BEAUTIFUL STITCH CRAFTS

FT MAGAZIN E OF THE YEAR

MAKE IT MODERN MAKE IT EASY MAKE IT YOURSELF

YOU CAN DO IT!

Inspiring ideas and easy steps for beginners and experts

No. 157 (Vol. 17.06) AU $9.95* NZ $12.20* (Both incl. GST)

Create your own

QUILTS • TOYS • KNITS • EMBROIDERY OIDERY • CUSHION • BAG HSP1706_OFC_FINAL.indd 1

4/21/2016 9:39:17 AM

SUBSCRIBING SU DON’T MISS T THIS MONTH’S S SPECIAL OFFER

11 Homespun

7


Hettie’s Patch Stocking Tilda Fabrics

Fairy F Houses H

Patchwork & Quilting Fabric & Supplies 294 Port Road HINDMARSH SA 5007 Phone: (08) 8346 0548 hettiespatch.com

Block of the Month b by Nikki Tervo Pre-printed. $ $34 per month with fabrics. Fabric colours vary Fa

Flip la K

Quilting Templates Australian Designed & Manufactured

2 Great Products from Fiskars

The Rotary Cutterr o and Ruler Combo and the New e Fiskars Adjustable Rotary Cutter

LOOK OUT FOR US at the Craft & Quilt Fairs Australia Wide in 2016 and the Stitches and Craft Fairs in 2016.

Purchase Direct from our website www.fliplak.com If you are in NZ you can contact Trendy Trims for resellers of Flip la K in New Zealand. Trendy Trims details are also found on our website, or alternatively contact Flip la K on 02 4992 1631. In USA Country Living Quilts – located in Texas, you can also find their details on our website.


Y P P A H FYS!

End o financial yf e deals you ar cannot miss !

CRAFTY-EO

MAY 2016

a u s t r a l i a n

your heart in your hands

12 ISSUES

CRAF

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www.universalshop.com.au T&Cs: Subscriptions will commence with the first available issue. Existing subscriptions will simply be extended. Free gifts arrive separately to the magazine subscription and are sent as soon as possible. Free gift offers do not apply to subscribers currently on the Easy Payment Plan. Offer open to Australian residents only. By subscribing you acknowledge that you understand that ‘tip-ons’ and gifts or bonus issues that may be available with non-subscriber copies of this magazine may not be provided to subscribers and is at the discretion of Universal Magazines Pty Ltd. The Promoter shall not be liable for any loss or damage which is suffered or sustained (including but not limited to, indirect or consequential loss) or for personal injury which is suffered or sustained as a result of taking part in this or any other gift offer. By subscribing, you consent to receive any direct marketing material including emails which inform the recipient of the Promoter’s other publications, products, services or events and to receive promotional material from third parties. Please tick the box if you do NOT wish us to use this information for the purposes stated above . This offer is only available while stocks last, or until expiration date.

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READERS’ SHOWCASE One of the joys of putting Homespun together each month is seeing the vision of our designers translated into personal masterpieces by our enthusiastic readers. We’d love to hear from you, too. Write to us with your crafty triumphs or with any tips, advice and new-product sightings you’d like to share with others.

THIS MONTH’S WINNER Kokila Haddon, from Carrum Downs, Vic, for her Pockets the Elephant project:

Congratulations to Kokila for her great effort. As the winner this month, she will be receiving the following prizes: Q Colour Knitting with Confidence book, by Nguyen Le, guides you through techniques, including stripes, intarsia, entrelac, double knitting, Fair Isle and stranded knitting, with step-by-step photos, charts and diagrams as well as fun project ideas, courtesy of Sally Milner Publishing.

“As soon as I saw Pockets the Elephant, by Simone Gooding, in the February 2016 issue (Vol 17 No 2), I fell in love with him. I am a little (a lot) obsessed with elephants and knew that I had to make him immediately. Well, almost immediately. I had to wait for my 100% wool felt to arrive in the mail. I think he is adorable and have been looking for some more May Blossom patterns to add to my collection. Thanks for a great magazine!”

Q Five assorted balls of Cleckheaton 8 ply wool to mix and match. Each ball band contains a knitted hat pattern to get your creative ideas started. Yarn supplied by Australian Country Spinners. For contact details for Sally Milner Publishing and Australian Country Spinners, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

BIRDS ON THE BRAIN AIN Gayle Jeavons, from Toowoomba, a, Qld: “I was recently looking through gh my Homespun magazine collection n when I needed some inspiration. I came across Dishy Bird, by Bobbie Watts, ts, in the October 2015 issue (Vol 16 No 10) and I was reminded of the hoop art rt I worked on last year. I thought I’d d send a photo of my bird art, which h was hand drawn, hand coloured and hand stitched. As a textile artist, I need to keep the fire of creativity burning, and your magazine azine helps keep my creative fire alive.”

FEELING FOXY Sherrilee Betteley, from Narrogin, WA: “Here is my version of Too Flashy for Foxy, by Anthea Christian, from the June 2015 issue of Homespun (Vol 16 No 6). I’ve sent through the best photo I have; I no longer own the softie itself.”

SEND YOUR LETTERS TO: Email enewton@universalmagazines.com.au Mail Homespun Readers’ Showcase, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde NSW 1670.

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Homespun


INSPIRE DESIGN CREATE For your local Janome Specialist call 1300 JANOME

www.janome.com.au

www.janome.co.nz

THE MC500E IS THE NEWEST EMBROIDERY ONLY MACHINE 160 Built-in Designs Embroidery size 200 x 280mm Colour LCD Screen Embroidery Editor Software Extra wide table


Best of the best from

new l knitsine in

Here are our favourite stitched doughnuts on Pinterest this month.

Best cushions

Sweet dreams are made of these. Designer: Hazel Loves Ivy Contact: www.etsy.com.au/shop/hazellovesivy, (Instagram) @hazel_loves_ivy

ELEGANT EASY STITCH Sometimes, the very best things are the simplest – like this stylish garterstitch knitted throw. Off-white and golden stripes are embellished with nothing more frivolous than four corner tassels, which are as easy to make as the rug itself. This pattern is worked in Patons chunky Inca yarn and is one of the designs featured in the Patons, Cleckheaton and Panda Throws and Rugs No. 357 pattern book, available from your favourite craft supplier. Or contact 1800 337 032 or patonsyarns.com.au for your nearest stockist.

Best brooch

What a treat! Designer: hannahdoodle Contact: www.hannahdoodle.co.uk

THE CURIOUS ENCASEMENT OF BUTTONS

Best pincushion

Let your pins become the sprinkles. Designer: The Crooked Spruce Contact: thecrookedspruce.etsy.com, (Instagram) @thecrookedspruce

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Homespun

Jean Kake, of Quilted Cupcake, never intended using her vintage Goodwill Singer sewing machine, which she picked up for a mere $15. It was always going to be just a lovely, evocative decoration for her studio. But when she got it home, she thought she could go one step further with the concept of decoration – hence her glued-on buttons, charms and beads, which she says make her smile. See for yourself at www.quiltedcupcake.org/uncategorized/ quilted-cupcakes-sewing-machine. For more of Jean’s inventiveness, find ‘Quilted Cupcake’ on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.


PIN INTEREST Bright ideas, fabulous products, clever tips & quick reads

… BUT THE KITCHEN SINK!!! Well, who cares about the kitchen sink when you can take its tea towels and put them to better, more creative use? That’s the psychology of Sachiko Aldous, at least, and we’ve got to agree with her. The five tea-towel dress she made for her daughter belongs on a junior catwalk, not doing drudgery dry-up duty about the house. Sachiko’s blog is called Tea Rose Home, and this item is at: tearose home.blogspot.com /2011/07/tutorial-fivekitchen-towels-dress. html. Also check out her Instagram: @tearosehome and Pinterest: www. pinterest.com/tearosehome.

E

STITCHERS IN TIM

Crochet Superstars big names. Crochet attracts some here – We’ll drop just four screen and two from the silver preme: two who reigned su

WATERCOLOUR ART FABRIC This Cloud9 Fabrics range is called ‘Brush Strokes’ but perhaps the word ‘masterpiece’ should have been added to that. This art-by-the-metre is brand new (due in store this month – see the full range at cloud9fabrics.com/fabrics/brush-strokes). Distributed locally by Dayview Textiles – (02) 9607 2724, dayviewt@bigpond.net.au, www.dayviewtextiles.com.au.

vis • 2 x Bettes – Bette Da r and Bette Midle James Buchanan pr • 15th US esident – 1861) (in the chair: 1857 to and … amused” (but clearly t no • “We are et) Queen kept amused by croch e: 1837 to 1901) Victoria (on the thron

Homespun

15


diary dates

PIN INTEREST

Let us know about your upcoming event – email details to homespun@universalmagazines.com.au or send them to Homespun Diary Dates, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde, NSW 1670. Please notify us at least four months before the event.

Vic – Melbourne June 18-19 Sunbury Sunbury Stitchers & Quilters’ ‘Fifty Shades of Red’ Quilt Show; Memorial Hall, Stawel St (Melway 382E4). Shops, raffles and door prizes. Proceeds from charity quilt raffle will go to Sunbury C.F.A. Open Sat 9am-4pm, Sun 10am-3pm. Entry $7, seniors $5. More information: Phone Evelyn on 0449 142 485.

July 9 Melton Willows Quilting Group Quilt In; Senior Citizens Hall, McKenzie St (Melway 337 C9). Guest speaker is Neil Chisholm. Morning and afternoon tea supplied. Open 10am-4pm. Entry $7. More information: Phone Maureen on (03) 9743 3962 or email mamohr@iprimus.com.au.

Vic – Country June 17-19 Bendigo CraftAlive Bendigo; Prince of Wales Showgrounds, Holmes Rd. Bringing together both talented interstate and local exhibitors,

focusing on creative hand-finished products, DIY products, craft supplies, homewares and creative workshops. Open 10am-5pm. More information: www.craftalive.com.au.

to LFQ. Open Sat & Sun 9am-4pm, Mon 9am-3pm. More information: Phone Lorraine Carrington on 0458 111 142 or email ljcarrington@bigpond.com.

July 1-3

NT – Country June 24-27

Ballarat CraftAlive Ballarat; Mercure Convention Centre, 613 Main Rd. Interstate and local exhibitors, hand-finished products and creative workshops. Open 10am-5pm. More information: www.craftalive.com.au.

July 1-10 Wangaratta ‘Strictly Quilts’ Exhibition; St Bernard’s School Hall, Williams Rd. Open 10am-5pm. Entry $3. More information: Phone Frances Salathiel on (03) 5721 2598.

Qld – Country June 25-27 Mossman Leukaemia Foundation of Queensland (LFQ), Mossman District Branch, 10th Annual Quilt and Craft Expo ‘Airing Of The Quilts’; Mossman Indoor Sports Centre, Front St. Craft stalls and more than 200 quilts on display. Profits

Alice Springs Alice Springs Beanie Festival, Araluen Arts Centre; 61 Larapinta Dr. Beanie exhibition, beanie competition and workshops. More information: visit www.beaniefest.org or email Jason Quin, hello@beaniefest.org.

SA – Adelaide July 2-3 Hilton Orange Tree Quilters’ Quilt Show; Hamra Centre library, 1 Brooker Tce. Quilt display, raffles, trading tables. Profits go towards making quilts for HeartKids SA and other charities for ill and disadvantaged children in the community. Open Sat 10am-4pm, Sun 1pm-4pm. Entry $5. More information: Phone Elaine on 0409 492 321 or Eve on 0418 818 573 or email bemond@senet.com.au.

PIN HEADS This little bit of retro brooching comes courtesy of 1920’s-loving Yali, from Yalipaz. Her flapper girls are roughly 5cm (2in) square and made from painted ultrasuede fabric. They are available from www.yalipaz.etsy.com.

AS A RULE ... ... rulers are a fixed length, but now they don’t have to be. Karen K. Buckley’s 6in Perfect Adjustable Ruler is in five sections, which can be clicked together to make a 6in square or 6 x 12in, 6 x 18in and 6 x 24in lengths, complete with accurate grid markings and angle lines at 30, 45 and 60 degrees. The jigsaw-like joins are extremely precise and snug, making the ruler/s as firm, accurate and easy to use as any other quilter’s ruler. But when it’s time to go to a class or store the pieces, pop them in the protective heavy felt envelope that comes with the set. There’s also a 3in-wide version available. Order yours from Wendy Whellum, of Legend and Lace, www.legendandlace.com.

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Homespun


PIN INTEREST

Quote

“Properly practised, knitting soothes the troubled spirit, and it doesn't hurt the untroubled spirit either.” ann – Elizabeth Zimmer m

ITSY-BITSY KNITTING NEEDLES + MASSIVE TALENT! What is it about miniatures? Anything perfectly made but scaled down never fails to charm and amaze. And that certainly goes for Julie Williams’ infinitesimal jumpers – they are so sweet, they’ll knock your little woolly socks off! And she’s a mini-master of multiple techniques – we’re showing you a Fair Isle and an intarsia design here. Little Cotton Rabbits is the name of her brand – www.littlecottonrabbits.typepad.co.uk. But, here’s an extra surprise: showing you these little cuties on these pages is just a teaser for our wonderful Julie Williams ‘What a Cute Idea’ feature – these are actually the clothes she knits for her tiny animals. Do a quick flick to page 59 for an ‘awwww!’ moment.

PULLING THE PIN – MAGNETIC BOWL A LINE IN LING No bones about it, these little fabric fishes are winners. They are the work of Julia, from Vintage with Laces (vintagewithlaces@yahoo.de), who started out with plain linen designs and ended up loving them so much, she kept embellishing with more lace, for fins and tail – plus plenty of broderie ‘angle-aise’ for a bit of scale!!! Direct link through to www.vintagewithlaces. blogspot.com.au/2013/07/catch-of-day-fabric-and-lace-fishes.

WATCH THIS FACE! In amongst the feast of wonderful watches available from Metal et Linnen, you’ll find some terrific embroidered designs – and they are pretty hard to resist. In a few simple stitches, the designers at the company create instant charm. Shop for yours at etsy.com/shop/ metaletlinnen or browse the website, metaletlinnen.com.

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Homespun

Cheri Lehnow, of Tinker With This (tinkerwiththis. blogspot.com), came up with a very practical idea for corralling all those pins that like to go hiking in your workroom. She magnetised a shallow dish to keep them hugging their home paddock. And the process couldn’t be simpler – go to tinkerwiththis.blogspot.com.au/ 2016/01/diy-magnetic-pinbowl.html to see.


Personal Touch

Professional Finish Another industry first from Brother, the Persona PRS100 introduces to the market the first single needle embroidery machine with free motion quilting capability.

Visit www.brother.com.au to find your nearest dealer for an in-store demonstration

For the first time hobbyists and enthusiasts can buy a machine that combines professional level embroidery features with easy to use technology and an easy conversion to free motion quilting and stippling. With advanced levels of customisation, the PRS100 offers users personal touch versatility with a polished professional finish. View the video to see

the PRS100 in action youtube.com/BrotherAu

/brotheraustralia

/brotherau


BOOK NOOK The latest new leaves, from handbooks to hardcovers, inspiration to instruction.

Mini Skein Knits $24.99

Tilda’s Toy Box by Tone Finnegar, $44.99 Tilda fans will be delighted with Tone’s latest book. It provides instructions for making dolls with numerous outfits; cute softies, including a monkey, snake, whale and parrot (see photo above); and soft furnishings for children’s bedrooms, such as quilts, cushions and bunting. You can even accessorise your little girl with bags and purse projects. All patterns are provided full size in the back of the book, and each project is illustrated with an array of photographs and diagrams. Homespun readers who are making our Foxley Village block of the month will be particularly pleased to know that all of the sample projects in the book have been made using the Tilda ‘Sweetheart’ range, which is one of the fabric collections used in Foxley Village. Perhaps you can start planning to put any surplus fabrics from your BOM to good use by choosing your favourite toys from this book. Published by David and Charles. Available in craft shops or by mail order from www.candobooks.com.au. Phone (02) 4560 1600 or email sales@capricornlink.com.au.

Quilts

MODERN Today’s from Yesterday’s

Roots

Inspiration

ProjectsInspiredbyPatchworkfromto 

Bill Volckening

Modern Roots: Today’s Quilts from Yesterday’s Inspiration by Bill Volckening, US$27.95 Quiltmaker and collector Bill Volckening has been adding eye-catching quilts to his collection for more than 25 years. His acquisitions have been documented in publications, on his blog and in public exhibitions. In this book, he provides patterns – and superb instructions – to make 12 quilts based on his antique and vintage collection. The designs include those built on classics, such as Log Cabin, Pineapple and Lone Star, as well as others that are less-well known, such as Cross Roads to Bachelor’s Hall, shown below left. Bill Volckening draws the reader’s attention to any inconsistencies in the original quilts that make them unique and quirky, but also provides alternative instructions for those who might prefer uniformity. Each project is presented in two different sizes and, in addition, some are showcased in a new interpretation made by a quilter working in the ‘modern quilt’ style. (Abbreviated instructions are provided for these quilts, as well). Lots of diagrams and close-up photographs make the instructions easy to follow. Published by C&T Publishing. Available in craft shops or as an e-book from www.ctpub.com. Phone +1 925 677 0377 or email ctinfo@ctpub.com.

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Homespun

It can be hard to resist buying yarn, and mini skeins, one of the latest trends, make it even harder with their tiny twists, dainty size and gorgeous hues. That said, it can be difficult to use mini skeins when working from standard patterns. This book provides 23 projects (plus two variations) created by a number of different designers especially for combining an array of mini skeins in classic stripes, simple stranded knitting and bold colourwork. And, of course, they’re not only suitable for mini skeins – they’re a marvellous way of using up odds and ends of leftover balls in your stash. The projects are divided into chapters on ‘For the Head, Neck and Shoulders’, ‘For the Hands, Legs and Feet’, ‘For the Body’ – including our favourite, the striped jumper shown below – and ‘For the Home’. The patterns are well written, and there are several close-up photographs of each project. There is one project rated for beginners, 14 easy and eight intermediate. We also loved that the jumper and cardigan projects are able to be made in bust sizes from 76cm (30in) up to 129cm (51in).

Published by Lark Crafts. Available in craft shops or by mail order from www.candobooks.com.au. Phone (02) 4560 1600 or email sales@ capricornlink.com.au.


This tour led by Pauline Grace teacher, designer and quilter. This 20 day tour will take you to the Festival of the Quilts in Birmingham, England. We will also visit London, Windsor, Bath, Sissinghurst Garden, Kent, Leeds Castle, Dover, Bruges, Brussels, Rhine River, Heidelberg, Rhineland, Basel, Troyes and Paris.

$8,980 PER PERSON, TWIN SHARE DEPARTING SYDNEY:

6th August 2016 PRICE INCLUDES: 1. China Southern Airlines economy class air-ticket. 2. International airport taxes, fuel surcharge and airlines levy (currently $730, subject to change). 3. First class hotels with daily breakfasts. 4. Entrance fees for all sightseeing spots, special dinners, entertainment and quilt shows as indicated in the itinerary. 5. All the meals mentioned in the schedule. 6. All transfers and transportation by airconditioned coach. 7. All programmes and sightseeing tours with Englishspeaking tour manager. 8. A tour leader & quilter from Australia. (Departure date is subject to change according to the final confirmed dates of Birmingham Quilts Exhibition)

This tour led by Tita Leach teacher, designer On the tour you will visit Okayama, Osaka, Kyoto, Kawaguchiko, Mt. Fuji and Tokyo with many highlights Japan has to offer.The special features of this special interest tour include Nishie (Pink Dye) workshop, a visit to "Kurashikihanpu" (Canvas) manufacturer and a visit to a Rampuya (Blue Dye Indigo workshop in Okayama, two days at the Tokyo Great International Quilt Show 2017

Tour price $5,780

13 DAY TOUR TO THE GREATEST QUILT SHOW IN JAPAN

per person,

twin share

DEPARTING SYDNEY:

16 Jan. 2017 Call 1300 789 252 for itinerary and information QUILTS is only available from Asia Discovery Tours, 370 Pitt Street, Sydney. Website: www. asiadiscoverytours.com.au


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Pattern & Palette Play

Get a real buzz this month by dipping into our sweet, sweet selection of honeybee fabrics – from golden yellows to rich, syrupy ambers and warm ochres. All fresh from flower to hive. Compiled by Janai Velez 22

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01 Liberty Art Fabrics ‘Classic Collection’ Capel G. Distributed and sold by The Strawberry Thief. 02 Liberty Art Fabrics ‘Spring/Summer 2016 Season’ Paper Garden D. Distributed and sold by The Strawberry Thief. 03 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Ebony Gold 19753-16, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 04 Windham Fabrics ‘Evelyn’ D419884, designed by Whistler Studios. Distributed by Leutenegger. (To be released soon.) 05 Moda Fabrics ‘Basic Mixologie’ Mustard 33021-29, designed by Studio M. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 06 Windham Fabrics ‘Evelyn’ D419823, designed by Whistler Studios. Distributed by Leutenegger. (To be released soon.) 07 Andover Fabrics ‘Margo’s Mignonettes’ D7794Y, designed by Margo Krager. Distributed by Leutenegger. 08 Moda Fabrics ‘Basic Mixologie’ Mustard 33023-29, designed by Studio M. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 09 Rowan/Westminster Fibers ‘Kaffe Fassett Collective: Spring 2015 Collection’ PWGP070.OCHRE, designed by Kaffe Fassett. Distributed by XLN Fabrics. 10 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Ebony 19755-15, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 11 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Gold 19756-12, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 1 2 Andover Fabrics ‘Margo’s Mignonettes’ D7921Y, designed by Margo Krager. Distributed by Leutenegger. 13 Northcott ‘Toscana’ Sunflower 9020-520, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 14 Andover Fabrics ‘Mandalay Breeze’ D8236MNK, designed by Kathy Hall. Distributed by Leutenegger. 15 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Ebony 19752-15, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 1 6 Dashwood Studio ‘Cotton Candy’ D1161, designed by Susan Driscoll. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 17 Art Gallery Fabrics ‘Succulence’ Abundance Sandstorm SCC-98609, designed by Bonnie Christine. Distributed by Craft Project – Charles Parsons. 18 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Gold 19751-12, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 19 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Honey 19750-11, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics.

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1300 364 422, info@craftproject.com.au, www.craftproject.com.au. Q Leutenegger: (02) 8046 4100, sales@leutenegger.com.au, www.leutenegger.com.au. Q Lloyd Curzon Textiles: (08) 8362 2451, admin@lcurzon.com.au, www.lcurzon.com.au. Q Millhouse Collections: (07) 5449 1936, sales@millhousecollections.com, www.millhousecollections.com. Q PK Fabrics: (02) 9557 2022, sales@pkfabrics.com.au, www.pkfabrics.com.au. Q The Strawberry Thief: robyn@thestrawberrythief.com.au, www.thestrawberrythief.com.au. Q Two Green Zebras: (02) 9553 7201, sales@twogreenzebras.com, www.twogreenzebras.com. Q XLN Fabrics: (02) 9621 3066, info@xln.com.au, www.xln.com.au.

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Fabrics shown were available at the time of going to print, unless stated otherwise. Check with the suppliers for current availability and your nearest stockist.

Suppliers: Q Craft Project – Charles Parsons:

20 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ White Gold 19753-14, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 21 Windham Fabrics ‘Evelyn’ D419874, designed by Whistler Studios. Distributed by Leutenegger. (To be released soon.) 22 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Gold 19757-13, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 23 Windham Fabrics ‘Evelyn’ D419833, designed by Whistler Studios. Distributed by Leutenegger. (To be released soon.) 24 Riley Blake Designs ‘Dot & Dash’ Dots C6172-GRAY, designed by Doodlebug Design. Distributed by Millhouse Collections. 25 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Laurel White 19752-13, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 26 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Honey 19751-11, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 27 Liberty Art Fabrics ‘Spring/Summer 2016 Season’ Potters Quilt C. Distributed and sold by The Strawberry Thief. 28 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Laurel White 19756-13, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 29 Windham Fabrics ‘Evelyn’ D419854, designed by Whistler Studios. Distributed by Leutenegger. (To be released soon.) 30 Moda Fabrics ‘Bee Creative’ Tonal Honey 19757-11, designed by Deb Strain. Distributed by PK Fabrics.


Selvedge

HILLARY WATERS FAYLE For most of us, leaves simply mean summer shade and fall colour – we enjoy the underfoot autumn crunch and the year-round rustle of leaves lifted on breezes. But do we appreciate their true potential? Virginia-based artist Hillary Waters Fayle likes to take a closer look at leaves in order to find inspiration for her art. Hillary has combined her expertise in fine stitching with her sstt reverence for nature, to create unique, delicate and breathtaking works of art brreeaaath b tht th inn the the he fform o of embroidered leaves. leav le aveesss.. The T idea came to her while working at an wh w whil hiille w wo o environmental education camp. een nvi viro iroonnm m “I “I had had ad a few f hours off one afternoon aaffte terrnnoon tern oon and I kept looking oo up this magnificent oak tree, up at at tth his is m wondering if I might be able to use my needle skills somehow to sew leaves together. I tried it, and it worked – not incredibly well, at first, but it worked!” she says. Since then, Hillary has cultivated her technique and branched t out oou u with different leaf 26

Homespun

varieties and other organic objects. Living in the city, she’s become what she calls an “urban harvester”, gathering suitable specimens while she’s walking to work or out to meet a friend. “It might be a peculiarly coloured leaf that catches my eye or one that has a strange spot from disease or an insect. But at other times, it’s the perfection and regularity I look for – relative flatness or symmetry,” she says. Needle and thread are used to stitch the leaves, the X-Acto knifing iss ccalled ooccasional oc c aallleed for for to fo to cut out portions, and sometimes cut cu ttiim mees preservative is nnon-toxic no onnbut generally, Hillary nnecessary, ne eccees ry finds it’s better to keep things au naturel. It may seem a simple art process, but leaf fragility means that the process is painstaking and delicate. “I’ve irreparably broken many leaves and had to start over, but usually it comes out better the second time around, anyhow,” Hillary says. Thick and waxy evergreens are preferable, to avoid tearing, but Hillary laarry also enjoys the challenge of creating something exquisite from super-fragile species, such as ginkgo. Her embroidery is complex and experimental, combining different stitches to both highlight veins and to join the leaves as well as creating spider-web-like designs in the voids. “I’ve always preferred to work on a very small scale, and I think that, in embroidery, I found a whole world of tiny and intricate characters that I could combine as I chose, like writing in my own language,” Hillary says. Her leaves also represent small mementoes of times and events. “The experience of collecting the leaves is becoming more and more important – who I am with, where we are, if the tree is dying, is in a section of forest condemned to be logged or if it is growing in a sacred place, etc. The embroidery is often a reaction to the leaf itself … I am here to enhance and add meaning, but not to the point where it overshadows the leaf,” she says. With leaves, twigs, seed pods and feathers, Hillary breathes new life into found botanical materials with her restrained, creative approach and sustainable art practices. “Through this gentle but intricate stitch work, I want to express the idea that our relationship with the natural world is both tenuously fragile and infinitely complex.” Discover more of Hillary Waters Fayle’s art on her website (www.hillarywfayle.com) or on Instagram (@hillary.waters).

– Janai Velez

Photography (brown leaf): Natalie Hofert Photography

DESIGNER EDGE


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‘Forest Fable’ is a whimsical tale of woodland creatures, inspired by traditional folk art and updated with bright modern colours. Look closely and you will find delightful details like tiny ladybirds and wild berries hidden amongst the branches!

Designed and distributed in Australia by Leutenegger. For free projects and to find your nearest stockists, contact: phone: +61 2 8046 4100 fax: +61 2 8046 4199 email: cservice@leutenegger.com.au web: www.leutenegger.com.au


SALVAGE

Photography: Minna Mercke Schmidt; Production: Marie SamnegĂĽrd and Linnea Fennhagen/House of Pictures/Picture Media

Breathe new life into little leftovers, small scraps and otherwise wasted remnants with these clever ideas.

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The Patchwork Angel el SASHIKO has become so popular. We are finding more e and a d more o e of o our ou stitchers s c e s are ae enjoying y g this relaxing relaxin ng Japanese style of stitching.

Glass houses Even the tiniest offcuts can be put to good creative use if you have the vision to see their possibilities. These minuscule scraps have been stitched into little padded houses to act as wine-glass charms – and charming they are! Here’s how you can make them: Cut the roofs, houses, chimneys, doors and windows for each house. Sew the roofs to the house shapes, front and back separately. Place wrong sides together, add chimneys between the roofs. Sew together along the edges, leaving a small opening for filling. Turn right side out, stuff with fibre fill and hand sew closed. Glue the windows and doors on the front of the houses. Hand sew a split ring onto the top of each house. Fasten a 6cm (21⁄2in)-long jewellery chain in the ring and attach a lobster clasp onto the other end of each chain. All done!

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e range of We have a larg in both indigo ls pre-printed pane d l as threads an or white as wel you started. needles to get some of the Pictured are just e. e on our websit panels availabl cm ox 30cm x 30 Panels are appr each plus p&h. and are $10.95

Pin spots Not only handy storage for small sewing accessories (measuring tape, thread spools, sewing needles, safety pins, thimbles, pins, small scissors, buttons), but also an invaluable pincushion to sit beside your machine – created with a remnant of spotted fabric just millimetres wide. Make one yourself by following these steps: For the pincushion jar top, you will need to cut out a thick paper circle approx. 2cm (3⁄4in) smaller than the diameter of the jar lid. Cut out a circle in fabric; it should be 4-5cm (11⁄2-2in) larger than the paper circle. Sew basting stitches (long stitches) around the fabric circle approx. 5mm (1⁄4in) in from the edge. Position a wad of fibre fill in the centre of the circle. Place your paper circle on top of the fibre fill, then pull the basting stitches to gather up the circle and close it off. Tie the threads securely. Glue the pincushion onto the jar lid. Tie or glue lace and/or ribbon around the lid and jar neck, if you want, just to finish off the decoration.

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Order either on our Secure website www.patchworkangel.com.au or by phone 07 5477 0700.

AND Don’t forget we now stock quality yarns for Knitting and Crochet!

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PATCHWORK ANGEL OR YARN ANGEL

www.patchworkangel.com.au 343 Mons Road, Forest Glen Qld 4556 On the Sunshine Coast just one hour north of Brisbane Take exit 200 on the Bruce Highway

Ph 07 5477 0700 Email info@patchworkangel.com.au

Homespun

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Why invest in a Domestic Machine?? When a Tajima is so affordable! Introducing the All New TUMX-C1502 Standard 2,000,000 stitch memory or 200 designs, 15 Needles, 1200 Stitches per minute Sewing speed, Extra Large Sewing Area 360mm x 500mm. FREE Pulse Autograph Software. 2 x Round Hoops of each sizes: 12cm, 15cm & 18cm 2 x Large Hoops 41cm x 55.5cm 2 x Bobbin Cases, 6 x Bobbins 2 x Threading Aids 10 x Needles DBXKS #11 Tool Kit & Operating Instructional CD 2 days Training and Installation conducted by a Tajima Technician Optional Extras: Wide cap Frame Set: Including 2 wide cap frames, cap driver & loading Jig. $990.00 inc GST Boarder Frame & Clips: Ideal for badges, table cloths and other extra large embroidery jobs. $275 inc GST Steel Stand: with wheels $550 inc GST

$18,535

inc GST

100% Made in Japan Guarantee and peace of mind when purchasing your machine from Tajima Australia. We provide support Australia wide as the Australian agent giving our customers an extra service level that you won’t experience with a domestic machine. When you purchase your new Machine, a Qualified Technician will not only install the machine, but will also provide with on the spot training!

*Note Stand is an optional extra

www.tajimaaustralia.com.au Head Office: 74 Raglan Street, Preston 3072 Phone 1300 283 460


Tajima Australia is the Australian industrial agent for MADEIRA offering a full range of products to the Embroidery and Quilting Industries.Whether its Threads,Bobbins or Backings we have a product to suit most applications.

AeroQuilt

Aeroquilt is MADEIRA’s new Premium Quilting Thread,it is ideal for long arm Quilting, With 48 colours to choose from including 12 Verigated colours. 3000yd/2750mt Cones. 100%Polyester Core Spun (dtex135x2,den120x2)

Aerolock

Value 8 Pack 9130BVP(8 of our most popularr colours) Value 8 Pack 9131BVP (8 Verigated Cones) and also available as Individual Cones.

Aerolock by MADEIRA is a Premium Serger thread . Available in 2000yd/1830mt Cones. There are 48 Beautiful Colours in the Range. 100% Core Spun polyester (dtex135x2,den120x2)

Value 8 Pack 9128BVP(4 White & 4 Black) Also Available in Individual Cones 9128B

Check out our MADEIRA Embroidery de thread packs as well as metallics, polyesters and more ! y

Tajima Australia has a wide range nge of Embroidery and Quilting Consumables & Accesories .

See You at The Sydney Craft and Quilt Fair ! Our Whole Range is available on our webstore ! 9128B

www.tajimaaustralia.com.au

Head Office : 74 Raglan Street Preston Vic 3072 Phone 1300 283 460


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PRO

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SWEET JUSTICE Vicki Knight took the law into her own hands with this quilt. She deftly combined Lawyer’s Puzzle and Courthouse Steps blocks, softening her case with abundant florals. Our verdict is that the finished design ranks high in the court of appealing.

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Materials Q Large assortment of scrap fabrics to total about 5m (55⁄8yd). Your assortment should be about half lightvalue fabrics and half medium- or dark-value fabrics. It will need to include some pieces as large as a fat quarter for 34

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some of the patches in the three largest blocks Q Fat quarter red print fabric (Courthouse Steps and Courthouse Steps Variation block centres) Q 25cm (3⁄8yd) cream floral print fabric (Border 1) Q 90cm (1yd) red floral print fabric (Border 3)

Q 55cm (5⁄8yd) green print fabric (binding) Q 3.6m (4yd) backing fabric Q Batting at least 200 x 175cm (77 x 70in) Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in and free-motion feet Q General sewing supplies

Finished size: 184 x 159cm (701⁄2 x 621⁄2in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. Seam allowances of 1⁄4in are used throughout.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Diagram 1

Lawyer’s Puzzle blocks

1

Each Lawyer’s Puzzle block is made from four smaller units. The most efficient way to work is to cut and assemble two matching smaller units at a time. To make two units, choose one light-value fabric and one medium- or darkvalue fabric from your assortment of scraps. From the light-value fabric, cut: • one square, 4in • six squares, 2in • two squares, 11⁄2in.

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From the medium- or dark-value fabric, cut: • one square, 4in • six squares, 2in. Rule a diagonal line from corner to corner on the wrong side of the light 2in squares. Match each of them with a 2in square of the darker fabric, right sides together. Sew 1⁄4in either side of the ruled line. Cut along the marked lines and press the pieced squares open, as shown in Diagram 1. Trim them to measure 11⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

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Repeat the process described in Step 4 to sew two pieced squares using the 4in squares of light- and medium- or dark-value fabric. Trim your pieced squares to measure 31⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Lay out one 11⁄2in square of light fabric, six pieced squares from Step 4 and one pieced square from Step 5 as shown in the Layout Diagram. Start assembly by sewing the small pieced squares together in rows of three – the squares in each row should be orientated in the same way. Sew a row to the right edge of the large pieced square. Sew the 11⁄2in light square to the end of the other row of three, then join this row to the top edge of the unit. Press. Your unit should measure 41⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Use the remaining squares to assemble a second unit exactly the same. Repeat Steps 1-8 to make a total of 72 units – 36 matching pairs – in all.

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Lawyer’s Puzzle block

Layout Diagram Homespun

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JEC

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01

Lawyer’s Puzzle Block Layout Diagram – make 14

10 Lawyer’s Puzzle Half-Block Layout Diagram – make four of each

To make a Lawyer’s Puzzle Block, choose four units from Step 9. Lay them out in two rows of two, rotating the units as shown in the Lawyer’s Puzzle Block Layout Diagram. Sew the units in each row together, then join the rows, carefully matching the centre seam. This block should measure 81⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat Step 10 to make a total of 14 Lawyer’s Puzzle Blocks. Use the remaining units to make eight half-blocks – four of each kind – as shown in the Layout Diagram. The half blocks should measure 41⁄2 x 81⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge.

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Four Corners block

12 Four Corners block

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From a red tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: • Three squares, 51⁄2in (A) • Four squares, 21⁄2in (B).

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From a brown on white print fabric, cut: • Three squares, 51⁄2in (A). From a multi-coloured floral print fabric, cut: • Four squares, 21⁄2in (B) • Four rectangles, 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in (C). From a fawn tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 1 x 121⁄2in • Two strips, 1 x 131⁄2in (Border 1). From a green tone-ontone print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 2 x 131⁄2in • Two strips, 2 x 161⁄2in. Repeat the process described in Step 4 to sew six pieced squares using the brown on white and red toneon-tone A squares. On the wrong side of three of the pieced squares, rule a diagonal line from corner to corner perpendicular to the seam. Pair each marked square with an

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unmarked one: the seams should lie one on top of the other, and the red triangles should be facing the brown ones. Sew 1⁄4in either side of the marked line. Cut along the marked line to yield two Hourglass blocks from each pair of pieced squares – six Hourglass blocks in all. (You will only use five in this project.) Press. In the interests of accuracy, your Hourglass blocks have deliberately been made slightly larger than needed, and they now need to be trimmed to measure exactly 41⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. To do this, place the 45-degree diagonal line of a square ruler along the diagonal seam line; the vertical line marking 21⁄4in from the edge of the ruler must lie down the centre of the block. Use a rotary cutter to trim the right edge. Rotate the square 90 degrees, and repeat the process three times to trim the other three edges. See Diagram 2. Lay out five Hourglass blocks, the red B squares, the four multi-coloured B squares and C rectangles as shown in the Four Corners Block

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Layout Diagram. Double check that all the Hourglass blocks are orientated correctly. Start assembling the block by sewing each red B square to its neighbouring multi-coloured B square. Then sew each B+B unit to a multicoloured C rectangle – checking that they are orientated correctly before stitching. Sew the units in each of the three rows together. Then sew the rows together, carefully matching seams. Press. Your block should measure 121⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Sew the 1 x 121⁄2in fawn strips to the left and right edges of the block. Press seams outwards. Then sew the 1 x 131⁄2in fawn strips to the top and bottom edges of the block and press as before. Your block should now measure 131⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat the process described in Step 23 to sew the 2in strips of green print fabric to the block. Your block should now measure 161⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

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45° 21⁄4in Diagram 2

B

C

C B

B

B

B

C

C B

Four Corners Block Layout Diagram

B

Card Basket block Homespun

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Card Basket block

D C

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From a white print fabric, cut: • Two squares, 51⁄2in (A) • Two squares, 5in (B) • One square, 41⁄2in (C). From a tan print fabric, cut: • One square, 51⁄2in (A) • Two squares, 5in (B). From a multi-coloured floral print fabric, cut: • One square, 51⁄2in (A) • Four squares, 21⁄2in (D). From a teal print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 1 x 121⁄2in • Two strips, 1 x 131⁄2in (Border 1). From a brown print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 2 x 131⁄2in • Two strips, 2 x 161⁄2in. Repeat the process described in Step 4 to sew four pieced squares using the white print and tan print B squares. Trim them to measure 41⁄2in square. Rule a line diagonal line from corner to corner on the wrong side of the four multicoloured D squares. Pin a D square, right sides together, in a corner of the white C square. Stitch on the line, then trim the corner 1⁄4in outside the stitching, as shown in Diagram 3. Repeat to sew a D square in all four corners of the C square to make a Square-in-a-Square block. Repeat the process described in Step 4 to sew two pieced squares using one white and one multicoloured A square. Do the same thing using the other white print and the tan print A squares. Rule a diagonal line from corner to corner across the seam on the wrong side of the two white+tan pieced squares. Pair each of these marked squares with one made of white+multicoloured print fabrics: the seams should lie one on top of the other, and the tan triangles and the multicoloured triangles should both

26 Diagram 3

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Card Basket Block Layout Diagram

VICKI’S ACCURACY TIP I like to make some of my patchwork units slightly too large, then trim them down. It can be tedious, especially when you’re making as many blocks as you need for this quilt. But I find it’s worth it: with so many small patches, accuracy is critically important if everything is to fit together easily when you come to assemble the quilt.

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A Dandy block

32 A Dandy block

be facing white ones. Sew 1⁄4in either side of the marked line. Cut along the marked line to yield a total of four Hourglass blocks. Press. Repeat Step 19 to trim them to 41⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Lay out the Square-ina-Square block, the four Hourglass blocks and the four white+tan pieced squares in three rows as shown in the Card Basket Block Layout Diagram. Double check that the units are all orientated correctly. Sew the units in each of the three rows together. Then sew the rows together, carefully matching seams. Press. Your block should measure 121⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat Steps 23 and 24 to sew the teal and brown strips to the edges of the block. It should measure 161⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

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From a white print fabric, cut: • Two squares, 5in (A) • One square, 41⁄2in (B) • Four rectangles, 21⁄2 x 41⁄2in (C). From a tan print fabric, cut: • Two squares, 5in (A) • Four squares, 27⁄8in (D). From a red print fabric, cut: • One square, 51⁄4in (E). From a green tone-ontone print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 1 x 121⁄2in • Two strips, 1 x 131⁄2in (Border 1). From a multi-coloured print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 2 x 131⁄2in • Two strips, 2 x 161⁄2in. Rule a light diagonal line on the wrong side of the tan D squares. Pin a square in diagonally opposite corners of the red E square, right sides together, as shown in Diagram 4. The two tan squares will overlap in the centre. Sew 1⁄4in on either side of the lines through both tan squares. Cut the fabrics on the line and

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TARDIS

WARATAH PANEL QUILT

50” x 80” or 1.27m x 2m. 3 background choices.

BACKGROUND COLOURS

$225 including backing

Quilt Top Kit $120

S SHOT SNAP TRALIA S OF AU9” or 2m x 2m. 79” x 7

cluding $190 inking c a b

Homespun BOM quilts also available. Happiness, China Shop and Foxley Village quilts.

Dragonfly Fabrics

DARWIN’S EXCLUSIVE PATCHWORK & QUILTING SHOP

www.dragonfabric.com.au ONLY AT

Shops 2 & 3, 53 Alawa Cres. ALAWA NT 0810 p. (08) 8948 0691 f. (08) 8948 0694 e. dragonfabric@bigpond.com

3 June-4 September 2016 National Wool Museum Geelong NATIONAL WOOL MUSEUM 26 MOORABOOL ST GEELONG PH 03 5272 4701 WWW.NWM.VIC.GOV.AU


press the seams towards the tan triangles. Pin another D square on each unit from Step 42, as shown in Diagram 5. Sew 1⁄4in either side of the line, then cut the fabrics on the line. You will now have four matching Flying Geese units. They should measure 21⁄2in x 41⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat the process described in Step 4 to sew four pieced squares using the two white and two tan print A squares. Trim them to 41⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge. Lay out the units in three rows as shown in the A Dandy Block Layout Diagram. Double check that the units are all orientated correctly. Sew the units in each of the three rows together. Then sew the rows together, carefully matching seams. Press. Your block should

43

measure 121⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat Steps 23 and 24 to sew the green and multicoloured strips to the edges of the block. It should measure 161⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

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Assembly

44

48

45

49

46

Lay out the three large blocks, the 14 Lawyer’s Puzzle blocks and the eight Lawyer’s Puzzle half-blocks, as shown in the Quilt Layout Diagram. (The Lawyer’s Puzzle blocks and half-blocks are indicated by the yellow lines.) Sew the blocks into units, and join them to create three sections, as shown in Diagram 6 (on page 42). Then sew the sections together to complete the centre of your quilt. It should measure 481⁄2 x 401⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge.

D D

E

Diagram 4

D

Diagram 5 C

C

B

C

C A Dandy Block Layout Diagram

40

Homespun

Quilt Layout Diagram

50

From the cream floral print fabric for Border 1, cut: • Five strips, 11⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Join these strips end to end to create one long strip. From it, cut: • Two strips, 11⁄2 x 401⁄2in • Two strips, 11⁄2in x 501⁄2in. Sew the shorter strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press seams outwards. Sew the longer strips to the left and right edges of the quilt and press as before. Your quilt should now measure 501⁄2 x 421⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge.

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Courthouse Steps blocks

53

From the fat quarter of red print fabric for the centres of the Courthouse Steps blocks, cut: • 30 squares, 2in.


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From an assortment of light print scraps, cut: • 60 rectangles, 11⁄4 x 2in (A) • 60 rectangles, 11⁄4 x 31⁄2in (C) • 60 rectangles, 11⁄4 x 5in (E). From an assortment of medium-dark print scraps, cut: • 60 rectangles, 11⁄4 x 31⁄2in (B) • 60 rectangles, 11⁄4 x 5in (D) • 60 rectangles, 11⁄4 x 61⁄2in (F). Begin a Courthouse Steps block by sewing a light A rectangle to the left and right edges of a red 2in square. Press seams outwards (and continue to press all seams outwards as you continue to assemble the block.) Sew a medium-dark B rectangle to the top and bottom edges of the block. Sew a light C rectangle to the left and right edges of the block; then a medium-dark D rectangle to the top and bottom edges of the block. Sew a light E

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rectangle to the left and right edges of the block; then a medium-dark F rectangle to the top and bottom edges of the block. See the Courthouse Steps Assembly Diagram. Repeat Steps 56-57 to make a total of 30 Courthouse Steps blocks. They should measure 61⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

Courthouse Steps Variation Blocks

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From the remainder of the fat quarter of red print fabric for the centres of the Courthouse Steps blocks, cut: • Four rectangles, 2 x 3in. From a light fabric scrap, cut: • Two rectangles, 11⁄4 x 2in (A) • Two rectangles, 11⁄4 x 41⁄2in (B). From a medium-dark fabric scrap, cut: • Two rectangles, 11⁄4 x 31⁄2in (C) • Two rectangles, 11⁄4 x 6in (D).

Courthouse Steps block

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Diagram 6

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Courthouse Steps Variation block


382 Warburton Hwy, Wandin North VIC 3139 p: (03) 5964 3592 e: sales@quiltyarnsew.com.au

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1. Hoops Sisters Block of the Month ‘Sewn Seeds’. 2. ‘Scarlet Serendade’ by Sharon Schamber. 3. ‘Gypsy’ by Sharon Schamber. 4. ‘Pickle Promenade’ by Sharon Schamber.


Getting to know … VICKI KNIGHT How did this quilt get its Sweet Justice name? I sometimes like to choose a name for my quilts to reflect the blocks that I used in the making process. Because the main block in this quilt is the Lawyer’s Puzzle block and there is a border of Courthouse Steps blocks, I wanted a name that had something to do with law. I struggled a bit because the beautiful florals that I used just didn’t want to have anything to do with the law! I finally settled on ‘Sweet’ for the flowers and ‘Justice’ for the law. What was your inspiration for the design? My inspiration, as usual, came from the array of beautiful scraps that were waiting patiently in my sewing room to be used up. I love traditional blocks and like to try out different ones. The Lawyer’s Puzzle block was one that I’d been wanting to use for a while. There are so many wonderful traditional blocks out there, but most of us tend to stick with the same ones over and over. I sometimes think it’s a shame that so many of the old blocks aren’t used much any more. Maybe we should start a movement to revive those that tend to be overlooked now; they’re part of our quilting heritage.

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From another light fabric scrap, cut: • Two rectangles, 11⁄4 x 5in (E) • Two recangles, 11⁄4 x 71⁄2in (F). To make a block for the corners of Border 2, sew the light, then the medium-dark, then the second light rectangles around the centre red rectangle, as shown in the Courthouse Steps Variation Block Assembly Diagram. Press seams outwards as you go. Your block should measure 71⁄2 x 61⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat Steps 59-62 to make a total of four of these blocks.

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Border 2

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Lay out seven Courthouse Steps blocks along the top and

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Do you like to participate in craft shows, workshops and sewing bees? I love going to craft shows and checking out what others have done but I don’t participate myself. I prefer to do my own thing in my own time, which isn’t really conducive to entering shows. There are generally rules that you have to follow, which I find cramp my style. I’m not really a follower of rules when it comes to creativity. When I make a quilt, I do what feels right at the time, and you can bet your life that whatever feels right doesn’t fit in with the rules that I needed to follow. How long have you been stitching? I’ve been stitching since I was about four or five. I spent a lot of time making dolls’ clothes when I was little and then moved on to clothes for myself when I started needlework classes at secondary school. And I made many of my children’s clothes over the years. About 10 years ago, I started patchworking. I don’t do any dressmaking now; it doesn’t hold any interest for me any more. What’s the biggest stitching mistake you’ve ever made? I can’t really think of any stitching mistakes, although I’m sure that there have been many. When you are a patchworker, a mistake is an opportunity to go off in another direction and create something unique. Mistakes are design elements. Do you have any stitching secrets you’d never share – like Colonel Sanders and his secret herbs and spices? No, stitching to me is about sharing. When I get together with stitching friends, we share our work, we share our knowledge and we share our lives. It’s the way it has always been, and I hope it’s the way it always will be. I learned to quilt because other quilters generously shared their knowledge with me. How could I keep secrets when other stitchers have been so generous to me? What’s the best tip you can pass on to a beginner? My tip is to relax and believe in yourself. Don’t worry about the ‘right way’ to

bottom edges of the quilt with a dark outermost strip adjacent to Border 1. Lay out eight Courthouse Steps blocks along the left and right edges of the quilt, again with a dark outermost strip adjacent to Border 1. Add a Courthouse Steps Variation block at the top and bottom of these columns. Move the blocks around until you have an array of colours and prints that you like. Sew the seven Courthouse Steps blocks for the top border together. Press. Your border strip should measure 61⁄2 x 421⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge so that it fits perfectly on your quilt. If your border strip isn’t the correct length, unpick some of the seams and re-sew them. Join the border strip to the top edge

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do things. Whichever way works for you is the ‘right way’. Remember to enjoy what you’re doing. If you’re not enjoying it, why do it at all? What’s next on the agenda for you and your quilts? I’m not sure what’s next. I’m quite happy plodding along at my own pace, making quilts that I like, when I like. Do I need an agenda? I think that I prefer to let things happen when they happen without too much planning in advance. The only thing that I’d like to be doing with my quilts is teaching. I was teaching a couple of years ago but, for various reasons, I’m not at the moment. I love teaching and would really like to get back into it. What is your favourite: • Piece of music: I don’t have a favourite piece of music. • Movie: I always love kids’ movies, especially Bedknobs and Broomsticks and Mary Poppins. I love musical comedy and happy movies. When watching a film, which doesn’t happen very often, I want it to be cheerful and entertaining. There is too much sadness in the world already. • Sport: I’m not really a sporting person. I do train with a circus-skills group at the Flying Fruit Fly Circus twice a week, though. We are called the ‘Fruit Bats’. I’ve been involved in the Fruit Bats for about eight years now, and love it. It is a fun mix of exercise, pyramids, hula hooping, juggling, clowning, etc, and it keeps my body and mind active. • Book: I don’t know if I should tell you my favourite book. After telling you my favourite movies, you’ll think I’m a big kid. Well, here goes: my favourite book is The Magic Faraway Tree, by Enid Blyton. I just love the simple fantasy of it. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to be able to climb a magic tree to visit different lands at the top? It is pure enjoyment. I am not happy with the new politically correct version of the story that is around now, though.

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E Courthouse Steps Variation Block Assembly Diagram – make 4


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of the quilt and press the seam towards Border 1. Repeat Step 66 to add a border strip to the bottom edge of the quilt. Then use the same process to sew the columns of blocks for the left and right border strips together. They need to measure 621⁄2in long. Sew them to the quilt.

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Border 3

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From the red floral print fabric, cut: • Seven strips, 41⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Join the strips end to end to make one long strip and press the seams open. Measure your quilt vertically through the centre. Cut two strips this length from the long red strip. Sew them to the left and right edges of the quilt. Press seams outwards. Measure your quilt horizontally through the centre. Cut two strips this length from the remainder of the long red strip. Sew them to

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the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press.

Finishing

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Remove the selvedges and cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths. Sew the pieces together side by side with a 1⁄2in seam to make a backing. Press the seam open. The quilt top, backing and batting are ready to take to a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth out the backing fabric on the floor with right side down and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is free of wrinkles. After pressing the quilt top, lay it, right side up, on top of the batting and baste the three layers together with safety pins or thread. Quilt as desired. Vicki machine quilted a free-motion swirl pattern in the centre of her quilt; stitched in the ditches of Borders

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1 and 2; and worked a vine on Border 3 in white thread. Trim the excess backing fabric and batting 1⁄4in outside the edge of the quilt top. From the green print fabric for the binding, cut: • Seven strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Join the binding strips, end to end, with diagonal seams to make one length. Trim the seams to 1⁄4in and press them open. Fold the binding in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, sew the binding to the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 98 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch the folded edge to the back of the quilt by hand. Label and date your quilt to finish.

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For contact details for Vicki Knight, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

226 Scarborough Beach Road Mt Hawthorn WA 6016 P. 08 9201 1011 E. sales@teddytree.com.au F. facebook.com/theteddytree Open. Tues-Fri 9.30am-5pm, Sat 9.30am-3pm

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Beatrice

BEAVER

Unlike common or garden-pond beavers, Beatrice would never be seen dead chomping on logs and extracting splinters from her teeth. She is far too refined, preferring to bathe rather than bite – and always in ladylike swimming cap and duck floatie, which came courtesy of her creator, Jennifer Goldsmith.

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Materials Q 30 x 45cm (12 x 18in) mid-brown wool felt (body) Q 15cm (6in) square of dark brown wool felt (tail) 50

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Q 30 x 45cm (12 x 18in) white wool felt (teeth, floatie and cap) Q 5 x 10cm (2 x 4in) dusty pink wool felt (inner ears) Q 25 x 30cm (10 x 12in) teal wool felt (cap)

Q 15 x 20cm (6 x 8in) yellow wool felt (duck bill and cap) Q 15cm (6in) square of nine different coloured wool felts (cap embellishment)

Q Set of four 35mm (1in) bear joints with screws, nuts and disks Q Two 6mm (1⁄4in) glass teddy eyes with loops (eyes) – see Note Q Waxed dental floss

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Q Black plastic safety nose about 15 x 15mm (5⁄8 x 5⁄8in) Q Two black pearl beads (duck eyes) Q Machine sewing threads in brown, white and yellow Q Stranded embroidery threads in white, yellow and teal Q Fibre fill and stuffing tool

Q Air-erasable marking pen or graphite pencil Q Cardboard or template plastic Q Doll-making needle Q Screwdriver and spanner for joints Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, blanket stitch, ladder stitch

Preparation and cutting

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Trace all the shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto paper or template plastic, transferring all the markings and labels. If you’ve used paper, Jennifer recommends gluing the patterns to cardboard for extra accuracy and durability. Cut the shapes out carefully on the lines. Trace around the templates on the appropriate wool felts. To trace a shape in reverse, flip the template over so that it is right side down before tracing around it. Transfer the markings for openings, joint and eye placement, and then cut the shapes out of felt on the traced lines. From the mid-brown wool felt, cut: • One body and one reversed • One lower face • One upper face • One back of head • Two arms and two reversed • Two legs and two reversed • Two ears. From the dark brown wool felt, cut: • Two tails. From the white wool flannel, cut: • One teeth shape • One square, 3⁄4in • Two floatie rings • One duck head and one reversed • Two duck wings and two reversed • 20 bathing cap flower circles. From the teal wool felt, cut: • Two bathing caps and two reversed. From the yellow felt, cut: • One duck bill and one reversed • Eight bathing cap flower circles. From the dusty pink wool felt, cut: • Two ears.

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Finished size: 30cm (12in) Note: Read all the instructions before you begin. Set your sewing machine to a shorter than usual stitch length to give smoother seams. This toy is not intended for a child under three years as it has glass eyes and beads that could work loose and become a choking hazard.

A scant ¼in seam allowance is used throughout and is included in the patterns. Wool felt has no true right and wrong sides; we use the term ‘wrong’ side to indicate the side on which seams are visible. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet, but you can also download the digital patterns from www. homespun.net.au/homespunpatterns/ and print them out.

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From the squares of wool felt in assorted colours, cut: • 72 bathing cap flower circles.

Assembly

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Match each arm with an arm-reversed shape, right sides together. Sew around the edge, leaving an opening for turning where marked on the pattern. Clip the curves and turn the arms right sides out. Repeat this step to make the legs. Repeat again with the two tail shapes. Match each brown ear with a dusty pink one, right sides together, and pin them together. Sew around the curved edge, leaving the straight edge open for turning. Clip the curves and turn the ears right side out. Fold in ¼in along the straight edge on each ear and use doubled thread or waxed dental floss to ladder stitch them closed. Pull these stitches firmly to gather the bottom of the ear and bring the bottom two corners of the ear together. Tie off securely, then tack the two corners together so that the ear holds this shape. Fold the body shape, right sides together, so that the edges of one of the darts are aligned and pin them in place. Sew the dart from the outer edges to the point. Repeat with the other dart. Then sew both darts on the body reversed shape. Match the two bodies, right sides together. Pin the shapes together, carefully aligning the darts. Sew around the body, leaving the straight neck edge open as well as the opening for turning marked on the pattern. Don't leave an opening

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Side view

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Back view Homespun

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for the tail. Turn the body over and check that the stitching has gone through both layers of felt all the way around. Clip the seam allowance around the curves. Leave the body inside out for the time being. Lay the shape you’ve cut for the teeth on the 3⁄4in square of white felt. Stitch around the teeth shape just inside the edge; take time to stop and pivot the felt to ensure smooth curves in your stitching. Trim the square of felt even with the edge of the teeth shape – see tip below. Jennifer finds this to be a much easier way of stitching two very small shapes together rather than trying to work with two teeth shapes.

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JENNIFER’S FELT SEAM TIP The small seam

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allowances used when sewing felt can be tricky – beginners often find that when they remove a piece from the machine and turn it over, their stitches haven’t caught both sides all the way around. If this happens a lot, it can be very frustrating. An easy way to avoid this, if you’re sewing something like an ear, is to cut out one ear shape and pin it to a piece of felt slightly larger than the ear shape. Then sew the ear to the felt before trimming the larger shape back to the edge of the shape. It’s far less frustrating and time consuming.

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Use small sharp embroidery scissors to make a cut in the lower face on the horizontal line marked ‘mouth cut’. Working with the right side of the lower face facing you, insert the very top straight edge of the teeth through the opening; centre it between the left and right edges of the opening. Fold the lower face, right sides together, in line with the mouth cut, capturing the top of the teeth between the layers. The top edge of the teeth should overhang the edges of the cut in the lower face just a little. See Diagram 1. Pin the layers of the lower face together. Sew the raw edges of the mouth cut together, catching the teeth in the seam. Start and end this line of stitching about 1⁄4in either side of the teeth. Sew the chin dart in the lower face using the same method as in Step 12. Then sew the dart in the upper face. Pin the bottom edge of the upper face to the top edge of the lower face, right sides together. Start by pinning the centre and either end, then pin along the length of the edges. Sew the edges together. Make a tiny hole in the lower face where marked for the post on the safety nose. Cut a scrap of felt slightly larger than the nose and make a tiny hole in the centre of it. Push the nose post through the hole in the lower face, and slip the felt scrap onto the post on the wrong side of the face. Then slip the backing shape for the nose onto the post until it sits against the wrong side of the felt. Repeat Step 12 to sew the darts in the back of head shape. Pin

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the back of head to the front of the head, right sides facing. Begin pinning at each side of the neck, then pin at the centre top of the head and pin the rest of the seam together evenly between them. Stitch this seam and turn the head right side out. Use three strands of white embroidery floss to backstitch a line down the centre of the teeth shape, working the stitches into the head. This creates two teeth and holds the white felt against the beaver’s face. With the body inside out and the head right side out, slip the head through the neck opening of the body, with the nose pointing towards the belly. Align the seam in the centre of the head with the centre seam of the body. Insert your fingers inside the head and push out towards the shoulders so that the raw edges around the neck and head are aligned. Pin the neckline and sew around it with small neat backstitches using doubled thread or dental floss. Sewing this seam by hand is much less frustrating than attempting it by machine. Turn the head and body right side out through the opening in the back. From scraps of felt, cut eight circles about 1½in in diameter to protect the beaver’s body from the friction of the joints. Snip a small hole in the centre of each circle for the bolts to fit through. Each joint consists of two wooden disks, two washers, one bolt, one lock nut and two felt circles. Referring to the pattern for placement, make small holes in the inner side of the arms and legs,

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Top edge of teeth Washer Disk Felt circle Limb

Lower face

Body Felt circle Disk Washer

Diagram 1

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Diagram 2


and in the body for the joints using sharp-pointed embroidery scissors. Before making the holes, ensure you are creating left and right arms and legs – once the holes are made, they’re there for good! Place a washer onto a bolt, then a wooden disk and a felt circle. Insert this loaded bolt inside a limb and poke the end through the hole you made for it. Then insert the bolt end through the corresponding hole in the body. Inside the body, slip a felt circle, wooden disk, washer and nut over the bolt end and use a screwdriver and spanner to tighten the joint. See Diagram 2. Repeat this step for the other three limbs. Adjust the tension on the joints to fine tune them for uniform movement. If they’re too loose, the limbs will be floppy and the beaver won’t sit well. Stuff the head through the opening in the back using small pieces at a time. Fill the nose, darts, belly and bottom firmly, sculpting the shape as you go. Close the back opening with ladder stitch using doubled brown sewing thread. Stuff the arms and legs and ladder stitch the openings closed. Stuff the end of the tail firmly, reducing the density of the stuffing closer to the body. Stop stuffing about 1⁄4in from the straight edge. Turn the raw edge in. Pin the end of the tail to Beatrice’s body where shown on the pattern. The end should be in the shape of a horizontal oval. Stitch the tail to the body with ladder stitch using doubled brown sewing thread.

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Pin the ears to the head over the point where the seam joining the upper and lower face attaches to the back of the head. Ladder stitch them in place using doubled brown sewing thread. Using the pattern as a guide, or varying the placement as you wish, determine the position for Beatrice’s eyes. Thread the doll needle with a long, doubled length of dental floss and insert it into the back of the head just above the neckline and to the left of the dart, leaving a thread tail of 5in. Bring the needle out at the first eye position on the left of Beatrice’s face (the right side of the face as you look at her) and take it through the loop on the back of the eye. Make a tiny snip in the head just large enough for the eye loop to sink into, go back through that hole and come out just to the right of the entry point. Repeat this sequence for the other eye, this time entering the head just to the right of the dart. Don’t use the same entry and exit points, but do keep them close together – all four points should be no more than a generous ¼in apart. Tie the two thread tails at the back in a single knot. Before tying again to form a reef knot,

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adjust the tension on the threads to shape the head by indenting the eyes in the face. After tying the knot securely, bury the thread ends inside the head and trim them under tension to make the ends pop back inside. If you’d like Beatrice to smile, thread a needle with thread to match the mid-brown felt – thread both ends of the thread into the needle, creating a loop. Insert the needle into the head at the very corner on one side of the mouth and exit in the same place at the other end of the mouth. Do not pull the thread all the way through but instead leave the thread loop on the surface of the head. Make a tiny stitch at the second end of the mouth and exit the needle close to where you started – pulling the needle through the thread loop you left there. Pull the thread to put some tension on it, indenting the corners of the mouth a little. Pass the needle back and forth from one end of the mouth to the other twice more. Then thread the thread on to the doll needle. Pass this needle through the head, exiting at the centre back. Secure it neatly, then pass the needle through the head again, putting tension on the thread before cutting it close to the felt so that the cut end will be pulled back into the head.

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Bathing cap

37 Cap lining

Bathing cap Duck floatie

JENNIFER’S EAR MATCHING TIP When you are making the beaver’s ears, turn the bottom edges of the ears under at the same time, rather than completing one ear before starting the other one. Even though the ears are only small, it’s very easy for them to turn out quite different in size if you don’t compare them as you go along. It happens to me all the time.

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the centre of the semicircle through the fold and into the cap. Sew the first flower at the front centre of the bathing cap and work towards the nape. Position the flowers very close together to prevent them from unfurling and vary the direction in which the fold of each flower lies on the surface of the bathing cap. Continue stitching flowers in place over the entire surface of the bathing cap, covering it densely. Cut additional felt circles if you need to. Do not work stitches any closer than 3⁄8in from the outer edge of the cap – that is, the outer edge of a flower may overhang the edge of the cap, but underneath, the stitches through its fold should be at least 3⁄8in from the edge. Once you’re happy with the look of the bathing cap, slip the plain cap inside the decorated one, wrong sides together. Pin the edges together. Blanket stitch them together using three strands of teal embroidery floss; you need to stitch the edges of the ear openings as well the outer edges of the cap.

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Duck floatie

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Match each duck wing with a duck wing reversed. Sew around the edge, leaving the opening marked on the pattern. Turn each wing right side out and neatly ladder stitch the openings closed. Match the two floatie rings, wrong sides together. Blanket stitch the edges together using three strands of yellow embroidery floss. Stitch the inner edges first. Stop stitching about 3in before you have completed the stitching, stuff the ring firmly, then finish stitching. Position a bill on each duck head as marked on the pattern and top stitch it in place by machine using thread to match the bill. Turn each head over and trim the white felt underneath the bill about 1⁄4in from the stitching. This reduces the bulk in this narrow end of the head.

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On one of the bathing cap shapes, pin, then sew, the two short edges marked with an ‘x’ together. Repeat with one of the bathing cap reversed shapes. Match these two bathing caps, wrong sides together, then pin and sew the centre seam. Repeat Step 38 with the second pair of bathing cap/bathing cap reversed shapes. Thread a needle with three strands of teal embroidery floss and knot the end. Use it to sew the circles cut from assorted felts to one of the bathing caps. To do this, fold a felt circle in half and work three small stitches in


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Getting to know …

JENNIFER GOLDSMITH What does this craft mean to you? This craft means the world to me. It’s how I express my creativity. It’s how I tell the world that I’m here and this is what I do. It’s how I make many friends and build common connections with people who are interested in similar things. It brings me satisfaction when I see someone who has never sewn a toy before pick up one of my designs and decide that they’re going to make it. It brings me happiness when I see children clutching one of my toys while grinning like they’ve just won the best prize ever. How long have you been creating softies? I started by taking an evening class in my early 20s, where I made a teddy bear. I was hooked the moment I started, watching a bear coming to life before my eyes and through my choices. I continued to make teddy bears for years after that. By the time our son came along, the purpose of a toy took on a very different meaning for me. I wanted him to have toys that were special and unique … but bespoke took money that we just didn’t have. One day, he asked if we could have chickens. Real clucking ones. I loved the idea of hens in the yard but I wasn’t sure the neighbours and council would share our fondness for the idea. I solved the problem by making Harry a cotton chicken. And he loved her! Then he wanted more, in different sizes. Our flock grew to include layers, pullets and day-olds, complete with feather-boa down on their heads. Things have kind of bumbled along from there, really!

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Match the two heads, right sides together. Sew them together, leaving the neck open. Turn the head right side out and stuff it firmly. Turn the raw edge of the neck under, then ladder stitch it to the front of the floatie ring. To add the duck’s eyes, thread a needle with doubled white thread and knot the ends together. Insert the needle at one eye position and exit at the other; tug the thread to pull the knot into the stuffing inside the

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Do you like to do a wide variety of styles and subjects with your toys? I think my toys now have taken on a ‘look’ of their own. There are some common techniques I employ in basic construction. They’re either jointed with buttons or old-fashioned teddy bear joints or they have their limbs sewn into body seams. Of late, I’ve noticed that my head shapes have mostly been made up of three or more pieces. Oh, and I love darts for shaping. As for embellishing, I often add different ‘fur’ colour by use of appliqués. For this, I mostly stick to my tried-and-true ‘zigzag around the edge’ method. I love the simple ‘stitchy-ness’ of it and the fact that it tells the holder exactly how the toy was put together. Most of my toys wear an item of clothing of some sort, too. For me, these additions add to the story of the character and give personality and history to their tale. Tails tend to pose the odd conundrum when putting pants on critters, though. For me, there also needs to be a reason why the fox wears a frock or a piglet pops on a tutu. Perhaps that’s why the ‘dreaming things up’ part of a design can take me so long. Over-engineering can be my worst enemy. Ever had any calamities – a puppy that turned into a porpoise or frog destined for the dustbin rather than the pond? Cats and I are not friends. Not those made of felt or fluff, at least. I can’t even begin to describe my one and only attempt to render a kitty from chenille. Arms too long, head too small, belly waaaay too distended. Oddly enough, I finished it, though. I stuffed every limb and closed every opening then held it at arm’s length and dropped it in the bin! That was years ago now. I still haven’t built up confidence to attempt a feline again. If you weren’t sewing these sweet little creatures, what would occupy your time? I’d love to have our backyard running as a neat and efficient urban farm. I’d be delighted if time would allow me to have a veg patch constantly bursting with produce, rather than cooling its heels, waiting for the ratty bolted-to-seed broccoli to be shown the door so the corn can get its feet down. How lovely it would be to have edges that never saw a weed put a step out of place. I think we’d make wonderful urban homesteaders. We have chickens now, after all!

head. Thread a black bead onto the needle; insert the needle at the second eye position and bring it out back at the first. Thread the other bead, then continue to sew back and forth between eye positions several times. Pull the thread quite firmly each time to indent the eyes into the head and hold them in place securely. End the thread by tying a knot close to the body, inserting the needle into the head and tugging to pull the knot into the stuffing. Hold the thread under tension,

You’ve recently turned this into your full-time job, haven’t you? Has that made the whole softie-making experience even better? I’m not sure that there’s very much ‘full time’ about what I do. I fit it in as much as I can when I can but that commitment has to be a bit organic, depending on family commitments. There’s always a juggling act that happens in each and every mother’s life. We all need to keep a lot of balls in the air at once. Recently, we renovated my work space. It meant five weeks of being completely unable to make anything and then weeks after of trying to find new homes for all of my things. I find that softie-making gives me far less mothering guilt, though. I can get up early and get things done before I need to devote time to the family and then slip back into it once everyone is out the door for the day. Your children are growing up fast – are they still excited about the toys you make or have they got to that dismissive phase? They are growing up fast! I’ve gone from having a toddler and a pre-schooler to having a teen and a tween. Our daughter is still taken with every new creation. She still wants all the prototypes and declares every new creation to be ‘the best one yet’. Our son isn’t as eager to have soft toys added to his collection. (Can you guess he’s the teen?) He does, however, offer wonderfully calm congratulations when he sees the newest cab off the rank. A slow smirk followed by a ‘That’s pretty good, Mum’ … high praise from a high-school boy! What’s the strangest softie or doll you’ve ever made? I think the Tortoise in a Turtleneck, which featured in Homespun, was not so much strange as it was a problem poser. My need to have all the elements of the design ‘make sense’ meant that I had to solve such questions as how a jumper would be worn over the tortoise’s shell. That had me a bit flummoxed. Have there been any you simply couldn’t part with? I keep all of the prototypes that I make. Except the cat … there was no saving that cat. Prototypes have a very special place in my heart. They’re the most important steps in the realisation of a design. It’s where the design leaps from paper and I am challenged to see if I really can do what I imagine I can.

cut it near the surface of the felt and allow it to spring back inside the head. Pin the wings to the top edge of the floatie, quite close to the head and pointing towards the back. Ladder stitch them in place, working the stitches around the front half of each wing, allowing the back half to sit up from the surface of the ring.

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For contact details for Jennifer Goldsmith, of Frazzy Dazzles, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.


NEW!

Yes you do have room for a longarm…it’s simple!

Our new HQ Simply Sixteen requires a little over five feet of space and enables any quilter, beginner to advanced, to finish any size quilt without the space requirements of a conventional frame system. The unique hoop framing and clamp systems make finishing multiple quilts a dream. The HQ Simply Sixteen’s two modes of built-in stitch regulation make sure you produce a perfect stitch length every time. The HQ Simply Sixteen is a very affordable longarm quilting machine and it’s simply the best solution when space is at a premium.

Head to our website www.handiquilter.com.au for latest news and events!

Handi Quilter Australia www.handiquilter.com.au (02) 4337 3737

ȝŧÕ•


United Stitches By Rosalie Quinlan

A Stitch & Switch Program! 5 and 10 month options available. Contact the store or visit our website for more details.

Latest fabrics • Block of the month • Books and patterns Open weekends • Prompt mail order is our specialty

Tula Pink fabrics in stock. Prompt mail order is our specialty.

Through the windows Panels $20 plus post and handling.

Shop 4a 4a, 20 Argyle Street Street, Camden NSW 2570 Phone: 02 4655 8348 Email: sales@thestitcherscupboard.com.au

www.

lilylane.com.au

26-28 Prince St, Rosedale VIC 3847 P: 03 5199 2777 E: jennifer@lilylane.com.au

Log onto our website for year round specials at

www.thestitcherscupboard.com.au

Find us on Facebook Stitches from the Bush

p. 0427 764 147 e. stitchesfromthebush@bigpond.com www.stitchesfromthebush.com.au

HEARTS Y P AND HAPRS FLOWhEBOM 10-mont asley Be by Leanne

This BOM is postage free within Australia

y ts and Happ cludes Hear thread pack). $115.00 (in starter d an Month 1: le nd ttern, t Quarter Bu r month (includes pa Flowers Fa 5.00 pe brics). $2 fa : nd 10 bi 2d s er an Month s and bord Pack: d Fabrics thread, linen Pattern an tterns, pa es Complete ud cl sted (in Set $310 po and threads). fabrics


What a cute idea!

PICK A PUSSYCAT – ANY PUSSYCAT Some designers/crafters are so clever. And it’s a natural to include Julie Williams, of Little Cotton Rabbits (www.littlecottonrabbits.typepad.co.uk), in that accolade. She creates small animal knits that make you go all gooey inside. Plus, each one radiates a unique personality, despite diminutive proportions. We thought we’d show you her range of cats – tortoiseshell to tabby, plain to patched, and a few Siamese for good measure. “My animals are designed with little hands in mind,” says Julie. “They are around 9in tall and, with their fat little tummies, are a good size for children to hold, cuddle and play with.” You can see how some of them are clad, if you go to page 18, where we feature Julie’s tiny animals’ sweaters. Magical! Homespun

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BOY TOYS

We don’t want to stereotype here, but let’s face it, Leanne Milsom has got it 100 percent correct by balancing pale pastels and patterning with a movable feast of boyish delights – from trains and tractors to tricycles.

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Materials Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) cream toneon-tone print fabric (stitcheries) Q 42 assorted fat eighths of coordinating print fabrics OR 21 fat 62

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quarters for a less scrappy look (hexagons) Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) floral print fabric (binding) Q 1.4m (11⁄2yd) backing fabric – see Note Q No 9 embroidery needle

Q One skein of DMC Colour Variations in Water Lilies (4040) or a variegated thread to coordinate with the colours of your fabrics Q Thread for hand basting

Q Batting at least 140 x 120cm (55 x 47in) Q 30cm (3⁄8yd) lightweight fusible batting (embroidery stabiliser) Q Hand quilting thread for joining the hexagons

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Q Fabric glue pen Q 0.1 brown pigment pen Q 126 pre-cut 21⁄2in hexagon papers or template plastic and stiff paper to make your own Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in foot Q General sewing supplies

Stitch used: Backstitch Finished size: 122 x 101.5cm (48 x 40in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. A single length

Preparation

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If you’re not using pre-cut hexagon papers, trace the hexagon from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic and cut it out accurately on the line. Trace around it on stiff paper and cut it out. You can fold the paper to cut a few at a time, but be careful to maintain perfect accuracy. You need 126 paper hexagons in total. From the assorted print fabrics, cut: • A total of 118 squares, 51⁄2in. Cut three squares from each of the 42 fabrics or six squares from each of the 21 fabrics: you’ll have eight extra squares that are not used in this project (hexagons). From the cream tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: • Eight squares, 51⁄2in (stitcheries). From the floral print fabric, cut: • Five strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding). Pin a paper hexagon to the fusible batting and cut it out next to the paper. Repeat this step to cut a total of eight batting hexagons (stitchery stabiliser). Using the brown pen, lightly trace the stitchery designs from the Pattern Sheet onto the centre of the eight squares of cream fabric. Keep the lines very fine so they will be covered by the embroidery. Fuse the batting hexagons to the wrong side of the cream squares behind the traced designs, orientated so that the stitchery is centred between the top and bottom horizontal edges of the hexagon.

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of backing fabric is only just wide enough to accommodate this quilt. If you wish to have a little more overhang on your backing fabric, cut the length in half from top to bottom and insert a strip of coordinating fabric between the two halves. You could use the fabrics from your fat eighths/quarters to create a strip for this purpose.

This quilt is English paper pieced by hand. Two strands of embroidery thread are used throughout. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au/ homespun-patterns/ and print them out.

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Apply a small dab of glue to a paper hexagon and stick it to the middle of the wrong side of a 51⁄2in print fabric square. Cut the fabric by eye 1⁄4in outside the hexagon shape. Cut a total of 118 fabric hexagons with seam allowance in this way. Fold the seam allowance of a print fabric hexagon around a paper template, one side at a time, and tack it in place by hand, as shown in Diagram 1. Begin and end with a knot on the front of the hexagon to make it easier to remove the basting stitches in Step 18. Repeat for all the print fabric hexagons.

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Diagram 1

Embroidery

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Backstitch the eight stitchery designs with variegated thread. Working through the batting and fabric helps to hide the thread ends and prevent the fabric from puckering. When the stitcheries are complete, apply a dab of glue to a paper hexagon and position it on the batting hexagon behind a stitchery. Trim the cream fabric by eye 1⁄4in outside the batting/paper hexagons. Repeat this step for the other seven stitcheries. Repeat Step 9 for all the stitchery hexagons.

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Assembly

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Select 11 assorted fabric hexagons and place them in a column one under the other. At this point, Leanne says to join these hexagons on their adjacent sides – see Step 14. However, you Homespun

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stitchery placement in each row so that they’re scattered evenly over the quilt. When all the vertical rows are joined, match columns 1 and 2, right sides together, and whipstitch along all the edges. The seam zigzags, so bring the corresponding edges together in turn and sew the seam in one continuous line. Repeat this step to join all 11 columns together. All the outer edges of the quilt will be uneven at this stage. Press the quilt lightly. Carefully snip the knots, unpick the basting stitches and remove all the paper hexagons from behind the fabrics. To square up the quilt, unfold the turned-under edges of the hexagons around the edge of the quilt and press them flat. Use a rotary cutter and ruler to carefully trim the hexagon points along the left and right sides of the quilt. Trim the protruding half hexagons from the top and bottom edges. See Diagram 3. Ensure that the corners are perfect right angles. Work carefully to avoid cutting any of the whipstitching or other hexagons.

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might prefer to lay out the hexagons for the entire quilt before you start joining them together so you can achieve an even spread of colours and patterns with the stitcheries interspersed. Referring to Diagram 2, match two hexagons, right sides together, and whipstitch along the adjacent edges in quilting thread. The second vertical column has 12 hexagons, eleven in print fabrics and one stitchery. Join the hexagons in this column. Continue joining the hexagons in vertical columns: the odd-numbered columns have 11 hexagons and the even-numbered ones have 12. Include a stitchery in columns 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. Vary the

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Diagram 3

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Finishing

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The backing, batting and quilt top are ready to take to a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth out the backing fabric on the floor with right side down and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is free of wrinkles. After pressing the quilt top, lay it, right side up, on top of the batting and baste the three layers together with safety pins or thread.


Getting to know …

LEANNE MILSOM What or who was the inspiration for this new baby design? The fabrics were my inspiration for this design. I was sorting through my cupboard full of fabrics and folding them into colours. When I’d put a few of these fabrics together, they looked so nice and reminded me of a baby boy. So my new design was born. Did it take you long to come up with the sweet embroidery designs? Stitchery is my favourite thing to do, so as soon as I had a design in mind, I knew it was going to have embroidery and be a boy quilt. I thought boy-toy designs would be perfect. Are baby and children’s projects favourites of yours? I like to make a variety of projects, from big bed quilts to small pouches and needlebooks,

and sometimes, I like to work on baby projects just for something a bit different. I think it’s nice to offer a variety of baby projects for all the grandmas and new mums out there. Do you have children of your own? I have three fantastic teenage boys and, if I’d been a quilter when they were small, then they all would have had their own baby quilts. What is your idea of the perfect sewing weekend? Recently, I went on my first proper weekend quilt retreat with a bunch of girlfriends, and we had the best time. I sewed all day and into the night. It was fantastic to just sew and not have to worry about housework, meals or my family. It was wonderful to just focus on the project at hand, be inspired by what others around me were sewing, and be in wonderful girly company. I don’t get much of that at my house! I also love just having the day to potter in my sewing studio. I get so much enjoyment from that one room. It’s where all my ideas come to life. How many projects do you think you’ve made over the years? I have made lots of projects in the eight or so years I’ve been quilting. I have at least 40 quilts that are all sizes; pillows; cushions and bags. And then there are all the gifts I make throughout the year for birthdays and Christmas – very rarely do I buy a gift. I love giving something I’ve created. What do you do with your finished pieces? Most things I make I keep for myself – like the big quilts. They cost a small fortune to make,

so I make those for my family to use. Smaller projects I mainly give as gifts. If I kept everything I made, I’d have no room left. Have you got a favourite that you simply couldn’t ever part with? I made a quilt that is almost king size. It’s made from all my ‘Kansas Trouble’ fabrics scraps and hundreds of half-square triangles. I worked on this quilt for more than 12 months, and it’s my absolute favourite. Its warm colours remind me of autumn. Whenever I had a spare half hour, I’d sneak into my studio and get a block ready to put together. I loved going through my fabrics and picking out the different designs. I tried to make each block from different fabrics. Apart from stitching, what are your interests? I love to garden. When I’m not sewing, you’ll find me outside. I love to grow flowers from seeds and I have a vegie garden that I potter in. Also, every day at 5am, you’ll find me at the local gym because I love to keep fit. And then there’s my passion for of travel. We have an overseas trip planned for this year, and I can’t wait. What is your favourite: Piece of music – I like a variety of music, but Celine Dion is my favourite. Movie – It has to be Love Actually. I love romance. TV show – Good old Coronation Street; I watch it every night. Sport – Going to the gym. Food – Mince pies and shortbread biscuits. Oh, yum!

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Quilt as desired. Leanne machine quilted over the zigzag vertical seam lines in cream thread using a programmed feather stitch. Trim the excess backing fabric and batting 1⁄4in outside the edge of the quilt top. Join the binding strips, end to end, with diagonal seams to make one long length. Trim the seams to 1⁄4in and press them open. Fold the binding in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press.

include it on the front, or use it as the quilt label on the back.

when you’re sewing the hexagons together – this way, they won’t show on the front of the finished quilt.

LEANNE’S TIMESAVING TIP Keep the

to personalise the quilt. Embroider the baby’s name and date of birth and

Homespun

For contact details for Leanne Milsom, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

LEANNE’S STITCHING TIP Keep your whipstitches small

LEANNE’S DESIGN TIP Create an extra stitchery block

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With raw edges together, sew the binding to the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 98 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch the folded edge to the back of the quilt by hand. Label and date your quilt to finish.

prepared hexagons together in a zip-lock bag and, when you have a few spare minutes waiting in the car or at the doctor’s, have them on hand so that you can sew some together.


PATCHWORK & NEEDLECRAFT

Woodland

Park

“Woodland Park” is a beautiful children’s fabric range designed by Christine Sharp and Rachael Wright from Kids Quilts. Five patterns, from wall hangings to bed quilts, have been designed to accompany the fabric. ‘Goodnight Owl’. ‘Nuts About You’ and ‘Woodland Park’ are three of the patterns ranging in price from $15-$30. Kits are available for each of the designs and details can be found on our website. Fabric is $23/m.

For further information contact: Cath and Pat Guilfoyle, Onpoint Patchwork & Needlecraft, 61a Station St, Waratah NSW 2298 Telephone: 02 4968 0094 Email: shop@onpointpatch.com.au

www.onpointpatckworkandneedlecraft.com


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Northern Knits Scandinavians sure know how to do winter. Outside might be perishing, with snow drifts and sub-zero temperatures, but their interiors are cosy havens, filled with Fair Isles knits and comforting textures. Our snuggly chair covers set the Scandi scene as our southern winter kicks into action.

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Photography: Olaf Szczepaniak/Jalag; Creation: Zuhause Wohnen/living4media/Picture Media

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Materials Q Panda Magnum 8 ply 100g balls: two balls each of Blue (321) and White (301) Q One pair of 3.75mm (UK 9/US 5) knitting needles or the size needed to give correct tension Q 40cm (16in) square cushion insert Q Wool needle for sewing seams Finished sizes: Chair back cover 28 x 38cm (11 x 15in); seat cushion 38cm (15in) square – refer to the Sizing Tip before you begin Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. This is an intermediate skill level project. Use only the yarn specified. Other yarns are likely to produce different results. Quantities are approximate as they can vary between knitters. Check the ball bands to ensure that all yarn of each colour is from the same dye lot. These items are knitted on smaller needles (at a firmer tension) than is usually recommended for this yarn. When working from the graph, read odd-numbered (knit) rows from right to left and even-numbered (purl) rows from left to right. Repeat the 16-stitch pattern five times before working the last stripe.

Abbreviations beg = begin/ning; cont = continue; K = knit; P = purl; patt = pattern; rem = remain/ ing; rep = repeat; st/s = stitch/ es; stocking st = knit right side rows, purl wrong side rows.

Tension 24 sts and 27 rows to 10cm (4in) over Fair Isle patt using 3.75mm needles. To work a tension square, using 3.75mm needles and white, cast on 36 sts. Work 40 rows Fair Isle patt from the graph. Cast off loosely. Check your tension carefully. If there are fewer sts to 10cm (4in), use smaller needles and if there are more sts, use larger needles. 70

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www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Chair back cover Using 3.75mm needles and Blue, cast on 90 sts. Work 4 rows stocking st. Beg Fair Isle Patt – Note: Do not weave colours in Fair Isle patt but carry colours not in use loosely across on the wrong side. Always carry the colours to the end of the rows and catch them in at the side edges. Always carry the Blue above the White. 1st row – Knit 1st row of Fair Isle patt from the graph, working from right to left. 2nd row – Purl 2nd row of Fair Isle patt from the graph, working left to right. Cont in stocking st, working rows 3 to 20 inclusive from the graph. Rows 1 to 20 inclusive form patt.

Work a further 130 rows patt ... 150 rows in all. Using Blue, work 4 rows stocking st. Cast off loosely.

Seat cushion Using 3.75mm needles and Blue, cast on 90 sts. Purl 1 row. Beg Fair Isle Patt – Work 110 rows Fair Isle patt as for the chair back cover. Beg underside – Using Blue for rem, cont in stocking st until underside measures 38cm (15in) from beg to match the patterned section. Cast off loosely.

Finishing Do not press the knitting. Fold the chair back cover in half and join the side

Diagram 1 – Shape the top corners of the chair back cover as shown if desired.

edges neatly – we recommend using mattress stitch. Fold the stocking st hem to the wrong side and slip stitch it in position. Pin the cover to size and steam it gently. Refer to Diagram 1 to finish.

Key: = White (301) = Blue (321)

Fair Isle graph

Fold the seat cushion cover in half and join the side edges neatly. Pin it to size and steam it gently. Before joining the cast on and cast off edges, push the cushion insert inside, ensuring it goes right into the corners.

SIZING TIP

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If your chair back is just slightly larger or smaller than the stated finished size or is a bit thicker than average, the cover should be fine – it can stretch a little, provided you haven’t carried the yarn too tightly behind the work, or it can sit a little more loosely. However, if the size is more than about 5cm/2in larger or smaller, you should add or subtract repeats of the Fair Isle pattern. A full repeat (16 sts) would add or subtract about 7cm (23⁄4in). Adding or subtracting a half repeat (8 sts) would mean the design was no longer be symmetrical.

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PICTURE PERFECT

Photograph: Minki Kim

Let’s focus our attention on funky fashion accessories, courtesy of Minki Kim’s shoulder bag, which is as flash as it is versatile. Carry it as a stylish handbag or take it literally and stow your camera. Flip it, and you’ll find the back is as lovely as the front. Instructions by Kristin Esser.

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Materials Q 20cm (1⁄4yd) natural linen (bag sides and appliqué background) Q 25cm (10in) square of ticking or stripe fabric (bag back) Q Assorted scraps of print fabric (camera appliqué and patchwork) Q 50cm (1⁄2yd) print fabric (lining) Q 50cm (1⁄2yd) lightweight fusible interfacing Q 50cm (1⁄2yd) fusible bag batting Q Fusible web Q 40cm (16in) heavyduty zipper Q 1.7m (17⁄8yd) of 25mm (1in) wide cotton webbing (bag strap) Q Adjustable strap hardware – ring and slider wide enough to accommodate the cotton webbing Q Small piece of printed cotton ribbon (optional embellishment) Q Erasable fabricmarking pen Q Threads to match the bag fabric and assorted colours for appliqué and machine embroidery Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in, zipper and opentoe/appliqué feet Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 19cm square x 7.5cm deep (71⁄2in square x 3in deep) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. 74

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Bag front

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton or linen, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric, interfacing and

batting 107cm (42in) wide. Seams of 1⁄4in are used throughout, unless otherwise stated. The appliqué method is fusible raw-edge with

Preparation and cutting

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From the natural linen, cut: • Two strips, 11⁄2 x 161⁄2in (zipper gusset) • Two strips, 2 x 161⁄2in (bag bottom gusset) • One square, 41⁄2in (appliqué background) • One square, 3in (handmade patch) • Two rectangles, 11⁄2 x 2in (zipper ends). From the ticking/stripe fabric, cut: • One square, 81⁄2in. From the assorted print fabrics, cut: • 12 squares, 21⁄2in (patchwork). Trace the lining shape from the Pattern Sheet onto paper, transfer the markings and cut it out. Fold the lining fabric and the lightweight interfacing in half, short edges matching. Place the pattern on the fold of the fabric and interfacing as indicated and cut out one shape from each. Use the same pattern to cut two shapes, not on the fold, from the bag batting. From the remaining lightweight interfacing, cut: • One square, 4in (appliqué stabiliser) • One square, 21⁄2in (embroidery stabiliser). Fuse the 4in and 21⁄2in squares of lightweight interfacing to the wrong side of the 41⁄2in and 3in squares of linen, centring them both. Trace the camera body and lens shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving a little space between the shapes. Cut them out

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machine stitching but you can adapt the instructions to your preferred method. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern

Sheet in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www. homespun.net.au/homespunpatterns/ and print them out.

roughly. Fuse the camera body shape to one fabric scrap and the lens shapes to contrasting fabrics, using the photographs as guides. Cut the shapes out carefully on the lines. Trace or draw the flower and the word ‘handmade’ from the Pattern Sheet onto the 3in square of linen with the erasable fabric-marking pen.

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Peel off the backing paper and fuse the camera body and lens shapes to the centre of the 41⁄2in square of interfaced linen. Use the pattern as a guide to draw on the camera details with an erasable fabric-marking pen. Below the camera on the right, trace/write the word, ‘dream’ with the pen. Thread the sewing machine with dark thread, shorten the stitch length to 1.8 and fit the open-toe/appliqué foot. Sewing very close to the edges of the shapes, outline each appliqué shape and stitch over the camera details you’ve drawn. Minki stitched some of her lines twice for emphasis. She says to take your time and not to worry if your lines aren’t perfect – that’s part of the charm of handmade! Using the same dark thread, machine stitch over the ‘dream’ letters twice. Pull all the thread ends to the back and knot them off neatly. Keeping the same foot on the machine, change to dark pink thread and

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Steps 12-13 Homespun

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shorten the stitch length to 1.6. Outline the flower and shade the outer parts of each petal and the flower centre in the same colour by sewing back and forth. Shade the top of the bud in the same colour. Switch to white thread and stitch around the flower centre to create a highlight. Change to light pink thread and fill in the rest of the flower and bud by sewing back and forth over them. Fill the leaves with light blue thread, then outline them with green. Finally, change to dark thread and outline the entire flower, bud, leaves and stem. Machine stitch over the ‘handmade’ lettering in the same colour and finish all the thread ends neatly. Press under the edges of the 3in square by 1⁄4in. Pin the square to the right side of the 81⁄2in bag back, positioning it about 11⁄2in from the bottom and right edges. Top stitch it in place with thread to match the fabric.

Steps 14-15

1

⁄4in

Diagram 1

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18

Steps 20-21

Step 22

Bag front construction 1

⁄4in

Assembly Fold all the 161⁄2in linen strips in half, short edges matching, and mark the centre points. On the wrong side of the bag front and bag back panels, mark dots 1⁄4in in from the edges at the corners, as shown in Diagram 1. Match the centre of a 11⁄2 x 161⁄2in linen strip with the centre top of the bag front panel, right sides together. Pin it in place. Sew the strip across the top edge of the bag front: work with the bag front uppermost and start and end the stitching at the dots you marked in Step 19, 1⁄4in from the edges of the bag panel. Repeat the process described in Step 20 to sew a 2 x 161⁄2in linen strip to the bottom edge of the bag front, again leaving the first and last 1 ⁄4in unstitched. Repeat Steps 20-21 with the bag back. Fuse the bag batting shapes to the wrong side of the back and front assemblies. Quilt the bag front as desired. Minki stitched straight lines 1 ⁄8in each side of the patchwork seams. With right sides together, pin one side of the zipper tape to the long raw edge of the top linen strip on the bag front. Fold the 11⁄2 x 2in rectangles of linen so they measure 1 x 11⁄2in and press them. Slip them between the zipper and fabric at each end, just covering the zipper ends.

15 Step 16-17

square. Then stitch the four-square rows to the top and bottom edges and press all the seams. The bag front panel should measure 81⁄2in square, raw edge to raw edge.

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Arrange the 12 assorted fabric squares around the camera square in a pleasing layout. You should have two squares on each side and four squares across the top and bottom. Some of Minki’s fabrics have directional prints and she placed them the same way up as the camera. When you’re happy with the arrangement, sew the squares together in two rows of four for the top and bottom and two vertical rows of two for the sides. Press the seams to one side. Sew a two-square row to the left and right edges of the camera

MINKI’S VARIATION TIP The instructions describe how I created the little flower, but feel free to do your own thing here. You could appliqué a bit of fabric for the flower shape, hand embroider it, or if you feel comfortable with free-motion quilting/embroidery, you might prefer to sew it with a darning foot on your machine and the feed dogs lowered.

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Sew along the length of the zipper using a zipper foot. When the zipper pull gets in the way, stop with the needle down, move it out of the way, and continue stitching to the end. Pin the other side of the zipper tape to the long raw edge of the linen strip on top of the bag back. Slip the other side of the folded rectangles between the layers again and stitch the zipper in place as before. With right sides together, match the two long strips along the bottom of the bag and sew them together. Minki pressed the seam open and top stitched 1⁄8in either side of the seam, but this is optional. Cut a 3in length of webbing, feed it through the ring of the adjuster set and fold the webbing in half, enclosing the ring inside. Fold the short ends of the bottom gusset strip under by 1⁄4in and press well. At the end of the zipper, lay the folded end of the bottom strip over the top strip with 1⁄4in overlap. Slip the folded webbing with the ring between the layers over the middle of the zipper so 1in of webbing is showing. Top stitch across the edge of the bottom strip to secure. Feed one end of the remaining webbing through the crossbar of the slider, fold it over by 1in and machine stitch it securely in place – use zigzag stitch to prevent the end from fraying. Feed the other end of the strap through the ring attached to the

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Steps 31-32

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Step 32

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Step 37

bag, take it through the slider and attach it to the other side of the bag in the same manner as the loop. Reinforce the strap attachment by stitching a rectangle over the area on the side panel where the strap end sits. Minki covered that reinforcing stitching with a short length of printed cotton ribbon, adding another decorative element at the same time. Your outer bag now has four holes in it – these need to be sewn up to create the bag sides. Undo the zipper and turn the bag inside out. Pinch the ends of one hole and flatten the fabric so the sides of the gusset and a bag front/back panel are matching, right sides together. Stitch along this edge, reversing at each end of the stitching for strength. Minki pressed her seams open and top stitched 1⁄8in each side of them – this is optional. Repeat Step 33 to close the other three holes and complete the outer bag construction. Turn the bag right side out but leave the zipper open.

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Finishing

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Fuse the lightweight interfacing shape to the wrong side of the lining fabric shape. Press under 1⁄4in at each end of the lining – these edges will be sewn to the inside of the zipper tape. Lay the lining piece on the table, right side up. With right sides together, match the corners of the two ends to the corners of the side tabs and pin. Sew these two short seams, reversing at both ends.


Step 38

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Repeat Step 33 to sew up the four sides. Leave the lining with the wrong side facing out. Slide the lining inside the outer bag, with the wrong

Getting to know … MINKI KIM Why this particular craft? I sew because I love it. Years ago, I was hand embroidering my own and my children’s drawings. One day, my husband brought home a sewing machine, and I was curious whether I could do the same sort of ‘drawing with thread’ with the sewing machine. It turns out I could, and what was even better was that I could do it so much faster. I began to create projects that I could embellish with my sewing illustrations, and I discovered a new passion along the way. Have you tried plenty of others? Oh, yes! Over the years, I’ve dabbled in lots of crafts: card making, scrapbooking and even creating little mini albums for each month. But that felt a little too much like homework – like I was always behind. I have a university degree in sculpting, which I don’t do at all any more, but I think I’ve found my true love with fabric, needle and thread. Any funny stories along the way? When I’m searching for an idea, I often say, “Idea, idea, please give me an idea” to my three young

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sides together and the seams matching. Pin or clip the folded edges of the lining to the inside of the zipper tape and hand stitch it securely in place to finish.

For contact details for Minki Kim, of SewingIllustration.com, turn to the Stockists pages at the back of the magazine. Some of the styled and step photos are courtesy of Minki Kim.

daughters. My five year old will often draw something on fabric for me, and I will use that as the start of my project. I love to use my children’s drawings in my projects; it creates a treasured keepsake. The funny part is, now she gets mad at me if I don’t use all her drawings. If you weren’t doing this, what else would occupy your time? I think I’d take lessons to become a better photographer. I should probably just do that anyway, but I’m a little intimidated. Who taught you your crafting skills? I am a self-taught sewist, but I came from a very creative family. My father was a tailor and, when I was little, I used to play with fabrics at his shop. He gave me my first piece of beautiful lace, and I played with it over and over, creating clothing for my doll. My mother does beautiful calligraphy and woodworking. Creativity was encouraged in my home, and I hope that I’m passing on that same message to my daughters. Is it hard to find time to do your stitching? I think it’s always hard for busy mothers to take time to be creative. But I find that, if I give myself the gift of a few minutes to sew, it gives me the energy and joy to tackle the other things I need to do that day. For me, it began with just giving myself permission to sit and sew for the time that it took me to drink one cup of coffee. When I realised how much joy it brought me, I found other pockets of time that I could fill, like by the pool in the summer or while my girls are doing homework. I make sure to always have a basket with a bit of handwork ready to grab on the way out the door, and all those little pockets of time really add up. What’s your source of inspiration? I get my inspiration from everyday life. I think it’s human nature to want to draw the world – faraway places that are so beautiful and grand. But, in reality, I find what I really draw is my everyday

life: my humble kitchen; my messy sewing room; the piles of shoes by the door; and my sweet girls. This is my real life, and I find that it’s actually quite beautiful. What are your favourite materials to work with? I honestly think you can’t beat the combination of linen and beautiful cotton fabric. I work mostly with linen and scraps from my favourite fabrics. One thing about using such tiny pieces of fabric in my designs is that no piece of fabric is too small to save. I collect those small sugar packet containers that you see on tables in restaurants; I have three right now. I use them to collect the tiniest of scraps. Where do you live and work? I live in sunny southern California with my husband and three young daughters. My first workspace was just a sewing machine tucked in a corner of our tiny apartment. I loved that small space, as I began to decorate it with my handmade creations and really made it my own. Since then, we’ve moved to a larger house, where I claimed what would normally be the living and dining rooms. It’s very spacious, and I feel lucky to have this space to create in. People have commented to me that they envy me this sewing room, but my philosophy is that it’s much better to use this space for something useful every day, than just twice a year when guests come for the holidays. I feel that the place you spend most of your time in should be the best spot in the house. What is your advice for beginners? Just keep sewing and creating. This is the advice my own father gave to me about my creative pursuits – just keep doing it. It doesn’t really matter if what you are making is perfect – in fact, it won’t be – but just keep at it and it will keep getting better and better. One thing that I like about sewing illustration is that, even when it is imperfect, it’s still charming. So, let go of perfectionism and enjoy yourself. It’s just fabric!


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JEC

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‚ FATIMA S FASHION

Girls around the globe are clothes conscious, accommodating their culture in a modern fashion context. Allison Dey Malacaria’s little Muslim doll wears jeans and a bright top at home, adding a dress, hijab and under-scarf to maintain her modesty when stepping out.

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Artwork: Peter Hinton


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Materials Q 20 x 40cm (8 x 15in) black fabric (hair) Q 12 x 23cm (5 x 91⁄2in) skintone fabric (face and hands) Q 23 x 26cm (91⁄2 x 11in) green fabric (shirt body and sleeves) Q 13cm (5in) square of blue fabric (legs/pants) Q 13 x 16cm (5 x 7in) black fabric (shoes) Q 28 x 34cm (12 x 14in) yellow linen (underscarf) Q 26 x 68cm (101⁄4 x 27in) print fabric – see Note (hijab/scarf) Q 46 x 48cm (18 x 19in) salmon linen (dress) Q Stranded embroidery cotton in black Q Four press studs (dress and underscarf closures) Q Fibre fill Q Machinesewing threads to match and contrast with the fabrics Q Turning tool such as a chopstick Q Paper and cardboard for patterns Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, French knot, ladder stitch or whipstitch, straight stitch Finished size: 33cm (13in) tall Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. The doll is made using Allison’s layered method 84

Homespun

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


where the front and back panels are constructed from joined fabric blocks onto which the shapes are traced and stitched, then cut out afterwards. Fabrics should be woven, mediumweight for the doll, underscarf

and dress. Chiffon, gauze/muslin or satin are suitable for the hijab. When she made this doll, the only fabrics that Allison purchased new were those for the skin and hair/shoes – all the rest were upcycled from

women’s clothing. The hair and shoe fabrics are listed separately so you can vary their colours if you wish – Allison used the same black fabric for both. Seam allowances are 5mm (1⁄4in) unless otherwise stated.

• One rectangle, 10.5 x 12cm (41⁄8 x 43⁄4in) (underscarf front) • One strip, 6 x 18cm (21⁄4 x 7in) (underscarf strap). Trace the body/legs, arm, dress, neck facing and underscarf templates from the Pattern Sheet onto paper, including the markings, and label them. Glue the paper to cardboard and cut the shapes out carefully on the lines.

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Doll assembly

8 Step 8

Steps 9-10

Preparation and cutting

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From the black fabric for the hair, cut: • One rectangle, 9 x 11cm (31⁄2 x 41⁄4in) (head back) • One rectangle, 7 x 11cm (23⁄4 x 41⁄4in) (hair fringe) • Three strips, 3 x 36cm (11⁄8 x 14in). From the skintone fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 9 x 11cm (31⁄2 x 41⁄4in) (face) • Two rectangles, 6 x 10cm (21⁄4 x 4in) (hands). From the green fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 11 x 11.5cm (41⁄4 x 41⁄2in) (shirt) • Two rectangles, 10 x 12.5cm (4 x 5in) (arms/sleeves). From the blue fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 11 x 11.5cm (41⁄4 x 41⁄2in) (legs/pants). From the black fabric for the shoes, cut: • Two rectangles, 7 x 11cm (23⁄4 x 41⁄4in) (shoes). From the yellow linen, cut: • Two rectangles, 13 x 15cm (5 x 6in) (underscarf back)

2

With right sides together, join the rectangles for the back of the doll on their 11cm (41⁄4in) edges in the following order: head back, shirt, legs, shoes. Press all the seams open. With right sides together, join the rectangles for the front of the doll on their 11cm (41⁄4in) edges in the following order: face, shirt, legs, shoes. Press the seams open. Fold under 5mm/¼in on one long edge of the hair fringe and press. Using the doll template as a guide to placement, position the hair fringe rectangle over the front of the face section of the doll front with the hemmed edge over the face. Top stitch across the folded edge in matching thread to secure it in place. Match the doll front and back panels, right sides together, checking that the seams match at the neck, hips and ankles. Pin them together. Position the doll shape on the wrong side of the front panel with the neck and leg seams aligned. Trace around the edge of the template, marking the armholes and opening at the top of the head. Using a shorter than usual straight stitch, machine stitch on the traced line, reversing at each of the openings so the stitching doesn’t unravel as you turn and stuff the doll.

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Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www. homespun.net.au/homespunpatterns and print them out.

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Trim the fabric by eye 5mm/¼in outside the stitching, but leave slightly wider allowances at the openings. Clip the inner curves between the legs, where the shirt meets the legs on the outer edge and at the neck. Clip along the outer curves of the head as well to prevent the head puckering when it’s Step 13 (back view) stuffed. Turn the doll body right side out, using the chopstick to push out all the seams gently. Turn in the allowances at all the openings along the traced lines and press the doll flat with a warm iron. Join the two sets of hand/ sleeve rectangles on their 10cm (4in) sides and press the seams open.

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Steps 15-17 Homespun

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Fold the joined panels in half, long edges matching and seams aligned. Trace around the arm template on each one, matching the wrist line to the hand seam. Stitch on the traced line of the two arms, leaving the short ends open for turning and stuffing. Trim the fabric by eye 1⁄4in outside the stitching and clip the inner curve at the thumb carefully. Turn the arms right side out with a chopstick, push the seams out gently and press them flat. Stuff the doll from the feet up. Insert very tiny pieces to fill out the ends of the feet and fill the remainder of the legs with small pieces of stuffing. Leave the top 5mm (1⁄4in) of the legs unfilled so they can bend, then continue to stuff the doll’s body well using slightly larger tufts of filling, stopping at the arms and neck area. After stuffing the arms with small pieces of filling to the fill lines, insert the open ends of the arms into the armholes at an angle. Make sure both thumbs are pointing downwards. Secure the arms to the body by hand sewing around the armhole with ladder stitch or whipstitch. Continue to stuff the upper body more firmly and continue through the neck and up into the head. Before stitching the head closed, use a couple of pins to mark the eye placement. Thread a needle with six strands of black thread, knot the end, insert it through the opening of the head and emerge at an eye position. Make a French knot at each eye position and bury the thread securely inside the head. Finish stuffing the head and stitch it closed invisibly with ladder stitch. Fold each hair strip in half, right sides together and long edges matching. Stitch across one short end and down the length, leaving the other end open. Turn the tubes right side out and press them flat.

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Step 26

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Steps 31 and 33

ALLISON’S TUBE TURNING TIPS My favourite turning tool is a simple wooden chopstick. I like the round ones with flat ends and also use them as stuffing tools. When I have narrow tubes to turn, such as this doll’s hair strips, I use sturdy drinking straws. Push a straw into the open end of the tube all the way to the end. Push the stitched end of the fabric into the straw with the flat end of the wooden chopstick. Keep pulling the tube down over the chopstick as the tube is turned right side out. With larger tubes, such as the doll’s arms, it’s easy to just use the chopstick to poke into the arm and turn the whole thing right side out.

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Push the open ends inside the tubes to neaten them and stitch the ends closed by hand. Fold one finished strip in half and cut it into two equal lengths. Fold another strip in half and enclose the cut end of one half strip inside the fold of the long strip. Stitch about 3mm (1⁄8in) from the fold to join the strips into one pigtail. Make the second pigtail the same way. Sew a pigtail to each side seam of the doll’s head by hand under where the ears would be to resemble Allison’s doll or higher on the head if you prefer – they can also be plaited or left free.

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Dressing the doll

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For the yellow underscarf, fold the 10.5 x 12cm (41⁄8 x 3 4 ⁄4in) rectangle in half to measure 5.25 x 12cm (21⁄16 x 43⁄4in) and press the fold – this will be the front. With right sides together, match the two 13 x 15cm (5 x 6in) rectangles and, using the template as a guide, slip the folded front piece between the layers so the long raw edges are matching. Pin. Position the underscarf template over the stacked fabrics with the line matching the fold of the fabric between the layers. Trace around the entire underscarf template. Stitch on the traced line, leaving the bottom edge open for turning. Clip the inner curves at the neck carefully and cut the shape out by eye 1⁄4in outside the stitching. Turn the underscarf right side out so the two back pieces are together and the front piece is separate, forming a cap to go over the doll’s head. To make it a closer fit, sew darts in the back as indicated on the pattern. For the neck strap, fold the short ends of the 6 x 18cm (21⁄4 x 7in) strip under by 5mm/¼in and press. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. Open the strip and press the long raw edges in to the centre.

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Underscarf and face

Steps 32-33

Dress assembly

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Trim the bottom of the underscarf so that the neck strap strip fits over the bottom, covering it just up to the darts. Stitch all the way around the open ends and edge of the strap. Fit the underscarf on the doll’s head to determine the press-stud placement. Stitch the two halves of a press stud in place to fasten the strap snugly around the doll’s neck. For the hijab, finish the raw edges as desired. Allison suggests making a hand-rolled hem, using a rolled-hem presser foot on your machine if you have one or just pressing under a narrow doublefold hem and stitching it by hand or machine. With right sides together, fold the 46 x 48cm (18 x 19in) dress fabric in half to measure 23 x 48cm (9 x 19in). Place the dress template on the folded fabric with the centre front of the dress on the fold. Trace around the template and cut the shape out on the traced line. (The seam allowance is included in this pattern.) Trace the neck facing shape on one thickness of the remaining fabric and cut it out. Turn under a 4mm (scant 1⁄4in) double-fold hem at the ends of the sleeves and sew them in place by machine with matching thread. With right sides together, place the neck facing on the neck opening of the dress with the raw edges aligned. Sew around the neck hole with a 4mm (scant 1⁄4in) seam allowance. Clip the curves,

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36 Back view

ALLISON’S HIJAB WEARING TIPS The internet has opened my eyes to how a simple scarf can be worn most elegantly, and Muslim teens and women have posted lots of hijab-wearing videos. I recommend searching for ‘how to wear a hijab’ and watching a few of the videos to find looks you like so you can style your doll’s headwear fashionably.

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turn the facing to the inside and press the seam flat. Turn the back edges of the dress and facing under by 4mm (scant 1⁄4in) and repeat to make a double-fold hem. Machine stitch these edges in place. If desired, top stitch 5mm/¼in from the edge of the neckline to help the facing to sit flat. With right sides together, fold the dress so the side and sleeve seams are aligned and pin. Sew from the sleeve hems to the bottom edge of the dress at both sides. Neaten these seams with zigzag stitching or a second row of straight stitch to prevent them fraying. Clip the seam allowance carefully at the underarm. The back of the dress is bias cut and stretchy, so put the dress on the doll and check that the bottom edges of the dress are level at the back and front – trim if necessary. Hem the bottom of the dress as described in Step 37. Fit the dress on the doll with the opening overlapping at the back. Use pins to mark the placement of three press studs about 5cm (2in) apart, starting at the back neck. Sew the press studs in place by hand. To finish, put the dress on the doll again and do up the press studs. Fit the underscarf to the head and fasten the neck strap. Finally, wrap the hijab around the head and neck and tie it in place elegantly.

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For contact details for Allison Dey Malacaria, of SweaterDoll, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.


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Getting to know … ALLISON DEY MALACARIA How would you describe your particular craft style? I tend to design for an openended simplicity and a make-do attitude. My aim is to create a base from which the maker can create something uniquely her style and/or personalise it for the recipient. And because I’m not always a perfect stitcher, I try to make sure the styles lend themselves to not needing to be ‘department-store perfect’, of having a bit of a hands-on, non-factory quality and including the possibility of reusing fabulous old clothes or retro linens. Did your distinctive style happen over time or was it immediate when you started stitching? The craft of my childhood and early adulthood was rooted in folk art, early American pioneer utility, and Depression-era thrift. These flowed easily into the hippie movement, when handcraft was revived as a valuable skill. As women moved into the work force en masse, I was still playing with needle and thread, as much as a rebellion to forced ‘liberation’ from the home as a love of hand stitchery. A simple quilt was infused with a hidden family story; so too a faceless calico doll with a dress patched together from colourful feedsacks. In a world handing us scripted stories through advertising, a handcrafted item promised nothing yet inspired a story through its very lack of pre-packaged description. I very much

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treasured this capacity of craft to tease out the story, and I believe that influenced me from the start. Are you good at all the crafts you have tried? Knitting and I are no longer on speaking terms, and I am standing my ground waiting for an apology and a conciliatory bouquet of flowers from my needles. What sorts of crafts do you avoid like the plague? I am fairly hopeless at anything involving machines, and that includes using the zigzag stitch on my 1959 Singer. Nothing would make me happier than to look forward to overlockers and free-motion embroidery, but I still can’t sew a straight line without forming a bird’s nest, and most of what I sew on a machine looks like a spider’s catch of the day, a tangled mummy of destroyed threads and fabric. I’m also not very good at clothing and alterations. Other than crafting, how do you like to spend your free time? Books and tea. Dystopian science fiction. Steampunk adventures. Middle-aged chick lit. I read every night before bed, sometimes instead of sleeping at all. I move house a lot, and when I land in a new location, the first thing I do is go get a library card from the closest library. Is your stitching a great diversion from tasks you’d prefer to avoid (eg: housework)? For me, it’s actually the other way around. Because I often use limited supplies, such as upcycled clothing or found objects, I have to have a clear plan before cutting and sewing. Since I am often making something I’ve never made before, I do a lot of figuring out in my head before constructing. I do laundry, make another cup of tea, wash the dishes and engineer projects in my head at the same time. If the good fairy granted you three wishes, what would you want them to be? (1) Good health for loved ones who are having chronic troubles. (2) An end to politics as a driving force of suffering in our world. (3) A little cabin for me and Mr. True Love and a home business that takes care of our simple needs. Of all the designs you have created, which has been your favourite? One of my favourite designs was an appliquéd wall quilt for my young son when he was two. It was a little house on a hill under a night sky. The house

had a yellow window to show the warmth glowing inside, and the door was sewn on just one side so it stayed closed, but if you pulled it back to ‘open’ it, there was a little embroidered boy standing there. And which has been most popular with the public or gift recipient? My free tutorial for an Amish puzzle ball is downloaded constantly. It’s not my design, but I learned to make them from the Missouri Mennonite women and have shared that knowledge. My second most popular download is a project I was asked to design in honour of William Morris, who co-founded the Arts and Crafts movement of the late 19th century. I created a wool felt pincushion that looks like his famous sunflower design. Are you happy with the space you work in – what are its limitations and benefits? We move house a lot, caretaking and sharing in others’ homes, so my studio always has to be in our bedroom, which is sometimes quite small. The limitations were frustrating until I asked myself: How can I devise a studio for the fatally nomadic? Now my studio system is compact and easily transported to a new location and used immediately. The main storage issue involves the found objects I use in fibre-art explorations for my 52 Week Sewing Cabinet of Curiosities blog challenge. I give away most of what I make, which makes me look terribly generous, but it’s the necessity of not having storage space. Have you got a stitching dream or goal? Beyond creating a viable business that takes us into our rocking-chair years, I’d really love to be able to create a body of work for a gallery exhibition. I love unusual fibre-art collections, like crochet used to create an entire city or unbelievably intricate weaving using unusual objects within the threads. I’ve been trying stitchery in porcelain teacups and old book covers and other media. It’s been quite the learning curve using simple power tools alongside needles and thread. What makes you laugh out loud? Mr True Love. He’s the only comedy show I need. I was never one to burst out laughing but, with him, I laugh so hard I cry. He has a unique gift for seeing the humour in the most mundane things. I’m too serious, and he helps me lighten up a bit.

ALLISON’S DOLL STUFFING TIPS

around the stuffing. All my dolls, even

Non-GMO corn fibre fill is most like

the pattern tests, are stuffed with clean

polyester filling – light and bouncy and

Do the rounded edges pucker? Mist the fabric with filtered or distilled water before stuffing the shape, fill it well and let the fabric dry and tighten

carded wool fleece. Polyester fibre fill

completely washable. I source my wool

is listed in the US Toxic Substances

fleece from www.morningstarcrafts.com

Control Act due to its toxicity when

and my corn filling from Eco Filling

fibres are ingested or inhaled.

Australia: www.ecofilling.com.

Homespun


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BACK TO THE FUTURE

This may be a Drunkard’s Path quilt but Jemima Flendt was clearly in control of her faculties when she created this intoxicatingly beautiful design. It is (tee)totally gorgeous!

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Homespun

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Materials Q 50cm (5⁄8yd) each of six light print fabrics – see Note (blocks) Q 16 fat quarters of assorted print fabrics – Jemima used two each of navy, aqua, green, mint, coral, cerise, light pink and beige (blocks) Q 50cm (5⁄8yd) aqua print fabric (binding) Q 1.4m (11⁄2yd) extra-wide backing fabric Q Batting at least 220 x 140cm (86 x 55in) Q Matilda’s Own Drunkard’s Path 41⁄4in templates or freezer paper to make your own – see Note Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1⁄4in and walking feet Q General sewing supplies Finished block size: 8in Finished quilt size: 203 x 122cm (80 x 48in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide and backing fabric 2.75m3m (108-118in) wide. A seam allowance of 1⁄4in is used throughout. Jemima’s light print fabrics include black and white text prints and white with black/ gold spot prints. Jemima used Matilda’s Own templates to make her quilt, which enabled her to rotary cut the patches easily, but you could also use the shapes provided on the Pattern Sheet to make your own templates and use scissors to cut the curves. 94

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JEMIMA’S PROJECT TIP One of the first quilts I ever made was a Drunkard’s Path. This block has always been one of my favourites. I originally made it by cutting out fabric circles and top stitching them to squares of background fabrics, cutting them into quarters and then rotating them. Using acrylic templates to cut the pieces helps to make the job easy. This quilt is a modern take on a very traditional block.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Windmill block

Step 7 (wrong side)

Step 7 (right side)

Preparation and cutting

‘arc’ template to crosscut 20 arc shapes from each fabric (Diamond blocks). If you rotate the templates between each cut, you’ll have less fabric wastage. From each of the 16 assorted print fabrics, cut: • Two strips, 41⁄4in across the 21in width of the fat quarter and crosscut eight quarter-circle pie shapes from each fabric (Diamond blocks) • Two strips, 43⁄4in across the 21in width of the fat quarter and crosscut eight arc shapes from each fabric (Windmill blocks). From the aqua print fabric, cut: • Seven strips, 21⁄4in across the width of the fabric (binding).

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1

If you are making your own templates, trace the two shapes printed on the Pattern Sheet onto the matt size of the freezer paper and cut them accurately on the lines. To use them, fuse them lightly to the right size of the fabrics. To cut the straight edges, lay a quilter’s ruler on top of the template, with one of its edges exactly aligned with the edge of the template. Cut along the edge of the ruler. (This prevents your cutting the template and compromising the accuracy of the shape.) Use scissors to cut along the curved edge right next to the freezer paper. Gently peel the freezer paper off the fabric, and fuse it to the next fabric. You should be able to use each template five or six times before it loses its stickiness. Make more templates as needed. From each of the six light print fabrics, cut: • Two strips, 41⁄4in across the width of the fabric and use the quartercircle ‘pie’ template to crosscut 20 quarter-circle pie shapes from each fabric (Windmill blocks) • Two strips, 43⁄4in across the width of the fabric and use the

2

3

4

Block construction

5

There are two blocks in this quilt that we’ll call Windmill and Diamond and they alternate over the quilt. The Windmill blocks have four arcs in assorted print fabrics forming a cross shape in the middle while the Diamond blocks have four light print arcs forming a curved diamond shape in the centre.

41⁄2in

Construction of the blocks is the same – only the fabric placement and rotation differ. To make a Windmill block, you need four different coloured arc shapes and four light print quarter-circle pie shapes. Select one pie and one arc shape. Fold them in half along the curved edges and finger press a crease in the middle of them. With right sides together and raw edges level, match the centre creases and pin at the centre point. Match and pin both ends together as well. You’ll notice that the rest of the edges don’t lie nicely on top of each other as they do with a straight seam but don’t panic. Begin sewing at one end and gently ease the curves through the machine bit by bit, keeping the raw edges level at the edge of the 1 ⁄4in foot. Remove the pins as you go and use the ‘needle down’ function when you stop (if your machine has one) to realign the edges. Don’t stretch or pull the layers as you sew or the unit will become distorted. Press the seam towards the pie shape. Repeat Step 7 three times with the arcs and pies you selected.

7

8

41⁄2in

Diagram 1 Homespun

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Getting to know … JEMIMA FLENDT What were your feelings when you first started sewing? Sewing has always been a love of mine, ever since I was a young girl. I used to sew with the scraps from my nanna, and my mum was always sewing clothes for our family. I’ve grown up around sewing, and now am able to call it not only my hobby but also my business. Has your response to your craft changed since then? My love of sewing has grown

Today, I’m mostly working in the publication industry, designing and creating quilts and working with fabric manufacturers and designers. I am also working on my first book, which is the most exciting adventure and has always been one of my driving goals. You are also doing some crochet now, is that correct? I love crochet – it is such a relaxing craft, and I love making blankets and scarves for my friends and family. I just love the different colours and textures of yarn and I can always take it with me when I travel or am waiting for the girls at different activities. Have you loved to crochet since you were a child? My nanna taught me to crochet when I was about eight – I’d make large grannysquare blankets and, as soon as I finished one, I’d be well on my way to starting the next. I was ‘hooked’. It was only a few years ago that I picked it up again and have not stopped since, with sometimes having two or three crochet projects on the go at once. What do you wish for your creative future? I’d love to begin to travel with my craft – teaching in different states and countries and inspiring others to learn quilting or develop new skills. Working on my book is the greatest achievement in my quilting career to date, and I hope that this will just be the beginning of great things ahead.

Step 9 (wrong side)

Diamond block

Step 12 (wrong side)

Trim the arc sides of the block so it measures 41⁄2in square, as shown in Diagram 1. Arrange the four units in two rows of two so that the assorted fabric arcs form a cross-like shape around the centre. Join the units in each row and press the seams open. Then pin the two rows together with the seams matching at the centre and stitch. Press the seam open to complete one Windmill block. It should measure 81⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

10 11

13

9

96

so much since I was a young child. I had my mum take me to quilting classes when I was 16 and have never looked back since. It has gone from something I loved to do on the side to the main part of my day. What is it that keeps you creating? I’m very motivated to ‘quilt better’ – I always want to learn new skills and perfect my craft. I mostly love inspiring others to learn quilting and sewing and to create for themselves. Do you teach your skills? In my professional life, I was a secondary-school home-economics teacher and loved teaching sewing and crafting to my students. I now teach classes and workshops and run retreats in quilting and sewing as well as designing for many different publications here in Australia and internationally. I love people wanting to learn tips and techniques for their own projects. Did your Tied with a Ribbon business come before your blog or did your blogging kick start your business? I started my blog and business at the same time. I used my blog to launch my business, and while the direction has changed over the years, my love of quilting has only grown and now turned into my full-time occupation. How different is your stitching world now from, say, a year ago? A year ago, I was still very much making quilts as custom orders for clients.

Homespun

Repeat Steps 5-9 to make a total of 30 Windmill blocks, mixing the prints in each block. The Diamond blocks have four light print arc shapes and four assorted print quarter-circle pie shapes. Repeat Steps 6-7 to join the units. Arrange the four units with the corners of the light fabric arcs meeting in the centre, making a light curved diamond shape surrounded by coloured pies. Sew the units and rows together as described in Step 9 to complete one Diamond block.

12

Repeat Steps 11-12 to make a total of 30 Diamond blocks. At the end, there will be surplus coloured shapes left over. They are not used in this project.

Assembly

14

Referring to the main photograph, lay out the 60 blocks in 10 rows of six blocks, alternating the two blocks. In the first, third and every subsequent oddnumbered row, start the row with a Diamond block; in the second,


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Binding diagram 40cm (16in)

Rule a line along the 45-degree fold

Mitring corners

fourth and every subsequent evennumbered row, start the rows with a Windmill block. Rearrange the blocks as needed to achieve a pleasing mix of colours and prints, keeping the overall alternating pattern in place. When you’re happy with the layout, sew the blocks in each row together. Press all the seams open. Put the rows back in the layout as you go. Pin the rows together in turn, matching the seams, and sew them together. Press the seams open.

15 16

Finishing

17

Remove the selvedges and trim the backing fabric to measure 86 x 55in. The quilt top, backing fabric and batting are ready to take to a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth the backing fabric on the floor with right side down and secure it in place with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is free of wrinkles. After pressing the quilt top, lay it, right side

18

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up, on top of the batting and baste the three layers together with safety pins (for machine quilting) or thread (for hand quilting). Quilt as desired. Jemima machine quilted tramlines 1 ⁄4in either side of the straight seam lines using white Aurifil 50wt thread and a walking foot. Trim the excess backing fabric and batting 1⁄4in outside the edge of the quilt top. Join the aqua binding strips end to end with diagonal seams to make one length. Trim the seams to 1⁄4in and press them open. Fold the binding in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, sew the binding to the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams above for details. Turn the binding over and stitch the folded edge to the back of the quilt by hand. Label and date the quilt to finish.

19

20 21 22 23

Join the ends by matching the fold line and the drawn line and sewing them together. Trim the seam, press it open and refold the binding, then finish sewing it to the quilt.

JEMIMA’S CURVED PIECING TIPS • Pinning the curved seams of the pies and arcs is really important. Use fine patchwork pins to align the raw edges and help you to sew easily around the curves. • Sewing curved seams may seem daunting at first, but give it a go. Practise on a few blocks first to work out the required tension. • Let the sewing machine do the work as you ease around the curve. Use the ‘needle down’ function (if available) so that you can easily stop and realign the raw edges as needed. • Your curved seams should be gentle and smooth. You won’t need to snip the seam allowance as it will lie nice and flat after a good press.

For contact details for Jemima Flendt, of Tied with a Ribbon, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.


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Case study:

LUGGAGE TAGS

Modern travel is all rapid-fire bookings, tourist crushes and stress. But you can recapture the grand, leisurely, Orient Express spirit with Roslyn Mirrington’s handmade luggage tags. They’re not just decorative – they’re practical, too, with your contact details written on the back. Bon voyage!

100

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Homespun

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Materials To make one tag Q Three or four fabric scraps at least 14cm (51⁄2in) square (tag front, tag back and window surround) Q Scraps of tan and mustard wool felt (appliqué) Q 15cm (6in) square of heavyweight clear vinyl – Roslyn’s was sold by the metre as table covering (rear window) Q DMC Stranded Embroidery Cotton in Very Light Golden Olive (834), Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844) and Winter White (3865) Q 15cm (6in) square of lightweight fusible interfacing Q 15cm (6in) square of heavyweight fusible interfacing – Roslyn used Formfuse Q 15cm (6in) square of heavyweight fusible stabiliser – Roslyn used Pellon 71F Peltex – see Note Q Fusible web Q 5mm (1⁄4in) brass rivets Q 30cm (3⁄8yd) of 25mm (1in) wide linen ribbon Q Sewing awl Q Fabric glue pen Q Hera marker (optional) Q Adhesive tape Q Small fold-back clips Q Paper and cardboard for templates Q Embroidery needle 102

Homespun

Q Small embroidery hoop (optional Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in foot and edgestitch foot (optional) Q General sewing supplies

Suitcase

Stitches used: Backstitch, colonial knot, satin stitch, straight stitch, whipstitch Finished sizes: Suitcase tag 9.5 x 12cm (33⁄4 x 43⁄4in); carpetbag tag 10.5 x 10.5cm (41⁄8 x 41⁄8in); saddlebag tag 12 x 8.5cm (43⁄4 x 31⁄4in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics, apart from the felt, be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Both the heavyweight interfacing and stabiliser are very stiff and thin, resulting in flat, rigid tags. Thin bag batting is not a suitable substitute. All the embroidery is worked with two strands of thread. The construction method is common to all three tags – the design details are given separately in the Stitchery Guide. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun. net.au/homespun-patterns/ and print them out.

Carpetbag

Saddlebag

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Preparation and cutting

1

Trace the tag template and window template for your chosen tag from the Pattern Sheet onto paper. Glue the paper to cardboard and cut the shapes out carefully on the lines. Trace the appliqué shapes for your chosen tag onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving a little space between them. Cut the shapes out roughly and fuse each one to the wrong side of the selected felt – Roslyn recommends using a pressing cloth or appliqué mat to protect the felt. Cut the shapes out carefully on the lines. From the Formfuse heavyweight fusible interfacing, cut: • One tag template • One window template. From the Peltex heavyweight fusible stabiliser, cut: • One tag template. From the heavyweight clear vinyl, cut: • One rectangle, 4 x 51⁄2in. From the lightweight interfacing, cut: • One square, 51⁄2in for the carpetbag or saddlebag tag and one rectangle, 51⁄2 x 61⁄2in for the suitcase tag.

2

3

4 5 6

7

If you’re making the carpetbag or saddlebag tag, select the fabric for the front of your tag and trim it to measure 51⁄2in square. For the suitcase tag, choose two coordinating print fabrics and cut a rectangle, 31⁄2 x 51⁄2in, for the centre panel from one fabric and two rectangles, 2 x 51⁄2in for the side panels from the second fabric. Join the smaller rectangles to the long edges of the centre rectangle and press the seams open to yield a rectangle 51⁄2 x 61⁄2in. Use a pencil to lightly trace the stitchery design for your chosen tag from the Pattern Sheet onto the centre of the right side of the fabric for the tag front. Fuse the lightweight interfacing cut in Step 6 to the wrong side of the traced fabric. Peel the backing paper from the fusible-web on the back of the felt shapes and position them on the fabric for the front of the tag as indicated on the pattern, overlapping them where required. Fuse the felt shapes in place. Select two fabrics for the tag back and window surround and from each one, cut: • One square, 51⁄2in.

8 9

10

Tag front

11

Put the fabric in a small embroidery hoop if desired. Refer to the Stitchery Guide below for the colours and stitches to use for each tag design. When the embroidery and appliqué are complete, put the tag, right side down, on a thick towel and press it well. Using a pencil, draw a line on the wrong side of the tag front, 1 ⁄8in by eye outside the embroidered outline. With the embroidery still face down, position the Peltex heavyweight interfacing shape on the wrong side of the fabric using the pencil line as a placement guide. Fuse it in place. Trim the fabric 3⁄8in by eye outside the edge of the interfacing. Use the awl to pierce holes through all the layers for the rivets included in the design. Insert the rivets according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Fold the raw edges of the fabric to the back of the interfacing shape and glue them in place with the fabric glue pen. Clip the seam allowance around curves and trim the excess fabric from corners to ensure the folds are smooth.

12 13

14 15

STITCHERY GUIDE Suitcase tag

Carpetbag tag

Design area

Thread

Stitch

Outlines

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Backstitch

Handle hinges

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Satin stitch

Keyhole

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Colonial knot and straight stitch

Keyplate rivets

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Colonial knot

Felt appliqué

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Running stitch

Outline and all flowers

Winter White (3865)

Backstitch

Buckle outline

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Backstitch

Buckle filling

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Satin stitch

Strap holes

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Colonial knot

Felt appliqué

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Running stitch

Homespun

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STITCHERY GUIDE cont ... Design area

Thread

Stitch

Outlines

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Backstitch

Buckle outlines

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Backstitch

Buckle filling

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Satin stitch

Strap holes

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Colonial knot

Strap appliqué

Ultra Dark Beaver Grey (844)

Running stitch

Strap tab applique

Very Light Golden Olive (834)

Straight stitch

Saddlebag tag

Tag back

16

1

Place the two 5 ⁄2in fabric squares for the tag back and window surround right side down on the ironing board. With glue side down, centre the Formfuse interfacing tag shape on the wrong side of one of the squares and the Formfuse interfacing window surround shape on the wrong side

of the other square. Fuse the shapes in place. Trim the fabrics 1⁄4in by eye outside the interfacing shapes. Cut out the window from the centre of the window surround 1⁄4in inside the interfacing and clip the corners. Repeat Step 15 for the tag back and window surround. Fold the 12in length of linen ribbon in half and stitch the raw edges together. Glue the raw ends of the ribbon loop to the upper centre (wrong side) of the tag back shape about 1⁄4in in from the edge. Centre the window surround panel, wrong side down, on the vinyl rectangle and temporarily secure it with adhesive tape. The vinyl is purposely oversize and will be trimmed in the next step. Sew the window surround panel to the vinyl rectangle

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Suitcase back

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⁄8in from the inner edge of the window. Trim the vinyl to match the outer edge of the window surround panel. Top stitch the upper edge of the window surround panel and vinyl 1 ⁄8in from the edge. With right sides facing up, match side and bottom edges of the window panel to the tag back and hold them in place with small fold-back clips. Top stitch 1⁄8in from the edge all the way around the tag back with matching thread, securing the ribbon in place as you stitch.

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Finishing

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Match the tag front and tag back, wrong sides together, and hold them in place with small fold-back clips. Using a needle and matching thread, whipstitch the front and back edges together by hand all the way around.

ROSLYN’S STITCHING TIP I used my edge-stitch foot

centre blade to the needle and adjust the needle position as needed.

to stitch 1⁄8in from the edge of the window panel by moving the needle three positions to the left. The needle positioning might vary on different machines, so measure from the

ROSLYN’S WINDOW PANEL TIP Use fold-back clips to hold the vinyl window panel to the tag back, rather than pins, which would permanently perforate the window.


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Getting to know … ROSLYN MIRRINGTON How would you describe your particular craft style? It’s always difficult to step back from your own work and objectively define your style. I guess mine is structured, detailed and practical, and usually incorporates flowers in some form. Did your distinctive style happen over time or was it immediate when you started stitching? I feel that my style evolves constantly as I learn new techniques. I become bored quite quickly, so I’m always on the search for new or more efficient ways of making things. As I learn more, my style becomes more structured and detailed. Are you good at all the crafts you’ve tried? Not at all. Many a project languishes at the back of the cupboard because I wasn’t happy with my execution. Most of them are clothes I’ve sewn that just don’t fit. My dressmaking-trained mother often rescues them. Pattern alteration is a skill I’m yet to acquire. What sorts of crafts do you avoid like the plague? Christmas craft, especially

ROSLYN’S FOLDING TIP Use a Hera marker (or a blunt knife) and a ruler to score the fabrics around the interfacing shapes for crisp, straight folds.

anything red and green. My apologies to all the Christmas crafters! It’s just not my thing. I guess I’m not willing to invest time in projects that are only used for a few weeks each year. It’s that practicality trait rearing its ugly head again. Other than crafting, how do you like to spend your time? I can lose myself for hours in my garden. Gardening is never a labour for me; it is pure pleasure. I have always found innate satisfaction in nurturing a plant through its cycle of growing, blooming and seeding down, ready for another generation. Is your stitching a great diversion from tasks you’d prefer to avoid (eg: housework)? I find it difficult to enjoy my stitching if the house is a mess. Having said that, the housework is endless, so I try to put aside some time each day, even if it’s just 15 minutes, to sew something. If the good fairy granted you three wishes, what would you want them to be? I have but one wish just now – for good health for my family. It is an obvious desire for most of us, but the last few years have been difficult for our family. If you and those around you are blessed with good health, then other good things follow, including more time to sew. Do you listen to music or watch television while you sew? I like to have the TV on in the background. I’m drawn to British dramas, in particular, especially anything with Richard Armitage or Rupert Penry-Jones. In the summer, the tennis and cricket are on constant rotation. And in winter, it’s AFL and netball. Do you like haby shopping alone or with friends? I’m happy either way, but I do get distracted if I’m with friends and tend to buy things that I’d not otherwise have bought. Friends lead me astray! What are your top five fave craft blogs? I can’t and don’t really want to answer this question. I have made too many friends through blogging and I don’t want to offend any of them if they are not listed in my top five.

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Make a paper label to go inside the window of your tag and slide it inside. To attach the tag to a bag, put the ribbon loop through the handle, open it and pass the tag through the loop. Pull the tag to tighten the knot. For contact details for Roslyn Mirrington, of Bloom, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

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Carpetbag back

Saddlebag back


Blessington Quilt Challenge inspired by the theme…

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JEC

PRO

09

ALL EARS! Have you heard about the sweet white bunny that stole the heart of Amy Sinibaldi? So adorable were his fine whiskers, twitchy little nose, chubby cheeks and proud rabbity ears that this top designer chose to set his image in stitches, drawing comfort from him as a squishy cushion.

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09

Materials Q 50cm (1⁄2yd) solid cream fabric (cushion front and lining) Q Large scraps of five assorted print fabrics (patchwork panel) Q Fat quarter solid grey fabric (bunny ears) 110

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Q Strip of dark pink print fabric (contrast strip) – see Step 3 Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) beige spot print fabric (cushion back and back opening trim) Q 20cm (1⁄4yd) light pink print fabric (binding)

Q Fabric scraps in white, black and pink (face appliqué) Q Machine threads to match the appliqué fabrics Q Perlé 5 cotton in black, white and light brown Q Fusible web

Q 45cm (18in) square of cotton batting Q Paper Q Quilt-basting spray (optional) Q 40cm (16in) square cushion insert Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in and walking feet Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Running stitch, satin stitch, stem stitch

Finished size: 42cm (161⁄2in) square Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements

are based on fabrics 107cm (42in) wide. The appliqué method described is raw-edge fusible-web machine appliqué but you can adapt the instructions to your preferred method. A scant 1⁄4in seam allowance is used throughout,

unless otherwise specified. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www. homespun.net.au/homespunpatterns/ and print them out.

the patchwork panel. The panel should now measure 7 x 161⁄2in, raw edge to raw edge. Lay the 17in square of solid cream fabric, right side down, on the table. Spray baste the square of cotton batting to the wrong side of the fabric (or use your preferred basting method). Spray baste the 101⁄4 x 161⁄2in rectangle of solid cream fabric and position it, right side up, on the upper half of the batting. You need to ensure that this cream fabric is centred between the left and right edges of the lining and batting and that its top edge lies slightly below the top edge of the lining rectangle that’s on the bottom layer. Quilt the upper part of the cushion front as desired. Amy machine quilted a diagonal crosshatch pattern at 4cm (11⁄2in) intervals. Peel the backing paper from the face appliqué shapes you prepared in Steps 8 and 9. Begin forming the bunny face by centring the white nose shape along the bottom edge of the cream rectangle, raw edges level. Fuse it in place. Aligning the straight edges with the same edge of the fabric, position the pink cheek shapes about 15mm (5⁄8in) on either side of the nose and fuse them in place. Then fuse the eyes above the nose and cheeks, as shown in the photograph. Using threads to match the appliqué fabrics, machine stitch close to the edges of all the shapes to secure them in place. With right sides together and long edges matching, lay the dark pink strip at the top of the patchwork panel on the cream rectangle and stitch. Fold the patchwork panel down over

13

Bunny face details

Preparation and cutting

1

From the solid cream fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 101⁄4 x 161⁄2in (cushion front appliqué background) • One square, 17in (cushion front lining). From the assorted print fabrics, cut: • A total of 24 squares, 21⁄2in (patchwork panel). From the dark pink print fabric, cut: • One strip, 1 x 161⁄2in (contrast strip). From the beige spot print fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 101⁄2 x 161⁄2in (cushion back) • Two strips, 13⁄4 x 161⁄2in (binding for back opening). From the pale pink print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding). Trace the large outer ear shape from the Pattern Sheet onto paper, label it and cut it out on the line. Fold the solid grey fabric in half, right sides together, and trace the large ear shape twice on the doubled fabric, leaving at least 1⁄2in between

2

3 4 5

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the shapes. Pin the layers together inside the shapes. Trace the inner ear, nose, eye and cheek shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving about 1 ⁄2in between the shapes. You need to trace two of every shape except the nose. Cut the shapes out roughly and fuse them, glue side down, on the wrong side of the white, black and pink fabrics for the appliqué. Cut the shapes out accurately on the lines.

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Cushion front

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Arrange the 24 assorted squares in three rows of eight, mixing the prints in a pleasing way. When you’re happy with the layout, sew the squares in each row together. Press the seams of the centre row in the opposite direction to the seams of the top and bottom rows. Join the rows, nesting the seams so they match perfectly. Press. The patchwork panel should measure 61⁄2 x 161⁄2in, raw edge to raw edge. Sew the 1 x 161⁄2in strip of dark pink fabric to one long edge of

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the cream rectangle, stopping 9cm (31⁄2in) from the top edge. Create highlights in the eyes by working oval shapes in satin stitch using white thread. To form the whiskers, cut four 20cm (8in) lengths of black thread. From the front, use a needle to take a thread into the nose and knot it on both the front and back of the fabric to anchor it in place. Repeat this step to attach two whiskers at each side of the nose, positioning them in mirror image to each other. Trim them to the desired length – 5-7cm (2-21⁄2in). For the outer ears, sew on the lines you traced in Step 8, leaving the straight ends open and reversing at the start and finish. Cut the ears out a scant 1⁄4in by eye outside the stitching and along the line on the straight bottom edge. Turn the ears right side out, easing out the points and curves. Press the ears flat. Fuse the inner ear shapes to one side of each outer ear, centring them on the straight raw edges; don’t sew around them yet. Referring to Diagram 1, position the ears on the cushion front at the top of the running-stitch line, angled down slightly at the outer edges. The tip of the white inner ear should be at least 1⁄4in below the top edge of the cushion. Slide them down 1⁄4in and then flip them over so the inner ears are facing the cushion front and the

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Bunny ear details

the rest of the batting/lining squares and press the seam. Quilt the patchwork panel as desired. Amy machine quilted parallel horizontal lines at about 25mm (1in) intervals. Trim the cushion front to measure 161⁄2in square with the nose centred between the left and right edges.

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Diagram 1

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To add the details to the face, use light brown thread to stem stitch a Y shape on the centre of the nose. Work a line of stem stitch in black thread on the cream fabric around the curved edge of the nose to give it extra definition and use the same colour to stitch a vertical line of running stitch up the centre of

25


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AMY SINIBALDI Where do you live and work? I currently live in southern California, in a tiny little house really close to the ocean. And my family is quite big, so I work all over the house. In my room, I have a desk, but I mostly work on my laptop in bed. Downstairs in the finished garage is where I do all my sewing. It is so not glamorous, but I have shelves and shelves and tables and stations and I don’t have to put anything away, so it works just fine. What’s your family structure? I have four kids and a very, very supportive husband – so supportive, he learned to cook this past year while I was working day and night.

tips of the ears are pointing downwards. Stitch across the end of the ears, reversing at the start and end of each line. Then press the ears upwards to their previous position and sew across them again a generous 1⁄4in above the fold to enclose the raw edges. Machine stitch just inside the edges of the inner ears through all layers; these stitches not only appliqué the inner ears in place, they will also keep the outer ears from flopping down over the bunny’s face. Finish by working a line of running stitch in black thread around the curved edge of each inner ear just outside the edge of the fabric.

26

and wrong sides together, and press. With right sides together and raw edges level, sew a binding strip to one long edge of each spot print rectangle. Turn the folded edges over to the back and sew them in place – Amy machine stitched her binding. Pin the ears down over the cushion front to keep

28

Assembly

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Fold the 13⁄4 x 161⁄2in spot print binding strips you cut in Step 2 in half, long edges matching

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Diagram 2

I’m looking at colour combinations and patterns every moment of every day. What are your favourite materials to work with? I love cotton and linen, and I’d love to work more with wool but I haven’t found a good source as yet. Do you ever see yourself stopping or diversifying? I definitely feel like my style is changing – has been changing for some time. I’d like to think that it will be changing always, because if it’s not, it means I’m not growing or learning. And stopping all this designing and sewing stuff ? Heck no!! Never. Do you teach your skills to others? I have been offered the chance to do some workshops but I haven’t had time to do that yet. I’d really like to do it in future, because then I’ll be able to connect more with people, rather than just ‘talking’ with them online. How would you describe your style? What makes it unique? I don’t think that I have my ‘signature’ style just yet, but I’m having a whole lot of fun getting there. Trying new things, experimenting, learning and making plenty of mistakes. Any embarrassing botch-ups along the way? I don’t know about embarrassing, but I botch things up all the time. When I first began sewing, I made really ugly little girl aprons. It was so much fun, but they were really not quite the aesthetic I truly like … they had lots of big buttons and whatnot. What is your advice for beginners? My advice for beginners is most definitely simply to begin – to not let fear get in the way of starting, because fear can keep a person from doing the most wonderful things.

them out of the way as the cushion is constructed. Referring to Diagram 2, place the cushion front, right side down on the table. Lay the backing rectangles on top, right side up, with the outer raw edges level and the bound edges overlapping across the middle. Machine baste about 1⁄8in from the edges through all layers.

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Portrait photograph: Maja A. Fowler

Getting to know …

Why this particular craft? Sewing patchwork projects is my fave because of the endless possibilities each and every time you cut into your chosen fabric. Have you tried plenty of others? I like to make jewellery and do paper crafts. I’m dying to work with yarn but I haven’t learned yet. If you weren’t doing this, what would occupy your time? I’m pretty sure if I weren’t sewing and designing I’d be writing books or decorating homes. Who taught you your crafting skills? I definitely did not learn sewing or crafting from my mum. She taught me how to sew a button, but that was the extent of my sewing lessons. I taught myself. I look at most things with an engineer’s eye and try to make sense of it on my own. I love learning tips and tricks from my friends, though. Those ‘aha’ moments are the best. What does this craft mean to you? Sewing is an outlet, it’s a passion, it’s my job, it’s problem solving. It works both parts of my brain, and I love that a tangible thing of beauty is the end result. Is it hard to find time to do your stitching or is this a profession? I suppose this is my profession. I’m sewing less and designing more these days, but the two feed into each other. Do you think of your craft as passion or a spare-time-filler? I think of it as a passion. I could do it from sunrise to sunset with or without a pay cheque. From where do you draw inspiration? I draw my inspiration from absolutely everywhere. Like most designers, my ‘eye’ is always on the lookout. Always. I find that


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30 AMY’S BINDING TIP For a machine-finished binding with the look of a hand-stitched one, here’s my trick. Attach the binding to the front in the usual way. Fold the binding to the back and glue baste it in place, making sure it covers the previous seam line by at least 1⁄8in. Now turn the piece to the front and stitch in the ditch between the binding and cushion cover front. It will catch the binding folded over to the back but from the front, it will look like your cushion was bound by hand.

AMY’S EAR TIP As another option, you might like to lightly – very lightly – stuff the bunny’s ears with fibre fill for a cute look.

AMY’S APPLIQUÉ TIP If you prefer needleturn appliqué, add 1⁄4in to all the bunny face shapes and appliqué them using that method instead of doing rawedge machine appliqué as shown here.

Join the 21⁄2in binding strips, end to end, with a diagonal seam, trim it to 1⁄4in and press it open. Fold the binding strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching and press. With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the cushion front, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 98 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch it to the back of the cushion. Refer to Amy’s Binding Tip for her machine-stitched method, or hand stitch it in place in the usual way. Unpin the ears and press them upwards again. Push the cushion insert into the cover through the back opening, making sure it goes right into the corners, and enjoy!

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CK BLOTHE OF NTH MO

PART 5

FOXLEY VILLAGE Congratulations! You’ve reached the half-way mark in our 10-part block of the month project. This issue, we turn your attention to one of the finest focal points of Natalie Bird’s glorious design – the trio of tall terrace houses, complete with Tilda floral facades and giant garden tools.

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MY MISTAKES – AND HOW I LEA TO AVOID THEMRNT ! By Na atta allie ie Bir ird  I ha hav ave ve al allw way ays ys le le ea ar arn rnt nt best by jumpi ng in and ha h av viin ng g a go go o.. I’m I’m ’m de defi fi fin niiittte n ely a hands-on le arner. I mak ak ke e pl ple len en ntty ty of of missta take kes, and I have di sc that th overed at iitt iiss b be esstt wh he en e nIe em mbrace them, ra th tth er ha an na av vo oiid o id tth he h e em m.  With itth h qu qu uiilt iltts,  I have kept th s, es esp pe pe ec ci cia iall alllly y, I like them to loo e very first cloth ‘h han k and doll I made, dm mad ade e’ a e’ w an hich, at the time, nd n d rre efl e fle fle ec ctt tth he work and love I thought was so g es go th es iin at ntto n ooo to th them fabulous, but whi em. A qu quilt ilt do il doesn’t have to be ch was actually perf pe rrfe fec hi cttt,, a c de an ous. It nd n dIo reminds me of w offt ftte en mak en ake a conscious ch here I started an oice to llea ea e d how my ave e a ssm cr ma af allllll mis t is iist stta st al ak a w ke k ays growing and eo or an imperfect po improving. ec et int c.., ra ath ther er tth  Most of the tim ha h an a n re red do o iit. t e, when I’m wor  Designing is a king on something, I have trial-and-error pr a general idea of ocess. I’ve thrown many a pr what it will be, but sometim ototype into the es, it turns out to back of the cupboard, and so be something completely diffe me designs have rent. I love the tw certainly not seen the light is ts and turns, and that sometim of day. es a project take s on a life of its own and tells me what it wants to be.

tormenting paddocks, chasing farmers and Y AS NT of the FA acre HE all who trespass on their little work, at hard TALE OF FOXLEY are e gees world, our Foxley e for plac er bett VILLAGE – PART 5 a is ge villa the sure making ) rrow Spa h Zac ones (aka the gg Twi were By Zachary their presence. To wit: they get itectural Don’t you just hate it when you who suggested ringing the arch ed terraced of et stre a ing branded with a certain undeserv build by ges chan glue, usual reputation and it sticks to you like housing in the urban mix. Not the ? ents shm mpli s none their but it, adm I , tion no matter what your acco ribu goosy cont p of love of Well, Foxley Village has a little troo less. It all came about from their the torments not many creatures who suffer through the art. Geese are often art-lovers – are the y The . ping geese are ey’s Foxl But . of this sort of stereoty that know le peop etvery town’s flock of well-behaved, swe particularly avid, and one of their and g inkin al-th dd’’s t Wood’s Gran is s ting pain tempered, industrious, later sic favourite clas doesn’t generally obliging geese. And it s American Gothic. If you don’t 1930 eption caallll itely reca matter what they achieve, the perc recognise the name, you’ll defin than e mor ing nial colo ing -look remains that they are noth dour a – e the imag dling about heeirr t of their a whole bunch of feathers, wad couple holding a pitchfork in fron But ve. uutt but too, folk, ge villa are y wasting space and being aggressi farmhouse. The and far from faffing about in ponds

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re as our not of the same optimistic natu ring, -fea God and n ster are geese. They the while our feathered pals look on village cheerier side of life. Anyway, our pretty and et swe e som d este flock sugg te to four-storey terraces and, in tribu rake and Grant Wood, insisted on adding hfork. And pitc ol’ y scar a of ad inste el, shov them. for er bett the streetscape is all the you ld wou ing, visit re you’ So next time pliment spare a couple of minutes to com really y’d The e? gees our poor misjudged it. te apprecia w ow rrow aarrrow par p pa Spa Zaaach S Zac – Z


BL CK OF O MONTHE TH

A fairyt fairytale tale village, where rakes and shovels as tall as houses make perfect sense!

PART 5: Row of Houses Materials for Part 5 Q Tilda solid off white (481012) – Fabric Y Q Fabrics A, B, D, J, N, P, U, Biscuit and Smoke (Row of Houses) Q Fabrics A, B, C, F, G, M, N, S, W and X (piecing) Q DMC Stranded Embroidery Cotton in Dark Red (498), Very Dark Beaver Grey (645) and Dark Khaki Green (3011) Stitches used: Backstitch, chain stitch, satin stitch

Row of Houses

Note: Refer to the Fabric Key for the Tilda ‘Autumntree’ and ‘Sweetheart’ fabrics used in this project. The appliqué method used is needleturn, but you can adapt the instructions to your preferred method. Seam allowances of 1⁄4in are used throughout for the piecing. Two strands of embroidery thread are used throughout. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but you can download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net. au/homespun-patterns/ and print them out instead. Homespun

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Preparation and cutting

CK BLOTHE OF NTH MO

1 2 3

From the solid off-white fabric Y, cut: • One rectangle, 19 x 17in (appliqué background). From each of fabrics C and S, cut: • One strip, 21⁄2 x 161⁄2in (sashing). From each of fabrics A, B, F, G, M, N, W and X, cut: • One square, 21⁄2in (pieced strip).

NATALIE’S SATIN STITCH TIP When there’s a lot of satin stitch in an area, as there is with the leaves in this block, use fusible interfacing or stabiliser behind the fabric to help prevent the fabric from puckering. If you hold the fabric taut or put it in an embroidery hoop when working the satin stitch, this also helps keep the fabric flat.

appliqué all the shapes in place for the row of houses (except the vine flowers), starting with the ones that are overlaid by others. Also trace the design lines for the tools, vine and lettering on the background rectangle. Using Very Dark Beaver Grey (645), backstitch the rake tines and shovel handle. Backstitch the lettering in Dark Red (498). For the vine, use Dark Khaki Green (3011) to chain stitch the stem and work the leaves in satin stitch. Appliqué the five flowers over the vine, referring to Natalie’s Circle Tip. Trim the completed appliqué to measure 181⁄2in high by 1 16 ⁄2in wide with the design centred.

4

6 7 8

5

9 10

Appliqué and embroidery Using the photograph as a guide to the placement of fabrics listed in Materials above, trace the appliqué shapes from the design on the Pattern Sheet onto the right side of the fabrics with a blue water-erasable marker. Cut them out by eye a scant 1 ⁄4in outside the traced lines. Referring to the general appliqué instructions in Part 1, prepare the background rectangle and

Fabric Key: Tilda fabrics from the ‘Autumn Tree’ and ‘Sweetheart’ ranges used in this project

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A

B

C

D

E

F

Celia green (481042)

Celia slate blue (481043)

Thula blue lilac (481046)

Thula lilac (481048)

Floribunda green (481041)

Floribunda lilac (481047)

G

H

I

J

K

L

Forest slate blue (481044)

Forest green (481049)

Doilies green (481040)

Ilse lilac (481051)

Sewn Spot slate blue (481045)

Sewn Spot dove white (481050)

M

N

O

P

Q

R

Celia dove white (481000)

Celia light blue (481002)

Thula carmine red (481001)

Thula red pink (481007)

Floribunda dove white (481005)

Floribunda slate blue (481006)

S

T

U

V

W

X

Forest carmine red (481008)

Forest light blue (481010)

Ilse carmine red (481011)

Doilies light blue (481004)

Ilse light blue (481009)

Sewn Spot carmine red (481003)

Homespun


This Block of the Month project is being published over 10 issues of Homespun, from February to November 2016. The materials required to make the complete quilt appear in Part 1. Contact our subscriptions department to order a subscription or back issues, or log onto Zinio or the Apple/Google Play newsstands to get the issues digitally.

NATALIE’S CIRCLE TIP To make perfect appliquéd circles, trace the specified circle shape onto lightweight cardboard and cut it out. Cut the fabric shapes out with a generous 1⁄4in seam allowance. Work a row of running stitch around the edge of the fabric circle, centre the cardboard circle on the wrong side of it and pull up the gathers to draw the seam allowance around the cardboard to the back, as shown in Diagram 1. Press well from both sides, then remove the cardboard before appliquéing the circle in place as usual. Hourglass blocks

Assembly

11 12

Arrange the eight assorted 21⁄2in squares as desired and sew them together in a row. Sew the 21⁄2 x 161⁄2in S fabric strip to the bottom edge of the appliqué block. Next, join the row of squares from Step 11 to the bottom

edge. Then sew the C fabric strip to the bottom of that to complete Unit 5. It should measure 241⁄2in x 161⁄2in, raw edge to raw edge. For contact details for Natalie Bird, of The Birdhouse, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

Diagram 1

OUR FABRICS This quilt uses a large variety of print and solid fabrics selected by Natalie from the Tilda ‘Autumn Tree’, Tilda ‘Sweetheart’ and Kona ‘Solids’ ranges, distributed in Australia by Two Green Zebras.

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PROUDLY PRESENTS

FOXLEY VILLAGE 2016 NEW BLOCK OF THE MONTH CREATED BY NATALIE BIRD

Tilda fabric distributed by Two Green Zebras (02) 9553 7201 twogreenzebras.com


S TS AVAILABLE IN COMPLETE KIT CONTACT A STOCKIST CLOSEST TO YOU. OW!! LIMITED SUPPLIES. BOOK NOW

Stockists AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY Hobbysew Belconnen Belconnen Ph: (02) 6253 0011 belconnen@hobbysew.com.au www.hobbysew.com.au Motif By Hand Crace Ph: 0402 622 919 motifbyhand@gmail.com www.motifbyhand.com NEW SOUTH WALES Fabric Pixie Goonellabah Ph: 0415 826 994 deanne@fabricpixie.com.au www.fabricpixie.com.au Hobbysew Kings Park Kings Park Ph: (02) 9621 4000 kingspark@hobbysew.com www.hobbysew.com.au Hobbysew Top Ryde Top Ryde Ph: (02) 9877 5067 topryde@hobbysew.com www.hobbysew.com.au Lyn’s Fine Needlework Baulkham Hills Ph: (02) 9686 2325 sales@lynsfineneedlework.com.au www.lynsfineneedlework.com.au My Sewing Supplies Kirawee Ph: (02) 9542 3513 info@mysewingsupplies.com.au www.mysewingsupplies.com.au Nesting Needles Coffs Harbour Ph: 0400 055 989 lisa@nestingneedles.com.au www.nestingneedles.com.au Patchwork on Parker Cootamundra Ph: (02) 6942 1104 jock-commins@bigpond.com

Stitch Between The Bridges Tamworth Ph: (02) 6765 4138 stitchbtbtamworth@gmail.com Stitched n Framed Port Macquarie Ph: (02) 6581 3338 jenny@stitchednframed.com.au www.stitchednframed.com.au The Stitchers Cupboard Camden Ph: (02) 4655 8348 sales@thestitcherscupboard.com.au www.thestitcherscupboard.com.au Wild Cotton Fabric Miranda Ph: 0421 901 976, 0413 523 627 admin@wildcottonfabric.com.au

QUEENSLAND Country Quilt Co Ipswich Ph: (07) 3294 7000 www.countryquiltco.com.au Fabric Patch Cooribah Ph: (07) 5442 4613 janeene@fabricpatch.com.au www.fabricpatch.com.au Marci’s Quilting Service Kirwan Ph: (07) 4773 5481 mqs06@iinet.net.au Sew Patch n Quilt Gladstone Ph: (07) 4978 7772 info@sewpatchnquilt.com.au www.sewpatchnquilt.com.au Stitches From The Bush Goondiwindi ph: 0427 764 147 stitchesfromthebush@bigpond.com www.stitchesfromthebush.com.au The Patchwork Angel Forest Glen Ph: (07) 5477 0700 info@patchworkangel.com.au www.patchworkangel.com.au

Picton Patchwork & Quilting Picton Ph: (02) 4677 2802 troy@pictonpatchwork.com.au

The Quilters Angel Highfields Ph: (07) 4630 8062 info@quiltersangel.com.au www.quiltersangel.com.au

Post Office Patchwork Glenbrook Ph: (02) 4739 9555 popatchwork@eftel.net.au www.postofficepatchwork.net.au

The Quilters Shack Bundaberg Ph: (07) 4154 4486 ken_4_sue@hotmail.com www.patchwork&cupcakes.com

Rainbow Patchwork Lismore Ph: (02) 6622 3003 info@rainbowpatchwork.com.au www.rainbowpatchwork.com.au

WESTERN AUSTRALIA Care 2 Create Woodvale Ph: 0412 534 379 care2create@bigpond.com re2cr ate.com are2 www.care2cre

World S Kraft Daze Sewing n gton dington Maddin 9 7843 59 Ph: (08) 9459 net au iinett.net.au kraftdaze@iine www.kraftdaze.com.au TASMANIA Chez Moi French Style Hobart Ph: (03) 6231 3321 chezmoifrenchstyle@gmail.com Esme’s Patchwork Launceston Ph: (03) 6334 9775 lillian@esmes.com.au SOUTH AUSTRALIA Country Fabrics ‘N’ Things Eudunda Ph: (08) 8581 1663, 0458 900 655 eudunda@fabricshop-aus.com www.fabricshop-aus.com Hettie’s Patch Hindmarsh Ph: (08) 8346 0548 hetties@bigpond.net.au www.hettiespatch.com.au Ruby & Kate Port Lincoln Ph: (08) 8682 3636 rubyandkate@me.com www.rubyandkate.com.au

Palm Beach Quilting Carrum Downs Ph: (03) 9775 1601 www.palmbeachquilting.com.au Sew Bright Alpine Quilting Bright Ph: (03) 5981 2020 sewingnbeyond@hotkey.net.au

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Sewing ‘N’ Beyond Rosebud Ph: 03 5981 2020 sewingnbeyond@hotkey.net.au www.patchnquilt.com.au

Dragonfly Fabrics Shop Alawa Ph: (08) 8948 0691 dragonfabric@bigpond.com www.dragonfabric.com.au

Sewn and Quilted Blackburn Ph: (03) 9877 1664 carol@sewnandquilted.com.au www.sewnandquilted.com.au

VICTORIA

Sha Cottage Moe Ph: (03) 5127 3306 jbucko1@bigpond.com

A Patchwork Quilt Wallan Ph: 0425 861 464 jess@apatchworkquilt.com.au www.apatchworkquilt.com.au Catharina’s Vintage Stitches Kyabram Ph: 0409 700 385 catharinas48@gmail.com www.catharinasvintagestitches. com.au Lily Lane Quilting Rosedale Ph: (03) 5199 2777 jennifer@lilylane.com.au www.lilylane.com.au Little Crafty Shop Melbourne info@littlecraftyshop.com.au www.littlecraftyshop.com.au Millrose Quilting & Gallery Ballan Ph: (03) 5368 2995 sales@millrosecottage.com.au www.millrosecottage.com.au

The Patchwork Tea House Warburton Ph: (03) 5966 2400 thepatchworkteahouse@ bigpond.com www.thepatchworkteahouse.com The Quilt Shop Eltham Ph: (03) 8418 6770 sales@thequiltshop.com.au www.thequiltshop.com.au Yarram Drapery Yarram Ph: (03) 5182 5085 yarrdrap@bigpond.net.au NEW ZEALAND Cushla’s Village Fabrics Auckland & Nelson Ph: +64 03 540 2011 (Nelson) Ph: +64 09 445 9995 (Auckland)) z shop@cushlasvillagefabrics.co.nz www.cushlasvillagefabrics.co.nz


On the road

1

WEST VICTORIA & MELBOURNE 2

TOUR GUIDE 1 KYNETON 2 WOODEND 3 BALLARAT 4 BALLARAT 5 BALLARAT 6 BUNINYONG 7 GEELONG 8 GEELONG WEST & WERRIBEE 9 MOONEE PONDS 10 MOONEE PONDS 11 PASCOE VALE 12 FAIRFIELD 13 BLACKBURN 14 ELTHAM

3 4 5 6

11 10

9

14 12 13

8 MELBOURNE

8 7

1. K yneton

PICK UP STITCHES

igo on the Calder Where’s Kyneton: Heading south from Bend Gisborne. and don Mace to way Freeway, Kyneton is on the

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in the main Where in Kyneton: 30 Piper Street. We’re tiful old buildings shopping street of Kyneton, with some beau lining the street. Who plays host: Sharon Boxshall all things knitting Worth visiting because: We absolutely love ises, we’re prem r large to ng movi and patchwork and, after s. We like fabric erful wond with filled s lucky to have three room , where shop of a lolly to think of our store as the craft equivalent you when t emen you’re sure to be filled with that sense of excit range erful wond a find your dream fabric. Not only do we have tion of wool of fabrics, but we also have a fantastic selec me and Subli r Sirda products, including Noro, Heirloom, tion of selec sive exten an speciality sock yarns. We have knitting, g, feltin ng, quilti , work patterns and books on patch ing to start want e you’r ct proje ever what so crochet and sewing, Sew days and on, inspiration is always at hand. Stitch and are always popular, evenings are held throughout the year and so why not join in the fun? Scarf Easy Knit Kits What we recommend: The AFL Beanie and washable, 12ply. ine Mach with AFL and team logos to sew on. 3444 Vic ton, Address: 30 Piper Street, Kyne Phone: (03) 5422 6614 Email: pickupstitches@bigpond.com


2. Woodend

SEW WOODEND

Where’s Woodend: Woodend is a beautiful 19th-century tourist town, located 50 minutes from Mel bourne, via the Calder Freeway, or 90 minutes by train from Southern Cross station. Where in Woodend: 108 High Stre et. Ample parking is available nearby. Or from the V-line station, it’s a five minute walk past the Victoria Hotel and iconic cloc k tower. Who plays host: Store owner Allis on, who has a background in textile art and a love of fabric and embroidery, along with the help of staff member Bree, who has her own fashion line, Lulu Rocket Retro (available in store).

3. Ballarat

Worth visiting because: When you visit , you’ll be struck by our excellent customer service in such a friendly atmosphere. We love to nurture creativity, so you’ll always find help and encouragement from us when you need it. With our range, we like to cater for both the mod ern and contemporary textile artist. Our shelves are packed with all sorts of goodies, including vintage buttons, laces and linens, artist buttons, embroidery threads, Japanese fabrics, haberda shery, Australian-made yarns, and Lulu Rocket Retro bespoke garm ents, and we’ve also become well known for our range of cat-design fabrics! What we recommend: Our mon thly in-store sewing-machine service days will encourage you to take care of your machine. We like to be a store that you will feel comfortable visiting regularly, as we always have som ething new and unique to look at and frequently changing stock. Take the time to enjoy the scenic town we’re lucky to live in, have a nice lunch, coffee and cake and pop in to visit our won derful, inviting store. If you mention this profile when you visit , we’ll give you a 20 per cent discount on fabrics. Address: 108 High Street, Wooden d, Vic 3442 Phone: (03) 5427 2770 Email: sewwoodend@yahoo.com.au Website: sewwoodend.com

SOVEREIGN NEEDLEWORK

Where’s Ballarat: Approximately one hour north-west of Melbourne on the Western Highway. Where in Ballarat: 215 Mair Street. We’re one block from the train station and one block from Sturt Street, which is the main street of Ballarat. Who plays host: Elaine Quirk, and sometimes Elaine’s husband, Chris, helps out when he’s not at work. Worth visiting because: There is really nothing else like Sovereign Needlework in the area. Our walls are adorned with a wonderful variety of threads, so finding the right thread and colour for your projects won’t be hard. We also have a range of cross-stitch kits and fabric so you can create your own designs, trammed tapestries, wool, needles and plenty of patterns for cross stitch and knitting. You’ll also find lots and lots of books to choose from, so you’ll never struggle to find inspiration for an upcoming project. Our kettle is always on, so feel free to drop in and have plenty of fun browsing. What we recommend: We just love stitcheries, and our wide range of sewing needles and other stitching products will indulge any passionate stitcher’s needs. Address: 215 Mair Street, Ballarat, Vic 3350 Phone: (03) 5332 1782

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4. Ballarat

EUREKA PATCHWORK

Where’s Ballarat: Just over an hour’s drive west of Melbourne. Where in Ballarat: 36 Mair Street East. Just a few minutes’ drive from Sovereign Hill and the Gold Museum and a short walk from the Ballarat Art Gallery and railway station, next to Autopro, and a few steps from JB HiFi, and Dan Murphy’s. Who plays host: Elisabeth Rundle and her friendly staff. Worth visiting because: After relocating from our former location in Victoria Street, we still offer the same great service and range as before. We are happy to help you with matching fabrics for your next project or just hunting down that perfect colour you need from our spectacular wall of colour – it just has to be seen to be believed. We can also refer you to the long-arm quilters you need to finish your projects. Also on offer is a great range of classes in various areas. We also offer quick turnaround on repairs to sewing and embroidery machines. Tour groups are welcome to visit. What we recommend: We have a large range of blenders, and we’re renowned for the fine collection of Japanese-themed fabrics we have available. You can also shop for a selection of our fabrics on the website. Address: 36 Mair Street East, Ballarat Central, Vic 3350 Phone: (03) 5331 6160 Email: fabrics@eurekapatchwork.com.au

5. Ballarat

COTTON FACTORY

Where’s Ballarat: On the Western Highway, west of Melbourne – about 90 minutes’ drive (130km) . There is a great train service from Regional and Metro Victoria. And we are on your route if you are driving from WA, NT or SA thro ugh to Melbourne. Where in Ballarat: 128 Clyde Street. Cotton Factory is located in a quaint old Scout Hall, in a quie t residential street on the corner of Brougham and Clyde Streets. Loo k for the corner and our big beautiful green doors. Who plays host: Alison von Bibra (known as AvB to one and all) is your hostess. Alison is a mum and garden-lover in addition to being a devotee of the daily managem ent of her fabric habit. Worth visiting because: Cotton Fact ory has become well-known for its extensive range of text and low-volume fabrics. I source

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Website: www.eurekapatchwork.com.au

a very broad range of text prints, so you’ll find fabulous typography from Lecien, Robert Kaufman, Free Spirit, Moda, Ella Blue and Riley Blake Designs. These fabrics combine well with the brights I stock, including modern ranges from Aliso n Glass, Tula Pink, Tim Holtz, Amy Butler, Denyse Schmidt and Caro lyn Friedlander in addition to a myriad of wonderfully talented Aus tralian designers. I source and work with local designers, so you will find patterns and designs from several locals when you visit – ther e’s so much talent in Ballarat. The online store is always open, and the studio is typically open Thurs-Sat 10am-3pm. I am also able to make arrangements for groups and special visits outside thes e hours: please just give me a call to organise an appointmen t. I love social media, so follow Cotton Factory on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ cottonfactoryballarat) and Instagram (@cotton_factory) to keep up to date with all that is happenin g in the studio. What we recommend: It’s hard to pick just one. My range of quilt kits, bag-making supplies, toy-mak ing supplies, English paper piecing supplies, Australian patterns and the top-quality fabrics will really make you feel spoilt for choi ce. I also like to stock hard-tofind precuts, which I import directly from the US. Address: 128 Clyde Street, Cnr Brou gham Street, Ballarat, Vic 3350 Phone: 0434 600 817 Email: aliso nvonbibra@hotmail.com Website: www.cottonfactory.bigcart el.com


6. Buninyong

SEW SPECIAL BUTTON HEAVEN

Ballarat. Come by Where’s Buninyong: Just 10 minutes from stops just across car or catch the bus from Ballarat. The bus the road from the shop. t. We can be Where in Buninyong: 320 Learmonth Stree ry. Bake yong found right next door to the Bunin hard work the all ell; Fenn Who plays host: Owned by Gael . Lindy and da Belin is done by Jenny, Paula,

7. Geelong

as a small Worth visiting because: What started out n to be the go-to haberdashery shop in Buninyong has grow 7,000 buttons place for buttons; in fact, we have more than provide for any to able in stock . We pride ourselves on being to choose from ns butto of project, and with the largest range need. We also you what find to hard in country Victoria, it’s not range of great a s, fabric ng quilti x stock ranges from Nute are also tours bus and ps grou r Large . wool haberdashery and keep and ite welcome to visit. Don’t forget to visit our webs , page up to date with the store on our Facebook en. heav utton ecialb ewsp om/s ook.c .faceb www e, buttons, but What we recommend: Our passion is, of cours young at heart . the for fabric we also have a great range of fun ialty yarns spec and wool of tion The recently introduced selec and gifts. ery rdash habe of range our to is a wonderful addition you with ct proje your bring ns, butto our for If you plan to visit n butto ct that perfe and we will be only too happy to help find for in drop that will bring your work alive. You really must ns. a visit to see our amazing selection of butto , Vic 3357 yong Address: 320 Learmonth Street, Bunin Phone: (03) 5341 3050 Email: info@sewspecial.net.au Website: www.buttonheaven.com.au

BELLARINE SEWING CENTRE

Where’s Geelong: Victoria’s second largest city, Geelong is 75km from Melbourne and within a short drive from the popular seaside communities on the Bellarine Peninsula, as well as being the gateway to the famous Great Ocean Road. Where in Geelong: 395-399 Moorabool Street. Directly opposite the home of the Geelong Cats AFL team, and a 1km straight drive from the town centre. Who plays host: John and Zoe, with the help of their wonderful team. Worth visiting because: When you drop in, check out our extensive range of Brother and Elna sewing machines and accessories. You’ll find over 3,000 bolts of patchwork fabrics – from brights to reproduction fabrics, not to mention the large range we have of the beautiful Tilda fabrics. We have an amazing range of patterns, templates, kits and books, including the full range of Zoe Clifton Designs patterns, books and templates. What we recommend: We love expanding our customers’ sewing knowledge, offering a wide range of classes for all skill levels. Don’t forget to check out our website for 24/7 shopping, with a huge range of our products available – but we would love for you to drop in and see them for yourself! Address: 395-399 Moorabool Street, Geelong, Vic 3220

Phone: (03) 5221 3034 Email: bellarinesewingcentre@outlook.com Website: www.bellarinesewingcentre.com.au

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8. Geelong West & Werribee Where are Geelong West & Werribee: You’ll find Geelong just south-west of Melbourne, and Werribee is halfway between Melbourne and Geelong on the Princes Highway M1. Where in Geelong West & Werribee: Shop 1/63 Synnot Street, Werribee. Synnot Street is one of the major roads in Werribee, and we are right next door to Officeworks. 176 Pakington Street, Geelong West. Pakington Street is a main shopping street through Geelong West – you’ll find us surrounded by lots of great shops to visit. Who plays host: Owned by Ken and Marj Wilks. Lynn and Jodi lead the team in Werribee. Worth visiting because: Heights in Werribee has a large range of quilting fabrics to choose from, along with batting, interfacing and haberdashery. If you’re after threads, we’ve got you covered with brands including Signature 40, Robison Anton, Rasant, Gütermann and QA. We also have the latest in quilting machines, with both the Bernina Q20 sit-down machine and the HandiQuilter Simply 16 with HQ little foot frame. We’re also dealers for Husqvarna Viking, Janome and Bernina sewing, embroidery and overlocker machines, along with Babylock overlockers. To complement your craft room, we have Horn sewing furniture available. Our industry-qualified technicians are available to service all brands of machine onsite at our Geelong

9. Moonee Ponds

HEIGHTS SEWING CENTRE

West store, or drop your machine into the Werribee store and we’ll look after it. We’re also happy to have bus groups visit us at Werribee – just give Lynn and Jodi a call to arrange a time. What we recommend: We really love the Horn gaslift sewing chairs. They are height adjustable, and the chair back just sits snuggly in to support your back when sewing. It also has a hiding spot under the seat and is available in three colourways. The Accuquilt Go! fabric-cutting machine is another favourite and it’s available in three sizes, and a range of dies are also available in each store. Address: Shop 1/63 Synnot Street, Werribee, Vic, 3030 176 Pakington Street, Geelong West, Vic 3218 Phone: (Werribee) (03) 8742 6238, (Geelong) (03) 5229 3558 Email: heightsewing@bigpond.com Website: www.heightsewing.com.au

MOONEE PONDS SEWING

of Linda, Denise, Who plays host: Evelyn, with the assistance Heather have Janneke, Andrea, Kerri and Wendy. We also . days club on d and her award-winning jelly slice aroun of s brand best the Worth visiting because: We carry , Husqvarna Viking, machines – Brother, Bernina, Janome, Pfaff Simply 16 and 16 t Swee er iQuilt Babylock, Elna and Hand cabinets Horn of range our out k quilting machines. Chec haberdashery, our with along es, ssori acce and sewing-machine lisers, quilt battings threads, machine-embroidery designs, stabi you with all and plenty of patchwork fabrics. We can help ine mach es, your sewing needs, including sewing class service and repairs. rience our great What we recommend: Come in and expe gh your machine throu you guide will old-fashioned service. We north of we believe that use Where’s Moonee Ponds: About 15 minutes beca ded inclu are ns purchase, and free lesso enient with the conv very is port trans c Publi CBD. e’s drop in for a visit? Melbourn the more you know, the more you sew! Can’t at the Moonee ing stopp s buse and city the from tram No. 59 send us an email or No worries, you can visit our online shop, from our front door. over the phone. Ponds Junction, which is only a few steps even give us a call, and we’ll take your order Puckle Street. And the train station is a short walk down We would love to hear from you! Road. We are located s, Vic 3039 Where in Moonee Ponds: 44 Pascoe Vale Address: 44 Pascoe Vale Road, Moonee Pond s Civic Centre, and right behind the clock tower, Moonee Pond Phone: (03) 9370 8695 Mt Alexander Road. near the junction of Pascoe Vale Road and Email: mpsewing@bigpond.net.au the close to Street parking is available, and we are very Website: www.mooneepondssewing.com y racecourse. beautiful Queen’s Park and the Moonee Valle

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10. Moonee Ponds

TRANQUILITY CRAFTS ‘N SU PPLIES

Where’s Moonee Ponds: Moonee Ponds is a suburb of Melbourne, and just a short train ride from the city. Where in Moonee Ponds: 37 Holm es Road. We’re a short walk from the train station. If you ’re driving to the store, parking is available across the road or in the carpark on the corner. Who plays host: You will be gree ted by the owner, Joanne, who has many years of experience and is ready to help you.

11. Pascoe Vale

Worth visiting because: We are a shop well worth visiting, especially if you’re looking for insp iration, as the walls and shelves are lined with completed samples to get you creatively inspired. You’ll find in exce ss of 2,000 bolts of patchwork fabric, linens and Aida cloth for cross stitch and embroidery. If you’re an embroidery and cross-stitch enthusiast, you’ll be happy to know Tranquil ity Crafts ‘N Supplies carries everything for your embroidery and cross-stitch needs. I have threads from DMC, Cosmo, Threadworx, Madiera and Cottage Garden Threads, just to name a few. Of course, for patchworkers, I have many books, patterns and other necessities for completing a quil t. If you need help with anything, don’t hesitate to ask; I’m always happy to help out. What we recommend: A great new kit is this simple quilt that measures 35½ x 44½in (90 x 114cm) and is an adaption of Life is a Patchwork of Friends quilt card from Wildcraft Farm. This kit includes all you need – quil t card, stitchery fabric, charm pack, pearl cotton and bind ing fabric – all for just $57 plus p&h. Address: 37 Holmes Road, Moonee Ponds, Vic 3039 Phone: (03) 9375 3575 Email: tranquilitycrafts@bigpond.c om.au Website: www.facebook.com/Tranq uilityCraftsnSupplies

PATCHWORKS UNLIMITED

Where’s Pascoe Vale: A suburb in the north of Melbourne. Where in Pascoe Vale: 25 Pascoe Street. We are in between a fish-and-chip shop and a pizza shop, in a small collection of shops on the street. Who plays host: Pauline and Bronwen own the store. We also have some lovely ladies who will help out sometimes to fill in for us. Worth visiting because: We have one of the biggest ranges of bright fabrics and Japanese fabrics in the northern suburbs of Melbourne. We also stock our own patterns and a lot of Australian-designed patterns. Our classes are well-priced and a lot of fun, so why not sign up for one, such as our runner courses, which are held each month. If you do five runner classes, you get the sixth for free! What we recommend: We love to encourage you to ‘give it a go’ – you might be surprised by how much of a genius you are at choosing what you love! We will help you and guide you in the best outcome direction. We also love our new ranges of fabrics, so be sure to check out what’s new when you visit. Address: 25 Pascoe Street, Pascoe Vale, Vic 3044 Phone: (03) 9300 4011 Email: patchworksunlimited@gmail.com Website: www.patchworksunlimited.com

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12. Fairfield

GJS DISCOUNT FABRICS

Where’s Fairfield: A suburb in the north-east of Melbourne, just a short drive from the CBD. Where in Fairfield: 31 Steane Street. We’re on the corner of Sparks Avenue and Steane Street. We are extremely excited to have moved into our new premises just off Darebin Road in the hip suburb of Fairfield after 21 years in Brunswick. We’re not far from the warehouse outlet of Diana Ferrari and Warwick, and there is plenty of parking and space to move. Who plays host: Georgia, Sue and Carolyn head up an amazing team who are friendly, knowledgeable and experienced in many aspects of the sewing industry. Worth visiting because: We are wellestablished as Melbourne’s largest independent retail fabric store, specialising in patchwork and craft fabrics, as well as glitter and dance fabrics, as we are a leading supplier to the dance and theatrical arts industry. However, our patchwork and craft fabrics are sure to blow you away, with some of the best designers and manufacturers around. We have ranges from Cotton & Steel, Tula Pink, Amy Butler, Kaffe Fassett, Art Gallery, Moda, Kokka, Michael Miller, Riley Blake and StudioTGreen, just to name a few. We also have an extensive range of haberdashery. Our new location fortunately has an upstairs sewing room, which is available for sewing groups and workshops. Feel free to enquire about our

13. Blackburn

SEWN AND QUILTED

Where’s Blackburn: Located in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne, it’s an easy trip by car, train or bus. Where in Blackburn: 92 Whiteho rse Road (also known as Maroondah Highway). Our sho p is located at the rear of our house, which is just five doo rs past the end of the shopping strip on the city-bound side of the road. Who plays host: Carol, along with huge help from her fantastic team.

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existing groups so you can join in the fun, or maybe you could start your own group. We also welcome large groups and bus tours to the store. We’re open Mon-Fri 9am-5pm and Sat 9am-4pm, but are closed on public holidays. What we recommend: We have patterns from the very talented girls at Ric Rac and Nicole Mallalieu Designs, so inspiration is never far. We also have a customer-loyalty program, so make sure you show us your card when you are in store; for every $200 you spend, you will receive $20 off your next purchase – always a nice surprise. Address: 31 Steane Street, Fairfield, Vic 3078 Phone: (03)9380 2989, 0403 184 853 Email: info@gjsdiscountfabrics.com.au Website: www.gjsdiscountfabrics.com.au

Worth visiting because: We prid e ourselves on offering top customer service, and we just love the feeling of the ‘patchwork commun ity’ that our customers and students bring to our shop. We have so many fantastic teachers, who bring a huge depth of knowledge, covering many skill areas. You’ll find an eclectic range of gorgeous fabr ics to choose from, including Kaffe Fassett, Tula Pink , Liberty, Tilda, French General, Laundry Bas ket Quilts, 1930s, reproductions and Japanese fabr ics. And, of course, we can’t forget our huge range of inspiring books, threads and notions. What more could a patchworker want? What we recommend: Two of our newest kits are proving to be hugely popular. Rain bow Nest is a delightful short story and quilt patt ern by Edyta Sitar (Laundry Basket Quilts), and we have put a kit together for your convenience. And what better time than now to start stitching the stunning Oh Christmas Tree quilt, by Flying Fish Quilts, just in time for Christmas, and also avai lable as a kit. Address: 92 Whitehorse Road, Blac kburn, Vic 3130 Phone: (03) 9877 1664 Email: caro l@sewnandquilted.com.au Website: www.sewnandquilted.com .au


14. Eltham

THE QUILT SHOP

sive range of bright Worth visiting because: We offer an exten Tula Pink, Tilda, fabrics and patterns, including Kaffe Fassett, wonderful wall our Alison Glass and Cotton + Steel. Check out forget to have don’t and of paper-piecing shapes and supplies, collection of large our out k a seat in our reading corner to chec off point”. dropand “husb our this call books – we also sometimes asing incre ever an and ads Thre o Cosm of We have the full range also are We ads. Thre en Gard ge Cotta tiful selection of the beau ‘Chenille-It one of the few shops in Australia to stock the that adds texture to Blooming Bias’ – a new and easy technique g. Wander in to our your quilts, and doesn’t require endless cuttin participate can you e fantastic and spacious classroom, wher t the year, ghou throu er off on are in one of our many classes that Sew n Sit s group g sewin your or you can book our room for g with visitin are you that nce adva in know meetings. If you let us es. batch of scon Yum! a group, we will even arrange to cook you a ourne’s CBD, Where’s Eltham: 20km north-east of Melb with the ‘Chenille-It What we recommend: We’re totally in love way to the Yarra in the heart of Diamond Valley, and on your And we’ve also had Blooming Bias’ and so are our customers. Valley wine district. quilt, and we have a great response to our Venetian Windows left on the main Where in Eltham: 2/38 Bridge Street. Turn the store. in quilt just hung the new Butterfly Garden about, and we are the road and head straight through the round 3095 Vic m, Address: 2/38 Bridge Street, Eltha first driveway on your left, opposite Bunnings. hop.com.au n Sharo Phone: (03) 8418 6770 Email: sales@thequilts s wner co-o Who plays host: Pop in and catch up with m.au op.co Website: www.thequiltsh . and Alison, and possibly any of our four boys

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Market Place

PRODUCTS OF THE MONTH P

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KORNACRAFT SEWING CENTRE

HEIGHTS SEWING CENTRE

FRESH & TASTY VEGETABLE PLACEMATS

BERNINA ‘AURORA AUSTRALIS’ 570QE

After a quick and easy project? This fabric panel will create four 18 x 12½in size placemats, and included is backing fabric. Only $28, including postage within Australia.

The next generation Bernina Aurora is here, with 4.3in colour touch screen, Bernina Stitch Regulator, patchwork foot, 5.5mm stitch width, embroidery capable and 10 year warranty.

Phone: (08) 8522 3246 Email: sales@kornacraft.com.au Website: www.kornacraft.com.au

Phone: (03) 5229 3558 Email: heightsewing@bigpond.com Website: www.heightsewing.com.au

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THE STRAWBERRY THIEF LASER CUT LIBERTY

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FISKARS AUSTRALIA

FABRIC PATCH

FISKARS UNIVERSAL SCISSORS SHARPENER

SHIP TO SHORE APPLIQUÉ É QUILT PATTERN BY CLAIRE TURPIN DESIGNS

Automatically adjusts to sharpen different blades. Grinds safely with minimal effort. Finger indentations offer a comfortable, secure grip. Lightweight and compact for easy storage.

Easy to read, step-by-step instructions; fullsize pattern pieces; compatible with Brother ScanNCut; perfect for new baby; measures 41 x 47in. Kits and patterns available.

Phone: (03) 8645 2400 Email: australia@fiskars.com Website: www.fiskars.com.au

Phone: (07) 5442 4613 Email: janeene@fabricpatch.com.au Website: www.fabricpatch.com.au

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Less time cutting, more time for stitching! Who wouldn’t love that? The Strawberry Thief has come up with the perfect patchwork solution with new laser-cut packs. Featuring beautiful Liberty Tana Lawn, packs are available in a range of shapes, sizes and colourways.

Email: robyn@thestrawberrythief.com.au Website: www.thestrawberrythief.com.au


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ECHIDNA SEWING PRODUCTS

JJ’S CRAFTS

BROTHER SCANNCUT STAMP STARTER KIT

CANVAS WORK

Get the most out of your Brother ScanNCut with the Stamp Starter Kit, including everything you need to create one-of-a kind clear stamps. Includes: three Stamp Sheets (6 x 8in), acrylic block with grid, 50 stamp patterns on ScanNCut Canvas and ability to create your own designs. RRP $45.95

New canvas-work patterns with surface embroidery are available for $28, with the option of purchasing a kit. Visit the website to see the range of designs in stock.

Phone: 1800 000 360 Email: sales@echidnaclub.com.au Website: www.echidnaclub.com.au

Phone: +64 6 844 0680 Email: info@jjscrafts.co.nz Website: www.jjscrafts.co.nz

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THE TEDDY TEDDY TREE TREE THE

ASIA DISCOVERY TOURS

PFAFF

TOP THIS HAT KIT

20 DAY EUROPEAN GARDENS, CASTLES AND QUILTS TOUR

PFAFF PASSPORT 2.0

A ball of continuous texture yarn and a cute topper – quick and easy to knit or crochet and super-fun to wear. Available for $17.95 each.

This 20 day tour will take you to the Festival of the Quilts in Birmingham and will showcase Europe’s scenic beauty and its artistic diversity.

A wonderfully portable sewing machine that can do anything a home stitcher or quilter could ask for. Packed with features, it is surprisingly light but very powerful – ideal to take to classes.

Phone: (08) 9201 1011 Email: sales@teddytree.com.au Website: www.teddytree.com.au

Phone: (02) 9267 7699 Email: sales@asiadiscoverytours.com.au Website: www.asiadiscoverytours.com.au

Phone: (02) 4337 3737 Email: australia.info@blessingtongroup.com.au Website: www.pfaff.com/au

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BIRCH CREATIVE

YARRA VALLEY QUILT YARN & SEW

CRAFTEE COTTAGE

PLASTIC SNAP FRAMES

SCARVES AND WRAPS

ALPACA SAND OR SEA SHAWL

Light and durable, they secure fabric with the easy-to-use snap-clamp design. Made of lightweight PVC tubing, making it easy to use for all your quilt and stitching projects. Available in two sizes.

These great scarves and wraps use Patons, Cleckheaton and Panda Yarns. Knit and crochet designs are available, and you can join our classes, where we show you how to make them.

Available exclusively from Craftee Cottage, featuring two beautiful alpaca 4 ply yarns – Misti Alpaca and Indiecita Alpaca. Blues (sea) or Neutrals (sand) colourways and kit available.

Phone (trade enquiries only): (03) 9450 8900 Website: www.birchhaby.com.au

Phone: (03) 5964 3592 Email: sales@cccpatchwork.com.au Website: quiltyarnsew.com.au

Phone: (03) 9568 3606 Email: info@crafteecottage.com.au Website: www.crafteecottage.com.au

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LILY LANE QUILTING

TWO GREEN ZEBRAS

TAJIMA AUSTRALIA

SWEET TOOTH

CAROLYN FRIEDLANDER COLLECTION QUILT PATTERN

AEROQUILT THREADS BY MADEIRA

Feel like a kid in a candy shop! Sweet Tooth has a rainbow of candy-coloured light, medium and dark solids on a contrasting dark solid background. Kit and quarterly options available.

Pattern for nine-part block of the month quilt. Finished quilt measures 40½ x 51½in. Pattern includes six alternative projects. Contact us for stockists.

Ideal for the speed of long-arm and standard quilting machines. Made from 100 per cent core-spun polyester. Available in 48 colours including 12 variegated.

Phone: (03) 5199 2777 Email: jennifer@lilylane.com.au Website: www.lilylane.com.au

Phone: (02) 9553 7201 Email: sales@twogreenzebras.com Website: www.issuu.com/twogreenzebras

Phone: 1300 283 460 Email: sales@tajimaaustralia.com.au Website: www.tajimaaustralia.com.au

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BROTHER AUSTRALIA

TRANQUILITY CRAFTS ‘N SUPPLIES

BROTHER PQ1500SL SEWING MACHINE

NOW I KNOW MY A, B, Cs

The PQ1500SL is a dream machine that belongs in the sewing room of every serious quilter and seamstress. It is a high-speed straight-stitching machine, sewing up to 1,500 stitches per minute. Offering an adjustable pin-feed mechanism, four feed-dog settings, a knee lifter and bed extension table for quilting, it’s the ultimate companion for any serious sewer.

This lovely bright quilt would make a perfect gift for a boy or girl. Kit includes all the fabric for the quilt top and binding, and is rotary cut and machine pieced. Measures 38 x 53in, kit cost is $65.

Phone: (02) 9887 4344 Email: brothermarketing@brother.com.au Website: www.brother.com.au

Phone: (03) 9375 3575 Email: tranquilitycrafts@bigpond.com.au

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NATIONAL WOOL MUSEUM SCARF FESTIVAL 2016: MYTHS AND LEGENDS Featuring creative designer scarves inspired by myths and legends, this exhibition is well worth a visit. It’s on at the National Wool Museum, in Geelong, Victoria from 3 June to 4 September, 2016 – experience this incredible display for yourself. Address: National Wool Museum, 26 Moorabool Street, Geelong, Vic 3220 Phone: (03) 5272 4701 Website: nwm.vic.gov.au

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National Wool Museum photographs: Maugosha Martin, Joan Bannon and Ingrid Merritt

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STOCKISTS & CONTACTS THIS MONTH’S DESIGNERS’ CONTACTS PROJECT 1: SWEET JUSTICE Vicki Knight Email: vickilorraine@hotmail.com PROJECT 2: BEATRICE BEAVER Jennifer Goldsmith Frazzy Dazzles – the gentle art of making Email: jenny@frazzydazzles.com Website: www.frazzydazzles.com PROJECT 3: BOY TOYS Leanne Milsom Email: lp.milsom@bigpond.com Blog: www.lizzie-the-quilter. blogspot.com PROJECT 5: PICTURE PERFECT Minki Kim Website/blog: minkikim.com Instagram: @zeriano

Background fabric: ‘Theory of Aviation’ from Windham Fabrics. Distributed by Leutenegger.

PROJECT 6: FATIMA’S FASHION Allison Dey Malacaria SweaterDoll Email: sweaterdoll@gmail.com Website: sweaterdoll.blogspot.com PROJECT 7: BACK TO THE FUTURE Jemima Flendt Tied with a Ribbon Website: www.tiedwitharibbon.com Blog: www.blog.tiedwitharibbon.com Instagram: @tiedwitharibbon Facebook: www.facebook.com/ Tiedwitharibbon PROJECT 8: CASE STUDY: LUGGAGE TAGS Roslyn Mirrington Bloom Blog: bloomandblossom.blogspot. com.au PROJECT 9: ALL EARS! Amy Sinibaldi nanaCompany Blog: www.nanaCompany.typepad.com Instagram: @amysinibaldi BLOCK OF THE MONTH: FOXLEY VILLAGE Natalie Bird The Birdhouse Email: thebirdhouse@bigpond.com Website: www.thebirdhouse.com.au Blog: www.thebirdhouse.typepad.com

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shford Wheels & Looms Ph: 1800 653 397, website: www.ashford.co.nz/yarn. Asia Discovery Tours Suite 1302, Level 13, 370 Pitt Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. Ph: (02) 9267 7699, website: asiadiscoverytours.com.au. Australian Country Spinners Toll Free: 1800 337 032, ph: (03) 9380 3888, website: www.auspinners.com.au. Australian Machine Quilters Festival Ph: 0448 256 214, email: info@amqfestival.com.au, website: www.amqfestival.com.au. ellarine Sewing Centre 395-399 Moorabool Street, Geelong, Vic 3220. Ph: (03) 5221 3034, email: bellarinesewingcentre@ outlook.com, website: www. bellarinesewingcentre.com.au. Bernina Australia (Contact address only) Unit 10, 15 Carrington Road, Castle Hill, NSW 2154. Ph: 1800 237 646 or (02) 9899 1188, email: bernina@bernina.com.au, website: www.bernina.com.au. Birch Haberdashery & Craft Ph: (03) 9450 8900, website: www.birchhaby.com.au. Bird, Natalie – see box at left. Black Possum Fabrics Shop 1, 197 Myall Street, Tea Gardens, NSW 2324. Ph: (02) 4997 0866, email: blackpossumfabrics@ bigpond.com, website: www.blackpossumfabrics.com. Brother Australia Ph: 1300 880 297, website: www.brother.com.au. apricorn Link (Australia) PO Box 704, Windsor, NSW 2756. Ph: (02) 4560 1600, email: books@capricornlink.com.au, website: www.capricornlink.com.au. Carol’s of Midland 47 Farrall Road, Midvale, WA 6056. Ph: (08) 9250 2722, email: carolsmi@bigpond.net.au, website: www.carolsofmidland.com.au. Catharina’s Vintage Stitches 141 Allan Street, Kyabram, Vic 3620. Ph: (03) 5852 3356, email: catharinas48@ gmail.com, website: www. catharinasvintagestitches.com.au. Charles Parsons & Co See Craft Project – Charles Parsons & Co. Constantine Quilts RSD 1028, Agery via Kadina, SA 5555. Ph: (08) 8825 6214, email: constantinequilt@ internode.on.net, website: www.constantinequilts.com. Cotton Factory 128 Clyde Street,

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Cnr Brougham Street, Ballarat, Vic 3350. Ph: 0434 600 817, email: alisonvonbibra@hotmail.com, website: www.cottonfactory. bigcartel.com. Country Dawn Quilting & Patchwork 38 Reyburn House Lane, Town Basin, Whangarei, Northland, New Zealand. Ph: +64 9 438 4856, email: shop@ countrydawnquilting.com, website: www.countrydawnquilting.com. CraftAlive 185 Moray Street, South Melbourne, Vic 3205. Ph: (03) 9682 5133, email: info@craftalive.com.au, website: www.craftalive.com.au. Craftee Cottage Shop 5, 52-54 Atherton Road, Oakleigh, Vic 3166. Ph: (03) 9568 3606, email: info@ crafteecottage.com.au, website: www.crafteecottage.com.au. Craft Project – Charles Parsons & Co Ph: (toll free) 1300 364 422, email: info@craftproject.com.au, website: www.craftproject.com.au. ey Malacaria, Allison – see box at left. Dragonfly Fabrics Shop 2-3, 53 Alawa Crescent, Alawa, NT 0810. Ph: (08) 8948 0691, email: dragonfabric@bigpond.com, website: www.dragonfabric.com.au. chidna Sewing Products Head office: 56 Neumann Road, Capalaba, Qld 4157 (Stores in Brisbane, Townsville, Melbourne and Sunshine Coast). Ph: (07) 3390 3600, email: sales@echidnaclub.com.au, website: www.echidnaclub.com.au. Eureka Patchwork 36 Mair Street East, Ballarat Central, Vic 3350. Ph: (03) 5331 6160, email: fabrics@ eurekapatchwork.com.au, website: www.eurekapatchwork.com.au. abric Patch 223 Lake Cooroibah Road, Cooroibah, Qld 4565. Ph: (07) 5442 4613, email: janeene@fabricpatch.com.au, website: www.fabricpatch.com.au. Fabric Pixie Ph: 0415 826 994, email: deanne@fabricpixie.com.au, website: www.fabricpixie.com.au. Fiskars Australia 39-41 Fennel Street, Port Melbourne, Vic 3207. Ph: (03) 8645 2400, email: Australia@fiskars.com. Flendt, Jemima – see box at left. Flip la` K PO Box 44, Stroud, NSW 2425. Ph: (02) 4992 1631 or 0428 556 688, website: www.fliplak.com. irl’s Shed 208 Dunford Road West, Grahams Creek, Qld

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4650. Ph: 0409 748 600, email: neola_simkus@girlsshed.com.au, website: www.girlsshed.com.au. GJs Discount Fabrics 31 Steane Street, Fairfield, Vic 3078. Ph: (03) 9380 2989, 0403 184 853, email: info@gjsdiscount fabrics.com.au, website: www.gjsdiscountfabrics.com.au. Goldsmith, Jennifer – see box at left. eights Sewing Centre Shop 1/63 Synnot Street, Werribee, Vic 3030, 176 Pakington Street, Geelong West, Vic 3218. Ph: (Werribee) (03) 8742 6238, (Geelong) (03) 5229 3558, email: heightsewing@ bigpond.com, website: www.heightsewing.com.au. Hettie’s Patch 294 Port Road, Hindmarsh, SA 5007. Ph: (08) 8346 0548, email: hetties@bigpond.net.au, website: www.hettiespatch.com. Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machines Locked Bag 40, Gosford, NSW 2250. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@blessington group.com.au, website: www.husqvarnaviking.com/au. anome PO Box 1383, Moorabbin, Vic 3189.Ph: Toll-free 1300 JANOME; Vic (03) 8586 3100; NSW (02) 9624 1822; WA (08) 9248 6689; Qld (07) 3256 3477; SA (08) 8356 7700, website: www.janome.com.au. JJ’s Crafts 243 Gloucester Street, Greenmeadows, Napier, North Island, New Zealand. Ph: +64 6 844 0680, email: info@jjscrafts.co.nz, website: jjscrafts.co.nz. im, Minki – see box at left. Knight, Vicki – see box at left. Kornacraft Sewing Centre 108 Murray Street, Gawler, SA 5118. Ph: (08) 8522 3246, email: sales@kornacraft.com.au, website: www.kornacraft.com.au. eutenegger PO Box 1445, Macquarie Park, NSW 2113. Ph: (02) 8046 4100, email: cservice@leutenegger.com.au, website: www.leutenegger.com.au. Lily Lane 26-28 Prince Street, Rosedale, Vic 3847. Ph: (03) 5199 2777, 0428 486 365, email: jennifer@lilylane.com.au, website: www.lilylane.com.au. Lloyd Curzon Textiles 61 King William Street, Kent Town, SA 5067. Ph: (08) 8362 2451, email: admin@lcurzon.com.au, website: www.lcurzon.com.au.

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asha’s Russian Punch Embroidery Ph: 0412 781 807, email: masha1@optusnet.com.au. Milsom, Leanne – see box on page 137. Mirrington, Roslyn – see box on page 137. Moonee Ponds Sewing 44 Pascoe Vale Road, Moonee Ponds, Vic 3039. Ph: (03) 9370 8695, email: mpsewing@bigpond.net.au, website: www.mooneeponds sewing.com. My Patch Fabrics 42 Wason Street, Milton, NSW 2538. Ph: (02) 4455 4087, email: sew@ mypatchfabrics.com.au, website: www.mypatchfabrics.com.au. ational Wool Museum 26 Moorabool Street, Geelong, Vic 3220. Ph: (03) 5272 4701, website: nwm.vic.gov.au. npoint Patchwork & Needlecraft 61a Station Street, Waratah, NSW 2298. Ph: (02) 4968 0094, email: shop@onpointpatch.com.au, website: www.onpointpatchwork andneedlecraft.com. atchwork Paradise 128 William Street, Rockhampton, Qld 4700. Ph: (07) 4927 6628, email: info@ patchworkparadise.com.au, website: www.patchworkparadise.com.au. Patchworks Unlimited 25 Pascoe Street, Pascoe Vale, Vic 3044. Ph: (03) 9300 4011, email: patchworks unlimited@gmail.com, website: www.patchworksunlimited.com. Pfaff Sewing Machines

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Locked Bag 40, Gosford, NSW 2250. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@blessingtongroup.com.au, website: www.pfaff.com/au. Pick Up Stitches 30 Piper Street, Kyneton, Vic 3444. Ph: (03) 5422 6614, email: pickupstitches@bigpond.com. ainbow Patchwork 75 Union Street, South Lismore, NSW 2480. Ph: (02) 6622 3003, email: info@rainbowpatchwork. com.au, website: www.rainbow patchwork.com.au. ew Many Stitches Shop 4, Level 2, 147 Queen Street, Campbelltown, NSW 2560. Ph: (02) 4628 4437, email: sewstitches@bigpond.com. Sewn and Quilted 92 Whitehorse Road, Blackburn, Vic 3130. Ph: (03) 9877 1664, email: carol@sewnandquilted.com.au, website: www.sewnandquilted. com.au. Sew Special Button Heaven 320 Learmonth Street, Buninyong, Vic 3357. Ph: (03) 5341 3050, email: info@sewspecial.net.au, website: www.buttonheaven.com.au. Sew Woodend 108 High Street, Woodend, Vic 3442. Ph: (03) 5427 2770, email: sewwoodend@yahoo.com.au, website: sewwoodend.com. Singer (Contact address only) Unit 17/167 Prospect Highway, Seven Hills NSW 2147. Ph: (02) 9620 5922, email: info@singerco.com.au, website: www.singerco.com.au. Sinibaldi, Amy – see box on page 137.

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Xmas wishes are granted

NEXT MONTH

I you start stitching now, If yo you’ll be ready for Christmas. And An there’s plenty to inspire you in July Homespun Q Xmas koala Q Xmas birds and baubles Q Xmas star quilt Q Xmas carolling embroidery Q Xmas gifts patchwork & appliqué JULY HOMESPUN – ON SALE JULY 7 138

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Sovereign Needlework 215 Mair Street, Ballarat, Vic 3350. Ph: (03) 5332 1782. Stitches from the Bush Email: stitchesfromthebush@ bigpond.com, website: www.stitchesfromthebush.com.au. ajima Australia Ph: 1300 283 460, email: sales@ tajimaaustralia.com.au, website: www.tajimaaustralia.com.au. The Crafty Hive Shop 3, 69 National Avenue, Loftus, NSW 2232. Ph: (02) 9542 3298, email: info@ thecraftyhive.com.au, website: www.thecraftyhive.com.au. The Crewel Gobelin 9 Marian Street, Killara, NSW 2071. Ph: (02) 9498 6831, email: enquiries@ thecrewelgobelin.com.au, website: www.thecrewelgobelin.com.au. The Patchwork Angel 343 Mons Road, Forest Glen, Sunshine Coast, Qld 4556. Ph: (07) 5477 0700, email: info@ patchworkangel.com.au, website: www.patchworkangel.com.au. The Quilt Shop 2/38 Bridge Street, Eltham, Vic 3095. Ph: (03) 8418 6770, email: sales@thequiltshop.com.au, website: www.thequiltshop.com.au. The Quilters Shack 77 Boundary Street, Bundaberg, Qld 4670. Ph: (07) 4154 4486, email: girls@thequiltersshack.com, website: www.thequiltersshack.com. The Stitcher’s Cupboard 4A/20 Argyle Street, Camden, NSW 2570. Ph: (02) 4655 8348, email: sales@thestitcherscupboard.com.au website: thestitcherscupboard.com.au.

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The Strawberry Thief Email: robyn@thestrawberry thief.com.au, website: www.thestrawberrythief.com.au. The Teddy Tree 226 Scarborough Beach Road, Mount Hawthorn, WA 6016. Ph: (08) 9201 1011, email: sales@teddytree.com.au, website: www.teddytree.com.au. Tranquility Crafts ‘N Supplies 37 Holmes Road, Moonee Ponds, Vic 3039. Ph: (03) 9375 3575, email: tranquilitycrafts@bigpond.com.au, website: www.facebook.com/ TranquilityCraftsnSupplies. Travelrite International Pty Ltd 423 Whitehorse Road, Balwyn, Vic 3103. Toll free: 1800 630 343, outside Australia: +61 3 9836 2522, email: michelle@travelrite.com.au, website: www.travelrite.com.au. Two Green Zebras Ph: (02) 9553 7201, email: sales@twogreenzebras.com, website: www.twogreenzebras.com. SM Australia See Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machines, Singer or Pfaff Sewing Machines. arwick Art Gallery 49 Albion Street, Warwick, Qld 4370. Ph: (07) 4661 0434, email: warwickart@ sdrc.qld.gov.au, website: www.warwickartgallery.com.au arra Valley Quilt Yarn & Sew 382 Warburton Highway, Wandin North, Vic 3139. Ph: (03) 5964 3592, email: sales@ cccpatchwork.com.au, website: www.cccpatchwork.com.au.

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Join Michelle Marvig on one or both of these fabulous Quilting Tours

Only available through Travelrite International

Quilting tour of the USA Visiting Philadelphia, the Amish area of Lancaster, Bedford, Washington, Houston for the International Quilt Festival and San Francisco.

Long stays in each location, visit stunning fabric shops and exciting museums. October 23 to November 11, 2016

Classes given by quilting and craft experts, Michelle Marvig, Sue Daley and Wendy Williams. TO

New Zealand Aboard Radiance of the Seas Sydney to Sydney Sydney

Bay of Islands Tauranga

Auckland Rotorua

Milford Sound Doubtful Sound Dusky Sound

Wellington Akaroa Dunedin

Six days of workshops and craft work with included sightseeing tours in the Bay of Islands, Auckland, Tauranga, Wellington, Akaroa and Dunedin with visits to exciting quilting shops.

28 March to 10 April, 2017

Travelrite International

E: balwyn@travelrite.com.au www.travelrite.com.au ATAS accreditation #A10538

Toll Free

1800 630 343

CRUISE INDUSTRY AWARDS AUSTRALIA


Issue#17.6 June 2016  

Pack your bags! We’re off on all sorts of stitching adventures in June Homespun. Before you even arrive at the airport, you’ll need Roslyn M...

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