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a u s t r a l i a n

DECEMBER 2015

your heart in your hands

CRAFT E IN MAGAZ E OF THR YEA

‚ THERE S STILL TIME!

LAST-MINUTE CHRISTMAS IDEAS Advent Wallhanging • Decorations • Star Quilt • Fabric Greetings

No. 151 (Vol. 16.12) AU $9.95* NZ $12.20* (Both incl. GST)

Modern mends

FASHION FORWARD: LET RIP WITH BIG, BOLD DARNS & PATCHES


Good to Great Sewing

Go from

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LOOKING FOR THE PATTERN SHEETS TO START YOUR HOMESPUN PROJECT?

Registration is easy! 1

2

1 Simply go to www.homespun. net.au/wp-login/ and click the “register” link to create your account, or you can log in with Facebook. Note: this is a different account to your Zinio/Apple/ Google account.

YOU’RE INVITED

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Once you’ve logged in, just go to the “Patterns” section of the Homespun site, or direct link www.homespun.net.au/ homespun-patterns/ and click on the project you’re after to download the PDF.

Become part of the Homespun family by: * SUBSCRIBING to our monthly magazine (see page 127) * CHECKING OUT OUR WEBSITE at www.homespun.net.au * FOLLOWING US ON FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/homespunmag * BROWSING ON PINTEREST www.pinterest.com/homespunmag * TAPPING INTO INSTAGRAM @homespunmagazine

Don’t forget when printing PDFs, print on plain A4 paper, with page scaling turned off (or at 100%).

It’s sew easy!

Any questions? Contact us at homespun@universalmagazines.com.au


OUR PROJECTS THIS ISSUE

30

46 4

Homespun

Positive & negative

Rainbow of stars

36

62

Bell birds

One day at a time


68

74 Pouch of plenty

90

Dashwood

96 Crunchy the caterpillar

106

There’s a bear up there

Star of wonder

112

DollyGrams

Homespun

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Think we will go with Flowerville!

a u s t r a l i a n

The Patchwork Angel el

omespun your heart in your hands

Editor Susan Hurley Deputy Editor Elizabeth Newton Technical Editor Megan Fisher Writer/Online Editor Emma Bradstock Writer/Researcher Janai Velez Senior Designer Martha Rubazewicz Pattern Artist Susan Cadzow Photography Ken Brass Stylist Sandra Hinton

Advertising Rob Jordan (NSW and Qld) ph: (02) 9887 0359, fax: (02) 9805 0714, mob: 0411 424 196 Angelos Tzovlas (Vic, WA, SA, Tas and NT) ph: (03) 9694 6404, fax: (03) 9699 7890, mob: 0433 567 071 Advertising Production Hannah Felton Advertising Senior Designer Martha Rubazewicz Associate Publisher Karen Day Subscriptions & mail orders 1300 303 414 or +61 2 9887 0317 Editorial enquiries homespun@universalmagazines.com.au Advertising enquiries rjordan@universalmagazines.com.au atzovlas@universalmagazines.com.au Subscription enquiries www.universalshop.com.au or 1300 303 414 Printed by KHL Printing Co Pte Ltd, Singapore Distributed by Network Services – ph: 1300 131 169 NZ Distributors Netlink – ph: (09) 366 9966 Needlecraft Distributors Ltd – ph: 0800 909 600, www.needlecraft.co.nz UK Distributor Manor House Magazines – ph: +44 167 251 4288 USA Distributor Brewer Quilting & Sewing Supplies – ph: toll free 1 800 676 6543 Singapore Distributor Car Kit Pte – ph: +65 6 282 1960, fax: +65 6 382 3021 Circulation enquiries to our Sydney head office (02) 9805 0399.

Looking for some SPRINGTIME stitching! Then the new Block of the Month FLOWERVILLE by Rosalie Dekker (formerly Quinlan) is the perfect choice. We have lots of options available to suit any budget. The stitcheries come pre-printed on hanky linen to make it so easy for you. Choose to have the stitcheries monthly for $32 per month over 9 months (including p&h in Aust). Have the whole set all at once for $225 plus p&h. Add a set of specially dyed COTTAGE GARDEN threads $83.40 or a TILDA fabric bundle $155 (limited stock in the same colours). Don’t forget to order some of our favourite stabilizer for behind your stitcheries. Order either on our Secure website www.patchworkangel.com.au or by phone 07 5477 0700.

AND Don’t forget we now stock quality yarns for Knitting and Crochet! SHO OP ON OUR SECURE WEBSITE SHOP Like us on FFa Facebook!

PATCHWORK ANGEL OR YARN ANGEL

www.patchworkangel.com.au 343 Mons Road, Forest Glen Qld 4556 On the Sunshine Coast just one hour north of Brisbane Take exit 200 on the Bruce Highway

Ph 07 5477 0700 Email info@patchworkangel.com.au

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Homespun

While every effort has been made to ensure that the projects featured in Homespun are the original work/s of the respective artist/s, no responsibility is taken by the publisher in the event that originality is disputed, and all proof of original design, or otherwise, lies with the artisan/s. Inspiration from other sources and the reworking of traditional patterns and designs in new and unique ways is, however, regarded as constituting ‘originality’ as acknowledged by the artisan/s and the publisher. No patterns may be reproduced (except for personal use). If a project is taught in a class or workshop, each attendee is required to have their own copy of the appropriate Homespun issue/s. Projects may not be produced for commercial gain without the written permission of the designer.

Chairman/CEO Publisher Chief Financial Officer Associate Publisher Associate Publisher Circulation Director Creative Director Production Executive Editorial & Production Manager Prepress Manager Marketing & Acquisitions Manager

Prema Perera Janice Williams Vicky Mahadeva Emma Perera Karen Day Mark Darton Kate Podger Nerilee Chen Anastasia Casey Ivan Fitz-Gerald Chelsea Peters

Homespun is published by Universal Magazines, Unit 5, 6-8 Byfield Street, North Ryde NSW 2113. Phone: (02) 9805 0399, Fax: (02) 9805 0714. Melbourne office, Level 1, 150 Albert Street, South Melbourne Vic 3205. Phone: (03) 9694 6444, Fax: (03) 9699 7890. This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the publishers. The publishers believe all the information supplied in this book to be correct at the time of printing. They are not, however, in a position to make a guarantee to this effect and accept no liability in the event of any information proving inaccurate. Prices, addresses and phone numbers were, after investigation, and to the best of our knowledge and belief, up to date at the time of printing, but circumstances may have since changed. It is not possible for the publishers to ensure that advertisements appearing in this publication comply with the Trade Practices Act, 1974. The responsibility must, therefore, be on the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisements for publication. While every endeavour has been made to ensure complete accuracy, the publishers cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions. This magazine may have some content that is advertorial or promotional in nature. Please pass on or recycle this magazine. *Recommended retail price ISSN 1443-4792 Copyright © Universal Magazines

MMXV ACN 003 026 944 www.universalmagazines.com.au


CONTENTS December 2015 Stitching

Sourcing

12 PIN INTEREST A feast of crafty ideas from the best creative minds 24 SALVAGE Waste-not, want-not wonderland – buttoned table settings 26 SELVEDGE Designer Edge: Frédérique Morrel is such a deer girl! 44 WHAT A CUTE IDEA! Try tweed and houndstooth for your Christmas stockings 111 ANOTHER CUTE IDEA! 11 Forget baubles – trim your tree with haberdashery 124 BOOK NOOK 12 Read to succeed 137 STOCKISTS 13 & CONTACTS 138 NEXT MONTH 13 A crafty teaser for Homespun’s special Sizzling Summer January issue

Showing & telling

8 READERS’ SHOWCASE 53 MODERN MENDS Say goodbye to invisible mending and flaunt your darning with pride 84 WELCOME TO MY WORKROOM The studio showroom of international success April Cornell

Shopping

20 PATTERN & PALETTE PLAY Fabrics – A virtual symphony of harmonious musical designs 28 WINDOW SHOPPING Big, bold, dramatic black and white products 128 ON THE ROAD Craft shopping in northern and coastal New South Wales 134 MARKET PLACE Product browsing from your armchair

DECEMBER 2015

your heart in your hands

a u s t r a l i a n

30 QUILT Positive & Negative Vicki Knight 36 CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS Bell Birds Prue Scott 46 CUSHION Rainbow of Stars Roslyn Russell 62 ADVENT WALLHANGING One Day at a Time Rebecca Johnson 68 MULTI-PURPOSE BAG Pouch of Plenty Leanne Milsom 74 QUILT Dashwood Donna Warren 90 MAGNETIC SOFTIE Crunchy the Caterpillar Rebecca Atkinson 96 QUILT Star of Wonder Jessica Wheelahan 106 CROCHETED SWAG There’s a Bear Up There! Charlotte Rion 112 STITCHED XMAS MESSAGES DollyGrams Allison Dey Malacaria 121 QUICK STITCH Hoop Crochet Kate May

CRAFT

NE

MAGAZI

‚ THERE S STILL TIME!

OF THE YEAR

LAST-MINUTE CHRISTMAS IDEAS Advent Wallhanging • Decorations • Star Quilt • Fabric Greetings

No. 151 (Vol. 16.12) AU $9.95* NZ $12.20* (Both incl. GST)

Modern mends

FASHION FORWARD: LET RIP WITH BIG, BOLD DARNS & PATCHES

SUBSCRIBING DON’T MISS THIS MONTH’S SPECIAL OFFER

126 Homespun

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READERS’ SHOWCASE One of the joys of putting Homespun together each month is seeing the vision of our designers translated into personal masterpieces by our enthusiastic readers. We’d love to hear from you, too. Write to us with your crafty triumphs or with any tips, advice and new-product sightings you’d like to share with others.

THIS MONTH MONTH’S S WINNER

Congratulations to Tammurah for her great effort. As the winner this month, she will be receiving the following prizes: Tammurah Lamson, from Deepwater, NSW, for her My My Butterfly quilt: “I was so glad to pick up my August copy of Homespun (Vol 16 No 8), as a niece was born earlier that month and I was struggling for inspiration for a suitable quilt for her. Then I opened it to Monica Poole’s cot quilt, and it was just perfect! So I headed for my fabric stash and created a quilt in the right colours for her nursery. I quilted it in the traditional manner, as I did not have any pre-quilted fabric and I had a bit of fun with free-motion quilting on the appliqué (still have my learner plates on there). I’m very pleased with the results. Thanks so much for your great mag – I’m inspired monthly and look forward to every copy.”

Q Fiskars 20cm (8in) non-stick scissors with sharp blades for fabric cutting, legendary comfort and a bent-handle design for improved accuracy.

Q Totes Amaze book, by Amanda McKittrick, from Hardie Grant Publishing with 25 fabulous bag designs – basic totes, gorgeous gifts, special-purpose bags and more.

Q Stitch Style Sweet Dreams book, by Margaret Rowan, from David & Charles (distributed by Capricorn Link Australia): create your dream bedroom with eight designs including a quilt, pillow and doona-cover set and even easy-wear pyjama pants. For contact details for Fiskars, Hardie Grant Publishing or Capricorn Link Australia, turn to the Stockists pages at the back of the magazine.

SEND YOUR LETTERS TO: Email enewton@universalmagazines.com.au Mail Homespun Readers’ Showcase, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde NSW 1670.

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Homespun


Faeries in My Garden

ANNUAL AUSTRALIA DAY SALE Tue 26 Jan to Fri 29 Jan 2016 See you at the shop!

“Beautiful Designs - Exquisite Fabrics”

Our *Gi

of the Month* Club is all about Love

Make beautiful gifts for your special people or give yourself a lovely treat!

*Gi of the Month* Club 2016 $39 + $7 P&H (Australia and New Zealand) $39 + $17 P&H (Other Overseas) Every second month for 12 months Pictured is “Strawberries & Cream” supper cloth that was sent out as a two-part project and comprised two of the total of six projects for the year in 2015.

70 Park Parade, Shorncliffe, Qld 4017 Ph: (07) 3869 0808 Email: shopatfaeries@bigpond.com

www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au

Six projects in a year Project includes pattern and fabric. Threads & Embellishments: $15 per project extra

It’s a mystery! You don’t know what the project is until you receive it! Find us on Facebook

Visit our website and join our mailing list, or hop on to Facebook and Like our page.


Bridget Gordon, from Wee Waa, NSW: “When I saw the gorgeous fox on the cover of your June edition, I just fell in love with him. Anthea Christian’s photos and instructions were spot on and so easy to follow. I spent as much time choosing and coordinating fabrics from my stash as I did making him. I love how he turned out, and he’s gained many admirers since moving in with me.”

Joy Boughey, from Denmark, WA: “I congratulate Anthea Christian on the design of her fabulous Mr Fox, and what a gorgeous front cover he made! Resisting him was impossible, so everything else was put on the backburner while I put together my version of the jaunty and adorable young fella. A huge thank you to Anthea and Homespun.”

Vicki Cameron-Tootell, from Knoxfield, Vic: “When I picked up my June issue, I instantly fell in love with the fox on the front cover. I loved choosing the fabrics and seeing him come together – it wasn’t as hard as I’d thought it would be. He was going to be a gift, but I like him so much that I’ve decided to keep him for now.”

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Homespun

Hayley Hapgood, from Malanda, Qld: “Thank you for the fantastic Mr Fox project featured in June 2015 Homespun. I made him for my 11-year-old daughter using ‘Emmy Grace’ (Bari J) fabrics and one Tilda print, and I’m really happy with the combination. Anthea provided great photos and instructions to follow so that the fox softie was a pleasure to stitch.”

TOO FLASHY FOR FOXY by Anthea Christian (June 2015/Vol 16 No 6) Phyl Domka, from Kalgoorlie, Kalgoo WA: “I fell in love with the fox on the cover and made this oone for my daughter (who’s in he her 40s and still not too old for a soft toy, as she said). I’m going to make a purple variation for her d daughter and a yellow one for a frie friend. Thank you to Anthea Christian for Chr her easy-to-follow instruc instructions.”

Lian Lim, from Brighton-leSands, NSW: “I was looking for something to do when flashy y Mr Fox caught my eye and I knew I wanted to make him. Thee randomness of fabric Anthea used gave me the idea of using tartan fabrics so this Highland fox was born. I’ve filled half the body and tail end with rice for weight and balance, and it’s now a doorstop. I’m still smiling whenever I see him.”


Best of the best from

veste inter d est

Here are our favourite animal angels on Pinterest this month.

Best fox

A delightfully different type of flying fox. Designer: oh, albatross Contact: ohalbatross.com

PERFECT PATCHES

One of the sweetest designs in Patons Crochet Cuties pattern book is this Motif Vest, which is alive with bright colour worked in all sorts of crochet patterns. It’s a little masterpiece that your child is going to love. Worked in Regal 4-ply cotton or Big Baby 4 ply, it’s ideal for intermediate-level crocheters. Your nearest yarn store should have a copy of this book. If not, call 1800 337 032 or visit www.patonsyarns.com.au.

Best mouse

Thank heavens for this little cutie! Designer: Catherine Lane (aka Mrs Plop) Contact: mrsplopsshoppe@ gmail.com, www.mrsplop.co.uk, www.etsy.com/shop/MrsPlopsShoppe

BEYOND BOLEYN

Best cat

That angelic face is simply irresistible. Designer: Elena of NeighborKitty Contact: www.etsy.com/shop/NeighborKitty

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Homespun

Whoever said there’s nothing new in the world clearly hasn’t seen Shirlee McGuire’s wonderful brooches. They’re themed around Henry VIII’s multiple wives, so there’s plenty of scope for making a full range!!! “I create work inspired by characters from history and classic literature – wearable art, pieces on canvas or framed and freestanding sculptures,” says Shirlee. “These can be worn or kept as little art pieces. Some people like to collect the set and frame them. They’re made from vintage fabrics, which I embroider and embellish to create the costumes of the period.” See more of Shirlee’s work or buy a brooch for yourself by visiting www.facebook.com/shirleedesigns, www.shirleemcguire. blogspot.co.uk or emailing direct at shirleemcguire@yahoo.co.uk.


PIN INTEREST

Bright ideas, fabulous products, clever tips & quick reads

SNIPPET

Man & Machine

Here’s a little tribute to three fathers of sewing-machine design. THOMAS SAINT (England, 1790) – This London cabinetmaker was the first to conceive a design for a workable sewing machine, which used the chain-stitch method. BARTHÉLEMY THIMONNIER (France, 1829) – Introduced sewing machines into factories, but workers felt displaced and set about destroying the machinery. ELIAS HOWE (USA, 1846) – Got the first US patent, with a machine using a lockstitch design.

FIRST REVEAL!

HOMESPUN’S NEW 2016 BLOCK OF THE MONTH

Natalie Bird and Homespun would like to invite you to FOXLEY VILLAGE – the enchanting new BOM, which will feature in 10 issues of Homespun, from February through to November, 2016. This fabulous fantasy design of foxes on rooftops, kittens in teahouses, stacked geese and twittering birds, schoolhouse, cottages and quilt store is Natalie Bird’s finest work. Foxley Village is where Little House on the Prairie meets the very best contemporary design. You’re going to love it!

YOU’D THINK IT WAS SPRING

Take a look at these fresh, fabulous and gloriously graphic new designs from Art Gallery Fabrics. Designed by Katarina Roccella, they’re part of the new ‘Avant Garde’ range, just released this month. They are distributed locally by Craft Project – Charles Parsons, ph 1300 364 422 or email info@craftproject.com.au. (To see more of the latest collections, go to issuu.com/artgalleryfab/docs/lookbook_new_collections_1516.) Homespun

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PIN INTEREST

WHO NEEDS CONIFERS?

MAKE IT A YUMMY XMAS

It’s not so much a matter of baking as making to get this particular variety of gingerbread house, from the creative recipe book of Jessica Anderson, of Cutesy Crafts. Such a lovely idea for a tree decoration – and the roof comes off so you can store the little gingerbead men inside. Love the buttoned roof slates! If you go to cutesycrafts. com/2013/12/felt-gingerbread-house-ornament.html, Jessica will guide you through her full tutorial.

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Homespun

Cross-stitch tree photograph: Martin Vecchio

Think about substituting your traditional Christmas tree with something a little crafty this year. Jessica Decker suggests a giant cross-stitch fir, complete with a big X-star as a crowning glory. If you want to see more of Jessica’s creativity, go to jdmakesthings.com. She’s an art director, graphic designer and maker of things, so she’s a storehouse of ideas.


Flex'n Glide Bodkins

- Handy length and flexibility allow smooth passage even along curves. - Flex'n Glide Bodkin eye features grippers to ensure drawstring remains firmly in place. - Large bodkin eye is ideal for easy threading of wide or narrow drawstring.

Art No.9581

Long, flexible bodkins quickly With sturdy grippers! pull drawstring through casing.

Clip'n Glide Bodkin - Clip provides firm hold on elastic end for pulling through casing with ease. Suitable elastic width:5/8 in.(15mm) or wider Width of casing opening:3/4 in.(20mm) or wider - Exceptional flexibility ensures smooth passage along curvy areas.

Clip provides firm hold on elastic end! Long, flexible bodkin pulls elastic through casing with ease!

Art No.9582

Elastic Lock Set

- Elastic Lock firmly holds elastic or tape ends and prevents slipping into casing (figure 1). - Side clips for locking two elastics simultaneously-easily pull two rows of elastics through casing (figure 2)!

Side clips Set includes Elastic Lock for firm hold and flexible bodkin for elastic.

Art No.9583

Easily holds two elastics at once!

No more elastic slippage!

Distributors in Australia

Distributor in New Zealand

Ascot Lane Distributors(Australia) Pty Ltd

Birch Haberdashery & Craft

QH Textiles Pty Ltd

Ascot Lane Distributors(NZ) Limited

www.ascotlane.com.au

www.birchhaby.com.au

www.qhtextiles.com

www.ascotlanedistributorsnz.co.nz


PIN INTEREST

MARK MY WORDS This cute stitched bookmark is the brainchild of Minki Kim, from Minki’s Work Table. For more sweet inspiration, check out Minki’s website at minkikim.com or connect to instagram.com/zeriano. And her patterns are for sale at sewingillustration.com.

AND RIGHT BACK AT YA … We love ya fabric artwork, too, Lisa Stubbs! This natty little gnat caught our attention, then won our hearts, here at Homespun. Its beguiling expression is as appealing as Lisa’s great skill with upcycled children’s clothes, beads, buttons and felt. She also does kids’ book illustration and beautiful screenprints, so her website, www.lisastubbsillustration.com, is like an exhibition. And you can also buy her work on Etsy, www.etsy.com/uk/shop/LilSonnySky.

SLEEP, PERCHANCE TO SEW Olga Becker credits part of her love of vibrant embroidery to her Ukrainian heritage, and her genes certainly kicked in when she spotted a pair of vintage stitched pillowcases at a garage sale – for just 50 cents each. In a matter of 15 minutes, she had created a sew-easy, elastic-waisted skirt for a young girl. For more smart ideas, go to her Coffee & Thread blog (www.coffeeandthread.com), or you can link directly through to her step-by-step tutorial at www.coffeeandthread.com/2013/07/vintage-pillow-skirt-tutorial.html. Those long enough in the tooth will remember the hippy era, when bandanas were everywhere – there was always a sea of them at rock festivals and peace marches. Well, here’s proof that good design (albeit a rarity in the hippy vintage!) is perennial. While hippies have come and gone, classic bandanas live on – and Jemima Schlee has just put out a book to celebrate and utilise them. Called Take a Bandana – 16 Beautiful Projects for Your Home, the book shows a selection of ideas, from bags to bunting. It’s published by Guild of Master Craftsman Publications (distributed locally by Capricorn Link). Get it at craft shops or by mail order from www.candobooks.com.au. Phone (02) 4560 1600 or email sales@capricornlink.com.au.

HIP HIPPY HOORAY!

WHAT A HOOT!

These cross-body owl purses make you smile, just to look at them. The fact that they are useful, as well as adorable, only adds to their charm. Suzanne Smith, from Just Another Hang Up, is responsible for their creation, and you’ve got to admit she’s done a great job. These and other birds and critters are available from JustAnotherHangUp.Etsy.com. Or just browse Suzanne’s blog and Facebook at JustAnotherHangUp. blogspot.com, www.facebook.com/justanotherhangup respectively.

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Homespun


Brother NV950 Sewing & Embroidery Machine

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PIN INTEREST

LOVE HIM, LOVE IT, LOVE HEART “Lockets are the best of both worlds, because they look simple from the outside, but inside they’re hugely personal, as they often hold a photo of someone special to you,” says the creator of this hand-stitched heart keepsake, Sarah Wissinger, of The Surznick Common Room, www.thesurznickcommonroom.com. Sarah was originally inspired by a similar project she found on Etsy, but by the time she went to buy the locket, it was no longer available and there was no shop name that she could give due credit to here. So she put her heart into her own creation.

MAKE A DATE WITH HOMESPUN It’s that time of year again, when you zip out and buy your copy of Homespun’s new diary for the upcoming year – and we promise you a treat with our 2016 design. It’s full of glorious colour, inspired design and extra-helpful Dos & Don’ts from some of the world’s best stitching designers. Have a flick through at your local newsagent or craft shop … we just know you’re going to be tempted. If you can’t find a copy, ask your newsagent to order it in or hop online to order from www.paperpocket.com.au.

SPOOLING RESOURCES Susan Lenz has a passion for vintage spools, and who can blame her? They are so evocative of times past and long-forgotten crafting. Even their little paper labels have a charm all their own. But most of us would love and leave, whereas Susan took these domestic treasures to new heights, decorating hundreds of them with hand stitching. The effect of them amassed is glorious, with the colours combining like the contents of a jewel chest. Just sharing the picture is a pleasure. For more, go to Susan’s website, www.susanlenz.com, and blog, artbysusanlenz.blogspot.com.

ORDER AMONG CARDBOARD CATS Necessity, as we all know, is the mother of invention, and this was definitely a necessity for Gloria Chen, who in a tidying-up frenzy came upon a bag-load of tangled threads. Before she had a chance to let herself off, she cut out rectangles of cardboard, with spikes at the top to represent cats’ ears, and used these brilliantly simple creations to sort out all her problems. And they sorted them out in the cutest possible way. Go directly to the tutorial on Gloria’s Little White Whale site at little-white-whale.com/2013/09/diy-string-organizers.

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Quote If I stitch fast enough, does it count as aerobic exercise? known

‒ Author Un


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Pattern & Palette Play

Orchestrate harmonious fabric compositions with a whole band of coordinates, a complementary duet or stunning solo arrangement. Encore! Compiled by Janai Velez 20

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01 RJR Fabrics ‘Perfect Pitch’ 2456-001, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 02 RJR Fabrics ‘Perfect Pitch’ 2459-001, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 03 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK1566015 (Ivory colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 04 RJR Fabrics ‘Perfect Pitch’ 2458-003, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 05 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK1569114 (Natural colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 06 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK156612 (Black colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 07 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK1566315 (Ivory colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 08 RJR Fabrics ‘Perfect Pitch’ 2457-001, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 09 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2236-002, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 10 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK156913 (Red), by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 11 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2233-001, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 12 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK156602 (Black colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 13 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK1566115 (Ivory colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 14 Nutex Wholesalers ‘Novelties’ Music to my Ears 88430, col.101. Distributed by Nutex Wholesalers. 15 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK15660186 (Silver colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 16 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2235-001, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 17 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK156613 (Red), by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 18 RJR Fabrics ‘Perfect Pitch’ 2460-001, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 19 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2233-002, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles.

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Q Dayview Textiles: (02) 9607 2724,

www.dayviewtextiles.com.au. Q Leutenegger: (02) 8046 4100,

sales@leutenegger.com.au, www.leutenegger.com.au. Q Nutex Wholesalers: New Zealand (09) 846 6366, craft@nutex.co.nz. Q Two Green Zebras: (02) 9553 7201, sales@twogreenzebras.com, www.twogreenzebras.com.

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Fabrics shown were available at the time of going to print. Check with the suppliers for current availability and your nearest stockist.

Suppliers:

20 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK156624 (Blue colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 21 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2237-002, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 22 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK156633 (Red colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 23 Andover Fabrics ‘Bessie and the Dairyinettes’ D8102B, designed by Suite 1500. Distributed by Leutenegger. (Released this month, available January 2016.) 24 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK156622 (Black colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 25 Andover Fabrics ‘Bessie and the Dairyinettes’ D8102G, designed by Suite 1500. Distributed by Leutenegger. (Released this month, available January 2016.) 26 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2238-002, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 27 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK15663186 (Silver colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 28 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘In Tune’ RK1566215 (Ivory colourway), designed by Studio RK. Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 29 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2234-003, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 30 RJR Fabrics ‘All Amped Up’ 2232-001, designed by Dan Morris. Distributed by Dayview Textiles.


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SALVAGE

Photography: Franziska Taube/living4media/Picture Media

Breathe new life into little leftovers, small scraps and otherwise wasted remnants with clever ideas that demonstrate your creativity.

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Cutting edge

Recent food and entertaining hype may spell culinary excellence, but it puts pressure on dinnerparty hosts to outperform friends. They not only need to serve up something scrummy, but also have to make the table presentation special. Designer dinnerware is one solution but it’s a little easy – and expensive. And, besides, we think Homespun readers might prefer something that requires a little creative ingenuity. Hence our buttoned-up approach. Let’s start with the cutlery. This natty presentation idea couldn’t be simpler – and it’s a super-fun way to make use of surplus buttons. The buttons need to be generous enough in size to take fine gift-wrap ribbon threaded through their holes to secure them in place. In a matter of seconds, you’ve created a conversation-starter decoration to score you entertaining points.

Bread and button

This will take a bit longer than tying up pieces of cutlery, but it makes a splendid sister concept, converting a cheap placemat into a decorator feature. The starting point, of course is to ransack your button jar for a few leftovers. We’ve shown two coordinating designs here, but you can create an equally effective mood with a mix of colours and patterns. Next, whip down to your local $2 store and buy some cheap and cheerful plain placemats and stitch your chosen buttons around the perimeter of each mat. Ours are zigzagged a little, just to help break up the rigid lines a bit. If you’re a little tight for time, a button stitched to each corner would still look cute and would tie in well with your eating-irons buttons. Homespun

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Forest Fableâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a whimsical tale of woodland creatures, inspired by traditional folk art and updated with bright modern colours. Look closely and you will find delightful details like tiny ladybirds and wild berries hidden amongst the branches!

Designed and distributed in Australia by Leutenegger. For free projects and to find your nearest stockists, contact: phone: +61 2 8046 4100 fax: +61 2 8046 4199 email: cservice@leutenegger.com.au web: www.leutenegger.com.au


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Spell it out in … Black and white never looked so good. No grey area here – if you want dramatic impact, commit to full-on, power-packed monochromatics.

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01 ink & weave tea towels are made from linen and are screen-printed with deliciously dry messages. 02 Function and aesthetically focused design have intersected at Fenton & Fenton. We love the criss-cross pattern on the ‘Ike Rope’ chair, which is suitable for indoor and outdoor use. 03 Update your tableware with striking Ikea solutions. We’ve mixed and matched products from the Tickar, Ungdom and Skäck ranges. 04 This clock has numbers; just not for telling the time! Contact Independence Studios for your nearest retailer of the scrambled ‘Mixed #’s’ clock. 05 MiniWilla’s whimsically graphic ‘Hello’ tray is made from birch and is available from Leo and Bella. 06 We love the fun print, moccasin silhouette and tassel detail on this Radical Yes! dotty design. 07 “I wanted to make a chair that has a distinct character but is still simple and natural in appearance,” says designer Johanna Jelinek. The ‘Vilmar’ chair is from Ikea.


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08 Intricate patterning juxtaposed with blocks of black – ‘The Climb’ woodland print is by Asher Boardman. Contact Quirky Fox for this limited-edition piece. 09 Add some extra love to meal times with these affectionate salt and pepper shakers. Contact Anjian Australia for more information. 10 Classic chair, classic comfort, classic black and white. This ‘Chloe’ design is available from Eco Chic. 11 Wee Gallery’s nesting dolls feature a bear, fox and owl. They come packaged inside one another and are sold through Leo and Bella. 12 General Eclectic’s ‘White Feather’ design canister has an airtight wooden lid, so it’s perfect for stylish food storage. It’s available from Bean Home & Body. 13 Tinker Finca’s bow ties are magnetic and come in a great range of patterns and materials. 14 Teddy and I’s gorgeous baby shoes are made from cotton drill with faux-suede soles. 15 Ikea’s ‘Önskedröm’ cushion features rows of quirky cartoon birds. 16 Scoot to the Milton & King site for beautiful wallpaper styles, including this one with Vespas. It’s designed by Ingrid + Mika.

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WHERE TO BUY Q Anjian Australia: (03) 9544 9918, www.anjian.com.au.

Q Bean Home & Body: beanhomebody.com.au. Q Eco Chic: 1300 897 715, www.ecochic.com.au. Q Fenton & Fenton: (03) 9533 2323, www.fentonandfenton.com.au.

Q Ikea: (02) 8020 6641, www.ikea.com.au. Q Independence Studios: 1800 819 270, www.isgift.com.

Q ink & weave: 0410 404 487, www.inkandweave.com. Q Leo and Bella: 0438 733 088, leoandbella.com.au. Q Milton & King: (07) 3162 5030, www.miltonandking.com.

Q Quirky Fox: +64 (6) 278 6909, www.quirkyfox.co.nz. Q Radical Yes!: www.radicalyes.com.au. Q Teddy and I: www.teddyandI.etsy.com. Q Tinker Finca: www.tinkerfinca.etsy.com,

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tinkerfinca@gmail.com. Turn the page to find Vicki Knight’s graphic quilt

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POSITIVE & NEGATIVE

Just recently, Vicki Knight has been in a black-and-white ‘frame’ of mind – stitching her monochromatic squares to contain let-me-loose colour. White borders with symmetrical black outlines bring together Escher-style graphics and cottagey patchwork. Picture perfect!

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Materials Q Large assortment of scrap fabrics – about 3m (31⁄4yd) in total (blocks and Borders 1 and 3) Q 90cm (1yd) white tone-ontone spot print fabric – see Vicki’s Fabric Tip (blocks) Q 1m (11⁄8yd) charcoal grey tone-on-tone spot print fabric (blocks) 32

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Q 1.1m (11⁄4yd) white toneon-tone leaf print fabric (Borders 2 and 3) Q 60cm (3⁄4yd) blue print fabric (binding) Q 4.2m (45⁄8yd) backing fabric Q Batting at least 210cm (82in) square Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in and free-motion feet

Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 188cm (74in) square Finished block size: 12in Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics

be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. The blocks and Borders 1 and 3 in this quilt are also jelly-roll friendly. Seam allowances of 1⁄4in are used throughout. Accurate cutting and sewing are very important if Borders 1 and 3 are to fit properly.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Cutting

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From the assorted scrap fabrics, cut: • 696 squares, 21⁄2in (blocks and Borders 1 and 3). From the white tone-on-tone spot print fabric, cut: • 21 strips, 11⁄2in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 24 strips, 11⁄2 x 41⁄2in (inner block frames); 24 strips, 11⁄2 x 61⁄2in (inner block frames); 24 strips, 11⁄2 x 101⁄2in (outer block frames); and 24 strips, 11⁄2 x 121⁄2in (outer block frames). From the charcoal grey tone-ontone spot print fabric, cut: • 23 strips, 11⁄2in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 26 strips, 11⁄2 x 41⁄2in (inner block frames); 26 strips, 11⁄2 x 61⁄2in (inner block frames); 26 strips, 11⁄2 x 101⁄2in (outer block frames); and 26 strips, 11⁄2 x 121⁄2in (outer block frames). From the white tone-on-tone leaf print fabric, cut: • Seven strips, 31⁄2in across the width of the fabric (Border 2) • Five strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 72 squares, 21⁄2in (Border 3). From the blue print fabric, cut: • Eight strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding).

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Choose four assorted 21⁄2in squares and join them in two pairs of two. Press the seams towards the darker fabrics where possible. With the seams abutted so they match perfectly, sew the pairs of squares together to make a four-patch unit. It should measure 41⁄2in square, raw edge to raw edge.

Diagram 1

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Referring to Diagram 1, stitch a 11⁄2 x 41⁄2in charcoal grey spot print strip to the left and right edges of the four-patch unit and press the seams outwards. Repeat this step to sew a 11⁄2 x 61⁄2in charcoal grey spot print strip to the top and bottom edges, pressing as before. Join two strips of three assorted 21⁄2in squares and two strips of five assorted 21⁄2in squares. Referring to Diagram 2, join a three-square strip to the left and right edges of the block and press the seams towards the grey fabric. Sew a five-square strip to the top and bottom of the block, pressing as before. It should measure 101⁄2in square, raw edge to raw edge. Referring to Diagram 3, stitch a 11⁄2 x 101⁄2in charcoal grey spot print strip to the left and right edges of the block and press the seams outwards. Sew a 11⁄2 x 121⁄2in charcoal grey spot print strip to the top and bottom of the block to finish, pressing as before. Repeat Steps 6-10 to make a total of 13 charcoal grey blocks. They should measure 121⁄2in square, raw edge to raw edge.

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White spot blocks

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Repeat Steps 6-10, substituting white spot print fabric strips for the charcoal grey strips, to make a total of 12 blocks.

Assembly

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Lay out the charcoal grey and white blocks in five rows of five blocks, alternating the colours as

Diagram 2

White spot block

shown in the photograph of the quilt. Move the blocks around – swapping charcoal blocks with other charcoal blocks, and white blocks with other white blocks – and rotate them until you’re happy with the overall balance of the colours. Join the blocks together in rows, pressing the seams towards the darker fabric. Replace the rows in the layout as you go.

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Diagram 3 Homespun

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VICKI’S FABRIC TIP There isn’t much difference visually between the white toneon-tone spot and leaf print fabrics listed in the requirements, and you can use the same fabric in both parts of the quilt if you so desire – you’ll need 1.9m (21⁄8yd). The reason I used two different fabrics is because I ran out of the first one and couldn’t buy any more.

VICKI’S CUTTING TIP Try fussy cutting some of your scrap fabric squares to add another element of visual interest and to entice people to take a closer look at your quilt.

VICKI’S MACHINEQUILTING TIP Always have a practice quilt sandwich beside your quilting table. Each time you sit down to do some freemotion machine quilting, quilt for a few minutes on your practice piece to get your eye in and your hands moving smoothly before starting on your quilt top.

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Join the rows together, abutting the seams, to complete the quilt centre. It should measure 601⁄2in square, raw edge to raw edge. Border 1 Join two strips of 30 assorted 21⁄2in squares and two strips of 32 assorted 21⁄2in squares. Mark the centre points of the pieced strips and quilt centre panel with pins. Sew the 30-square strips to the left and right edges of the quilt, matching the centres and ends, and press the seams towards the quilt

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Binding diagrams

40cm (16in)

Rule a line along the 45-degree fold

Mitring corners

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Join the ends by matching the fold line and the drawn line and sewing them together. Trim the seam, press it open and refold the binding, then finish sewing it to the quilt.


centre. Stitch the 32-square strips to the top and bottom edges and press as before. The quilt should measure 641⁄2in square, raw edge to raw edge. Border 2 Join the 31⁄2in white tone-ontone strips end to end to make one long strip and press the seams open. From the long strip, cut: • Two strips, 31⁄2 x 641⁄2in • Two strips, 31⁄2 x 701⁄2in. Sew the 641⁄2in strips to the left and right edges of the quilt, matching the centres and ends, and press the seams towards Border 1. Stitch the 701⁄2in strips to the top and bottom edges and press as before. Border 3 Lay out 17 assorted print 21⁄2in squares alternating with 18 white tone-on-tone print 21⁄2in squares, starting and ending with white squares. Join the squares into a strip. It should measure 21⁄2 x 701⁄2in. Repeat to make another strip the same. Sew these strips to the left and right edges of the quilt and press the seams towards Border 2.

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Getting to know … VICKI KNIGHT How did you start your sewing career? I’m not sure if I have a ‘sewing career’, as such. Sewing to me is fun; it’s a hobby. I started contributing my quilts for publication after a magazine contacted me and asked if I’d be interested in having my patterns published. My first reaction was to say no. At that stage, I hadn’t been quilting for long and had never used or even read a pattern, so the idea of writing one was extremely daunting. When I asked a friend what she thought, she said “Of course you can write a pattern”, so I did. I’m glad that she had faith in me when I was doubting myself. What would you do without sewing? I really don’t know what I’d be doing if I weren’t sewing. I’ve

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Lay out 19 assorted print 21⁄2in squares and 18 white tone-ontone print 21⁄2in squares, starting and ending with scrap squares. Join the squares into a strip. It should measure 21⁄2 x 741⁄2in. Repeat to make another strip the same. Sew these strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt and press the seams towards Border 2.

Finishing

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Remove the selvedges and cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths. Sew the pieces together side by side with a 1⁄2in seam to make a backing about 82in square. Press the seam open. The quilt top, backing and batting are ready to take to a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth out the backing fabric on the floor with right side down and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is free of wrinkles. After pressing the quilt top, lay it, right side up, on top of the batting and

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been doing some form of crafting all my life and can’t imagine living without it. Sewing in it’s different forms has always been my favourite thing to do. I suppose, if I weren’t sewing, I’d be doing some other craft, maybe scrapbooking. What are the stitching tools you couldn’t live without? I’m not someone who has to have the latest gadgets and new tools. My needs are fairly simple – a cutting mat, ruler, cutter and my sewing machine. I think I’d find life difficult without my ¼in darning and walking feet, though. Do you relish the time you spend in your workroom/studio? I love that my sewing room is mine. When my husband and I were looking for a house to buy, one of my priorities was that the house must have a sewing room. Sewing is an important part of my life, and I feel privileged to have my own space. It’s a bit on the small side, needs to be painted, could use new curtains, etc, but it’s mine, and I am grateful for it. What would you like to change about your workspace? I need more storage in my sewing room. It would be so nice to have somewhere to put all of my stuff and close the cupboard door. I’d also like to be able to set up my ironing board somewhere other than in the doorway. I’m very conscious of the iron cord sticking out as you walk in the door; I keep tucking it back under the ironing board, but it sneaks out again. I live in fear that someone will catch their foot in it and end up on the floor with a hot iron on top of them. One day, I’ll have the room painted and, with some luck,

baste the three layers together with safety pins or thread. Quilt as desired. Vicki quilted a free-motion Baptist’s Fan pattern over her quilt in white thread. Trim the excess backing fabric and batting 1⁄4in outside the edge of the quilt top. Join the binding strips, end to end, with diagonal seams to make one length. Trim the seams to 1⁄4in and press them open. Fold the binding in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, sew the binding to the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 34 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch the folded edge to the back of the quilt by hand. Label and date your quilt to finish. Vicki would love to see any quilts made from her design (via email).

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For contact details for Vicki Knight, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

I’ll find some wall space to hang some of my small quilts. Maybe what I really need is for the cleaning fairy to visit every night. If the room were cleaned and tidied each night, there’d be more floor space. How many different crafts do you do? Patchwork has taken over my life these days. I’ve tried many different crafts but I rarely do any others now. I’d like to have time to do some scrapbooking again. I have so many photos waiting for my attention, and my scrapbooking stuff is taking up valuable space in my sewing room. Do you take your stitching with you on holidays? Of course my stitching goes on holidays with me! I need to keep my hands busy, whether I’m on holidays or not. Stitching is so much a part of me that I don’t like to be without it. One of the first things that I organise when getting ready to go away is something to stitch. The last time I went away, I didn’t have a project that I could take, so I drew up a design that had been floating around in my head for a while just so I could made a start on it while I was away. I also have a notebook that I use when I’m travelling. I find travelling very inspiring and, as I’m lucky enough to travel quite often, I have to use my notebook to get ideas down quickly. It can be a bit overwhelming at times. Have you got lots of projects waiting to be done? My mind often works in overdrive, and projects form a queue in my brain. Sometimes, they even have a bit of a tussle over which is next in line! Some queue jumping happens at times: some designs can be really pushy!

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BELL BIRDS

It takes an expat to truly appreciate the glories of an Australian Christmas. Prue Scott, temporarily living in Germany, pays tribute to carolling bush choruses with embroidered bird decorations.

THE CAROL OF THE BIRDS Out on the plains the brolgas are dancing Lifting their feet like war horses prancing Up to the sun the woodlarks go winging Faint in the dawn light echoes their singing Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day Down where the tree ferns grow by the river There where the waters sparkle and quiver Deep in the gullies bell-birds are chiming Softly and sweetly their lyric notes rhyming Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day Friar birds sip the nectar of flowers Currawongs chant in the wattle tree bowers In the blue ranges lorikeets calling Carols of bushbirds rising and falling Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day Music: William G. James/ Lyrics: John Wheeler

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CHRISTMAS SPECIAL MAKE


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Materials Q Scraps of linen fabric in grey, white, light brown and red Q Stranded embroidery cottons in white and red to match the linens – Prue used DMC Winter White (3865) and Very Dark Shell Pink (221) Q 25cm (1⁄4yd) fine white cord (hanging loop) Q Fibre fill 38

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Q Two tiny dark grey buttons or beads (eyes) Q Tracing paper Q Stuffing tool such as a chopstick Q Water-erasable fabricmarking pen Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, blanket stitch, colonial knot, detached chain (lazy daisy)

stitch, fly stitch, ladder stitch, satin stitch, straight stitch Finished size: 10.5cm (41⁄8in) body plus 7cm (23⁄4in) tail Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. Materials and instructions are given for one bird decoration. Seam allowances of 7mm (generous 1⁄4in) are included

throughout, except for the wings, which are raw-edge blanket-stitch appliqué. Work the embroidery on the wings and face after construction of the bird is complete. Two strands of embroidery thread are used throughout. Instructions are given for working from the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net. au and print them out.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Preparation and cutting

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To make one bird, trace two wings and one each of the tail, back, stomach and side templates from the Pattern Sheet onto tracing paper, transfer the labels and markings and cut them out. Trace a wing embroidery design onto each of the wing templates. Prue used one design for each of her birds. If you’re only making one bird, select one of the designs or you could do a different design on each wing if you prefer. From the linen scraps, cut: • One side and one side in reverse from grey • One back and one tail from white • One wing, one wing in reverse and one tail from light brown • One stomach from red. Using the water-erasable fabricmarking pen, mark the fabric shapes with dots for the darts and centre matching points and a cross for the hanging loop placement on the back. Trace the embroidery design/s onto the wing shapes. Putting a light source behind the tracing paper helps make the design visible through the fabric. Or do as Prue did and transfer the designs after the birds are constructed by placing the tracing paper shapes over the blanket-stitched wings, pinning through the paper at the main points of the motifs and then removing the tracing paper leaving the pins still in place. You can either draw the design by eye using the pins as guides or just use the pins to guide your stitch placement.

STITCHERY GUIDE Small leaf

see page 40

Multi-leaf stems

Design area

Stitch

Stem and outline

Backstitch

Veins

Fly stitch and straight stitch

Stem

Backstitch

Leaves

Detached chain (lazy daisy stitch)

Centre vein and outline

Backstitch

Side veins

Straight stitch

Leaves and stem

Backstitch

Inner centre

Satin stitch

Outer centre

Backstitch

Petals

Open detached chain (lazy daisy) stitch

Stem

Backstitch

Leaves

Satin stitch

Flower head

Backstitch

Stamens

Colonial knots

see page 40

2

Large leaf see page 40

3

Flower 1

see page 42

4

Flower 2

see page 42

Assembly

5

Using the marked dots on the fabric and the dotted lines on the side tracing-paper templates as guides,

sew the four darts in each of the grey side shapes. Press the back two darts towards the front and the front two darts towards the back on each side.

PRUE’S SEAMING TIP If you have difficulty attaching the red and white pieces to the grey fabric because of the sharpness of the curve, try doing it in two parts: sew one side and then the other. You might also want to try tacking the seam once you have pinned it all in place.

Step 7

Face Homespun

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Small leaf

6

With right sides together, match the two side shapes along the centre front and sew the beak seam from A to B. Trim the point and clip the curves. With right sides together, pin the red stomach shape to the darted edge of the sides, matching the B dots. Use lots of pins to ease the grey fabric around the tight curve of the red shape. Stitch the seam and clip the curves. Repeat the pinning and sewing process to join the white back piece to the upper edge of the grey side pieces, but this time, leave an opening of 3cm (11⁄4in) along one side. Turn the bird right side out through the opening. (At this stage, there will also be an opening at the centre back where the tail will be inserted.)

9

Stuff the bird body with fibre fill until it’s plump and rounded. Use small neat ladder stitches to close the side opening. Match the white and light brown tail pieces and sew around them, leaving the short straight end open. Trim the seam and clip the curves. Turn the tail right side out through the opening at the end. Lightly stuff the tail with fibre fill – you want it to be just firm enough to stand up, but still fairly flat. Insert the narrow end of the tail into the hole at the back of the bird and ladder stitch it neatly in

Large leaf

place, closing this opening completely as you go.

Embroidery

7

10

13

8

11 12

14

PRUE’S STUFFING TIP When stuffing your bird, it’s very helpful to use a chopstick (or something similar) to push the filling inside. This helps to get it into all the nooks and crannies, such as the front of the head and up into the tail.

40

Multi-leaf stems

Homespun

Pin a fabric wing on each side of the stuffed bird body. Blanket stitch the wings in place with white or red thread. Prue chose to mix up the red and white colours between her birds, doing the blanket stitch and centre motif in one colour and the two outer motifs in the other colour. If you haven’t already transferred the embroidery design/s onto the wings, do so now. Refer to the Stitchery Guide for the


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Getting to know …

PRUE SCOTT You’re living for a short while in Germany, aren’t you? Yes, we are living here for five years, at this stage – my husband is working in an International Christian boarding school here. Is that a culture shock for your Australian family, especially at Christmas? It’s strange having to get your head around winter at Christmas, although where we lived in Sydney had experienced its fair share of cold Christmas Days in recent years. Somehow, it feels odd not to have salads for Christmas lunch. There was no snow here on Christmas Day last year, but we did get some just before New Year’s. How did you celebrate last Christmas? As we have always done in Australia, we went to church to celebrate the reason for Christmas

– Jesus’s birth – and then, unlike in Australia, where we would normally spend the rest of the day with family, we went to some friends’ place for lunch and had raclette – a traditional cheesy grilled dish of this region. You have young children, don’t you, so Christmas would be pretty special in your house, right? Last year was the first time I remember having a REAL Christmas tree, and the German firs used for Weihnachtsbäume (Christmas trees) are beautiful. Our youngest daughter and I went and picked the tree, and then we all decorated it together. We didn’t bring any of our Christmas decorations with us, so last year we didn’t have all the Christmas craft decorations that the kids have made at school over the years. I’m sure that will be remedied while we are here! Do you make lots of your own decorations and gifts for Christmas? I made a few decorations, including a snowflake wallhanging for our entryway, but was still getting to know the shops in the area where I could buy supplies, so I didn’t make too much last year. My mum sent a parcel of decorations over from Australia, including some Christmas bunting that she had handmade for us. Germany has some beautiful traditional Christmas decorations, though, so I look forward to accumulating some of those in the future. What’s your favourite part about the festive season? Remembering the reason for Christmas – when my saviour, Jesus, was born. I also did really like the magic of Christmas in winter last year – there was a totally different atmosphere when our little town was decorated with lots of Christmas trees down the main street. Rather different from sweltering temperatures and days at the beach or in the pool.

Do you like to live it up at Christmas or enjoy the downtime for crafting? Christmas time is holidays, so there’s not much time for crafting, because our three kids and my husband are home on holidays. Christmas is usually filled with lots of family things. Do you take stitching projects with you when you go on holidays? I actually usually don’t – mainly because we spend time doing things as a family, and there isn’t so much extra available time for me to quietly sew. How long have you enjoyed sewing? Since I was a kid. I remember the first time I used the sewing machine was when I made some clothes for my Cabbage Patch doll. My twin sister, Yvette Stanton, and I used to make little mouse dolls and sell them to our friends at school. My sister and I really got into embroidery at high school, though, with some very encouraging Textiles and Design teachers, particularly a lady named Miss Gurney. What are your favourite colours and prints to work with? I’m usually drawn to greens, blues and the cooler shades of red – spring type colours, though at times I like to push myself to try using a different colour palette. There isn’t really a particular type of printed fabric I like to work with, apart from trying to avoid prints that might date quickly. I want my designs to be timeless. Do you have enough time to make all the things you want to make? No! Of course not! I’ll also admit that I’m guilty of a short attention span at times, too, and have many unfinished projects. Shhh, don’t tell my husband! If you had one crafting wish, what would it be? For the kids not to play with my sewing machine, particularly while I’m using it!

stitches to use for each motif and use the photographs as guides to colour placement. When the embroidery is complete, sew the tiny dark grey buttons or beads in place for the eyes with matching machinesewing thread. Satin stitch the beak at the point of the face using red thread. Tie the ends of the cord together in a tight knot, trim the ends and stitch the knot to the back of the bird at the marking to make the hanging loop. Now, can you stop at just one?

15 16 17

For contact details for Prue Scott, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine. 42

Homespun

Flower 1

Flower 2


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A Country Tea Party

Block of the Month by Libby Richards Tilda Fabrics used $32.00 per month Also available Cottage Garden threads and DMC used in this quilt.


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Australian Homespun


What a cute idea!

HAPPY HOUNDSTOOTH CHRISTMAS It makes sense that English country squires (round, ruddy and rollicking – pip, pip!) would have an affinity with Santa (also round, ruddy and rollicking – ho, ho!). But Becky Smith did such a fine job of introducing one to the other, that the spirit of the two materialised as these cheerily aristocratic Lord of the Manor/St Nic Christmas stockings. All tweedy, houndstoothy and tartan-esque, some are patterned with pups and ponies. You can buy these from Becky’s appropriately named Smokin’ Tweed shop; go to www.smokintweed.etsy.com.

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RAINBOW OF STARS

Who needs pots of gold at the end of the rainbow when there are treasures enough in Roslyn Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s galaxy-of-colour cushion?

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Homespun

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Materials Q 16 assorted coloured print fabric scraps (Star blocks) Q 16 assorted low-volume print fabric scraps (Star block backgrounds) Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) print fabric (cushion back) Q 56cm (22in) square of batting 48

Homespun

Q 56cm (22in) square of any cotton fabric (cushion front lining) Q 45cm (18in) zipper Q 50cm (20in) cushion insert Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1⁄4in, zipper and walking feet Q General sewing supplies

Finished size: 46cm (18in) square Finished block size: 41⁄2in Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in)

wide. Seam allowances of 1⁄4in are used throughout. Roslyn pressed her seams open throughout this project. When half-square triangle units are assembled as described here, their outer edges are on the bias grain of the fabric, making them very stretchy and unstable, so handle them with care to avoid distorting the blocks.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Cutting

1

From each of the assorted coloured print fabrics, cut: • One square 2in • One square, 31⁄2in (Star blocks). From each of the assorted low-volume print fabrics, cut: • Four squares, 2in • One square, 31⁄2in (Star block backgrounds). From the print fabric for the cushion back, cut: • One strip, 13in across the width of the fabric. Cut one rectangle, 13 x 181⁄2in. Trim the remainder of the strip to 11in, and from it, cut one rectangle, 11 x 181⁄2in.

should measure 5in square, raw edge to raw edge. Make a total of 16 Star blocks as described in Steps 4-6.

7

2

8

3

9 10

Star blocks

4

To make a block, chose both squares cut from the same coloured print fabric and all five squares cut from the same lowvolume print fabric. Match the 31⁄2in square of coloured fabric with the 31⁄2in low-volume square, right sides together. Sew all the way around the edge with a 1⁄4in seam, as shown in Diagram 1. Using a ruler and rotary cutter, cut the stitched square on both diagonals to yield four half-square triangle units. Press the seams open gently. Trim the units to measure 2in square with the seam diagonally across the centre. Lay out the matching 2in coloured square, the four half-square triangle units and four matching 2in squares of background fabric in three rows of three to form the Star block. Stitch the units in each row together, then join the rows, matching the seams, to complete the block. It

Assembly

Arrange the 16 Star blocks in four rows of four blocks and move them around until you are happy with the colour placement. Sew the blocks into rows, then join the rows to complete the front of the cushion. Press. Lay the 22in square of cotton fabric for the lining on the table, wrong side facing up, and secure it with masking tape. Smooth the square of batting over it and lay the cushion front, right side up, on top. Baste the three layers together with safety pins or your preferred method. Quilt as desired. Roslyn machine quilted pairs of parallel diagonal lines in both directions that highlighted the star points – a walking foot is recommended for this. Trim the excess lining fabric and batting level with the edge of the cushion front. Turn under 1⁄2in on one long edge of the 11 x 181⁄2in cushion back rectangle and press. With the zipper right side up, pin the pressed edge along one side of the zipper tape. Fit the zipper foot to your machine and stitch along the folded edge. When you get near the tab end, stop with the needle down, lift the presser foot, slide the tab out of the way and continue stitching to the end.

Star block

11

5

12 13

6

14

Block components

Wrong side of Star block

ROSLYN’S ACCURACY TIP Small blocks can be fiddly. When stitching your blocks, use a slow stitching speed to maintain control. This will give you better accuracy.

Diagram 1 Homespun

49


Getting to know …

ROSLYN RUSSELL Where do you live and work? I live with my husband and two daughters, aged six and four, in Melbourne. How did you start your sewing career? It all started by being inspired after borrowing a sewing book from the library and then buying a basic second-hand sewing machine from eBay. What would you do without sewing? I also really enjoy cooking as a creative outlet.

What are the stitching tools you that you simply couldn’t live without? My seam ripper and small rotary cutter. What would you like to change about your workspace? I’d love it to be bigger. I currently work in a corner of our dining room. It would also be great if it would clean itself once in a while! How many different crafts do you do? I occasionally dabble in other things, but nothing has struck a chord in quite the same way as sewing and quilting have. What’s your favourite – and why? Patchwork and small projects. I enjoy a quick finish and I love experimenting with different colours and prints in my patchwork projects. Do you like to take your stitching away with you on holidays? No – there would end up being too much luggage!! Have you got lots of projects waiting to be done? I generally like to start and complete one project at a time. I rarely have other works in progress lying around. If you were granted one secret sewing wish, what would you like it to be? To be allowed to buy as much fabric as I wanted. Step 16

15

Repeat Steps 13 and 14 with the 13 x 181⁄2in cushion back rectangle, ensuring that the top and bottom edges of the rectangles are aligned on either side of the zipper. You should now have the zipper sewn in place along both long edges of the tape with the zipper teeth exposed in the middle. To form a flap to cover the zipper, first turn the larger cushion back rectangle (shown in blue in Diagram 2) over the zipper along the stitched line so that it is wrong side up and is covering the zipper and overlapping the smaller cushion back rectangle (purple in the diagram). Press. Draw a light line on the wrong side of the fabric 1in from the stitching. Fold the cushion back rectangle over along this line so that

16

its right side is facing up again. This will have created a flap of fabric that covers the zipper. Stitch 1in from the fold through all layers to hold it in place – this line of stitching should be very close to the previous one joining the cushion back rectangle to the zipper. At the edges of the cushion back, sew across the flap within the seam allowance to keep the ends together neatly. Trim the cushion back to match the cushion front. Undo the zipper at least halfway. With right sides together, pin the cushion front and back together around the edges. Sew all the way around the cushion, being careful to keep the seam allowance

17 18

ROSLYN’S FABRIC TIPS

background, use white, cream or pale grey with subtle prints.

For the stars, choose fabrics with a strong base colour in a small print or solid. This maximises contrast and makes the stars ‘pop’ against the background. When selecting the low-volume prints for the

ROSLYN’S CUTTING TIP

Homespun

19

20

For contact details for Roslyn Russell, of Sew Delicious, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

1in

Use spray starch and give your fabrics a quick press before you start cutting. You’ll end up with much more accurate blocks.

1in

Diagram 2

50

accurate so that the star points aren’t lost in the seam. Clip the corners and neaten the edges of the seam allowance with zigzag stitching if you wish. (This will help prevent fraying when the cushion cover is washed.) Turn the cover right side out. Push the cushion insert inside the cover and fasten the zipper to finish.


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SPE FEA CIAL TUR E

MODERN MENDS

If you’ve torn it, flaunt it! Forget yesterday’s invisible mending – way too dull and discreet. Today it’s all about parading your patches with Mardi Gras flamboyance and embracing the fabric wear and tear as a blank canvas for your stitching artistry. So let rip and make some darn magic with proud patching, wicked weaves, conspicuous colour clashes, exuberant embroidery and some adorable appliqué. By Emma Bradstock

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IAL SPECTURE FEA

Patch Project ct 1: Creative Mending ending of Knitted Sleeves leeves Name: Karen Barbé bé Blog: blog.karenbarbe.com Instagram: @barbekaren Facebook: facebook.com/ karenbarbe.textileria Karen has come up with a cute way to reinforce her much-loved knitwear that was starting to flag and sag at the elbow. Using duplicate stitch (Swiss darning) to create patterned patches, she made the area stronger and much more visually interesting than your everyday plain darning.

Patch Project 2: Mending Moth Holes with Moths Name: Joanie Gorman Blog: ninimakes.typepad.com Instagram: @ninimakes While studying a moth on her window, Joanie was struck with inspiration for an embroidery design – she’d use a moth design to cover moth ho holes! Using needle felting to create the piece, sh she then added embroidered detailing and trims aro around the moth before stitching the motif ov over the offending hole. If you want follow suit, yo you can direct-message Joanie on Instagram (@ (@ninimakes) – she’ll send you the pattern.

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Patch Project 3:: Flame Sock Darn rn Name: Eirlys Penn Blog: www.scrapiana.com Turning a standard darn into a work of beauty, Eirlys followed the classic formula, creating a vertical structure first, then weaving horizontal rows of yarn in and out. Using a synthetic yarn in a contrasting colour for strength showed the mending in all of its glory. This piece was one of the earliest darns Eirlys attempted; since then, her skills have advanced to a point where she now runs a local mending group in the UK.

Patch Project 4: That Green Cardigan Name: Tom van Deijnen Blog: tomofholland.com Facebook/Instagram/Twitter: @tomofholland As a self-taught textiles practitioner, Tom creates and repairs knitted items, many of which are done as commissions for his Visible Mending Program. This particular much-loved cardigan was sent to Tom for repair. He used several different, but coordinating, mending techniques, including knitted patches and darning to create a beautiful finished effect.

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IAL SPECTURE FEA

P Patch Project 5: Doing the Slow Sew D N Name: Kim Andersen E Email: artinred44@gmail.com B Blog: artinredwagons.blogspot.com F Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/ A Art-in-Red-Wagons/204175176272271 E Etsy: www.etsy.com/shop/ aartinredwagons P Pinterest: @radioflier K Kim received a stack of her greatg grandmother’s linens, many of which w were fragile and torn in places. Not w wanting to lose her newly acquired ffamily heirlooms, Kim looked for a way tto carefully mend and strengthen them. B Being a lover of Japanese sashiko, sshe used teabag papers for patches hiko reinforced with line after line of sashiko stitching. Kim says “The paper is agile surprisingly strong, in spite of its fragile appearance. It seemed to me to be a old match made in heaven – 100-year-old linens and teabag paper.”

Patch Project 6: Tattered, Mended. Linen Blouse, 2014 on Mending (work in progress) Name: Alessandra Taccia Website: www.alessandra-taccia.com A favourite wardrobe item of Alessandra’s, this linen blouse had seen much wear, which required a little ingenuity and the Japanese technique of boro to bring it back to life. Alessandra put a patch behind the leastdamaged part with only a few frail threads, then she used sashiko stitching to reinforce the patch. To the most severely damaged sections, Alessandra wove in silk threads.

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P t hP Patch Project j t7 7: Appliqué Heart Patches Name: Kristyne Czepuryk Website/blog/shop: prettybyhand.com Instagram: @prettybyhand Pinterest: prettybyhand Although Kristyne really dislikes mending, you wouldn’t I’ pick it by this beautiful solution to holey leggings. It’s all about turning a chore into something creative to motivate Kristyne, so she took inspiration from the boring iron-on patches in store and made her own. Using pretty coordinating fabric, she fused the love-heart patches with fusible web and machine appliquéd them for extra hold. She opted for additional hearts to fill the empty spaces and to create the sweetest leggings you’ll ever see.

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IAL C E SP TURE FEA

Patch Project 8: By the Seat of My Pants Name: Champagne Maker Website: champagnemaker.com Blog: crushparty.blogspot.com Tumblr: crushculdesac.tumblr.com Instagram/Pinterest/Twitter: @champagnemaker Champagne Maker has really taken mending to the extreme, creating jeans that are wearable works of art. She used patches of Liberty of London fabrics, along with upcycled baby clothes, all embellished with embroidery stitches and plenty of French knots.

Patch Project 9: Embroidered Patched Jeans Name: Aimee Ray Etsy: www.littledear.etsy.com Blog: www.littledeartracks.blogspot.com After wearing a hole in the knee of her favourite old jeans, Aimee decided to patch them up using a technique she saw on Pinterest. “I applied Fray Check to the raw edge, so the hole wouldn’t get any bigger, then I cut a piece fabric, large enough to cover it, and ironed it on with fusible bonding tape around the edge of the hole. I added some running stitches at the edge to hold it in place, then embellished with some embroidery. I love how it turned out. I’d definitely use this technique again – I’d even consider cutting a new hole in some jeans just to repair them.”

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Patch Project 10: Boro Patched Jeans ns Name: Peggy Vonburg Blog: www.womanwithwingsblog.blogspot.com Peggy used the style of boro, a Japanese term for mended and patched cloth, to extend the life of her favourite denim jeans. Using various denim scraps cut into different shapes, such as leaves and moon designs, she hand stitched them into place with simple embroidery.

Patch Project 11: Crocheted Jean Patches Name: Kelley Freeman Email: kelley@ramenneedles.com Blog: www.ramenneedles.com Website: @ramenneedles Leftover yarn from crochet projects provided a light-bulb moment of inspiration for Kelley, when holey hell started happening with her jeans. A er jeans were as few crocheted patches later, her good as new and significantly cuter, too!

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IAL C E SP TURE FEA Patch Project 12: Mending of a Tea Towel Name: Natalie Chanin of Alabama bama Chanin m Website: AlabamaChanin.com Blog: Journal.AlabamaChanin.com Instagram: @AlabamaChanin Facebook: www.facebook.com/ VisitAlabamaChanin Natalie’s favourite 10-year-old tea towels had seen better days. With scraps of organic cotton jersey and Button Craft thread, she used seed, whip and eyelet stitches to patch up the fabric. Natalie loves the mended effect and is reminded of a quote from Sister Parish: “Even the simplest wicker basket can become priceless when it is loved and cared for through the generations of a family.”

Patch Project roject 13: Saki-ori Doryman Sweater Name: Jonathan Lukacek Blog: bandanna-almanac.com Instagram: @Bandanna_Almanac Osaka-based designer and mender need extraordinaire Jonathan Lukacek combined gee forces with Narita-san (owner of a vintage and handmade store, Brown Tabby, also in Osaka), to give new life to this sweater. Together, they repaired it with patches of sakiori fabric, which is re-spun/woven scraps that create a thicker fabric. This process runs the risk of being quite bulky, but this sweater was thick to begin with, so the patches meshed well on the elbowss and as a chest pocket. They also used sashiko darning alongside traditional darning for the small holes.

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Patch Project 14: Creative Mending g â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Patches Name: Karen BarbĂŠ Blog: blog.karenbarbe.com Instagram: @barbekaren Facebook: facebook.com/karenbarbe.textileria These patches are woven on a cardboard loom and are a creative and fun solution for mending holes in garments or just as embellishments for not-so-old ones. Karen shares her instructions:

How-to:

1

Cut a circle of cardboard (cereal box cardboard works well) and draw a grid on it. The circle here is roughly 9cm in diameter with a grid of 4mm. Draw an inner circle 4mm smaller and cut slits in all vertical lines. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go through the inner circle line. Secure the tail of your yarn on the back with masking tape and start running the vertical threads through the slits until you cover the whole circle. Start weaving in the middle, using a blunt needle. Go under the first thread, then over the second one, under the following and so on. In the next row, invert the sequence: go over the the first one (note you are working now from the opposite side), under the next one and then over the following thread and so on. The third row starts from the same side as the first one following the same sequence. You can change the colours of the yarn or experiment with different sequences; for example, going over two threads and under one for a herringbone effect. Be a little experimental. When finished, carefully remove the cardboard circle or tear it, if necessary. Hand wash your patch, weave in all tails and sew it to the material to be mended, tucking in all the border loops.

2 3

4 5 6

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One Day at a Time

Why should kids have all the fun with advent calendars? Rebecca Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s found a way to make them a family affair, with an elegant wallhanging that captures the spirit of the occasion. Fill each pocket with treats for young and old on the run-up to Christmas.

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C SPE HRISTM CIA L M AS AKE

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Materials Q 1.8m (2yd) natural linen (background) Q 80cm (7⁄8yd) pocket fabric – see Note Q 40cm (3⁄8yd) pocket trim fabric – see Note Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) binding fabric Q 1.8m (2yd) backing fabric Q Thin batting at least 180 x 90cm (70 x 34in) Q 70cm (3⁄4yd) ribbon or crochet trim Q Acrylic paint in black and white Q Fabric medium Q Stencil brush or sponge stick Q Lettering stencils – Rebecca used 5in Edwardian font upper and lower case and 3in Times New Roman – see Note Q Assorted embellishments – Rebecca used a doily, JOY cross stitch, green and brown felted wool, diamante button, crochet trim and perlé cotton – see Note Q Erasable fabric pen Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 163 x 64cm (64 x 25in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. If you wish to vary the pocket fabrics as Rebecca did, you’ll need 20cm (1⁄4yd) each of four different fabrics (dark linen, 64

Homespun

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


burlap/hessian, light linen and cream linen) and a fat eighth each of two print fabrics. Likewise, if you wish to vary the pocket top trims, you’ll need 10cm (1⁄8yd) each of

five different fabrics (linen, black stripe, dark green print, black dot and cream geometric print). Instructions are not included for the Joy cross stitch – it was in Rebecca’s stash.

Cutting

1 2 3 4

From the natural linen, cut: • One rectangle, 64 x 25in (background). From the pocket fabric/s, cut: • 22 rectangles, 61⁄2 x 6in • Three rectangles, 61⁄2 x 12in. From the pocket trim fabric/s, cut: • 22 strips, 23⁄4 x 6in • Three strips, 23⁄4 x 12in. From the binding fabric, cut: • Five strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric.

Preparation and painting

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Lay out the background rectangle on a large surface and arrange the pockets and trims on it in seven rows of four to decide on the placement of the different fabrics and sizes. Rebecca put a large pocket in the second row at the left, the fourth row at the right and the seventh row in the middle, but you can vary this if it works better for your fabrics. At the same time, decide whether you’ll have numbers on every pocket, or just have embellishments on a couple. Rebecca chose to omit the numbers on pockets 14 and 15 and to offset the number on pocket 7 to allow for the doily. She also added linen squares to the print fabric pockets so the numbers would show up clearly. Finally, decide which paint to use for which numbers. When you’re happy with the layout, label each pocket with the appropriate number, so you can replace them in the layout later. Mix the acrylic paint and fabric medium according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Centre a number stencil on a pocket rectangle and apply the paint with a vertical dabbing motion. Lift the stencil straight up from the fabric. You might want to do a test on scrap fabric first if this is a new technique for you. Repeat this step for all the pockets or fabric squares requiring numbers.

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You could source your own cross-stitch design, substitute stencilled letters or a use printed fabric. If you can’t source the lettering stencils, you could type letters and

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Measure down 12in from the top edge of the background rectangle and rule a horizontal line with the fabric pen. (The crochet trim will go across here later.) Stencil the letters for ‘Days Til Christmas’ in the area above this line – spend some time planning the spacing of the letters and centring of the words before applying the paint. Set aside all the stencilled fabric for 24 hours to dry thoroughly. Then follow the heat-setting instructions for the textile medium to set the paint permanently.

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Assembly

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Measure 141⁄2in down from the top edge of the background and rule a horizontal line to indicate the top of the first row of pockets. Measure and mark 13⁄4in from the left edge of the background – the left edge of the first pocket sits on this line. Pin pocket 1 in place, then measure and pin the next three pockets along the horizontal line with 1in between them. Check that there is 13⁄4in of background fabric to the right of pocket 4 – if not, respace the pockets so they are centred with an equal amount of space between them.

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Measure down 1⁄2in from the top edge of pocket 1 and mark a horizontal line with the fabric pen. With right sides together, lay the pocket top trim along this line, as shown in Diagram 1. Sew across the trim with a 1⁄2in seam, then press it upwards. Fold the trim over to the back of the pocket; you should have 1in of trim visible at the front. Top stitch the trim 1⁄8in above the seam to secure it in place. Repeat Steps 10-11 for all the remaining pockets. Embellish your pockets as desired – Rebecca says you can decorate them as much or as little as you want. She trimmed a doily and stitched it to pocket 7. She cut some felted wool in the shape of a tree and trunk and sewed it to pocket 15 with perlé cotton, leaving space for a diamante button for the star. She appliquéd a cross-stitch design to pocket 14, sewed crochet trim to pocket 24 and stitched the stencilled squares to the print fabric pockets. Finish the three raw edges of each pocket with zigzag or overlocking. Press under a generous 1 ⁄2in on the left, right and bottom edges of each pocket. The small pockets should measure 6 x 43⁄4in.

numbers in similar fonts at the desired size on your computer, print them out and cut the shapes out with a small craft knife, leaving little tabs to keep floating shapes in place.

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Diagram 1

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that their top edges are 1in below the bottom edge of the pockets in the first row. Sew them in place in the same manner. Repeat this step for all seven rows of pockets. Sew the ribbon or crochet trim across the background on the line you drew in Step 8 above the pockets.

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Once the position of pockets in the first row of pocket is correct, top stitch just inside their left, bottom and right edges to sew them in place on the background, reversing at the start and end of the stitching to reinforce these points. Position the next line of pockets so

otherwise wouldn’thave known how to tackle. I currently belong to a local modern quilt guild and I try to get there as often as I can. How did your business come about? My business, Chasing Cottons, started a few months after my son died. I was sewing, designing quilts and writing patterns and I decided the next step was to start a blog and sell my patterns online and in stores. I decided to name it after my son, Chase, and my obsession for fabrics and all things cotton. It has grown over the years since 2010, and I’ve loved every minute of it. I love blogs and the online community, generally. It’s such fun to be able to share what you make with an audience as passionate about sewing as you are. Do you teach your skills? The past few months, I’ve started teaching an online quilt class, called Quilt Class 101, from my blog. It’s a free online class that has step-by-step tutorials each week helping you along the way to creating your very first quilt or to brush up on a few steps you may be unsure about. It has been an interactive class with other bloggers sharing their tips and tricks. What do you like most about your quilt work? I absolutely love the designing process. I love being inspired by things all around me. I see quilt designs everywhere I go – metal screens, architecture, advertising prints and packaging designs. I love taking a small element of something and turning it into a new quilt design. I also love seeing my patterns come to life in other people’s creations. Seeing their interpretations of my quilts and how diverse they can all be with just a different colour or choice in fabric is absolutely priceless. What do your family/friends/colleagues think of your passion for the craft? My family and friends are so supportive of my sewing addiction. They read my blog and always give me so much encouragement. My hubby calls me a ‘sewlebrity’. If there were one quilting superpower you could have, what would it be? A mathematical brain! Or perhaps a body double: then there’d be one of me to do all the daily chores and another who could sit and sew.

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When did you first become interested in quilting? Growing up, I always enjoyed crafts and creating things, but it wasn’t until I went to my first craft show, in 2008, that I fell in love with quilting. It was like a whole new world had opened up to me. The fabrics, the quilts, the designs … I was in awe of what was out there and I just knew I wanted to be a part of it. What was the first quilt that you ever made? At that same craft show, I grabbed a little bundle of fabrics. I also bought a quilt pattern that was simple, just 6 inch squares and strips. However, when I had cut it all and laid it out, I wasn’t totally happy with the design. I rearranged the blocks into a new design, adding borders and pieces, and I’ve been designing my own quilts ever since. Is that original design different from your current style? Yes. Since my first quilt, I’ve taken a more modern approach to my designs. Most of my quilts still use traditional techniques, but I make the designs modern, new and different. I try to design quilts that I’ve never seen anywhere before. How many quilts and quilted items have you made? 40.

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Getting to know …

How much time can you devote to your quilts? I used to quilt around 15 hours a week, but I have little kids, and since my last child, Kobe, who was born in 2012, I’m lucky if I get to sew a couple of hours a week. But as he’s growing, he’s getting bit better at playing beside me while I sew. How does your work fit in with your family life? Quilting and sewing for me is more than just an interest – it’s a passion. On March 19, 2010, I gave birth to my third child, Chase. We discovered right after he was born that his lungs hadn’t developed properly and, after fighting for life for two days, he passed away. It was the most devastating thing for me, my husband and my two other children, Tanner and Indi. We’ve all been struggling with the loss of our little boy. But, sewing and quilting helps me heal. With the birth of our fourth child, Kobe, sewing has taken a backseat, as I cherish every moment I have with him. My lifestyle now is filled cherishing family time and little bits of sewing as I continue to make quilts and gifts for friends and loved ones. Where do you live and work? We live on the NSW Central Coast. My husband and I grew up here, and we love it. We love being close to the beach and to our extended family. What is your favourite patchwork/quilting technique? My favourite patchwork technique is corner to corner curved piecing. I use it in so many of my quilt designs. This one little curve can make so many diverse designs. Do you prefer to hand-stitch or machinestitch? I sew most of my quilts by machine, but I absolutely LOVE to hand quilt. I usually machine quilt most of the design first and I then hand quilt decorative stitching. There’s just something therapeutic about sitting quietly, or amongst children and family, and sewing. Do you belong to a guild? Do you meet with a patchwork group? When I first started quilting, I took a sampler class at my local quilt store. For anyone learning to sew or at intermediate level, I think taking a class like this is a must. I learnt so many valuable techniques that have helped me push boundaries and sew quilts I probably


Finishing

triangular pockets to hang the calendar. Join the binding strips end to end with diagonal seams to make one long length. Trim the seams and press them open. Fold the binding in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, sew the binding to the edge of the wallhanging with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 34. Turn the binding over and hand stitch it to the back of the quilt. Sew the diamante button to the top of the tree embellishment if used. Label and date your wallhanging. Rebecca suggests filling the pockets with treats, gifts, meaningful messages, service projects and other Christmas-related activities as a reminder of the reason for the season.

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Lay out the backing fabric, right side down, on a large surface and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting over the backing, ensuring it is free of wrinkles. Smooth the wallhanging top over the batting, right side up, and baste the layers together with safety pins. Quilt as desired. Rebecca machined a horizontal line between each row of pockets and either side of the crochet trim near the top. She worked a line of quilting 1in inside the left, bottom and right raw edges. Trim the excess backing fabric and batting 1⁄4in outside the edge of the wallhanging. Instead of making a full-width rod pocket, cut two squares, 4in, from scrap fabric, fold them in half diagonally and pin them to the top corners of the quilt with their raw edges level with the background. See Diagram 2. (They are secured in place as the binding is attached in Step 23.) A rod of the correct length can be slipped up into these

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REBECCA’S ASSEMBLY TIPS I found it easiest to get the positioning of the pockets even by pinning all the pockets in a row in place at a time and sewing them to the background fabric. Always do quite a few reverse stitches at both top edges of the pockets because the openings get quite a lot

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For contact details for Rebecca Johnson, of Chasing Cottons, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

of use when gifts are put in and taken out.

REBECCA’S LAYOUT TIP I always take a photo of the layout on a digital camera so I can look at it on screen. That way it’s easier to see if I have two dark colours together and if the colour balance is right than by looking at the actual project.

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POUCH OF PLENTY

When Leanne Milsom created this patchwork pouch, she made sure it was multi-purpose – not to mention gorgeous! You can use it for …

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POUCH OF PLENTY PURPOSES

 Toiletries

 Shoes

 Sewing

 iPad

 Other

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Materials Q Fat quarter of taupe handkerchief linen (pouch front panel) Q 40 charm squares, 5in (Dresden Plates and patchwork) Q Fat quarter of print fabric (lining) Q 35cm (14in) zipper

Q Batting at least 45 x 65cm (18 x 25in) Q 50cm (1⁄2yd) of 12mm (1⁄2in) wide cream lace Q Template plastic Q Freezer paper Q Compass Q Sewing machine with 1⁄4in, zipper and walking feet

Preparation and cutting

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Trace the wedge shape from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic and cut it out carefully on the line. Use the compass to draw three circles with a radius of 11⁄8in on the freezer paper – circle diameter is 21⁄4in. Cut them out carefully. From the taupe handkerchief linen, cut: • One rectangle, 31⁄2 x 16in (upper front panel) • One rectangle, 6 x 16in (lower front panel). From the charm squares, cut: • Rectangles 2in wide in various

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Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 24 x 38cm (91⁄2 x 15in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics (except the charm squares)

lengths between 11⁄8in and 2in – you’ll need sufficient to make a strip at least 16in long when they are sewn together – see Step 17 (central front panel) • 79 squares, 21⁄2in (patchwork and Dresden Plate wedges) • One rectangle, 13⁄4 x 21⁄2in, from two different fabrics (zipper end tabs). From the print fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 10 x 151⁄2in (lining). Trace around the template plastic wedge shape on the wrong side of 39 of the 21⁄2in print squares and cut them out on the drawn lines. See Leanne’s Cutting Tip.

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be pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. Seam allowances are 1⁄4in throughout. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but you can also download the digital pattern from www.homespun.net.au and print it out.

Dresden Plates

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Fold a fabric wedge in half, right sides together and long edges matching. Sew across the wider end, reversing at each end of the seam. Trim the corner and turn the wedge right side out with the seam centred at the back to make pointed tip at the wider end. See Diagram 1. Press. Repeat Step 7 to make a total of 39 wedges. Divide the wedges into three sets of 13, keeping fabric repeats to a minimum. Lay out one set of 13 wedges in a ring with a pleasing

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www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


arrangement of colours and prints. With right sides facing and keeping the order correct, sew the wedges together on their long edges, starting at the seamed end and reversing to secure. Press all the seams open. Repeat Step 10 to make two more rings of wedges. Lightly fuse the shiny side of the freezer-paper circles to the wrong side of three charm squares and cut them out a generous 1⁄4in outside the edge of the paper. Sew a line of running stitch around the overhanging fabric on each circle and pull up the thread to gather the edges over to the back of the paper. See Diagram 2. Press. Centre a prepared circle on each ring of wedges, covering the narrow raw end of each wedge, and slip stitch them in place invisibly. Stop stitching when you’re about two-thirds of the way around each one, loosen the gathering stitches and remove the freezer paper before sewing the rest of the circle in place.

rectangle, with one of its long edges 3 ⁄4in from one long edge of the batting. Pin or tack the layers together. Quilt as desired. Leanne used a walking foot to sew a grid of 3⁄8in squares over the whole area, using the edge of the foot as a guide. Lay out the rectangles you cut in Step 4 in a row in a pleasing array. Sew them together along their 2in edges. Trim the strip to measure 2 x 16in. Press all the seams in one direction. With right sides together, sew this strip to the top edge of the quilted rectangle, stitching through the strip, linen and batting. Fold the patchwork strip over so that it is right side facing up and press it over the batting. Pin the strip to the batting. Pin the 31⁄2 x 16in rectangle of taupe linen to the top edge of the patchwork strip with right sides facing and stitch through the three layers. Fold the linen strip over so that it is right side facing up and press it over the batting. Pin or baste it in place. Quilt this top linen panel as desired. Leanne sewed four horizontal lines of quilting. Top stitch the lace to the top edge of the patchwork strip, right in the ‘ditch’ of the seam line.

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Pouch front assembly

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Cut the batting in half to yield two rectangles 121⁄2 x 18in. Set one piece aside for the back. Lay the 6 x 16in rectangle of taupe linen on the batting

LEANNE’S TIMESAVING TIP When sewing across the wider ends of the Dresden Plate wedges, try chain piecing (stitching one seam after another without cutting the thread) for faster sewing.

Trim the panel to measure 10 x 151⁄2in. Neaten the edges with a narrow zigzag stitch to prevent the linen from fraying if you wish. Pin the three Dresden Plates across the lower panel, leaving about 3⁄4in clear at the left, right and bottom edges. Appliqué them in place around their outer edges.

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Pouch back assembly

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Lay out the remaining 40 21⁄2in squares in five rows of eight. When you are pleased with the colour arrangement, sew them together in rows. Press the seams of the odd rows in one direction and the even rows in the other. Join the rows, abutting the seams so they match. Press. Baste this patchwork panel to the other piece of batting and quilt as desired. Leanne sewed a decorative machine stitch in cream thread over each seam line.

Diagram 1

Diagram 2

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Diagram 3

Pouch back

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Trim the panel to measure 10 x 151⁄2in, with the patchwork centred.

Finishing

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Fold the 13⁄4 x 21⁄2in zipper tab ends in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching. Press. Open them out, fold the long edges in to the centre crease and press. See Diagram 3. Insert the ends of the zipper tape inside the folded strips, as shown in Diagram 4. Stitch 1⁄8in from the edge of each tab over the zipper, making sure that both the front and back of the tab are caught in the stitching. Be careful not to break the needle by stitching over the metal end of the zipper. Undo the zipper halfway. Match one long edge of the zipper tape with the top edge of the front panel, right sides together and centred between the left and right edges of the panel. Pin it in place, inserting the pins from the wrong side of the front panel. Now lay a 10 x 151⁄2in lining rectangle on top of the front panel+zipper, with the top raw edges level. Pin. Remove the pins from the wrong side of the front panel. Diagram 4

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Bottom corner

LEANNE’S CUTTING TIP To save time when cutting the wedges, you can layer three or four 21⁄2in squares under a traced one and cut them all at once.

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Using the zipper foot on the machine, sew all the way along the pinned edge through all layers close to the zipper teeth. When you get to the zipper pull, stop with the needle down, lift the presser foot and do up the zipper, then lower the presser foot again and continue sewing to the end. Turn right side out and press. Repeat Steps 30-31 to sew the bag back panel and lining to the other long edge of the zipper tape. Open the zipper at least halfway. Fold the pouch so the front and back panels are right sides together, the lining rectangles are right sides together and the zipper is in the middle. Pin all the

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Diagram 5


way around and then sew the seam, leaving a 3in opening in one side of the lining. To box the corners, draw a 1in square at the bottom corners of the pouch and lining, as shown in Diagram 5. Cut along the lines.

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Getting to know … LEANNE MILSOM What’s your favourite element of this project? Definitely the Dresden Plates; they’re just so sweet and so much fun to make. How many different crafts do you do? I love to make quilts and do stitchery. I can’t fit in any more crafts than that. I don’t have the time.

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Bring the cut edges together with the seams open and matching and sew across, reversing at the ends. Repeat for all four corners. Turn the pouch right side out through the opening in the lining. Sew the opening closed neatly.

Then push the lining inside the pouch, paying special attention to the bottom corners and ends of the zipper. Press gently.

What’s your favourite – and why? Stitchery is my absolute favourite. Seeing my ideas and drawings come to life with threads is so wonderful. My favourite designs to stitch are garden-related – I love flowers. When did you start sewing and who taught you? I’ve been quilting for about 10 years. I was mostly self-taught, then I learnt a lot from various friends, but I still enjoy learning new things every day. What would you do without your special stitching projects? I love to work on hand projects in the evenings. After dinner, I sit on the sofa with stitching on my lap and enjoy a few hours of family, TV and stitching time. Without it, things would be pretty boring. What are you most proud of with your creative stitching? I’m most proud that others like what I design and want to make my projects. So much thought and time goes into designing a project, and the whole process is so enjoyable. I’m happy if it brings enjoyment to others, as well.

What are the stitching tools you couldn’t live without? I use my rotary cutter almost every day, whether it be to cut a few hexagons or cut fabric for my latest quilt project. It has to be my most-used and favourite tool. Do you cherish the time you spend in your workroom/studio? I certainly do cherish my sewing time. I like to be in there for at least two hours a day, and only feel I’ve accomplished something if I get a little time in my sewing room. What is it that you love about it most? I love having all my projects on display, my fabrics close at hand and my quilts all displayed nicely in my room. They provide so much inspiration. Mainly, I just love being surrounded by all my favourite things and creating something wonderful. Have you got lots of projects waiting to be done? I don’t have many works in progress, but I must admit I have quite a few quilts just waiting for their binding – I’m not a fan of binding! If you had one sewing wish, what would it be? That would have to be Time – there’s never enough.

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For contact details for Leanne Milsom, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

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382 Warburton Hwy, Wandin North VIC 3139 p: (03) 5964 3592 e: sales@cccpatchwork.com.au

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Topic Machine Embroidery Classes for 2016

HANDI QUILTER DEALER

1. Hoops Sisters Block of the Month ‘Sewn Seeds’. 2. ‘Scarlet Serendade’ by Sharon Schamber. 3. ‘Gypsy’ by Sharon Schamber. 4. ‘Pickle Promenade’ by Sharon Schamber.

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Dashwood

Urns and tendrils, framework and swags, flowers in full bloom and bursting buds … Donna Warren’s dusty-pink and sage-green quilt in classic needleturn appliqué is a magical fusion of dainty and dramatic.

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Materials Q 6.2m (6 ⁄8yd) solid white fabric (background) Q 1.5m (13⁄4yd) black and pink spot print fabric (Borders 1 and 3 and binding) Q 1m (11⁄8yd) solid light green fabric (stems and vines) Q 75cm (7⁄8yd) mid-green check print fabric (stems and vines) 7

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Q 50cm (5⁄8yd) each of three green tone-on-tone print fabrics (leaves and small calyxes) Q 60cm (3⁄4yd) solid light pink fabric Q 50cm (5⁄8yd) solid mid-pink fabric Q 1m (11⁄8yd) pink spot tone-on-tone print fabric Q 50cm (5⁄8yd) pink and green print fabric (large calyxes)

Q 1.5m (13⁄4yd) pink and green stripe print fabric (scallops) Q 50cm (5⁄8yd) pink print fabric (vases) – see Note Q 30cm (3⁄8yd) pink tone-ontone print fabric (J petals and M scallop drops) Q 2.6m (27⁄8yd) extra-wide backing fabric Q Batting at least 255cm (100in) square Q Roxanne’s Glue-Baste-It

Q Template plastic, large sheet of paper and fine permanent marking pen Q 5mm (1⁄4in) bias maker and spray starch Q No 12 appliqué (sharps) needles Q Cotton threads to match appliqué fabrics Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in foot Q General sewing supplies

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Finished size: 239cm (94in) square Note: Read all instructions before starting the project. A seam allowance of 1⁄4in is included throughout for the

patchwork. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide (except for the extra-wide backing fabric). You may need more than

50cm (5⁄8yd) of fabric for the vases if you fussy cut the shapes. The appliqué method used is needleturn, but you can adapt the instructions to the method of your choice. Instructions are given for using

the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out. Donna’s quilt was inspired by one by American quiltmaker Sue Garman.

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Diagram 1

Preparation and cutting

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From the solid white fabric, cut: • Two strips, 201⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut them to yield a total of four squares, 201⁄2in (centre blocks) • Another two strips, 201⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Trim them to 201⁄2 x 411⁄2in (Border 2) • 10 strips, 61⁄2in across the width of the fabric (Border 4) • Two strips, 201⁄2in down the length of the remaining fabric (Border 2). Trim them to 201⁄2 x 811⁄2in (Border 2). From the black and pink spot print fabric, cut: • 13 strips, 1in across the width of the fabric. Trim two of them to 401⁄2in and two to 411⁄2in (Border 1). Put the remaining nine aside to use for Border 3 • Nine strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding). From the solid light green, cut: • 1⁄2in strips on the bias. To cut bias strips, make a 45 degree cut across the fabric. Then align the ruler to the cut edge and cut strips 1⁄2in

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Diagram 2

wide. See Diagram 1. You will need sufficient strips to yield eight 6in strips (Border 2), four 7in strips (Border 2), eight 8in strips (Border 2), 16 9in strips (Border 2), four 10in strips (centre blocks), eight 16in strips (centre blocks) and eight 221⁄2in strips (Border 2). From the mid-green check print fabric, cut: • 1⁄2in strips on the bias. You will need sufficient strips to yield eight 4in strips (Border 2), eight 6in strips (centre blocks), eight 7in strips (Border 2), eight 81⁄4in strips (centre blocks) and eight 30in strips (Border 2). From one of the green tone-ontone print fabrics, cut • 1⁄2in strips on the bias. You will need sufficient strips to yield eight 21⁄2in strips (centre blocks). Use the remainder of this fabric for the A calyx shapes. Lightly spray each of the bias fabric strips from Steps 3, 4 and 5 with spray starch, then slide them through the bias maker. Press them flat with the iron as you go and be careful not to stretch the strip as you pull. See Diagram 2. Trim the strips to the lengths indicated, ready for appliqué. Make a master pattern of the Border 2 stem lines by tracing the lines from the Pattern Sheet onto a large sheet of paper using a black permanent ink pen. Once you’ve done that, turn the paper over and

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trace the lines on to the back of the paper too. To make templates, trace all the appliqué shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic using a permanent marking pen. Cut out each shape on the traced lines. Trace around the E and F circle templates on cardboard. Cut them out accurately and smoothly on the lines. To use these templates, trace around them on the wrong side of your fabric, leaving 1⁄2in between them. Cut the circles out of fabric by eye 1⁄4in outside the traced line. Work a line of running stitch close to the edge of the fabric shape, centre the appropriate cardboard circle on the wrong side of the fabric and pull up the thread to gather the edge over the cardboard. See Diagram 3. Fasten the thread. Press the circle well from both sides, loosen the stitching and remove the cardboard. Repeat this step to prepare all of the appliqué circles. To use all the other the templates, place them right side up on the right side of your chosen fabrics. Trace around the template using a soft pencil, then carefully cut the shape out of fabric by eye 3⁄16in outside the traced line. To trace a pattern in reverse, flip the template over, so that it is right side down on the fabric, before tracing around it.

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Diagram 3 Homespun

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the point and edge of your needle or finger to press the appliqué seam allowance under at the drawn line as you go. Press the block. Repeat Steps 11-17 to make a total of four blocks exactly the same. Lay out the four blocks in two rows of two with the large flower in the outer corners. Sew the blocks in each row together, then sew the rows together, carefully matching seams. Your quilt should measure 401⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

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Borders Border 1 Sew the 1 x 401⁄2in strips of black and pink spot print fabric that you cut in Step 2 to the left and right edges of the quilt. Press seams towards these strips. Sew the 1 x 411⁄2in strips of black and pink spot print fabric to the top and bottom edges and press. Your quilt should now measure 411⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Border 2 Trace around the scallop template 72 times on the right side of the pink and green stripe print fabric and cut them out as described in Step 10. Turn under 1⁄4in along one long edge and both short edges of a 201⁄2 x 411⁄2in strip of solid white fabric cut for Border 2 and press lightly to crease. Unfold. Pin six scallops on the fabric in a row so that their highest points will lie just a couple of threads below the crease once they’ve been appliquéd. Check that the scallops at each end of the row won’t overlap the creases once they’ve been appliquéd.

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Centre block

Centre block appliqué

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To make one block, you will need to trace one vase; one A calyx and one in reverse; one B bud and one in reverse; eight C leaves; two D leaves and two in reverse; 24 E berries; three F flower centres; three G inner flowers; one H outer flower; eight I leaves; eight J petals; one L calyx and one in reverse; and one K bud and one in reverse on to the right side of your chosen fabrics and cut them out as described in Steps 9 and 10. You will also need some of the bias strips you prepared in Step 6. Fold one of the 201⁄2in squares of white fabric in half along one diagonal and press lightly to crease the fabric. Unfold. Fold the vase shape in half, curved side edges matching, and finger press to crease it lightly. Pin the vase to the white background square, matching centre creases, with the bottom raw edge of the base about 21⁄2in from the corner, as shown in Diagram 4.

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Lay the square on the Centre Block stem lines on the Pattern Sheet, matching the diagonal crease with the broken line, and lightly trace the stem lines on the right side of the fabric using a soft pencil. Position the stems you’ve prepared from the light green, mid-green check and green toneon-tone print fabric in place over the traced lines, tucking raw ends under the top edge of the vase as appropriate. Use a few dots of Glue-Baste-It to hold them in position. Appliqué the stems to the background block using threads to match the stems. Glue each of the remaining appliqué shapes to the background, referring to the photo for guidance and layering the shapes as necessary. With these shapes, ensure that the glue is more than 3 ⁄16in inside the pencil line. When you’re satisfied with the placement, needleturn appliqué the shapes in place: use

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21⁄2in

Diagram 4


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Once you’re satisfied with their position, glue baste them in place. Now trace and cut the remaining appliqué shapes for this border: two A calyxes and two in reverse; two B buds and two in reverse; 14 C leaves; eight D leaves and eight in reverse; 42 E berries; six F flower centres; six G flowers; two H outer flowers; one L calyx and one in reverse; and one K bud and one in reverse as described in Steps 9 and 10. You will also need some of the bias strips you prepared in Step 6. Fold the border fabric in half, short edges matching, and finger press to crease the centre lightly. Unfold it. Lay the left half of the fabric on the master pattern of the Border 2 stem lines that you made in Step 7, matching the centre crease with the broken lines. Lightly trace the stem lines on the right side of the fabric using a soft pencil. Some of the pattern won’t fit on the fabric at this stage – that’s fine. Turn the master pattern over; lay the right half of the fabric over it and trace the stem lines on the other half of the border. Repeat Steps 15-17 to appliqué the shapes to the fabric. You won’t use all the shapes you’ve cut for this border strip at this stage – store the others in a labelled zip-lock bag until later. Leave the ends of the bias stem strips to overhang the left and right edges of the fabric. They will also be appliquéd later. Repeat Steps 23-27 to make a second short Border 2 strip exactly the same. Sew these strips to the left and right edges of your quilt, with the scallops closer to the centre. Your quilt should now measure 411⁄2 x 811⁄2in from raw edge to raw edge. Now repeat the process to appliqué the 201⁄2 x 811⁄2in long Border 2 white fabric strips in the same manner. Sew them to the top and bottom edges of your quilt.

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32 33 34 35

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Border 2

Your quilt should now measure 811⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. You will now be able to complete the appliqué for the short Border 2 strips – trace the stem lines and appliqué the shapes that overlap onto the long Border 2 strips. Border 3 Join the nine 1in strips of black and pink spot print fabric that you put aside in Step 3 together, end to end, to make one long strip. From it, cut: • Two strips, 1 x 811⁄2in • Two strips, 1 x 821⁄2in. Join the 811⁄2in strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Press the seams towards the darker fabric. Join the 821⁄2in strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Your quilt should now measure 821⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Border 4 Join the 10 strips, 61⁄2in of solid white fabric cut in Step 1 together, end to end, to make one long. From it, cut: • Two strips, 61⁄2 x 821⁄2in • Two strips, 61⁄2 x 941⁄2in. Repeat the process described in Step 23 to glue 12 scallops close to one long edge of each of the two 821⁄2in strips. Trace and cut 44 M shapes. Glue an M shape between each pair of scallops. Appliqué all the shapes to these border strips. Then join them to the left and right edges of the quilt, with the scallops closer to the centre. On each of the 941⁄2in strips, measure in 61⁄4in from each short edge and make a light pencil mark on the top edge of the fabric. Repeat Step 23 to glue 12 scallops along each strip between these marks – that is, leaving 61⁄4in at each end without any scallops in it. Then glue an M shape between each pair of scallops. Appliqué the shapes to these two strips, then sew them to the top and bottom edges of your quilt.

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Finishing

DONNA’S FABRIC SELECTION TIPS • Look for opportunities to add visual flair to your quilt by fussy cutting motifs printed on the fabric. I’ve done that with the vases, making them look quite regal by centring a formal wreath on each one. • Be a little adventurous with some of your fabric choices. Even though this is a traditional quilt design, the black and pink spot print fabric – which might be considered quite ‘funky’ – works well. I used checks for leaves and stems, a strong print for the large calyxes and a multi-coloured stripe for the scallops, and they’ve all added a little pizzazz to the quilt.

Getting to know … DONNA WARREN How did you start your sewing career? I came to sewing in my ’30s. I had dabbled a little, sewing some clothes earlier, but didn’t get into quilting until the purchase of a little shop in the Hills district of Sydney in the ’90s. My mum and I bought the local haberdashery store and changed it into a patchwork shop. My patchwork career started in the shop; I did classes with a couple of teachers and was so hooked that I ate, slept and dreamt patchwork. I was so obsessed, every thought was of colour and design. Then, I started to design my own quilts and taught them in our shop and ventured out to teach in other stores, as well. What would you do without your stitching? If I didn’t sew … hang on, that’s impossible.

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The quilt top, batting and backing are ready to take to a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re going to do the quilting yourself, smooth the backing fabric on the floor, right side down, and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is free of wrinkles. After pressing the quilt top, lay it on top of the batting, right side facing up. Baste the three layers together with thread (for hand quilting) or safety pins (for machine quilting). Quilt as desired. Donna machine quilted Dashwood using a loopy background filler, with a circular design in each corner, in white thread. She also echo quilted in the large flowers, creating the impression of an additional layer of fabric.

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I couldn’t not sew. I did get disillusioned for a while, and everything got too much and became a chore. But I’m back, with needle and thread firmly in my hand. I love my craft. I’m back to being a little obsessed with finishing off a beautiful antique quilt I have been planning to re-produce for years. What are the stitching tools you couldn’t live without? The obvious would be mat, ruler and cutter. But I also couldn’t live without bias makers, glue sticks, paper pieces, Polyfuse (my latest, got-to-have) and, of course, my trusty unpicker. Do you cherish the time in your workroom/ studio? As a machine quilter by profession and someone who also manages a patchwork store, it’s hard to allocate time to myself. I feel guilty if I don’t have a customer’s quilt stitching away on my day off. Sometimes, I just have to try to ignore that pile of quilts and take time for myself; otherwise, my husband complains about his cranky wife. What is it you love about it most? The peace and serenity. It’s just me and my radio, playing daggy music. We live on acreage, so I sit by the window at my sewing table, looking out at our orchard and while away the hours. What would you like to change about your workspace, if anything? We are about to finish a bit of renovating, and my sewing space will become a little more organised. At the moment, it’s a bit like another room in the house, with lovely shabby chic antique furniture, which I love, but I’d like to get it a little bit more impersonalised so my customers don’t feel like they are entering my living room.

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Trim the excess batting and backing fabric 1⁄4in outside the raw edges of the quilt. Cut the ends of the 21⁄2in strips of black and pink spot print fabric at a 45-degree angle. Join the strips end to end to make one length and press the seams open. Fold the strip in half, long edges matching and wrong sides together, and press. With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 34 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch it by hand to the back of the quilt. Label and date your quilt.

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For contact details for Donna Warren, of Quilted 4 You, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

How many different crafts do you do? Nowadays, I stick to quiltmaking only – time doesn’t allow much more. I’d love another few days in the week to fit in what I feel I need to accomplish. I have so many quilts in my head, wanting to escape, but I have to keep them bottled up, otherwise I have the attention span of a two year old and would have dozens of projects on the go. What is your favourite, and why? Quiltmaking has been my obsession for many years. I love the thought of leaving something behind for future generations to hopefully use and appreciate. Do you take your stitching with you on holidays? Holidays! What are they? My husband and I try to grab a weekend away two or three times a year. I haven’t been on holiday since we went down the coast for three days in 1997. Not that I’m complaining; if I were to take time off, I’d choose to spend the days at home. Have you got lots of projects waiting to be done? These days, I try not to start too many projects at once. I’m trying to complete a quilt I’ve drawn up from an antique quilt by Ann Robinson. I’m also sitting on the other side of the table and am doing a class with Anne Sommerlad to make her Elizabeth Jefferson quilt. Throw in a few class quilts that are waiting to be finished and a few more in my sewing cupboard … so the answer to that question is obviously ‘yes’. If you had one sewing wish, what would it be? To write a book. I have a lot of medallion-style quilts I have designed over the years and my dream has always been to put them together in a book for everyone to enjoy.


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Welcome to my

WORKROOM

Tricks learned from dealing in international design found their way into APRIL CORNELL’s studio styling, so that her surroundings became an unconscious extension of the products she was creating and selling. By Susan Hurley elodramatic operas and novels tell us that artists and designers need to suffer for their talents in draughty garrets – struggling to be noticed, enslaved in their poverty. It’s ’sposed to be noble or romantic or some such, but what’s so noble about never having a chance to bring your ideas to public attention? Or about desolation and destitution, for that matter? April Cornell had grander plans and proved that the path to design success is a matter of going global and making a big noise about what you’ve got to

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offer. And maybe painting your industrial studio bright pink, just in case there’s the odd person out there who hasn’t noticed you! And from that gutsy approach, she’s built a multimillion-dollar, design-business empire, while simultaneously devoting her life to creative pursuits. Her starting point was stepping out from her then-home base of Montreal, Canada. To her native Franco/Anglo background, she injected inspiration and business acumen gleaned from Afghanistan, Russia, Uzbekistan and India before relocating to the USA,

in order to tap into that huge market. “It was via Afghanistan that the business began. I travelled there in the 1970s, buying nomadic Koochi dresses made from Russian chintzes, old Uzbek embroideries, woollen shawls, cotton kilims and silk ikat chapans,” says April. “The world of the East was so colourful and different, I fell in love with it all. And then I started to create my own styles and patterns” – the Eastern textiles and carpets she slowly altered to suit Western tastes. “Really, the business part was learned negotiating with Afghans over


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the price of a carpet and with many cups of chai. We had little money, but lots of interest and motivation – it never occurred to me that we couldn’t do what we were doing. I don’t think I thought much about failing.” The artistic side of things is simply part of April’s makeup. From as far back as she can remember, she loved painting and drawing, and her passion morphed into designing fabrics, clothing and “just about anything, actually, from cups and plates to bed frames and tables and jewellery boxes and buttons. Designing just feeds on itself. Once you’re in its flow – its grasp – you can do anything.” It’s 40 years now, and her eponymous company is still going strong, wholesaling, retailing and selling her clothing, linens and household accessories online, in shops and through catalogues. At one point, April Cornell operated 100 retail outlets and, today, she’s also licensing her designs to other companies, such as Westminster, for quilting fabrics. Her massive archive of prints stretches back decades. 86

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A FEW OF MY FAVOURITE THINGS MY DOLLS & ANIMALS – A small collection of dolls and animals is sitting on top of my wire basket – my granddaughter’s pig, a funny cat with staring eyes, a stuffed owl and tiny elephant made by artist Wendy Wintersgill. They make me smile. I wish I could just sit and play with them. Make up stories. Be a kid. THE PINK DRESSER – It’s distressed with gold touches and says ‘mes choses’ – ‘My things’. It’s full of papers. I love the colour. So sympatico. And you can’t tell all the boring stuff that’s inside. It has go somewhere! A SMALL WOODEN TABLE – with its refinished top and black legs, it’s perfect to hold my paintings, and it’s the right size to move into a photo shoot. THE CARPET UNDER MY DESK – I love the blue – unusual colour for a Turkish carpet. THE LADIES’ CHAISE LOUNGE – It’s covered with a combination of tossed flowers and tiny polka dots – perfect for putting my feet up and working on my laptop. A BOX – A hammered copper tiffin box my son bought in Gujarat. AND … A very teeny tiny teacup.

So let’s crawl out of those dismal attics and waltz into April’s US office, to appreciate her work and her creative surroundings. You can find her and her family (her three sons work for the company) and colleagues in a big pink office in a small Vermont college town on Lake Champlain. The premises are nestled in a hillside, overlooking a lake. The pink you see on the outside is just the beginning of the exuberant use of colour. All up, you’ll find pink and yellow and green and white – “Our product is colourful and feminine and joyful, and the old industrial building was run down and rather grim. The multi colours livened it up and made it stand out in a very happy, upbeat way,” says April.

The success that April has earned is due in no small part to her daily surroundings. For her, making the working environment comfortable and “artful” is imperative. “It is so important! Whatever my environment, I immediately start to organise it towards beauty or peacefulness. I love to be surrounded by beautiful things. The shape, the colours, the form; my eye rests on different items, flowing from one to the other. Scraps of things are the kernels of ideas and art – photos that take me somewhere. It’s disturbing to my equilibrium if artificial things are about – plastic, ugly colours. That’s just torture. I have to move them.” Homespun

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But her work space is not conspicuously ‘fashioned’ … it is a natural extension of April’s personal style and her commonsense working perspective. “All of our colourful stuff floods the place and adds to the overall look. It’s a working environment. Photo shoots, line reviews, all move in and out of the space,” she says. “It’s joyful and artistic, but not formal. It’s comfortable. Eclectic. East meets West. I have a lot of stuff around, and I like looking at it. It takes me somewhere.” April sees the scheme as a workplace living room, with armchairs, rustic tables, comfy sofas and windows with a view, all adding to its casual, welcoming appeal. But it’s colour that sets the pace and anchors the whole aesthetic. 88

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“You can transform anything with colour,” she explains. “Nature gives the lead, and I follow. If I run out of ideas, I just look around; it’s all there for the picking. I love shapes and forms that are organic, that have an inner vitality. I’m not into a graphic style. I always want to see the heartbeat within. More, not less. All the layers compressed into line, into an expanding colour. Look into a flower or a leaf, a tree – and there is more and more mystery, more and more to see and understand, but it’s also simply a flower, a leaf, a spot of green, a twist of red. That’s what I want to capture. Both the simplicity and the complexity.”

There must be something to her theories, because April has been smoothly operating her design business for four decades and shows no signs of stopping. “You’re lucky if you can find work that includes art and creativity and be able to share it with a larger audience. It’s pretty unusual for art and business to marry up, but ours does. Now when I look at how much we did, I think, wow – that’s impressive. People have been asking me what my exit plan is for 25 years. I’m still figuring it out!” For more information about April Cornell, visit her website at www.aprilcornell.com or Facebook, www.facebook.com/ AprilCornellpage.


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Bethanne Nemesh of

White Arbor Quilting presents three new stunning books! Meet Bethanne at AMQ Festival in Adelaide! 25–28 Aug 2016

All book are $45.0 s 0 each + postage

“If You Can Feather, You Can Freehand” is a 43 page design fest. Review basic feathering techniques and learn to break apart motifs ranging from garden flowers to wedding bells, and put them on a stem, to make each and every quilt unique, completely customized, and, most important....fast. More than 50 elements are presented with dozens of potential mix and match designs. Once you learn the designs, use the book to make blocks, borders, sashing, and edge to edge treatments. Use the whole quilt setting suggestions to spark your imagination and create unique, personalised quilts with stunning secondary patterns... all fast and freehand.

In “Nemeshing, A Freehand Feather Flourish”, learn the lacy, organic feather filler that folks have come to associate with Bethanne’s high-end custom quilting. Not only will you learn the heirloom finish, but also variations for mid-custom, lightcustom, borders, and edge to edge treatments. The book is 39 pages including 5 pages of colour plates to see how all the different variations look on actual quilts.

In “The Devil is in the Details, the Art of Fine Finishing Touches” you will not only learn the intricate beaded piping, and beaded knife edge techniques that earn Bethanne’s show quilts so much attention, but 12 others as well. This book isn’t just for those interested in wowing judges on the show floor, it is for anyone interested in taking their quilts to the next level and adding a fine finishing touch to their quilt. The book features 49 pages, with color plates of easy to follow, step-by-step photography, and descriptions.

www.constantinequilts.com | sales@constantinequilts.com | Tracey Browning RSD 1028, Kadina SA 5555 | Ph. 08 8825 6214


T JEC

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Materials JEC

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Q Four assorted print fabric pieces at least 15 x 30cm (6 x 12in) (caterpillar segments) Q 15 x 30cm (6 x 12in) white felt (caterpillar head) Q Fat quarter or large scrap of calico or homespun (magnet pockets) Q Scrap of dark pink felt (cheeks) Q 15cm (6in) stiff fabric tape – see Note Q Stranded embroidery cottons in black, dark pink and white Q Fibre fill Q Paper for patterns

Q Nine corsage/floral magnets about 1cm (3⁄8in) diameter – see Note Q Compass Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, French knot, running stitch Finished size: 11cm (41⁄4in) high x 30cm (12in) length approx. Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. A 1cm (3⁄8in) seam allowance is used throughout. Use a shorter than usual stitch length on the

Preparation and cutting

1

Trace the caterpillar template from the Pattern Sheet onto paper, transfer the dots and cut it out on the line. Draw a 1in circle on the paper – set the compass to a radius of 1⁄2in – and cut it out on the line. From each of the four print fabrics, cut: • Four caterpillar shapes, transferring the dots to each one (body segments). From the white felt, cut: • Four caterpillar shapes (head). From the calico or homespun, cut: • 18 squares, 2in (magnet pockets). From the dark pink felt and using the pattern from Step 2, cut: • Two 1in circles (cheeks).

2 3

Step 7

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4 5 6

sewing machine to make the seams stronger and smoother. The magnets are available at large haberdashery or florist supply shops or can be ordered online. They need to be very securely enclosed in separate small bags inside the segments so as not to present a choking hazard to young children. Alternatively, the magnets can be omitted completely – join the segments together with strong thread instead. A doubled loop of ribbon can be used instead of the fabric tape for the antennae if you can’t find tape with enough body to ‘stand up’ – you will need 30cm (12in).

Assembly

7

Begin by pairing two matching caterpillar shapes, right sides together, and sew them together down one curved edge between the marked dots. Secure the stitching at the start and finish by reversing or using the securing function if you have one on your machine – make sure the stitching starts and ends exactly at the dots. Rebecca reinforced her seams with an additional line of small zigzag stitch within the seam allowances. Repeat this step with the other two matching shapes for this body segment. Match an unstitched edge of each unit from Step 7, right sides facing, and sew them together between the dots.

8

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


9

Then, for the final seam of this segment, sew from the top point one-third of the way down and reverse to secure. Then sew from the bottom point one-third of the way up and secure – leave the middle part of this seam open for turning and stuffing. Repeat Steps 7-8 for the segments cut from the other three print fabrics and the white felt. Turn the assembled felt and fabric segments right side out. Push the seams out gently by inserting a chopstick or similar tool and running the blunt end around each seam from the inside. As the magnets will try to attach themselves to the machine as you stitch, it’s easier to do most of the pocket sewing without them between the layers of fabric. Pair two 2in squares of calico or homespun and zigzag stitch around the outer edges on three sides. Then, using a straight machine stitch, sew a 3⁄4in-wide pocket in the middle of it, as shown in Diagram 1. Sew around this shape twice for strength. Insert one magnet in the pocket you just created. Machine stitch twice across the square at the open end of the pocket (shown in red in Diagram 1), enclosing the magnet very securely inside. Finally, zigzag stitch the remaining edge of the square. Repeat Steps 12-13 with the other 2in squares to make a total of nine magnet pockets – two for each body segment and one for the head. For the segments to be interchangeable, the magnets need to be facing so that they all attract each other rather than some repelling. Put all the magnets together in turn and lightly mark the correct side of each fabric pocket. When putting the magnets inside the segments, ensure the marked sides are all facing outwards. For the first fabric segment, insert a magnet pocket in

10 11 12

13

14 15

16

the left side of the shape, facing the correct way, and from the outside, pin it in place with a large pin. Repeat this step to pin a second magnet pocket inside the opposite side of the segment. Rebecca tried having a thin layer of filling between the magnet pockets and the fabric, but found that it weakened the connection. Cupping the segment in your hand, stuff it evenly until firm. Don’t remove the pins until the stuffing is complete so the magnets remain in the correct place. Slip stitch or ladder stitch the opening closed securely with strong thread and small stitches and then remove the pins. Repeat Steps 16-17 for all the other segments, but for the head, only insert one magnet pocket halfway down one seam – the face will be added to the opposite side. (The opening should be on neither of these seams.)

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Step 8

Finishing

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On the opposite side of the felt head to the magnet, position the dark pink felt circles either side of a seam and about 1cm (3⁄8in) below the middle. Before stitching them in place, join the head to another segment with its magnet to check the angle of the head and adjust the cheek positions if needed. Using two strands of matching embroidery thread, work running stitch around each circle to appliqué them to the head. Using three strands of black embroidery thread, sew one French knot above each cheek for the eyes, as shown in the photograph. Then backstitch a semicircular mouth shape between the cheeks. Cut two 7.5cm (3in) lengths of fabric tape and tie a firm knot at one end of both pieces. Fold the other end under on itself to neaten it and use two strands of white embroidery thread to stitch the folded end of each antenna securely to the top of the head above the eyes. Alternatively, make ribbon loops

3

⁄4in

Diagram 1

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for the antennae and sew them in place securely. Now, join the segments with the magnets in whatever order you like. Rebecca says that her three-year-old son (a.k.a. Chief Toy Tester) enjoyed working out how to join the segments.

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For contact details for Rebecca Atkinson, of Hurrah!, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

REBECCA’S STUFFING TIP Use only small pieces of stuffing at a time to fill each caterpillar segment – don’t be in a rush to fill it with one big piece of stuffing. By using small amounts and a stuffing tool (or the end of a wooden spoon) to firmly but gently pack each piece inside, you’ll achieve a nice round shape as well as disguising the magnets. If you use big clumps, the segments will be lumpy and misshapen.

REBECCA’S COLOUR TIP A great way to get your colours to coordinate is to look at nature for inspiration. There are so many examples in gardens and parks for colours that go together, scale and pattern.

REBECCA’S PERFECTION TIP Put down the unpicker! What you see as imperfect may give your work perfectly unique character.

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Getting to know …

REBECCA ATKINSON How would you describe your style? What makes it unique? I like to think of my style as ‘happy’ and perhaps eclectic. I love to see my toys make people smile and create a bit of fun. Why this particular craft? I love toys. I’ve always loved to draw, and pursued pattern making so that I could create my own drawings and characters in 3D. I love fabric and really enjoy re-purposing fabric, especially giving an old garment a new lease of life as a soft toy. Have you tried plenty of others? I have tried dozens of crafts – Nuno felting, quilting, knitting, screen-printing, lithographs, photography, graphic design, scrapbooking, clothes-making, jewellery design, reupholstering furniture, wool embroidery, teddy bear making … the list goes on. Any good stories along the way? I once donated a soft toy daschund to an animal charity quiz night – two bidders competed for it, and the winner was ecstatic, dancing across the hall to collect the dog. She asked me to sign it, as it was going to Germany for her uncle, who had obsessively been collecting sausage dogs his whole life – it was so lovely to see someone so happy about a soft toy, and one I had made. If you weren’t doing this, what else would occupy your time? I have a day job that pays the bills and a three-year-old and a one-yearold, so I have zero time to pursue my crafting

as much as I’d like to. If we won Lotto – and I’d have to start buying tickets to do that! – I’d love to go back to uni and do a different degree, and relearn knitting for the fifth time. Who taught you your crafting skills? My beautiful mum has always sewn, and many of my childhood snaps have her trusty Husqvana sewing machine in the background. She made lovely clothes for us as kids. I’ve always loved sewing, so I read books, did classes, tried things out and unpicked many, many things to teach myself. What did you learn along the way? My mum’s friend was selling her old sewing machine when I was about 20 years old, as she had upgraded to a new digital one. I bought her solid old Husqvana, and it was love at first sight. I’m still in love with it today, whereas a month or so after my mum’s friend bought her new machine, she was asking Mum if I’d sell her old machine back to her! Good equipment is a must but so is diving in and giving it a go and not being afraid to make mistakes – nothing creative is perfect, and that’s a good thing. What does this craft mean to you? Escape, peace, breathing space for my tired brain. Do you think of your craft as passion or a spare-time-filler? I’m passionate about it as a hobby, and it’s something I will always do in some form or another. From where do you draw inspiration? Kids’ books. I love stories and I worked in a bookshop for years, when I was a student. Now that I have children, I have even more children's books around the house. What’s your family structure? I’m married to an excellent soft-toy stuffer! We have a superactive three-year-old son, Hamish, and a very vocal, delightful one-year-old daughter, Isobel. We are very lucky to have a West Highland White Terrier dog, Matilda, who is usually grey and rather scruffy – a terrier ageing gracefully! Where do you live and work? I live close to the Perth CBD, in a leafy green suburb. My workspace is currently an old wooden school desk, and my fabrics are stored under a spare bed – because my craft room recently became my little girl’s bedroom.


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STAR OF WONDER

Twinkle, twinkle great, big gorgeous star! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s by Jessica Wheelahan, who has constructed it like a multi-faceted gem, with tiny patched fragments adding dimension and a sense of glittering movement.

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Materials Q An assortment of red and white print and toneon-tone fabrics to total about 4m (41⁄2yd) (star) – see Jessica’s Fabric Tip Q An assortment of white tone-on-tone print fabrics to total about 2.5m (23⁄4yd) (background) Q Several solid or tone-ontone red fabrics to total about 2m (21⁄4yd) (sashing, border and binding) 98

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Q 3.7m (4yd) backing fabric Q Batting at least 170cm (66in) square Q Perle 12 thread in white (hand quilting) Q Rotary cutter, ruler and cutting mat Q Template plastic and permanent-marking pen Q Erasable fabric-marking pen Q Sewing machine with ¼in foot Q General sewing supplies

Finished size: 152cm (60in) square Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. This project is recommended for experienced quilters as it requires a very high level of accuracy when cutting and sewing. It is recommended that all fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabrics 102cm (42in) wide.

A seam allowance of 1⁄4in is used throughout for the piecing, except for adding the binding, where a 3⁄4in seam is used. Instructions are given for using the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Make the star points

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Trace shapes A-C from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic and cut them out carefully on the lines. The centre star is made from eight diamond-shaped ‘star points’. Each star point is made from a combination of diamonds in three different sizes – the A, B and C templates. Study the photograph of Jessica’s quilt and the sample Star Point Diagrams to decide what combination of A, B and C shapes you will use in each star point. Each star point is comprised of the equivalent of four C shapes; each C shape is comprised of the equivalent of four B shapes; and each B shape is comprised of the equivalent of four A shapes. If you’re not sure what combination of shapes you’d like to use, cut and assemble sufficient for one star point at a time. Place them on a design wall as you complete each one before deciding on the combination of shapes for the next one. As a guide, Jessica suggests that you use 80-100 A diamonds, 50 B diamonds and 7 C diamonds. To sew four diamonds together – for example, four A shapes – start by matching two diamonds right sides together and one edge matching. You need to offset the diamonds so that your 1⁄4in seam runs right through the ‘V’, as shown in Diagram 1.

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Star Point Diagrams

Diagram 1 Homespun

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45˚

45˚ 45˚

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Star point sashing

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From the solid or tone-on-tone red fabric, cut: • One strip, 153⁄4in across the width of the fabric. From it, crosscut 16 strips, 13⁄4 x 153⁄4in. Trim each end of these strips at a 45-degree angle. On eight of the strips, make these cuts sloping to the left. On the other eight, make them sloping to the right. See Diagram 2. From a white fabric, cut: • Eight A diamonds. Sew a right-sloping strip to one outer edge of each star point. Sew a white A diamond to one end of a left-sloping strip, then sew this strip to the adjacent outer edge of each star point, as shown in Diagram 3. Press.

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Diagram 4

Diagram 2

Continue in this manner to sew A, B and C diamonds together to make eight separate star points.

231⁄4in

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Assemble the background

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From the assorted white toneon-tone print fabrics, cut: • 164 squares, 4in (D). Join 25 white D squares together in five rows of five squares each. Join the rows together, carefully matching seams. Trim two adjacent edges so the square measures 161⁄4in raw edge to raw edge. Repeat to make four large squares for the corners of the quilt. Lay out 16 D squares, as shown in Diagram 4. Sew the patches in each row together, then sew the rows together. Press. Trim the base edge so it's perfectly straight: this will be the base of your triangle. Measure and mark 231⁄4in on this edge. Cut from each of these marks at a 45-degree angle to make a triangle. Repeat to make four large triangles like this.

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Assemble the quilt

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On the wrong side of each of the Eight large star points, draw the 1⁄4in seam lines at each corner with an erasable fabricmarking pen, as shown in Diagram 5. Mark the seam lines in the same way on the wrong side of the large background squares and triangles. Match two adjacent star points, right sides together. Insert a pin through the intersections of the seam-allowance lines that you drew in Step 13, then pin the edges together in the usual way. Sew the star points together, sewing only from one seam-intersection line to the other – that is, do not sew into the seam allowances. Repeat to sew all the star points together in pairs. Now sew a large background triangle between each pair of star points. To do this, match one

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Diagram 3

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Diagram 5

short edge of the background triangle with the top raw edge of one of the star points in a pair, right sides together. Insert a pin through the intersections and along the edges, as you did in Step 14. Start stitching right at the point where the seam in Step 14 ended. Then match the other short edge of the triangle with the top raw edge of the second star point in the pair and stitch from the same starting point. Dab the lines you drew in Step 13 with a damp cloth to remove them. Press.


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Garden Tea Party y Enjoy the pleasure of teaa party as you stitch togetherr different block k patterns of tea pots. The blocks have a teapot borderr with real ‘teabag’ design d and flowers and vine complete the quilt final borders.

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Sew the units you created in Step 15 together in pairs: start this seam from what will be the centre of the completed star and sew to a point 1⁄4in from the outer edge, as shown in Diagram 6. Now stitch a background square in the corner of each half of the quilt. To do this, begin by sewing one edge of the square to the edge of a star point: start sewing from the outer edge of the quilt, working towards the centre. Stop stitching 1 ⁄4in from the end of the square, where the lines you marked in Step 13 intersect. Turn the square and match its adjacent raw edge with the edge of the neighbouring star point and repeat to sew from the outer edge to 1⁄4in from the edge of the square. Remove the lines by dampening them and then press the seams towards the background square. Join the two halves of the quilt: start and stop this stitching 1⁄4in from each edge and take care to match the centre points. See Diagram 7.

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Diagram 6

Getting to know … JESSICA WHEELAHAN Do you make lots of quilts? Yes, I make a lot of quilts. I have many projects on the go at any one time and love working in this way. I’ll begin a new quilt as soon as the idea strikes and then keep coming back to it until it’s complete. How did you come up with the idea? The idea for Star of Wonder came to me when I was researching for the The Quilters’ Guild of NSW’s 2015 red-and-white challenge. Lone Star quilts are beautiful but the traditional method for construction left me wondering if there might be another way to create this design. My quilt is essentially an eight-pointed star with each point created using different-sized diamonds. I used many red-and-white scraps from my stash to create the scrappy appeal. Did the design take long to perfect? I used my design wall to move the different pieces around until I got the layout of the star points right. It never ceases to amaze me how useful this approach is. You may think the design is right until you move an element here or there, and the whole thing changes. Did you create it as a Christmas design or just a strong graphic? As soon as the star began to emerge, I realised how powerful the graphic was and I recognised the Christmas appeal of the design – ‘Star of Wonder’ being the star the wise men followed to the stable in Bethlehem where Jesus was born. Your style varies from soft to striking – do you have a favourite? When sorting through my stash of fabrics, I find I’m drawn

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To complete the centre of the quilt, repeat Step 17 to join the remaining two corner squares. Remove the lines, then press.

Finish the quilt

Diagram 7

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From one or more solid or tone-on-tone red fabrics, cut:

to strong reds and browns and autumnal shades and large-scale prints in saturated colours. However, often I’ll begin a project because of the fabrics I have available. I’ll sort scraps into ‘like’ piles and, when these begin to tell a story, a quilt will emerge. So I don’t have a favourite, as such, I just go where the quilt takes me! Do you like to participate in craft retreats? Yes, our quilt group has a weekend retreat each year, which I enjoy very much. It has been held in the Blue Mountains [NSW], which is a lovely and peaceful setting. I come away feeling relaxed and refreshed. I also enjoy the Berry [NSW] quilting retreat held each year and organised by the wonderful Elizabeth Dubbelde, of Berry Patchwork. I have attended twice and enjoy meeting like-minded women from all over Australia. Are you a haby-store addict? I used to be … but have to hold myself back, as I have a sewing room chock full with all the notions and fabric I could need. When I need fabric, I have a few favourite local haunts. Who are your crafting/quiltmaking heroes? Too many to list; too hard to narrow this down to a few. I have been looking at the work of American quilter Eleanor McCain a lot recently. Do you have enough time to make all the things you want to make? I try to make the time. I loosely plan my non-working days around what the kids need, what has to be done around the house and a walk or two for the dog. Time left over gets split into small steps for the advancement of a quilt or two. It might be making the backing or a spot of appliqué or an evening of hand quilting once the day is winding down. Daily sewing is non-negotiable for me, and it helps having a hobby like this, as design is about problem solving. I’ve learnt to not try to do everything at once but to break things up into little tasks, which takes the pressure off and makes the whole thing more pleasurable. I think we have all had the experience of biting off more than we can chew; every time I sit down to sew knowing I’m short of time and having to rush, I end up having to unpick after making a silly mistake. The tortoise’s way is better! If you had one crafting wish, what would it be? Another set of hands and more hours in the day, thanks.

• Seven strips, 3in across the width of the fabric (border) • Seven strips, 41⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding). Join the 3in strips end to end to make one long strip for the border. Measure your quilt vertically through the centre. Trim two strips

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Colourful Cotton Socks

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“Woodland Park” is a beautiful cchildren’s fabric range designed by Christine Sharp and Rachael Wright from Kids Quilts. Five patterns, from wall hangings to bed quilts, have been designed to accompany the fabric. ‘Goodnight Owl’. ‘Nuts About You’ and ‘Woodland Park’ are three of the patterns rranging in price from $15-$30. Kits are available for each of the designs and details can be found on our website. Fabric is $23/m.

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this length from the long strip. Sew the strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Measure your quilt horizontally through the centre. Trim two strips this length from the long strip. Sew them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths. Remove the selvedges and join them with a 1⁄2in seam. Press. The quilt top, backing fabric and batting are now ready to take to a long-arm quilter. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth out the backing fabric on the floor, right side down, and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is smooth. Lay the quilt top, right side up, over the batting and baste the three layers together with thread or safety pins. Quilt as desired. Jessica quilted Star of Wonder by hand using white Perle thread and

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large stitches. She echo quilted some of the diamonds in each star point and worked a variety of straight-line designs in the background. Trim the excess batting and backing 1⁄4in outside the raw edge of the outer border. Join the seven 41⁄2in strips cut in Step 20, end to end, to make one long strip and press the seams open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the quilt with a 3⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 34 for details. Turn the binding over and hand stitch it to the back of the quilt. Then you can label and date your quilt.

JESSICA’S FABRIC TIPS • I used a variety of red-on-red, whiteon-white, white-on-red and red-onwhite prints in my quilt. Ensure you have a mixture of large- and smallscale prints and look for interesting textures in tone-on-tones and solids. • I wanted to create a quilt that seemed ageless. For this reason, I purposely chose fabrics that weren’t identifiable as having been designed in a particular season or by a particular designer. Instead, I looked for stripes, checks, tickings and geometric prints that could have been produced yesterday or 30 years ago. • Even if you don’t normally pre-wash your fabrics, I strongly recommend that you pre-wash for this project. In my experience, some red dyes that haven’t been pre-washed will run just from being pressed with steam. Leaching into the white surrounding fabrics will be very difficult to remove and will reduce the visual impact of the contrast between the red and white fabrics.

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For contact details for Jessica Wheelahan, of birdie beetle, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

G

A E Quay 6 670 24 Qu uay Street, Bundaberg 4670 Phone: (07) 4154 4486 Ph P Mon-Fri 2 2pm Mon-Frri 9am-5pm | Sat 9am-2pm w.thequiltersshack.com m www.thequiltersshack.com www w

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CLASSES

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WO R K S H O P S

L A R G E R A N G E O F PAT T E R N S

C OT TO N S & WO O L S


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â&#x20AC;&#x161;

What could be more perennially popular with kids than teddy bears? But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face it, the softie market is pretty well saturated with the likes of Pooh and Paddington. So Charlotte Rion dreamt up this sweet wallmounted knit/crochet swag alternative.

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Photograph: Pierre Nicou/UniversDeBebe/Picture Media

There s a Bear Up There!


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Materials

Special abbreviation

Ears

Q Patons Cotton Blend 8 ply 50g balls: one ball each of Brown (20), White (01) and Cream (03) plus a small quantity of Black (02) for embroidery Q 3.00mm (UK 11/US -) crochet hook – see Note Q 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) knitting needles Q Fibre fill Q Wool needle for finishing

dec = draw up a lp in each of next 2 sts, yoh and draw through all 3 lps on hook.

Make six. Using 3.00mm hook and Cream, make 3 ch and join with a sl st in first ch to make a ring. 1st round – 1 ch, 6 dc in ring, sl st in first dc. 2nd round – 1 ch, 2 dc in same st as sl st, 1 dc in each of next 2 dc, 2 dc in next dc, 1 dc in each of last 2 dc, sl st in first dc ... 8 dc. 3rd round – 1ch, 2 dc in same st as sl st, 2 dc in next dc, 1 dc in each of next 2 dc, 2 dc in each of next 2 dc, 1 dc in each of last 2 dc, sl st in first dc ... 12 dc. Fasten off.

Finished size: 70cm (271⁄2in) approx. Note: Parental supervision is recommended for children under three years as this toy could potentially present a choking or strangling hazard. This is an intermediate skill level knitting and crochet project. Use only the yarn specified. Other yarns are likely to produce different results. Quantities are approximate as they can vary between knitters/ crocheters. Correct tension is not essential for this project but note that it is worked on smaller needles/hook than is usual for this yarn. Australian/UK crochet terminology is used. North American readers should consult a crochet manual to ensure they interpret the instructions correctly. There is no direct US equivalent for a 3.00mm hook.

Abbreviations ch = chain; dc = double crochet; lp/s = loop/s; rep = repeat; sp = space; sl st = slip stitch; st/s = stitch/es; stocking st = knit 1 row, purl 1 row; yoh = yarn over hook 108

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Bear heads Make three. Using 3.25mm needles and Brown, cast on 14 sts. Working in stocking st throughout, increase one st at each end of first 3 rows ... 20 sts. Work 11 rows without shaping. Shape top of head – Decrease one st at each end of next 4 rows ... 12 sts. Work 2 rows without shaping. Increase one st at each end of next 4 rows ... 20 sts. Work 11 rows without shaping. Decrease one st at each end of next 3 rows ... 14 sts. Cast off.

Muzzles Make three. Using 3.00mm hook and Cream, make 3 ch and join with a sl st in first ch to make a ring. 1st round – 1 ch, 6 dc in ring, sl st in first dc. 2nd round – 1 ch, 2 dc in same st as sl st, 2 dc in each dc to end, sl st in first dc ... 12 dc. 3rd round – 1 ch, 1 dc in same st as sl st, (2 dc in next dc, 1 dc in next dc) 5 times, 2 dc in last dc, sl st in first dc ... 18 dc. 4th round – 1 ch, 1 dc in same st as sl st, 1 dc in each dc to end, sl st in first dc. Fasten off.

Balls Make four. Using 3.00mm hook and White, make 6 ch, leaving a length for finishing and join with a sl st in first ch to make a ring. 1st round – 1 ch, 6 dc in ring, sl st in first dc. 2nd round – 1 ch, 2 dc in same st as sl st, 2 dc in each dc to end, sl st in first dc ... 12 dc. 3rd round – 1 ch, 1 dc in same st as sl st, 1 dc in each dc to end, sl st in first dc. Rep last round 3 times.

7th round – 1 ch, draw up a lp in same st as sl st and also in next dc, yoh and draw through all 3 lps on hook, (dec) 5 times ... 6 sts. Fasten off, leaving a length for finishing.

Finishing Join the side and lower edges of the bear heads, stuffing them lightly with fibre fill before completing the seams. Attach two ears and one muzzle to each head, adding a small amount of fibre fill to them, as pictured. Stuff the balls lightly. Embroidery Using Black, satin stitch the eyes and noses, then using straight stitches, embroider the mouths as pictured. String Using 3.00mm hook and Brown, make a chain about 70cm (271⁄2in) long (or the length desired). Fasten off. Thread a ball, then a head alternately onto the string, ending with a ball, as pictured. Using the finishing lengths at each end of the balls, close their ends and secure them to the string with about 2cm (3⁄4in) between each piece, as pictured.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


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Another cute idea! HANG BY A THREAD

Photograph: Jonathan Fong

Christmas may come but once a year, but this clever tree-decorating concept will prove a perennial. Take that tinsel down and replace it with tape measures; give baubles the boot and hang spools instead; jingly bells can bow out to bobbins; and the tree-topper star can be crafted from a pincushion. All credit to Jonathan Fong, who came up with this haby-forming idea. See more at jonathanfongstyle.com.

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DOLLYGRAMS

All I want for Christmas is â&#x20AC;Ś a DollyGram! Allison Dey Malacaria sends you the right yuletide message with handstitched gingerbread embroideries (that come in fabric envelopes) and matching tree ornaments, all made from repurposed clothing and household linens.

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Materials Dollygram Q Two rectangles, 16 x 22cm (6 x 81⁄2in) of natural linen or homespun cotton – see Note (body) Q Rectangle of cotton batting 16 x 22cm (6 x 81⁄2in) Q Light blue and red machine-sewing threads (notepaper lines) Q Stranded embroidery cotton in red, white and black – see Note Q Fine-point permanent black marker (optional) Q 15cm (6in) length of red ricrac (optional) Envelope Q Two squares, 26cm (101⁄4in) of linen or other fabric – see Step 14 (envelope and lining) Q Stranded embroidery cotton in contrasting colour Q Decorative 25mm (1in) button Q Press stud Ornament Q Two rectangles, 13 x 18cm (5 x 7in) of linen or cotton fabric – see Note (body) Q Rectangle of cotton batting 13 x 18cm (5 x 7in) Q 10cm (4in) length of ricrac or ribbon (hanging loop) Q 10-15cm (4-6in) lengths of assorted coloured ricrac (optional – icing) Q Two 10mm (3⁄8in) buttons (optional – eyes) 114

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All projects Q Pencil Q Machine-sewing threads to match and contrast with the fabrics Q Turning tool such as a chopstick Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, cross stitch, French knot, straight stitch Finished size: Dollygram 18 x 11.5cm (7 x 41⁄2in); envelope (closed) 14 x 20.5cm (51⁄2 x 8in); ornament 14 x 9.5cm (51⁄2 x 33⁄4in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. Materials and instructions are for one of each item. Allison’s fabrics included vintage linens in cream (one dollygram front), natural (one dollygram back and front) and traced (one ornament front); homespun cotton in red (one envelope and lining) and beige (one ornament front and back, one dollygram back, one outer envelope); red and cream check fabric (one ornament back); and red on red stripe fabric (one envelope lining) – she encourages you to reflect your own style in your choices. The lettering on the dollygram can be embroidered or handwritten with a permanent marker if you prefer. www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


DOLLYGRAM

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Trace the larger body shape from the Pattern Sheet onto the wrong side of the 16 x 22cm (6 x 81⁄2in) rectangle of fabric for the front. Use contrasting machinesewing thread to tack along the traced outline so you can see it on the right side without having a permanent line there. Use a ruler and sharp pencil to lightly mark horizontal ‘notepaper lines’ over the front of the shape 1cm (3⁄8in) apart and also rule a vertical ‘margin line’ down the left side. Thread your machine with light blue thread in the top and machine stitch the horizontal lines, starting and stopping outside the tacked outline. Change to red thread and machine stitch the margin line – go over it a couple of times or use a triple stitch to give it a bit more definition. As an alternative to this, you could sew a line of red ricrac here as Allison did on her cream dollygram. Backstitch tiny circles in white thread to the left of the margin to represent punched holes if you wish – Allison’s natural dollygram has these. Use a sharp pencil to handwrite a poem, quotation or personal greeting along the blue notepaper lines. Backstitch the lettering in black thread with French knots for the dots. Allison used red thread for the dots on

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‘Christmas’. Alternatively, go over the pencil lines with a fine-pointed permanent black marker for a faster finish. Unpick the tacked outline.

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Match the stitched front piece with the other 16 x 22cm (6 x 81⁄2in) rectangle of fabric, right sides together, then put them both on the 16 x 22cm (6 x 81⁄2in) rectangle of batting and pin the three layers together. Stitch around the marked outline through all layers, leaving an opening down the outside of one leg for turning; reverse at the start and end of your stitching. Trim the shape about 3mm (1⁄8in) outside the stitching but leave a slightly wider allowance at the opening to make it easier to stitch closed later. Trim the batting level with the traced line at the opening. Clip the inside curves and corners without cutting the stitching. Turn the doll right side out through the opening between the fabric layers so the batting is inside. Run the turning tool gently around the inside of the shape to push the seam out neatly. Press flat with a warm iron. Fold the raw edges in and neatly ladder stitch the opening closed to finish.

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ENVELOPE

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Steps 2-5

ALLISON’S FABRICSOURCING TIPS You’ll quickly discover that linen wrinkles ALL the time – it’s not you, it’s the fibre. But linen is lovely and rustic in handcrafts and good sources include vintage tea towels, embroidered tablecloths and women’s blouses. Real homespun cotton has a coarser weave than quilting cotton and sources include vintage bed sheets and tea towels – check out the op shops.

ALLISON’S MAKE-DO TIPS If you feel overwhelmed by a project’s materials list, look at what you already own and substitute: use a regular pencil instead of a disappearing marker or upcycle felted wool blanketing instead of insulating batting for a pot holder for example. For this project, you could use a couple of layers of flannelette instead of the cotton batting or tea-dye some plain cotton fabric if you don’t have any linen.

If you’re using a directional print or striped

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Step 16

fabric for the envelope or lining, make sure that the design runs diagonally from corner to corner, not from side to side, so it’s facing the right way when the envelope is assembled, as described in Step 19. Match the two 26cm (101⁄4in) squares of fabric, right sides together, and sew all the way around them with a 6mm (1⁄4in) seam allowance. Clip the corners to reduce bulk. If using a directional print, fold the square as described in Step 19 before making the next cut, so that the print is facing the right way in the finished envelope. Measure 7cm (23⁄4in) from one corner along both adjacent sides and make a small mark on each edge. Cut between the marks to remove the corner. It’s a good idea to sew over the seams again where you cut so the stitching doesn’t unravel as you turn the envelope out through this opening. Turn the envelope the right way out and push out the corners neatly. Fold the cut edges in, press and pin. Machine stitch 3mm (1⁄8in) from the edge all the way around using matching or contrasting thread, closing the opening at the same time. Lay the shape on the table with the lining fabric facing up and the cut off corner at the

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Diagram 1

17 18 Diagram 2

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bottom, as shown in Diagram 1. Fold this short flat edge upwards and the two side triangles inwards so that the corners and edges meet and form the envelope pocket. The dotted lines on the diagram represent the fold lines. Press the folds and pin to keep the edges place. (The remaining pointed triangle at the top will form the flap.) Using two strands of contrasting embroidery cotton, sew a pattern of stitches along the two joins to hold the edges together, being careful not to catch the front of the envelope as you go. Refer to Diagram 2. Allison did parallel beige straight stitches on the red envelope and green cross stitches on the beige one. Fold the top flap down and press. Sew one half of a press stud to the inside of the top flap and the other half to correspond with it below the cutoff corner to fasten the envelope. Finish by sewing a decorative button to the outside of the flap to cover the press-stud stitching.

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ORNAMENT

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Repeat Step 1 with the smaller body shape and a 13 x 18cm (5 x 7in) rectangle of fabric. If you are adding embellishments to the front of your ornament, use contrasting machine-sewing thread to tack


QUOTABLE QUOTES “At Christmas play and make good cheer, For Christmas comes but once a year.” Thomas Tusser (1524-1580) “A little smile, a word of cheer, A bit of love from someone near, A little gift from one held dear, Best wishes for the coming year. These make a merry Christmas!” John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892)

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along the traced outline so you can see it on the other side without leaving a permanent line there. Omit this step otherwise.

Getting to know … ALLISON DEY MALACARIA Where do you call home, and who do you live with? My two grown children live in the US, and I miss them very much and don’t get to visit as often as I’d like. I met my husband five years ago when he came to visit the US. We fell madly in love, I moved to Australia, and we married soon after. We live simply and often caretake for others, so we’re a bit nomadic in our middle-age. His friends here think we’re a bit mad. I caught the tail-end of the hippie era and slid comfortably into the punk movement in the late ’70s, so my family is used to my crazy ways. Raised by Depression-era ladies, I never became much of a consumer and always ran my home the way Grandma did, and my husband loves it! Why this particular craft? Small projects using old, traditional, slow techniques provide a kind of personal space bubble where I can reconnect with my own thoughts and still make lovely gifts for friends and family. I was taught hand sewing at an early age, back when new supplies and fabrics were not so readily available. Making something new out of something old was the norm, and I enjoy it so much. These DollyGrams, ornaments and envelopes are made from repurposed clothing and household linens. Only the red ticking envelope liner is a brand new fabric. The cotton batting was a gold coin priced roll of remnants from a local fabric shop. Have you tried plenty of others? I’ve tried a few other things, like papercraft and basket weaving, but I always gravitate back to sewing. I used to make embellished quilts and story wall quilts when I wasn’t making toys

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Add ricrac, ribbon or other embellishments to the right side of the ornament front if desired. Allison machine stitched ricrac

and games and Halloween costumes for my own children. There are still many things I’d love to try, such as paper cutting. If you weren’t doing this, what do you imagine you’d be doing? If my hands no longer worked properly, I think I’d be swinging in a hammock under a big oak tree, reading endlessly. I love to read. Who taught you your crafting skills? I learned from my grandmothers, my mother and my stepmother and the local community of old time US Southern and Midwestern farm housewives and quilters. These were women for whom home arts were part of their beings. Not only were funds scarce for new textile goods, they simply did not live in a world of overwhelming new consumer goods. Their inspiration and instruction moved from person to person and maybe a library book or shared magazine and their joy in this sharing was palpable. I was an impatient child and never learned the ‘correct’ way to do anything. I’d always go off on my own and make the process work for my vision. Any good stories from those lessons? My favourite is the story of the intentional mistake. Old quilting ladies used to take one fabric and turn the print upside down or sideways and sew it in ‘wrong’. The reason, they said, was that people could never make something absolutely perfect, so they made sure to show their humility and good humour by adding a mistake. I never ever tried to make my work look like a store-bought, factory-made product after hearing that. I love seeing the person and the humanity in the finished handwork. What does this craft mean to you? This craft is ancient and low tech. It connects me to past wisdom and future sustainability. It’s the work of generations of humans who have made the home a place of comfort and refuge and enjoyment. It’s our very culture of selfreliance, self-expression and gift giving. This craft is also slow. It forces me to slow down. It is not something one needs a great deal of skill or equipment to accomplish. It means anyone can create something lovely and heartfelt. And that appeals to me. Is it hard to find time to do it or is it a profession? With the move to a new country, I wasn’t allowed to work for three years and then it was difficult to find employment in my 50s, so this is what I do, and I’d love to turn it into a business to provide income in the years to come. I love designing toys and dolls, embroidery patterns and other sewing patterns for others to make. I’m also studying

icing at the wrists, ankles, neckline and centre front of one of her ornaments. Allow the ricrac to overhang the tacked outline so

for a certified health-care position, but I still dream of working from home, doing exactly what I love to do and passing on the skills I’ve learned over the years. From where do you draw inspiration? Stories and art and history. I read a lot. I love stories. I love wandering through galleries and museums. All those story lines I learn go into my work. I love to be inspired by other people’s work and words and then see them become something new, informed by my own experiences and vision. I’m also often inspired by the very materials I find at the op shops, unusual materials or prints or textures. Why this skill – and this style? Because of the old women I learned from whose history was founded in the American pioneer movement and the frugality and make-do wisdom of farm life, I was able to take this passion for hand stitching and re-use wherever I have lived. I’ve moved house frequently during my life. It completely and perfectly complements my nomadic, low-tech life. What I make I usually give away. There’s a freedom in having simple tools that can transform everyday objects into artful items and gifts. And there’s a passing on of home-based culture in doing that. What are your favourite materials to work with? Unexpected treasures. Found objects, such as boxes of perlé cotton or embroidery thread or homespun cottons and linens and wools, are my favourites. Threads and fabric and needles. Simple as that. If they’ve appeared from the collection of a local granny who just isn’t using them anymore, all the better. It’s like a gift of generations. Perhaps this thread was used in that granny’s apron. Maybe this fabric was also used in her kitchen curtains. It excites me that there is a continuity and relationship created in using these older stashes. Do you teach your skills to others? It was never on my agenda to do so, but somehow I’ve managed to teach stitching and sewing arts to children in my home, through an after-school program, and even as an art teacher. I’ve also taught some doll-making and upcycling in Sydney and through the local Country Women’s Association. What is your advice for beginners? Stitching is fixable. If you miss a stitch, you can fill in with another. If your stitches are too large, you can pull them out and do it again. If you snip too far, guess what? You can stitch it back again. Stitching is also personal. Relax! Handwork is not perfect; it’s meant to be an expression of enjoyment and love.


the ends will be caught in the seam. Unpick the tacking. Fold the 10cm (4in) length of ricrac or ribbon for the hanging loop in half and lay it over the front with the two ends just above the centre top of the head. Pin it in place.

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Repeat Step 10 with the other 13 x 18cm (5 x 7in) piece of fabric and batting, making sure you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t catch the hanging loop in the seam except at the top of the head. Stitch over that area twice for extra strength.

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Repeat Steps 11-13 to complete the ornament. You can add the button eyes now too if you wish. For contact details for Allison Dey Malacaria, of SweaterDoll, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine. Homespun

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QUI STITCK CH

HOOP CROCHET

Kate May, of www.thehomemakery.co.uk/blog, added colour and panache to an embroidery hoop with some simple crochet stitches and then put it to work as an earring holder. Kate shares her step-by-step tutorial with us.

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CK QUI CH STIT

Materials: Q One ball of 8 ply crochet cotton in Candy Pink (12) – see Note Q 4.00mm (UK 8/US 6) crochet hook Q 18cm (7in) timber embroidery hoop – see Note Q Wool needle for sewing in ends Finished size: 18cm (7in) internal diameter

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Note: Read the instructions before starting the project. Australian/UK crochet terms are used throughout; readers from North America should consult a crochet manual to ensure they interpret the instructions correctly. No tension is given for this project. The crochet is worked on the outer ring of the embroidery hoop only – set the inner ring aside for now. Kate used Rico

Essentials Cotton DK yarn, which is mercerised. This process binds the yarn together and makes it very smooth with a subtle sheen – other yarns might give a different effect and need fewer stitches around the hoop.

Abbreviations ch = chain; dc = double crochet; sl = slip; st/s = stitch/es; tr = treble crochet

1 Make a slip knot on the hook and sl st onto the outer ring of the embroidery hoop.

2 Work dc into the hoop. To do this, put your hook into the hoop and hook the yarn from the back to the front so you have two loops on the hook. Put the yarn over and pull it through both loops to complete the first dc.

3 Slide the first stitch next to the hoop’s opening and work dc all the way around the hoop so the yarn covers it completely.

4 When you get to the other end, turn the hoop around and ch 3.

5 Work 1 tr into every second dc of the first row. (Kate tried working tr into every dc, but it created a ripple effect she didn’t like, but with some yarns you might need to work tr into every dc.)

6 When you have worked tr sts all the way around the hoop, join to the ch 3 with a sl st.

7 To create the scallops, *skip 1 tr, tr 7 into the next st, skip 1 tr and dc into the next st*. Repeat from * to * all the way around the hoop. (If you worked tr into each dc in the last row, you might want to skip 2 sts instead of 1 st.)

8 When you get to the last few scallops, check the number of sts left in case you need to fudge a little to make the scallops fit nicely. Kate was lucky this time and it worked out perfectly.

9 Now you can use your pretty hoop as you wish. Kate sewed scalloped braid to fabric and clamped it around the inner hoop with the crocheted one to make an earring hanger.

Homespun


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My Felt Doll by Shelly Down, $39.99 We consider ourselves fortunate to have been able to publish several of Shelly Down’s delightful little Gingermelon dolls in Homespun (Hansel and Gretel in Vol 14 No 8 and Pocahontas in Vol 16 No 1). Shelly has now released her first book, bringing together in one place her expertise in designing and teaching others how to make dolls. She begins with instructions for a basic 10in doll and then goes to town with 11 variations, including a ballerina, fairy, mermaid, princess and schoolgirl (shown above right). They are made mostly from felt, which means no fraying and no turning under raw edges; they’re also entirely hand stitched, so even beginners without a sewing machine will be able to bring a little lady to life. However, that’s not to say that an experienced crafter won’t also enjoy these dolls: the detailing on the outfits and accessories is fabulous. The instructions are clear, comprehensive and well-illustrated with line drawings and close-up photographs. Published by David and Charles. Available in all craft shops or by mail order from www.candobooks.com.au. Phone (02) 4560 1600 or email sales@capricornlink.com.au for wholesale enquiries.

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animals, including a moose, rabbit family, koala, panda and wolf, can be found in this book. They’re outfitted in all manner of stylish garments, such as walking shoes and backpack, neckerchief, golfing trousers, even a basket and ice-cream cone for the picnicking bunnies. There’s a technique chapter included up front, followed by standard instructions that apply for hooking many of the animals. Steps that relate only to one specifically are provided in separate chapters for each animal. That presentation has its pros and cons – it reduces repetition, but is likely to mean a bit of page turning as you flip between sections as you work. This, coupled with the fact that the instructions aren’t always highly detailed, means that these critters are probably not best suited to a novice. But if you’re willing to invest in some interpretation and you’re looking for cuteness plus, grab yourself a copy.

by Anna Faustino, US$27.95 How would you like to be able to make quilts that have no piecing or seams; that don’t require any turning under of raw edges; that can be made using any colour or print; that allow you to readily audition fabric options before having to make a single cut; and, most importantly of all, look as sensational as the example shown on the cover of Anna Faustino’s book? The terrific news is that the method is fairly straightforward – only some fiddly cutting if your design is intricate. Anna provides clear instructions for each step involved as well as patterns for 14 projects, graded from easiest to more challenging. The book also includes photographs of more gorgeous quilts to serve as inspiration – and before you know it, you’ll be able to move to drawing your own designs: think Zentangling, for starters, clip art and variations of traditional patchwork patterns. Anna even shows how to make these quilts using personal photographs: you’ll be able to immortalise your loved ones in glorious fabric art!

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ue. Turn off the Where in Port Macquarie: 14 Acacia Aven Turn right at Lake Pacific Highway onto the Oxley Highway. into Acacia Avenue. Road, then left at Fernhill Road, then right with help from Mary, r owne Who plays host: Jenny Gibbs is the with many years come all who Dawn, Kathy, Lark, Gail and Sue, of patchwork experience. ote and develop Worth visiting because: We love to prom Macquarie and Port n withi art e textil and ng patchwork , quilti ed with ranges of the surrounding areas. Our store is fully stock a dealership for are quilting products and haberdashery and we Sweet 16. er Quilt i Janome sewing machines and the Hand fabrics, uality top-q The shelves are lined with irresistible rns. mode and ons specialising in Moda, reproducti workshop area What we recommend: We offer a very large by local and held are es class and meet where social groups long-arm mill Gam her has Sue s. tutor g well-known visitin erpiece, and quilting machine in store to finish your mast of framing types we provide a custom-framing service for all to suit your needs. , NSW 2444 Address: 14 Acacia Avenue, Port Macquarie Phone: (02) 6581 3338 Email: jenny@stitchednframed.com.au Website: www.stitchednframed.com.au


2. Por t Macquarie

PATCHWORK IN PORT

Where’s Port Macquarie: Located on the mid-north coast, about half way between Sydney and Brisbane. Where in Port Macquarie: 79 Has tings River Drive. On the main drag into town, you can’t miss us with the big ‘red shed’ on the Clifton Drive roundabout, next to JAX tyres, with on-site parking. Who plays host: Jennifer and Geo ff run the shop together. Worth visiting because: We have owned our shop for three years and have loved every minute of it. More than 2,000 bolts

3. Kempsey

of fabric adorn our shelves, inclu ding batiks, reproductions, Christmas and Japanese prints. Our range of haberdashery includes products from Clover, Rob son Anton and Gütermann, along with speciality buttons, patt erns, English paper-piecing papers, embroidery supplies, lots of tools and bits and pieces. We’re also an authorised dealer and repair centre for Bernina and Husqvarna Viking sewing mac hines, with spare parts and accessories for all brands also avai lable. As a certified shop in Judy Niemeyer/Quiltworx, we carr y exclusive patterns such as Glacier Star, Mariners Compass and Paradise In Bloom. Jennifer is a certified instructor for Quiltwo rx.com and conducts regular Quiltworx classes, which are alwa ys fun to attend. Follow us on Facebook to keep up to date with what’s happening in store. What we recommend: We stock the best range of batiks on the mid-north coast. We also have a range of small, quick and easy projects available for holiday sew ers to pick up on their travels. Visitors are welcome to join our Sew & Go group on Wednesdays and our Bag Club and Quiltworx Club are also really popular. Address: 79 Hastings River Dr, Port Macquarie, NSW 2444 Phone: (02) 6583 3257 Email: info@patchworkinport.co m.au Website: www.patchworkinport.co m.au

CONNIE’S FABRICS

Where’s Kempsey: About 30 minutes north of Port Macquarie and about an hour south of Coffs Harbour by car – the perfect stop off on a road trip. Where in Kempsey: 1 Verge Street. To find us, at the traffic lights at the end of the bridge, head towards West Kempsey, then at the first intersection, go left, then at the next intersection, go left again, heading towards Riverside Park (not down the lane), and we’re just around the corner. Who plays host: Owned by Connie and Colin Norberry. We have help running the store on Monday, thanks to Connie’s mum Gwen, and we also have the help of friends Monica, Joanne, Adele, Sue and many others who are happy to pitch in when needed. Worth visiting because: Last year, we moved into much larger premises – about three times bigger than before, which means we have plenty of space to store and display all of our wonderful, and not to mention huge, range of patchwork fabrics and accessories. We also have plenty of room to accommodate groups, so if you want to organise a group visit, just give us a call to book, otherwise you’ll only get a dry biscuit for morning tea! We also have a Facebook page, so like us on Facebook to keep up to date with what’s going on in store.

What we recommend: Now that we have the space to admire our fabrics, it’s like we’ve fallen in love with our range all over again. We have a wide variety to suit everyone, including Japanese, reproductions, batiks, Kaffe Fassett, Australiana, William Morris and plenty of novelties – just to name a few. Address: 1 Verge Street, Kempsey, NSW 2440 Phone: (02) 6562 7792 Email: conniesfabrics@outlook.com

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4. Coffs Harbour NESTING NEEDLES FABRIC & PATCHWORK Where’s Coffs Harbour: Located on the mid-north coast, Coffs Harbour is a beautiful coastal holiday destination approximately half-way between Brisbane and Sydney. Where in Coffs Harbour: Shop 5, Central Arcade, 28-32 Harbour Drive. Turn into Harbour Drive from the Pacific Highway, right in the middle of town. Nesting Needles is on the southern side of the street – look for the Bellissimo Coffee Shop and Golden Hot Bread shops: we are located at the end of the arcade that runs between these two shops. Who plays host: Lisa, Ross, Justine, Sue and Jenny. Worth visiting because: You’ll be welcomed by our friendly and helpful staff, who are always on hand with advice. The store is full of beautiful fabrics, precuts, books, patterns, notions, bag accessories and kits. Our fabrics include Moda, Tilda, Lecien, FreeSpirit, Cosmo, Olympus, Penny Rose, Marcus and Maywood Studio. We also have a range of threads from Cosmo and Cottage Garden Threads. New students are always welcome to our modern, spacious and bright teaching environment. Classes are run weekly, fortnightly, monthly and bimonthly, in a range of techniques, including patchwork and quilting, fashion design, crochet and embroidery. We also run weekend workshops and host guest tutors. Feel free to ask our staff for any advice on projects, fabric choices or which class would best suit you.

5. Maclean

SEW EXCITED

Where’s Maclean: About 40 min utes’ drive north of Grafton, turn left at Ferry Park or left turn just over the Clarence River bridge if coming from the north. Where in Maclean: 237 River Stre et. We are very easy to find at the middle of the main street, opposite the Maclean Hotel. Who plays host: Nel Matheson with the invaluable assistance of Chris Bale.

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What we recommend: Portable sashiko panels and threads along with our English paper-piecing kits, are great ideas for people on the go, especially if you need a small project to take with you on your travels. Address: Shop 5 Central Arcade, 28-32 Harbour Drive, Coffs Harbour, NSW 2450. Phone: 0400 055 989 Email: lisa@nestingneedles.com.au Website: www.nestingneedles.com.au

Worth visiting because: We’re both experienced in a wide variety of needlecrafts, so the sho p reflects our areas of interest , and we pride ourselves on friendly and personal service, with help always at hand. In store, we have a wide range of fabrics for dressmaking and patchwork, hea ps of haberdashery, sewing needles and everything for your quilting and embroidery needs. You’ll find summer wools in stock, with patterns for knitting and crochet available, and we host a knitting and crochet group on Tuesday afternoons. We are also a Janome dealer, with a comprehensive range of machine s and accessories available, and we’re lucky to have the services of a great sewing-machine mechanic available. Groups are alwa ys welcome to visit: just let us know in advance, and we will be ready with a cuppa and some specials for you. What we recommend: We love ever y corner of our shop, especially our patchwork fabrics, which are affordable and varied in style. We have a complet e range of Simplicity patterns to go with our range of dressmaking fabrics. We also have a library of magazines and pattern books available to flick through when you visit . Address: 237 River Street, Maclean , NSW 2463 Phone: (02) 6645 1480 Email: sew.excited@bigpond.com


6. Lismore

RAINBOW PATCHWORK

and notions for your Aurifil threads, along with products, tools back fabrics and patchwork needs, including a range of wide coordinates, battings. You’ll find a large selection of fabric by Northcott ana’ ‘Tosc including the Jinny Beyer Palette and and Cotton Moda by s Solid as well as solids, including Bella of neutral range large a have Supreme by RJR, and we also sive range of exten an e, galor s batik have whites and creams. We of our new ranges, Kaffe Fassett fabrics, and just to name some s from Tilda, we have ‘Autumntree’ and ‘Sweetheart’ range Jansdotter. As ‘Snippits’ by Sarah Fielke and ‘Stella’ by Lotta of her patterns, many a Judy Niemeyer certified shop, we carry h quilt, Mont the of including the most recent Technique Niemeyer Judy for es class host Paradise in Blooms, and we also mill Gam a have we ng, quilti your quilts. If you need help with ed at the joining which her, Stitc er Where’s Lismore: This subtropical city locat Statl a with fitted ine long-arm quilting mach the commercial heart of Richmond River and Leicester Creek is se the shop. is usually busy stitching away as you brow . NSW of s River ern North of the available for kids’ What we recommend: We have many kits off the Bruxner Turn t. Stree n Unio 75 ore: Lism in re Whe quilt designed by quilts, including a new Hungry Caterpillar opposite side of the . Highway into South Lismore. We are on the Karen and exclusive to Rainbow Patchwork the post office. 2480 road to the railway station and right next to NSW ore, Address: 75 Union Street, South Lism to assist you with Who plays host: Karen and Glenda are able Phone: (02) 6622 3003 your patchwork needs. Email: info@rainbowpatchwork.com.au , store patchwork Worth visiting because: We are a specialist Website: rainbowpatchwork.com.au a beautiful range of carrying about 3,000 bolts of fabrics and

7. Glen Innes

GLEN FABRIC BARN

Where’s Glen Innes: Situated in the Northern Tablelands, known as the Celtic capital of Australia, Glen Innes is home to the Australian Standing Stones. Where in Glen Innes: 178 Grey Street. You’ll find us in the main street of town, two doors north of the Grey and Wentworth Streets roundabout, right next door to the florist. Who plays host: Fi is the current owner, for the past 18 months, and brings with her a great passion for all things crafty and is joined by her not-so-scary mother-in-law, Kath. Between the two of us, we have a combined experience in handcrafts of 90 years, so we can definitely help you out with any crafting problems you might have. Worth visiting because: We stock a lot more than expected, from fabrics to curtains, haberdashery, fashion fabrics, patterns, sewing machines, furniture, bric-a-brac and more. You’ll be in for a surprise when you stop by. Fi teaches classes on the weekends, but it’s always best to phone in advance for dates, times and what type of class we’re running. If you can’t make it to our classes, Fi is always happy to teach at other times that fit into your schedule, and she is more than happy to assist you with colour choice, design or starting points for project ideas. Follow us on Facebook to check out our new arrivals, specials and class calendar.

What we recommend: If you need some quick repairs done while on your travels, we offer a full range of alteration services and we usually have a turnaround of a few days. Address: 178 Grey Street, Glen Innes, NSW 2370 Phone: (02) 6732 7000 Email: frobits4@bigpond.com

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8. Armidale

GET STITCHED

Where’s Armidale: Half way between Sydney and Brisbane on the New England Highway, Armidale is the highest city in the Northern Tablelands district. Where in Armidale: 2/118 Dangar Street. The main street through town, Dangar Street will take you down past the cathedral. Through the roundabout, and we are the bright orange store on the left. There’s parking on the street, but we do have a big carpark at the back of the store with a longer time limit. Who plays host: You’ll be greeted by Karyn and, on a Friday, by Liz as well. Worth visiting because: Get Stitched is a unique little store, where our line of patterns and kits are entirely designed and made by Karyn. We have patterns and kits for quilts of all sizes, as well as bags, runners and cushions. Our shop is bursting with fabrics down one side of the shop and our haby along the other. Little projects are displayed above the cabinets, while bigger quilts hang in the front of the store and along the walls of the classroom, providing constant inspiration. Nowhere is off limits, and you can always feel free to wander through the class and have a chat; after all, that’s what it’s all about – inspiration and motivation. What we recommend: For lovers of appliqué, a great lightbox is a must. We have A3 and A4 sizes available, and they’re lightweight, portable and fabulous to work on. Also, Karyn’s latest block of the

9. Tamworth

STITCH BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

Where’s Tamworth: Tamworth straddles the Peel River and is a major regional centre for New England. It’s approximately 318km from the Queensland border, and about five hours from Sydney. Where in Tamworth: 9-11 Bridge Street. and side before Coming from Sydney, we are on the left-h we’re reaching town, and heading from Armidale, bridges! the een on the right-hand side – located betw or Jane. een Maur by Who plays host: You’ll be welcomed he’s at if l arriva on you meet Max, Maureen’s little dog, will work that day. orth known for the Worth visiting because: Not only is Tamw but Stitch Between Golden Guitar and Country Music Festival,

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month design, Butterflies and Gum Leaves, runs over six months and is $29 plus $3 postage per month, or as a complete kit for $174 plus $14 p&h. The kits are mostly precut. Final size is 48 x 56in. Address: 2/118 Dangar Street, Armidale, NSW 2350 Phone: (02) 6771 5122 Website: getstitched.com.au

in country NSW. The Bridges is the largest patchwork shop to expand our stock Over the last three years, we’ve continued st range of fabrics large to supply quilters and crafters with the s from Moda, range have we in the northwest area. Not only do but we also ter, Roos Red and Northcott, Robert Kaufman, Tilda ko. We sashi and s fabric ired -insp have a great range of Asian match, and mix to easy is it so s, range always stock complete selection. You’ll find and we are happy to help with your fabric patterns and a huge range of buttons, ribbons, threads, se from. Our haberdashery for crafters of all levels to choo nced quilters. adva to complete range of kits cover beginners master your or learn you Classes are held every week to help teachers, nal natio inter ding skills, and specialist tutors, inclu ng quilti arm longa have We . present workshops in store up Sign . finish al ssion profe a work machine to give your to keep up to date for our newsletter and like us on Facebook with what is happening in store. range of table What we recommend: Everyone loves our arly to keep regul ers runners and sashiko. We add new runn our range diverse and interesting. 2340 Address: 9-11 Bridge Street, Tamworth, NSW Phone/fax: (02) 6765 4138 Email: stitchbtbtamworth@gmail.com


10. Gunnedah

GUNNEDAH FASHION FABRIC S

Where’s Gunnedah: About an hou r’s drive west of one of the biggest regional centres of western NSW, Tamworth. Where in Gunnedah: 177 Conadill y Street. Located very centrally in the main street of Gun nedah, right at the pedestrian crossing opposite Subway. Who plays host: Owned by Kath ie Spence, with the help of a lovely lady, Therese. Kathie has always sewn, and is a passionate patchworker. Therese is a qualified teacher and

runs our sewing classes. We look forward to welcoming you with our old-fashioned country serv ice when you visit . Worth visiting because: We have a large range of patchwork fabrics from various designers, one of our favourites being Moda, however we stock many diff erent designers. We also carry a range of daywear fabrics, including the Rossini range of beautiful individual pieces. You ’ll find a very extensive range of haberdashery, ribbons, trims and laces, as well as all the necessary sewing accessories, inclu ding Simplicity and Kwiksew patterns. We sell Janome sewing machines and have a service mechanic who visits the shop regu larly to service and repair all makes and models of machines. Join in on one of our sewing classes with Therese; they run on the second Thursday of each month. We also run specialty patc hwork classes. Just get in touch with us for more information . What we recommend: Come and take a look at our beautiful new range from Rossini Fabrics, as well as our tubed buttons, trims and laces. We also have a larg e selection of flannels, including tractor prints for kids, and for your home decorating, we have a beautiful range of can vas and linens. Address: 177 Conadilly Street, Gun nedah, NSW 2380 Phone: (02) 6742 1235 Email: gff@bigpond.net.au

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Market Place

PRODUCTS OF THE MONTH P 2

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CRAFT DEPOT

YARRA VALLEY QUILT YARN & SEW

THE TEDDY TREE

SINGER HERITAGE SEWING MACHINE

NEVER FORGET

ALL AROUND THE TOWN ADVENT CALENDAR PANEL

Combining beautiful retro design with innovation, this machine sews like a dream and is backed by warranty. Available in store and online.

New design by Janet Rowe from Wild Craft Farm – patterns are $25.95 plus p&h. Kits available in original fabrics, which are from Sue Daley’s latest range Forget me Not.

This cotton panel is perfect for making your own advent calendar. Complete instructions are printed on the panel.

Phone: (02) 9980 8966 Email: mailorders@craftdepot.com.au Website: www.craftdepot.com.au

Phone: (03) 5964 3592 Email: sales@cccpatchwork.com.au Website: www.quiltyarnsew.com.au

Phone: (08) 9201 1011 Email: sales@teddytree.com.au Website: www.teddytree.com.au

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BROTHER AUSTRALIA

KORNACRAFT SEWING CENTRE

BROTHER AUSTRALIA PINTEREST

TUTU FAIRY POCKET PANEL

Brother Australia are very excited to announce that we are now on Pinterest. Head on over to pinterest.com/brotherau to get all your ideas, tips and tricks and some good ol’-fashioned fun! Whether you enjoy paper crafting or sewing, you’ll find all the DIY inspiration you’ll need to bring your creative and organisational goals to life. Check out our boards and follow us!

This cute, easy-sew pocket panel is fit for any little princess’s bedroom and will store all her trinkets and sparkly treasures! Available for $15.95 for panel plus postage.

Phone: 1300 880 297 Email: brothermarketing@brother.com.au Pinterest: pinterest.com/brotherau

Phone: (08) 8522 3246 Email: sales@kornacraft.com.au Website: www.kornacraft.com.au

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FREE TO YOU EACH MONTH PATCHWORK PARADISE MILLHOUSE MAKEOVER GRAND REOPENING Our shop has been revamped and restyled by the Millhouse team. New layout, new products, new fabrics, new block of months but the same fantastic staff. Phone: (07) 4927 6628 Email: info@patchworkparadise.com.au Website: www.patchworkparadise.com.au

NEW! &

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CRAFT DEPOT

join forces to create a fabulous monthly newsletter

JANOME MC500E EMBROIDERY MACHINE New from Janome, the Memory Craft MC500E Embroidery Machine comes with a 5in LCD colour screen, built-in embroidery designs, and much more. Available online or in store. Phone: (02) 9980 8966 Email: mailorders@craftdepot.com.au Website: www.craftdepot.com.au

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SINGER SINGER HERITAGE Experience the perfect combination of easyto-use features, technology, style and history. The high-tech features and retro style pay tribute to the iconic black machine design. Phone: (02) 4337 3737 Email: australia.info@blessingtongroup.com.au Website: www.singerco.com.au

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• Stitching and craft news • Hints and tips • Top tools of the trade • Designer breakthroughs • Upcoming content Sign up now to have our ‘WHAT’S MY STITCH?’ newsletter delivered to your inbox. Details on our website, www.homespun.net.au

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STOCKISTS & CONTACTS THIS MONTH’S DESIGNERS’ CONTACTS PROJECT 1: POSITIVE & NEGATIVE Vicki Knight Email: vickilorraine@hotmail.com PROJECT 2: BELL BIRDS Prue Scott Email: prudence_scott@hotmail.com PROJECT 3: RAINBOW OF STARS Roslyn Russell Sew Delicious Email: roslynruss@gmail.com Website: sewdelicious.com.au PROJECT 4: ONE DAY AT A TIME Rebecca Johnson Chasing Cottons Quilt Designs Blog: chasingcottons.blogspot.com.au Facebook: www.facebook.com/ ChasingCottons PROJECT 5: POUCH OF PLENTY Leanne Milsom Email: lp.milsom@bigpond.com Blog: www.lizzie-the-quilter. blogspot.com PROJECT 6: DASHWOOD Donna Warren Quilted 4 You Email: quilted4you@live.com.au Mobile: 0417 259 652 PROJECT 7: CRUNCHY THE CATERPILLAR Rebecca Atkinson Hurrah! Email: rkatkinson@westnet.net.au Blog: hurrah.typepad.com PROJECT 8: STAR OF WONDER Jessica Wheelahan birdie beetle Email: Wheelahancreative@ hotmail.com Instagram: @birdie_beetle Pinterest @Birdie_Beetle PROJECT 10: DOLLYGRAMS Allison Dey Malacaria SweaterDoll Email: sweaterdoll@gmail.com Website: sweaterdoll.blogspot.com typepad.com

melia Kates 186-188 Princes Highway, Beverley Park, NSW, 2217. Ph: (02) 9553 7457, email: sales@ameliakates.com.au, website: www.ameliakates.com. Annie’s Designs The Village Green, Shop 16/22-24 Kenthurst Road, Dural, NSW 2158. Ph: (02) 9651 2256, email: info@ anniesdesigns.com.au, website: www.anniesdesigns.com.au. Ashford Wheels & Looms Ph: 1800 653 397, website: www.ashford.co.nz/yarn. Asia Discovery Tours Suite 1302, Level 13, 370 Pitt Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. Ph: (02) 9267 7699, website: asiadiscoverytours.com.au. Atkinson, Rebecca – see box at left. Australian Country Spinners Toll Free: 1800 337 032, ph: (03) 9380 3888, website: www.auspinners.com.au. ernina Australia (Contact address only) Unit 10, 15 Carrington Road, Castle Hill, NSW 2154. Ph: 1800 237 646 or (02) 9899 1188, email: bernina@bernina.com.au, website: www.bernina.com.au. Birch Haberdashery & Craft Ph: (03) 9450 8900, website: www.birchhaby.com.au. Black Possum Fabrics Shop 1, 197 Myall Street, Tea Gardens, NSW 2324. Ph: (02) 4997 0866, email: blackpossumfabrics@ bigpond.com, website: www.blackpossumfabrics.com. Blessington Unit 23, 13 Gibbens Road, West Gosford, NSW 2250. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@ blessingtongroup.com.au, website: www.blessingtongroup.com.au. Brother Australia Ph: 1300 880 297, website: www.brother.com.au. apricorn Link (Australia) PO Box 704, Windsor NSW 2756. Ph: (02) 4560 1600, email: books@capricornlink.com. au, website: www.capricornlink. com.au. Charles Parsons & Co See Craft Project – Charles Parsons & Co. Clover Mfg Co., Ltd Ph: +81 6 6978 2220, email: info@clover-mfg. com, website: www.clover-mfg.com.

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Coleambally Stitch In Time 13 Brolga Place Coleambally NSW 2707. Ph: (02) 6954 4242. Connie’s Fabrics 1 Verge Street, Kempsey, NSW 2440. Ph: (02) 6562 7792, email: conniesfabrics@outlook.com. Constantine Quilts RSD 1028, Agery via Kadina SA 5555. Ph: (08) 8825 6214, email: constantinequilt@ internode.on.net, website: www.constantinequilts.com. Country Dawn Quilting & Patchwork 38 Reyburn House Lane, Town Basin, Whangarei, Northland, New Zealand. Ph: +64 9 438 4856, email: shop@ countrydawnquilting.com, website: www.countrydawnquilting.com. CraftAlive 185 Moray Street, South Melbourne, Vic 3205. Ph: (03) 9682 5133, email: info@craftalive.com.au, website: www.craftalive.com.au. Craft Depot 2 Railway Street, Pennant Hills, NSW 2120. Ph: (02) 9980 8966, email: mailorders@craftdepot.com.au, website: www.craftdepot.com.au. Craft Project – Charles Parsons & Co Ph: (toll free) 1300 364 422, email: info@craftproject.com.au, website: www.craftproject.com.au. ewdrop Inn Patchwork & Craft Shop 2/123 Boat Harbour Drive, Pialba, Hervey Bay, Qld 4655. Ph: (07) 4124 9320, email: sales@dewdropinn.com.au, website: www.dewdropinn.com.au. Dey Malacaria, Allison – see box at left. Dragonfly Fabrics Shop 2-3, 53 Alawa Crescent, Alawa NT 0810. Ph: (08) 8948 0691, email: dragonfabric@bigpond.com, website: www.dragonfabric.com.au. chidna Sewing Products Head office Brisbane: 56 Neumann Road, Capalaba Qld 4157. Ph: (07) 3390 3600, email: sales@ echidnaclub.com.au, website: www. echidnaclub.com.au (Townsville store: Ph: (07) 4740 4512, email: rhonda@echidnaclub.com.au). Elizabeth Sewing Machines Melbourne branch: 876 Lorimer Street, Port Melbourne, Vic 3207. Ph: (03) 8671 0000, email: melinfo@ elizabethmachines.com.au. Sydney Branch: 5/165 Rookwood

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Road, Yagoona, NSW 2199. Ph: (02) 9708 5019, email: sydinfo@ elizabethmachines.com.au, website: www.elizabethmachines.com.au. aeries in My Garden 70 Park Parade, Shorncliffe, Qld 4017. Ph: (07) 3869 0808, email: shopatfaeries@bigpond.com, website: www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au. Fiskars Australia 39-41 Fennel Street, Port Melbourne, Vic 3207. Ph: (03) 8645 2400, email: Australia@fiskars.com. Flip la` K PO Box 44, Stroud NSW 2425. Ph: (02) 4992 1631 or 0428 556 688, website: www.fliplak.com. et Stitched 2/118 Dangar Street, Armidale, NSW 2350. Ph: (02) 6771 5122, website: getstitched.com.au. Glen Fabric Barn 178 Grey Street, Glen Innes, NSW 2370. Ph: (02) 6732 7000, email: frobits4@bigpond.com. Gunnedah Fashion Fabrics 177 Conadilly Street, Gunnedah, NSW 2380. Ph: (02) 6742 1235, email: gff@bigpond.net.au. ardie Grant Publishing Website: www.hardiegrant.com.au. Hettie’s Patch 294 Port Road, Hindmarsh, SA 5007. Ph: (08) 8346 0548, email: hetties@bigpond.net.au, website: www.hettiespatch.com. Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machines Locked Bag 40, Gosford NSW 2250. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@blessingtongroup. com.au, website: www.husqvarnaviking.com/au. anome PO Box 1383, Moorabbin, Vic 3189.Ph: Toll-free 1300 JANOME; Vic (03) 8586 3100; NSW (02) 9624 1822; WA (08) 9248 6689; Qld (07) 3256 3477; SA (08) 8356 7700, website: www.janome.com.au. JJ’s Crafts 243 Gloucester Street, Greenmeadows, Napier, North Island, New Zealand. Ph: +64 6 844 0680, email: info@jjscrafts.co.nz, website: jjscrafts.co.nz. Johnson, Rebecca – see box at left. night, Vicki – see box at left. Kornacraft Sewing Centre 108 Murray Street, Gawler, SA 5118.

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Ph: (08) 8522 3246, email: sales@kornacraft.com.au, website: www.kornacraft.com.au. eutenegger Level 2, 68-72 Waterloo Road, Macquarie Park, NSW 2113, PO Box 1445, Macquarie Park, NSW 2113. Ph: (02) 8046 4100, email: cservice@leutenegger.com.au, website: www.leutenegger.com.au. Lyn’s Fine Needlework Unit 2, 9 Seven Hills Road, Baulkham Hills, NSW 2153. Ph: (02) 9686 2325, email: lynsneedlework@aol.com, website: www.lynsfineneedlework.com.au. acs Crafts Wholesalers and Distributors Unit 6, 30-32 Foundry Road, Seven Hills, NSW 2147. Ph: (02) 8824 1111, email: mailorders@macscrafts.com.au. Milsom, Leanne – see box on page 137. My Patch Fabrics 42 Wason Street, Milton, NSW 2538. Ph: (02) 4455 4087, email: sew@ mypatchfabrics.com.au, website: www.mypatchfabrics.com.au. esting Needles Fabric & Patchwork Shop 5 Central Arcade, 28-32 Harbour Drive, Coffs Harbour, NSW 2450. Ph: 0400 055 989, email: lisa@ nestingneedles.com.au, website: www.nestingneedles.com.au. npoint Patchwork & Needlecraft 61a Station Street, Waratah, NSW 2298. Ph: (02) 4968 0094, email: shop@onpointpatch. com.au, website: www. onpointpatchworkandneedlecraft.com.

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assionately Sewn Email: passionatelysewn@ gmail.com, website: www.passionatelysewn.com.au. Patchwork In Port 79 Hastings River Drive, Port Macquarie, NSW 2444. Ph: (02) 6583 3257, email: info@ patchworkinport.com.au, website: www.patchworkinport.com.au. Patchwork on Parade 13 Harbour Drive, Gulfview Heights, SA 5096. Ph: (08) 8285 4709, email: quilting@ patchworkonparade.com.au, website: www.patchworkonparade.com.au. Patchwork Paradise 128 William Street, Rockhampton, Qld 4700. Ph: (07) 4927 6628, email: patchwork@cqnet.com.au. Pfaff Sewing Machines Locked Bag 40, Gosford NSW 2250. Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@ blessingtongroup.com.au, website: www.pfaff.com/au. ainbow Patchwork 75 Union Street, South Lismore, NSW 2480. Ph: (02) 6622 3003. Email: info@rainbowpatchwork. com.au, website: www. rainbowpatchwork.com.au. ruby & kate 29 Blackman Place, Port Lincoln, South Australia, 5606. Ph: (08) 8682 3636, email: rubyandkate@me.com, website: www.rubyandkate.com.au. Russell, Roslyn – see box on page 137. cott, Prue – see box on page 137.

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S

NEXT MONTH

SUMMER SIZZLER!

Homespun H Ho m hots up next month with a special trib tr ib tribute to all things summer. We’re beachside, with a whole host of holiday projects. Q Boats and beach huts quilt & cushion set Q Thong shoulder bag Q Victorian bather dolls Q Ice-cream bunting

And lots of other heartwarmers A PICK UP A COPY OF JANUARY HOMESPUN ON SALE JAN 7TH. 138

Homespun

Sew Excited 237 River Street, Maclean, NSW 2463. Ph: (02) 6645 1480, email: sew.excited@bigpond.com. Sew Many Stitches Shop 4, Level 2, 147 Queen Street, Campbelltown, NSW 2560. Ph: (02) 4628 4437, email: sewstitches@bigpond.com. Singer (Contact address only) Unit 17/167 Prospect Highway, Seven Hills NSW 2147. Ph: (02) 9620 5922, email: info@singerco.com.au, website: www.singerco.com.au. Stitch Between The Bridges 9-11 Bridge Street, Tamworth, NSW 2340. Ph/fax: (02) 6765 4138, email: stitchbtbtamworth@gmail.com. Stitched N Framed 14 Acacia Avenue, Port Macquarie, NSW 2444. Ph: (02) 6581 3338, email: jenny@ stitchednframed.com.au, website: www.stitchednframed.com.au. Stitches from the Bush Email: stitchesfromthebush@ bigpond.com, website: www.stitchesfromthebush.com.au. he Crewel Gobelin 9 Marian Street, Killara, NSW 2071. Ph: (02) 9498 6831, email: enquiries@thecrewelgobelin. com.au, website: www.thecrewelgobelin.com.au. The Patchwork Angel 343 Mons Road, Forest Glen, Sunshine Coast, Qld 4556. Ph: (07) 5477 0700, email: info@ patchworkangel.com.au, website: www.patchworkangel.com.au.

T

The Patchwork Box PO Box 226, Bowral NSW 2576. Ph: (02) 4861 2517, email: sales@patchworkbox. com.au, website: www.patchworkbox.com.au. The Quilters Shack 24 Quay Street, Bundaberg, Qld 4670. Ph: (07) 4154 4486, email: girls@ thequiltersshack.com, website: www.thequiltersshack.com. The Stitcher’s Cupboard 4A/20 Argyle Street, Camden, NSW 2570. Ph: (02) 4655 8348, email: sales@thestitcherscupboard. com.au website: thestitcherscupboard.com.au. The Teddy Tree 226 Scarborough Beach Road, Mt Hawthorn, WA 6016. Ph: (08) 9201 1011, email: sales@teddytree.com.au, website: www.teddytree.com.au. Travelrite International Pty Ltd 423 Whitehorse Road, Balwyn, Vic 3103. Toll free: 1800 630 343, outside Australia: +61 3 9836 2522, email: michelle@travelrite.com.au, website: www.travelrite.com.au. SM Australia See Husqvarna Viking or Pfaff Sewing Machines. arren, Donna – see box on page 137. Wheelahan, Jessica – see box on page 137. arra Valley Quilt Yarn & Sew 382 Warburton Highway, Wandin North, Vic 3139. Ph: (03) 5964 3592, email: sales@ cccpatchwork.com.au, website: www.cccpatchwork.com.au.

V W Y


SHOP ONLINE TZ pickup in-store& B

A VERY

.FšZ Christmas

BERNINA 560 E 2

SALE

WITH EMBROIDERY MODULE

ONLY $5,199 | $500 off

NE W

GIFT VALUE

TOTAL SAVING

$100

$600!

Generation 7 Series

BERNINA 790 E

BERNETTE CHICAGO 7 2 WITH EMBROIDERY MODULE incl. Embroidery Software Customiser

ONLY $1,299 | $200 off GIFT VALUE

TOTAL SAVING

$100

$300!

BERNINA 720 ONLY $4,199 | $500 off

4

GIFT VALUE

TOTAL SAVING

$250

$750!

WITH EMBROIDERY MODULE

ONLY $10,999 | $500 off GIFT VALUE

TOTAL SAVING

$650

$1,150!

20%OFF F

ALL BERNINA FEET & selected accessories

MASSIVE 10 YEAR WARRANTY on all BERNINA sewing machines

3

BERNINA 770QE E WITH EMBROIDERY MODULE

ONLY $7,799 | $600 off GIFT VALUE

TOTAL SAVING

$600

$1,200!

NEW BERNINA BAGS

These bags offer 360° protection for your 7 and 8 series machine and embroidery module.

BERNINA 880 E

5

WITH EMBROIDERY MODULE

ONLY $12,999 | $500 off GIFT VALUE

TOTAL SAVING

$700

$1,200!

BERNINA XL Trolley Bag valued $250 rrp

More great offers available – visit a dealer or our website today! B BERNINA XL Embroidery E Module Bag valued va $200 rrp

Your

BONUS FREE GIFTS *

OESD $50 Embroidery Design Gift Card for digital downloads only

MACHINE TROLLEY BAG with 7 or 8 Series machine purchase

EMBROIDERY MODULE BAG with 7 or 8 Series embroidery module purchased with machine

$50 DESIGN GIFT CARD Number on gift card symbol equals number of $50 cards received

*Bonus free gifts on selected product only. Offers available until 31st December 2015, while stocks last.

Toll free 1800 237 646 • www.bernina.com.au • shop.bernina.com.au


Issue#16.12 Dec 2015  

December HOMEPSUN has some great last-minute Christmas stitching so you can personalise your gifts and decorating this year. You’ll find toy...

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