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a u s t r a l i a n

NOVEMBER 2015

your heart in your hands

CRA

MAGA FT ZINE O

F TH YEARE

C E L E B R A T I N G

I S S U E S

No. 150 (Vol. 16.11) AU $9.95* NZ $12.20* (Both incl. GST)

Collectors ̦ Edition


Let your creativity run free with the

Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 All it takes is one look at its unique design to understand that the Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 is a sewer’s dream. With Pfaff’s original IDT system guaranteeing even fabric feed from top and bottom, a unique selection of perfectly stitched high-quality 9mm stitches, extra large work space and longest free-arm, the Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 will fulfill every quilters’ needs and give your imagination free rein.

Find your nearest dealer at www.pfaff.com/au or phone (02) 4337 3737 BLES-570-PF


LOOKING FOR THE PATTERN SHEETS TO START YOUR HOMESPUN PROJECT?

Registration is easy! 1

2

1 Simply go to www.homespun. net.au/wp-login/ and click the “register” link to create your account, or you can log in with Facebook. Note: this is a different account to your Zinio/Apple/ Google account.

YOU’RE INVITED

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3

Once you’ve logged in, just go to the “Patterns” section of the Homespun site, or direct link www.homespun.net.au/ homespun-patterns/ and click on the project you’re after to download the PDF.

Become part of the Homespun family by: * SUBSCRIBING to our monthly magazine (see page 127) * CHECKING OUT OUR WEBSITE at www.homespun.net.au * FOLLOWING US ON FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/homespunmag * BROWSING ON PINTEREST www.pinterest.com/homespunmag * TAPPING INTO INSTAGRAM @homespunmagazine

Don’t forget when printing PDFs, print on plain A4 paper, with page scaling turned off (or at 100%).

It’s sew easy!

Any questions? Contact us at homespun@universalmagazines.com.au


OUR PROJECTS THIS ISSUE

42

64 4

Homespun

Miss Nancie

Floating on air

50

72

Gull cottage

Kiss chasey


80 Tulliver’s travels

110

126

Meow at the moon

Symphony of life

100

120

136

Fleur

Summertime blues

China shop Part 10

Homespun

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a u s t r a l i a n

A dd S o m e Co l our t o Y o ur L i f e !

omespun your heart in your hands

Editor Susan Hurley Deputy Editor Elizabeth Newton Technical Editor Megan Fisher Writer/Online Editor Emma Bradstock Writer/Researcher Janai Velez Senior Designer Martha Rubazewicz Pattern Artist Susan Cadzow Photography Ken Brass Stylist Sandra Hinton

Advertising Rob Jordan (NSW and Qld) ph: (02) 9887 0359, fax: (02) 9805 0714, mob: 0411 424 196 Angelos Tzovlas (Vic, WA, SA, Tas and NT) ph: (03) 9694 6404, fax: (03) 9699 7890, mob: 0433 567 071 Advertising Production Hannah Felton Advertising Senior Designer Martha Rubazewicz Associate Publisher Karen Day Subscriptions & mail orders 1300 303 414 or +61 2 9887 0317 Editorial enquiries homespun@universalmagazines.com.au Advertising enquiries rjordan@universalmagazines.com.au atzovlas@universalmagazines.com.au Subscription enquiries www.universalshop.com.au or 1300 303 414 Printed by KHL Printing Co Pte Ltd, Singapore Distributed by Network Services – ph: 1300 131 169 NZ Distributors Netlink – ph: (09) 366 9966 Needlecraft Distributors Ltd – ph: 0800 909 600, www.needlecraft.co.nz UK Distributor Manor House Magazines – ph: +44 167 251 4288 USA Distributor Brewer Quilting & Sewing Supplies – ph: toll free 1 800 676 6543 Singapore Distributor Car Kit Pte – ph: +65 6 282 1960, fax: +65 6 382 3021 Circulation enquiries to our Sydney head office (02) 9805 0399. While every effort has been made to ensure that the projects featured in Homespun are the original work/s of the respective artist/s, no responsibility is taken by the publisher in the event that originality is disputed, and all proof of original design, or otherwise, lies with the artisan/s. Inspiration from other sources and the reworking of traditional patterns and designs in new and unique ways is, however, regarded as constituting ‘originality’ as acknowledged by the artisan/s and the publisher. No patterns may be reproduced (except for personal use). If a project is taught in a class or workshop, each attendee is required to have their own copy of the appropriate Homespun issue/s. Projects may not be produced for commercial gain without the written permission of the designer.

Chairman/CEO Publisher Chief Financial Officer Associate Publisher Associate Publisher Circulation Director Creative Director Production Executive Editorial & Production Manager Prepress Manager Marketing & Acquisitions Manager

ONLY $12.95

ONLY $7.95

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Homespun

Prema Perera Janice Williams Vicky Mahadeva Emma Perera Karen Day Mark Darton Kate Podger Nerilee Chen Anastasia Casey Ivan Fitz-Gerald Chelsea Peters

Homespun is published by Universal Magazines, Unit 5, 6-8 Byfield Street, North Ryde NSW 2113. Phone: (02) 9805 0399, Fax: (02) 9805 0714. Melbourne office, Level 1, 150 Albert Street, South Melbourne Vic 3205. Phone: (03) 9694 6444, Fax: (03) 9699 7890. This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the publishers. The publishers believe all the information supplied in this book to be correct at the time of printing. They are not, however, in a position to make a guarantee to this effect and accept no liability in the event of any information proving inaccurate. Prices, addresses and phone numbers were, after investigation, and to the best of our knowledge and belief, up to date at the time of printing, but circumstances may have since changed. It is not possible for the publishers to ensure that advertisements appearing in this publication comply with the Trade Practices Act, 1974. The responsibility must, therefore, be on the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisements for publication. While every endeavour has been made to ensure complete accuracy, the publishers cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions. This magazine may have some content that is advertorial or promotional in nature. Please pass on or recycle this magazine. *Recommended retail price ISSN 1443-4792 Copyright © Universal Magazines

MMXV ACN 003 026 944 www.universalmagazines.com.au


CONTENTS November 2015 Stitching

Sourcing

14 PIN INTEREST A feast of crafty ideas from the best creative minds 26 SALVAGE Waste-not, want-not wonderland – tailoring old denim in an entertaining way 28 SELVEDGE Designer Edge: Chloe Giordano is a literary giant of stitching 79 WHAT A CUTE IDEA! Now, you’ll never lose your needle again 125 ANOTHER CUTE IDEA! Buttoned-up and blokey cushions covers made from his discarded shirts 144 BOOK NOOK 1 Read to succeed 152 NEXT MONTH 1 A crafty teaser for Homespun’s fabulous December issue 154 STOCKISTS 1 & CONTACTS

Showing & telling

10 READERS’ SHOWCASE 32 MILESTONES & MARVELS Celebrating Homespun’s 150th issue 60 HIGH TEA DOUBLE TAKE Mouthwatering morsels – or are they? 92 WELCOME TO MY WORKROOM Grand designs from an English stable block

Shopping

22 PATTERN & PALETTE PLAY Fabrics – The timeless beauty of blue and white 70 WINDOW SHOPPING Delicate dandelions 146 ON THE ROAD Craft shopping in New Zealand 150 MARKET PLACE Product browsing from your armchair

NOVEMBER 2015

a u s t r a l i a n

42 QUILT Miss Nancie Irene Blanck 50 APPLIQUÉ ACCESSORIES Gull Cottage Debbie von Grabler-Crozier 64 EMBROIDERED CURTAINS Floating on Air Melissa Grant and Libby Richardson 72 QUILT Kiss Chasey Jemima Flendt 80 SOFTIE Tulliver’s Travels Jennifer Goldsmith 98 QUICK STITCH Silhouette Pet Cushion Jessie Fincham 100 QUILT Fleur Katrina Hadjimichael 110 BAG Meow at the Moon Raquel Blasco 120 CROCHETED RUG Summertime Blues 126 WALLHANGING Symphony of Life Val Laird 134 EASY-STITCH TOYS Zenkidus Trixi Symonds 136 BLOCK OF THE MONTH PART 10 China Shop Kaffe Fassett, Kathy Doughty and the Material Obsession team

your heart in your hands

CRA OF THE E YEAR

MAGA FT ZIN

C E L E B R A T I N G

I S S U E S

No. 150 (Vol. 16.11) AU $9.95* NZ $12.20* (Both incl. GST)

Collectors ̦ Edition

SUBSCRIBING DON’T MISS THIS MONTH’S EXTRASPECIAL OFFER

38 Homespun

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KAFFE FASSETT + BRANDON MABLY AUSTRALIA 2016

XLN Fabrics and host partners are thrilled that Kaffe Fassett and Brandon Mably will be conducting a series of workshops and lectures across Eastern and Southern Australia during February - March 2016. For detailed information please contact a host partner listed on the page opposite.

info@xln.com.au | 02 9621 3066 | xln.com.au


KAFFE FASSETT+ BRANDON MABLY AUSTRALIA 2016

Sat. Feb. 6 & Sun. Feb. 7 Events: Workshop and Lecture HOST Kathy Doughty Material Obsession Drummoyne, SYDNEY, NSW T: 02 9819 6455 E: info@materialobsession.com.au W: materialobsession.com.au

Tue. Feb. 23 & Wed. Feb. 24 Events: Workshop and Lecture HOST Georgina Hambour GJ’s Discount Fabrics Fairfield, MELBOURNE, VIC T: 03 9482 5528 E: info@gjsdiscountfabrics.com.au W: gjsdiscountfabrics.com.au

Tue. Feb. 9 & Wed. Feb. 10 Events: Workshop and Lecture HOST Barbara Johns Pot Pourri Cottage The Junction, NEWCASTLE, NSW T: 02 4969 7020 E: info@potpourricottage.com.au W: potpourricottage.com.au

Fri. Feb. 26 & Sat. Feb. 27 Events: Lectures HOST Sue Bartleman Millrose Quilting & Gallery BALLAN, VIC T: 03 5368 2995 E: sales@millrosecottage.com.au W: millrosecottage.com.au

Fri. Feb. 12 & Sat. Feb. 13 Events: Workshop; BM Knitting Workshop and Lecture HOST Karen Barrett The Quilters’ Store Salisbury, BRISBANE, QLD T: 07 3875 1700 E: sales@tqes.com.au W: quiltersstore.com.au

Mon. Feb. 29 & Tue. Mar. 1 Events: Workshop; BM Knitting Workshop and Lecture HOST Ann Alderslade Frangipani Fabrics Sandy Bay, HOBART, TAS T: 03 6224 0244 E: sales@franfab.com.au W: franfab.com.au

Tue. Feb. 16 & Wed. Feb. 17 Events: Workshop and Lecture HOST Fiona Wright Fifi’s Fabricology Tallebudgera, GOLD COAST, QLD T: 07 5522 4007 E: info@fifisfabricology.com.au W: fifisfabricology.com.au

Thu. Mar. 3 Event: Lecture Location: ADELAIDE, SA HOST Inspirations Magazine Contact: Fiona Fagan T: 08 8293 8600

Fri. Feb. 19 Event: Lecture Location: CANBERRA, ACT HOST Inspirations Magazine Contact: Fiona Fagan T: 08 8293 8600

Fri. March 4 Event: Workshop HOST Lorraine Lovell Hettie’s Patch Hindmarsh, ADELAIDE, SA T: 08 8346 0548 E: hetties@bigpond.net.au W: hettiespatch.com

E: events@inspirationsmagazine.com.au

W: inspirationsmagazine.com.au Sat. Feb. 20 & Sun. Feb. 21 Events: Workshops HOST Jenny Adams Addicted to Fabric Phillip, ACT T: 02 6282 4494 E: jenny@a2f.com.au W: a2f.com.au

E: events@inspirationsmagazine.com.au

W: inspirationsmagazine.com.au


READERS’ SHOWCASE One of the joys of putting Homespun together each month is seeing the vision of our designers translated into personal masterpieces by our enthusiastic readers. We’d love to hear from you, too. Write to us with your crafty triumphs or with any tips, advice and new-product sightings you’d like to share with others.

THIS MONTH’S WINNER

Sharon Mobilia, from Canning Vale, WA, for her Canadian Inspiration quilt: “I was inspired by Emma How’s quilt in Homespun Vol 12 No 3. It took me about four years, on and off, to complete this monster quilt. It has more than 2,000 blue 21⁄2in squares. The original version finished at the border, but I added more rows to accommodate my king-size bed. It was professionally quilted in a leaf and flower pattern by Jacaranda Quilting.”

Congratulations to Sharon for her great effort. As the winner this month, she will be receiving the following prize: Q The Perfect Adjustable Square by Karen K. Buckley, courtesy of Wendy Whellum, of Legend and Lace. It’s a boxed set of 20 transparent components that fit together like a jigsaw to create precise squares or rectangles with optional centre guides. They’re excellent for squaring up blocks, centring embroidery or appliqué designs, fussy cutting for I Spy quilts and so much more. For contact details for Legend and Lace, see the Stockists pages at the end of the magazine.

SEND YOUR LETTERS TO: Email enewton@universalmagazines.com.au Mail Homespun Readers’ Showcase, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde NSW 1670.

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The Elements range by Tailormade is a modular system that gives you the freedom to mix and match to create the perfect room layout.

Itt is is never neve n ne eve ver too too early to earl ea ry rly t think thi hink hink k about abo bout bout u to Chri Ch rrist ist stm stma tm ma as gift g ftt giving! gi giv iv ivi ivin viin iing ing! ng! g Christmas

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DRAWERS Four tote-style drawers offer snag-free storage for project essentials. Lightweight and removable, the totes go where you go. The flat top work surface offers space to create, plus there is shelf space for upright storage of books and patterns. rrp $199

The spacious sewing table has an adjustable machine platform with a mechanical lift. Add an optional customised acrylic insert for flat-bed sewing. rrp $249

STORAGE CHEST

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This clever unit, used ideally in a corner, means no more wasted space. The easy-lift lid reveals deep storage ideal for an over-locker and projects in progress. Additional space under the unit can be used for storing lesser used items. rrp $149

Sturdy and stable, the cutting table features a surface area of 100 x 60cm and at the height of 92cm is designed to minimise back fatigue while cutting. Six open and adjustable shelves are complimented with a large storage area under the easy-lift table top. rrp $499

Mix and match units to create your ultimate setup!* T

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www.tailormadecabinets.com.au


SITTING PRETTY Wendy Rose, Gulmarrad, NSW: “I made my beautiful cushion using inspiration from Prue Scott’s Mughal Aari work featured in the January 2015 magazine (Vol 16 No 1). I changed it to a full-size cushion and used 4 ply crochet cotton for the embroidery. I am proud to say that it won first prize in our local agriculture show in the embroidery section.”

PUDDLE FUN Sandra Paul, from Cherry Heart, UK: “I always find something S to inspire me when I flip through Homespun, and this little embroidery – Singing Yet?, by Natashia Curtin, from the March 2015 (Vol 16 No 3) issue – was just too sweet to pass up. I altered mine very slightly, adding little appliquéd fabric pieces to the background and changing the shoes into some cute wellies, instead – didn’t want those trousers getting wet!”

PANDA-MONIUM Joanne Riley, from Shetland Islands, UK: “I just wanted to share with you my panda puppet that was made from the 2014 October issue of Homespun (Black Eyed Please!, in Vol 15 No 10). I used fleece, which gave a great finish and made him very soft. I loved making him and found Pauline McArthur’s pattern really easy to follow. I think that the padded head and big blue eyes allow you to give the panda a lovely expression. I changed the design slightly by giving my panda a bow tie.”

WHEELY GREAT Joan Rollason, Toowoomba, Qld: “When I saw Chris Jurd’s 30s Wheel quilt in the January 2015 issue (Vol 16 No 1), I just had to make it for my daughter’s 50th birthday. She’d won a jelly roll, and I wasn’t sure how to go about making it up. This was an ideal way to use it as well as some family embroideries. I’m so pleased with the result that I just had to share it with you. Thank you for a great magazine.”

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INSPIRE DESIGN CREATE For your local Janome Specialist call 1300 JANOME

www.janome.com.au

www.janome.co.nz

THE MC500E IS THE NEWEST EMBROIDERY ONLY MACHINE 160 Built-in Designs Embroidery size 200 x 280mm Colour LCD Screen Embroidery Editor Software Extra wide table


Best of the best from

note w knits or thy !

Here are our favourite animal brooches on Pinterest this month.

Best bird

Nice and chirpy – and stylish as a pin. Designer: cOnieco Contact: www.etsy.com/shop/cOnieco

KNIT THAT UP, JOT THAT DOWN! It’s not far off the new year, so now’s the time to think about 2016 diaries. And while you’re thinking hot dates (at least in the printed form), Cleckheaton would like to encourage a little creativity. Its wonderful knitted diary covers come in three design alternatives – Contrast Stripe, Arrow Embroidery and Bobbles. You’ll find the pattern for these in Cleckheaton’s Hand Made Gifts book, along with other wonderful accessory ideas to stitch. Pick up a copy from your favourite craft or haby store, call 1800 337 032 or visit cleckheaton.com.au.

Best butterfly

Intricately stitched and delicately crafted. Designer: Agnes and Cora Contact: www.agnesandcora.etsy.com

PATCH AS PATCH CAN

Best pooch

Anyone for a deliciously cute hot dog design? Designer: Alina Bunaciu Contact: hanaletters.etsy.com (Etsy), @hanaletters (Instagram), hanaletters.tumblr.com (Tumblr)

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There may not be a plethora of porch swings in Australia, but this charming idea can be adapted to any seating. And before you go saying it’s craft sacrilege to cut into a quilt, this one was well past its prime and destined for the dustbin had it not been repurposed by Rachel Denbow, from Smile and Wave (smileandwave.typepad.com). With some foam, stitched ties (for easy removal) and a sprinkling of doilies, she has created a beautiful cover that invites you to sit and take life at a gloriously gentle pace. And as you while away the hours, you might like to link through to Rachel’s full details at racheldenbow.blogspot.com/2010/12/im-little-bit-country.html.


PIN INTEREST

Bright ideas, fabulous products, clever tips & quick reads

TO THE LIGHTHOUSE When Judith Wilton moved to Augusta (the most south-westerly point of Australia, in WA), she was so impressed with the local quilters, she wanted to really show their designs off. So she hung them from the top of Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse (the tallest in Australia) to publicise this month’s exhibition. “Despite being calm on the ground, being at the top of the lighthouse was a different story. It was a matter of ‘hold on tight’, as the quilts flew like small pocket handkerchiefs,” says Judith. What we do for love – of quilting! Anyway, it seems to have worked. The setting is so eye-catching that we thought everyone should know that the Quilts of Leeuwin exhibition is being held on November 21 and 22, from 10am to 4pm both days at the Augusta Centennial Hall (cnr of Allnutt St and Hillview Terrace). Admission is $5, and profits go to the Royal Flying Doctor Service. There’s not a sour note in that information – ’specially considering you’ll also be in the lovely Margaret River wine-growing area when you drop by to see these quilts. For more info, call Susan Collins on 0427 581 332.

GOING WITH THE GRAIN

Photography: Pompom hearts: Jenniferrizzo.com/Rice fabric: Camilla Wordie

Boiled, steamed, fried, sewn? Rice transitions from cooker to craft, courtesy of conceptual food artist and stylist Camilla Wordie, who has created an art project called Wearing Rice Is Nice. This collection of rice-inspired fabrics, including seat covers and napkins, has been silk-screen-printed and hand embroidered. “The napkin composition was based on the idea of someone spilling their rice dish, making the material heavy and interesting to touch,” says Camilla. To see more of Camilla’s food art projects, visit her website, camillawordie.com, or follow her on Instagram, @c.m.c.w.

REFLECTIONS FROM THE HEART If you’re in a sentimental mood, how about creating heart-shaped pompoms? And, while you’re at it, you might just as well string them up to show them off. These were made by Jennifer Rizzo (www.jenniferrizzo.com), who can teach you how to make your own at www.jenniferrizzo.com/2013/01/how-to-make-heart-shapedpom-poms.html. And you not only get double value by hanging them against a mirror, but you get groovy decor at the same time.

Homespun

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ALL KITTED OUT

PIN INTEREST

Two sewing teachers in Ireland have teamed up to produce a range of delightful sewing kits that encourage children and adults to stitch. The kits contain virtually everything needed to make a softie, and, if you don’t have access to a sewing machine, hand stitching works perfectly, too. They come sweetly packaged in reusable tins. Cute and adorable. You can order them from www.pippablue.com.

HEART FELTWe’re in love with this hearty stitching from Wendi Gratz. The rainbow garland is a delight to display any time of year, plus it’s so simple and economical to make. Firstly, drag out your box of leftover felt and yarn pieces (use as many colours as you like), download the pattern from Wendi’s Shiny Happy World site (www.shinyhappyworld.com/2015/01/heart-garland-free-patternvalentines-day.html) and brush up on your blanket-stitching skills (because that’s the only stitch required). Then keep repeating the process of creating felt discs again and again and again. Simple!

Step 5: Repeat the cutting and gluing with the second shape.

EASTERN WIND UP

Sarah Neuburger, from The Small Object, www.thesmallobject.com, saw a similar idea to this on the La Belle site and decided to put her own special spin on the Japanese flossbobbin concept. She made them as little gifts for sewing colleagues and friends, but now she’s happy to share her how-to with Homespun readers. Here’s how you can head East without leaving your sewing room.

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Step 3: Lay the template on a scrap of fabric and cut it out about Step 1: Cut out the shape you want in paper and use it as a template. Trace the paper template onto a thin board. I raided my friend’s recycling bin for some cereal boxes.

Step 2: After transferring the design onto thin board, cut it out outside the traced line and staple the centre to another piece of thin board. Cut out along your traced line. This will ensure both of your front and back sides are exactly the same and fit together perfectly.

1

⁄4in outside the template. Step 6: Glue the two shapes together, wrong sides together.

Step 4: Using a fabric glue, stick the fabric to the front of the shape and the trimmed edge to the back. Step 7: Repeat the process with different fabrics to make a whole collection of thread holders. If you would like to get in touch with Sarah Neuburger, her email address is info@thesmallobject.com.


NEW Kafffe Fassettt BOM in Hom mespu un

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We stock a large range of Sewing Machines. SALES & REPAIRS for Brother, Janome & Bernina. Shop 4 / Level 2, 147 Queen St Campbelltown Phone/Fax: 02 4628 4437


PIN INTEREST

diary dates Let us know about your upcoming event – email details to homespun@universalmagazines.com.au or send them to Homespun Diary Dates, Locked Bag 154, North Ryde, NSW 1670. Please notify us at least four months before the event.

Tas – Launceston November 12-14 Punchbowl 30th Anniversary of Launceston Patchworkers and Quilters Exhibition; Punchbowl Christian Centre, 100 Punchbowl Rd. Open 10am-4.30pm Thurs-Sat. Entry $5. More information: Email Diane Oliver at d.oliver47@bigpond.com.

BIG FOOT(STOOLS) The stuffing of legend! These giant padded footstools are covered in fabric that’s crocheted by hand in a polypropylene material that won’t be cowed by Mother Nature’s storms. (There’s an interesting video on the WGU Design website, wgu.com.au/product/divine, showing the crocheting process.) WGU Design’s name for this is ‘Divine’ – and you can see why. Visit the website at wgu.com.au/product/divine or phone 1800 181 558.

Qld – Gold Coast November 14-15 Southport Stitch! By CraftAlive Southport; Southport Community Centre, 6 Lawson St. A show dedicated to patchwork, needlework, knitting, embroidery and all things stitching, with products to buy, demos, workshops and much more.

NSW – Central Coast November 14-15 Woy Woy Ettalong Beach Arts & Craft Centre Annual Christmas Exhibition and sale; Peninsula Community Centre, Cnr Ocean Beach and McMasters Rds.

Open Sat 9am-4pm, Sun 10am-3pm More information: Email www.ebacc. com.au or phone (02) 4341 8344.

NSW – Country November 28 Braidwood Braidwood Airing of the Quilts Turns 21; various streets and buildings in Braidwood, NSW. See the town transformed with quilts hanging from historic buildings, plus indoor exhibitions, quilt raffle, classes and more. More information: Phone Robyn on (02) 4846 4133 or Lesley on 0458 605 786.

Vic – Mornington Peninsula November 14-15 Mt Eliza Mornington Peninsula Patchworkers Biennial Quilt Exhibition ‘Patched Images 2015’; Toorak College, Old Mornington Rd. Trading tables, refreshments, demonstrations, raffles. Open Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 10am-4pm. Entry $6.

FISH OUT OF WATER Lauri Springer puts a fresh angle on fish toys by making hers ultra-versatile. She designed these as her Little Fishy Bean Bag, but suggests a safe alternative for young children by replacing the buttons with appliquéd circles and pellet filling with fibre fill. Don’t you love the multicoloured, multi-patterned scales? She shares her excellent tutorial (complete with templates) at lauri-nananews. blogspot.com/2012/08/august-16-little-fishy-pattern-and.html. Or visit her My Creative Frenzy Etsy store at mycreativefrenzy.etsy.com.

SLEEP, PERCHANCE TO SEW Olga Becker credits part of her love of vibrant embroidery to her Ukrainian heritage, and her genes certainly kicked in when she spotted a pair of vintage stitched pillowcases at a garage sale – for just 50 cents each. In a matter of 15 minutes, she had created a sew-easy, elastic-waisted skirt for a young girl. For more smart ideas, go to her Coffee & Thread blog (www.coffeeandthread.com), or you can link directly through to her step-by-step tutorial at www.coffeeandthread.com/2013/07/vintage-pillow-skirt-tutorial.html.

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PIN INTEREST

THE NO-KNIT FURNITURE SWEATER Impressed by this quick make? Also check out Meta’s production design and photo styling work: Portfolio: metacoleman.com; Production design work: norrfilm.com.

This is an easy, colourful idea courtesy of Meta Coleman, from One More Mushroom (onemoremushroom.com). Any child would love to have something like this in their nursery or playroom, so here’s how Meta went about making it: First, get yourself a cheap (under $40) set of Lätt table and chairs from Ikea and some yarn. Then …

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Make a tight knot with the previous colour and the new colour. Wrap all four legs in a patchwork of yarn. With a single colour of yarn, wrap around the seat horizontally. Meta also left a tail of yarn at the top of each leg so she could knot it onto the peach yarn.

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1

Tie a tight knot with the first piece of yarn around the leg of the chair.

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Wrap the yarn in varying thicknesses around the seat base, vertically and horizontally, so none of the chair wood is showing when you’ve finished.

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Wrap the yarn around the leg, fairly tight. It’s okay to wrap it with lots of spaces because you can push it down before wrapping the next colour.

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Wrap the seat back horizontally and vertically. Finish off with several tight knots – and then you’re done!

FLORA, FAUNA & KIMIKA HARA If you go to either of the following addresses you’ll see an on-site expo of Kimika Hara’s flamboyantly fabulous embroidery. It’s work that crosses borders between East and West/classic and contemporary, bringing a modern Japanese flavour to our stitching appetite. Animals, flowers, letters, foodstuffs are all fodder for her hungry imagination, and you get to feast your eyes on it at: kimikahara.blogspot.jp and www.flickr.com/photos/kimikahara/.

CRISS-CROSSED COLOUR CREATIONS Maryanne Moodie’s woven wallhangings are a perfect way to add texture, bursts of colour and intricate patterns to a room, all in a single artwork. See her beautiful makes at maryannemoodie.com. Or, if you’d like to try your hand at weaving, Maryanne sells supplies through her Etsy store, www.etsy.com/shop/MaryanneMoodie.

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Faeries in My Garden

ANNUAL AUSTRALIA DAY SALE Tue 26 Jan to Fri 29 Jan 2016 See you at the shop!

“Beautiful Designs - Exquisite Fabrics”

Our *Gi

of the Month* Club is all about Love

Make beautiful gifts for your special people or give yourself a lovely treat!

*Gi of the Month* Club 2016 $39 + $7 P&H (Australia and New Zealand) $39 + $17 P&H (Other Overseas) Every second month for 12 months Pictured is “Strawberries & Cream” supper cloth that was sent out as a two-part project and comprised two of the total of six projects for the year in 2015.

70 Park Parade, Shorncliffe, Qld 4017 Ph: (07) 3869 0808 Email: shopatfaeries@bigpond.com

www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au

Six projects in a year Project includes pattern and fabric. Threads & Embellishments: $15 per project extra

It’s a mystery! You don’t know what the project is until you receive it! Find us on Facebook

Visit our website and join our mailing list, or hop on to Facebook and Like our page.


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Pattern & Palette Play Taking cues from classic Delft design, these beautiful fabrics soothe the eye, calm the spirit and speak of the incomparable charms of mixed blues and white. Compiled by Janai Velez 22

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01 Red Rooster Fabrics ‘Symphony Rose Blue’ RR25377DKBLU, designed by Red Rooster Studio (Dark Blue colourway). Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 02 Art Gallery Fabrics ‘Morning Walk’ Limestone Feel Indigo MWK-1115, designed by Leah Duncan. Distributed by Craft Project – Charles Parsons. 03 Red Rooster Fabrics ‘Symphony Rose Blue’ RR25378LTBLU, designed by Red Rooster Studio (Light Blue colourway). Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 04 Art Gallery Fabrics ‘Chic Flora’ Innocent Charm Acai CF-30037, designed by AGF Studio. Distributed by Craft Project – Charles Parsons. 05 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20698-10, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 06 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20694-10, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 07 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20695-44, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 08 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20703-44, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 09 Red Rooster Fabrics ‘Symphony Rose Blue’ RR25376LTBLU, designed by Red Rooster Studio (Light Blue colourway). Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 10 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20696-42, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 11 Rowan/ Westminster Fibers ‘Kaffe Fassett Collective: Spring 2015 Collection’ Creased PWBM050.BLUEX, designed by Brandon Mably. Distributed by XLN Fabrics. 12 Windham Fabrics ‘Shirt & Tie’ D404259, designed by Another Point of View. Distributed by Leutenegger. 13 Windham Fabrics ‘Shirt & Tie’ D404209, designed by Another Point of View. Distributed by Leutenegger. 14 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20700-49, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 15 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20697-10, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 1 6 Windham Fabrics ‘Modern Country’ D407252, designed by Mary Elizabeth Kinch. Distributed by Leutenegger. 17 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20696-10, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 18 RJR Fabrics ‘Chelsea’ 2102-003, designed by Jinny Beyer. Distributed by Dayview Textiles. 19 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20699-44, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles.

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Q Craft Project – Charles Parsons: 1300 364 422,

info@craftproject.com.au. Q Dayview Textiles: (02) 9607 2724,

www.dayviewtextiles.com.au. Q Leutenegger: (02) 8046 4100,

sales@leutenegger.com.au, www.leutenegger.com.au. Q Lloyd Curzon Textiles: (08) 8362 2451, www.lcurzon.com.au. Q PK Fabrics: (02) 9557 2022, sales@pkfabrics.com.au. Q Two Green Zebras: (02) 9553 7201, sales@twogreenzebras.com, www.twogreenzebras.com. Q XLN Fabrics: (02) 9621 3066, info@xln.com.au.

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Fabrics shown were available at the time of going to print. Check with the suppliers for current availability and your nearest stockist.

Suppliers:

20 Red Rooster Fabrics ‘Symphony Rose Blue’ RR25374MDBLU, designed by Red Rooster Studio (Medium Blue colourway). Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 21 Robert Kaufman Fabrics ‘Tuscan Wildflower 3’ RK1541079, designed by Peggy Toole (Copen colourway). Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 22 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20700-10, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 23 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20705-49, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 24 Red Rooster Fabrics ‘Symphony Rose Blue’ RR25377LTBLU, designed by Red Rooster Studio (Light Blue colourway). Distributed by Two Green Zebras. 25 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20704-42, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles. 26 Windham Fabrics ‘Shirt & Tie’ D404269, designed by Another Point of View. Distributed by Leutenegger. 27 Windham Fabrics ‘Shirt & Tie’ D404227, designed by Another Point of View. Distributed by Leutenegger. 28 Moda Fabrics ‘Good Karma’ Navy 7216-11, designed by Stephanie Ryan. Distributed by PK Fabrics. 29 Art Gallery Fabrics ‘Happy Home’ Grass in Moonlight HAH-14401, designed by Caroline Hulse. Distributed by Craft Project – Charles Parsons. 30 Northcott ‘Porcelain Blue’ 20694-49, designed by Deborah Edwards Northcott Studio. Distributed by Lloyd Curzon Textiles.


SALVAGE

Photography: Peter Raider/living4media/Picture Media

Breathe new life into little leftovers, small scraps and otherwise wasted remnants with clever ideas that demonstrate your creativity.

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We have a high tea service, Patchwork and Quilting classes, Fabric and Haberdashery, Knitting and Crochet classes, Wool and Needles etc, Australian Made gifts, Children’s clothes, Children’s toys and gifts, Ceramics and Glassware.

A patch of blue jeans

If you’re spurred into stitching action by our cute jeans-bottom bread basket (left), you’ll be wanting to know what to do with the leftover legs of your kid’s jeans, and here’s a beautifully simple idea that will coordinate perfectly with your barbecue entertaining table setting. Use cut-up strips of the jean legs alongside other coordinating blues and greys going to waste in your ever-growing stash to make these elegant bench cushions. They can be run up on a machine in a matter of minutes.

Buns on seats

If you are the host with the most ideas, here’s a great new thought that should appeal. Ordinary bread basket – so old hat! Old jeans – the bottom line in upcycling! Such an imaginative presentation for a casual outdoor lunch, and a perfect way to save tired jeans ending up as landfill. The added bonus is that you don’t have to be an immaculate stitcher to make this (the telltale sewing quality is hidden from view). Simply cut off the legs from a pair of kid’s jeans to short-shorts length, fold the excess fabric under and secure it with strong stitches, to make a ‘bag’. Make sure the folded fabric is lying as flat as possible to prevent the bread container from tipping. And that, folks, is all there is to it. Bon barbie!

‘Sunnyside’ House 186-188 Princes Highway, Beverley Park NSW 2217 Ph. (02) 9553 7457 www.ameliakates.com.au /Amelia Kates

@ amelia_kates

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Selvedge

DESIGNER EDGE

CHLOE GIORDANO Reading and sewing have a lot in common. Both represent escapism, they’re solo pursuits and they spell relaxation and contemplation. On the practical side of things, they both require good lighting, comfortable seating and a focused frame of mind. No wonder so many of us love to indulge in these activities – it’s just a shame they can’t be done simultaneously. Or can they? Chloe Giordano, an artist living in Oxford, England, has found a way of uniting the two, so she can combine her love of sewing and reading. She creates book covers from textiles and thread. Using a fertile imagination and immaculate stitching skills, Chloe embroiders book covers, making artworks of their titles. Her first designs were done as an assignment for her illustration degree at the University of the West of England and included her entry in the 2011 Penguin Design Award. (Her interpretation of Gabriel García Márquez’s celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude, shown above, was Highly Commended.) “I’m a big reader and always wanted to somehow involve my work in the publishing industry, so these pieces were my starting point,” says Chloe. She continued this line of work after university and has made several covers in total. She’s currently working on a few professional projects and says she enjoys collaborating with publishing companies. “I’ve worked with Penguin a couple of times, and it’s always interesting work that makes me push my abilities further.” 28

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Chloe’s motivation to sew came in her college years, when she watched Michel Gondry’s ‘dreamy’ film The Science of Sleep, which featured the work of textile artist Lauri Faggioni. “I remember being taken with her immense creativity and free way of working – I tried to make some of the pieces myself, and it took off from there,” she says. That was the spark to the imagination’s flame, but Chloe still needed a friend to teach her the basic technicalities – like how to thread a needle! Since then, she’s been self-taught – through books! Chloe’s work demonstrates what can be achieved with a few basic sewing supplies and a simple embroidery stitch. “I use a basic straight stitch for all my work; it’s a simple technique but very labourintensive.” She works on calico, which she hand dyes and stitches with sewing thread. Yes, sewing thread; she used to work with embroidery floss, but switched to sewing thread because it allowed her to pack more detail into a small area. Add sewing needles and a hoop to the list, and that’s all she needs. Just as with regular book-cover designers, Chloe reads the book before developing an embroidery concept. “I normally collect references, from photos and passages in the book itself, then work up a few thumbnail ideas to pick from. Once the final design has been chosen, I work in a fairly methodical way through each element of the design. I photograph, rather than scan, the finished piece, to stop the texture getting flattened. “For me, it’s a case of balancing detail with something that will catch someone’s eye, picking an overarching theme that will bring the design together and give the theme of the book without bogging it down with references,” Chloe says. Now, having seen how nimbly Chloe Giordano translates the beauty of a book into another fabulous art form, it’s time to decide: Is the statement “You can’t tell a book by its cover” really a truism? Or should we file it under ‘false-ism’? For more of Chloe’s unique creative vision, you can visit her website at www.chloegiordano.com, follow her blogging at www.karenin.tumblr.com or like her Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ chloegiordanoillustration).

- Janai Velez


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Hands Ashford NZ Ltd Elmwood, Christchurch Ph/Fax 03 355 9099 hands.craft@clear.net.nz www.handscraftstore.com

Kiwi Gift Shop Queenstown 9300 Ph. 03 442 9563 kiwigiftshop@hotmail.com

The Yarn Queen Online Knitting Store Servicing all New Zealand Ph. 09 836 7285 sales@theyarnqueen.co.nz www.theyarnqueen.co.nz

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Flex'n Glide Bodkins

- Handy length and flexibility allow smooth passage even along curves. - Flex'n Glide Bodkin eye features grippers to ensure drawstring remains firmly in place. - Large bodkin eye is ideal for easy threading of wide or narrow drawstring.

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Distributors in Australia

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SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION OFFER! HOMESPUN FRIEND RIEND ND ZONE ANNIVERSARY Y OFFER For only $55 extra you can subscribe a friend for 12 months to Homespun magazine. Imagine the coffees shared over the monthly issues of your favourite magazine – share the love! Please call 1300 303 414 to redeem this offer, for this issue only!

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OFFER CODE: CHSP16.11 EXPIRY DATE: 3RD DECEMBER 2015 THIS OFFER IS ONLY AVAILABLE WHILE STOCKS LAST OR UNTIL EXPIRATION DATE.


Join Michelle Marvig on one or

France and the Mediterranean

Visit Venice, sail on the 4-star Eurodam to Dubrovnik, Kotor, Kerkira, Naples, Rome, Livorno, Monte Carlo, Barcelona and the European Patchwork Meeting at Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines. Visit tempting quilt shops, wonderful museums and see spectacular scenery while enjoying the comfort of your cruise ship.

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Quilting tour of the USA Visiting Philadelphia, the Amish area of Lancaster, Washington, Houston for the International Quilt Festival and San Francisco. October 23 to November 11, 2016 Long stays in each location, visit stunning fabric shops and exciting museums.

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Bali visiting Legian 3 nights and Ubud 6 nights July 14 to 23, 2016

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Irene Blanck’s Miss Nancie design in based on an antique quilt by Nancy Horsfall


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MISS NANCIE

We took a little theatrical licence with Irene Blanck’s poetically pretty quilt, embedding it in dramatic black to bring out its beauty. The stage is set with mood magic, but Miss Nancie is the star.

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Materials Q 1.5m (1 ⁄8yd) cream toneon-tone print fabric – see Special Note (centre background and strips) Q 70cm (3⁄4yd) blue uneven stripe fabric – see Special Note (Border 1) Q 1.6m (13⁄4yd) blue toile – see Special Note (strips) 5

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Q 30cm (3⁄8yd) red print fabric (centre block, squares and appliqué motifs) Q 25cm (1⁄4yd) green print fabric (centre block, squares and appliqué motifs) Q Fat eighths or scraps of fabric in a wide

assortment of colours and prints (appliqué and squares) Q 2.4m (25⁄8yd) backing fabric – or see Irene’s Frugality Tip Q 50cm (1⁄2yd) binding fabric – see Special Note Q Batting at least 173 x 135cm (68 x 53in)

Q Template plastic Q Lightbox Q Roxanne’s Glue Baste It or water-based glue stick Q Spray starch Q Fine-pointed erasable fabric marker of your choice Q Paper

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Q Karen Kay Buckley’s circles or compass and light card Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in foot Q General sewing supplies

Finished size: 153 x 115cm (60 x 45in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabric be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed.

Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide. Seam allowances of 1⁄4in are used throughout, unless stated otherwise. The appliqué technique used is needleturn, but you can adapt the instructions

to the method of your choice. Instructions are given for using the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

SPECIAL NOTES ON THE FABRICS The amount of cream background fabric listed requires the strips to be pieced to make them 60in long; if you’d prefer them to be without joins, you’ll require 2.6m (27⁄8yd). The amount of blue toile fabric listed allows the strips to be cut without joins: toile print is large scale and may be directional, so joins are likely to be noticeable. However, if you’re using a fabric where joins won’t be obvious, you’ll only require 1.2m (11⁄4yd) of it. There are two sets of cutting instructions in Steps 1 and 3 to correspond. Irene used the blue toile for her binding as well, but we listed the binding fabric separately so you can use a different fabric for it if you wish. To mimic the effect that Irene achieved in her quilt with the uneven blue strip fabric for Border 1 requires that four strips are cut from exactly the same part of the printed design. As most striped fabrics are printed with the stripes lying parallel to the selvedges, you will need to cut the strips down the length of the fabric, not across the width. The amount of fabric listed allows for this.

Preparation and cutting

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From the cream tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: • One square, 22in (centre background) • Three strips, 5in across the width of the fabric and crosscut six strips, 5 x 19in (short centre background strips) • Three strips, 5in across the width of the fabric OR two strips, 5 x 60in down the length of the fabric if not joining them (long background strips). From the blue uneven stripe fabric, cut: • Four strips, 13⁄4in x 24in, ensuring the stripe pattern is the same on each strip (Border 1). From the blue toile fabric (with no joins in the strips), cut: • Four strips, 5 x 60in down the length of the fabric (side strips) • Four strips, 5 x 19in down the length of the fabric (centre strips). OR From the blue toile fabric (with joins), cut: • Six strips, 5in across the width of the fabric (side strips) • Two strips, 5in across the width of the fabric and crosscut four strips, 5 x 19in (centre strips). From the binding fabric, cut: • Six strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Place the centre appliqué pattern on a lightbox and place the red fabric on top of it, right side facing up. Trace the outer pointed circle

onto the right side of the fabric with an erasable marker, including the inner circle at the base of the green scallops. Repeat this step with the green fabric and the scalloped circle. Cut them out by eye, 1⁄4in outside the traced lines. Next, place the blue fabric over the design and trace the eight triangles individually, leaving space between them for seam allowances. Cut them out by eye, 1⁄4in outside the traced lines. Trace, in turn, the cream spot circle as one shape, the orange star as one shape and the brown centre circle onto suitable fabrics. Cut them out by eye, 1⁄4in outside the traced lines. From paper, cut 52 squares, 1in. You can do this with an oldbladed rotary cutter, ruler and mat or use a pencil, ruler and scissors as you prefer. From assorted fabrics, cut: • 52 squares, 11⁄2in. Centre a 1in paper square on the wrong side of a 11⁄2in fabric square and glue the edges over the paper neatly. Repeat this step for all 52 squares. Press them well using spray starch, remove the papers and press them again. For the appliqué motifs in the cream strips, trace the upper and lower shapes separately onto assorted print fabrics, leaving space between them, and cut them out by eye, 1⁄4in outside the traced lines.

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You need a total of 14 starfish and their backgrounds; 12 buds and leaves; 12 starflowers and centres; and 12 sixpetal flowers and centres – 50 motifs (100 separate shapes) in all. Irene chose to use assorted print fabrics of one colour for each group of motifs. For example, all the six-petal flowers are red and all the starfish are orange. To prepare the circles for the centre block and flower motifs, sew a line of running stitch about 1 ⁄8in from the edge of a fabric circle, starting with a knot. Centre a Karen Kay Buckley circle of the same diameter as the traced shape on the wrong side of the fabric circle, pull up the thread to gather the fabric over the back and press well from both sides using spray starch. Remove the circle from the inside and press again. If you’re not using the Karen Kay Buckley circles, use the compass

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IRENE’S FRUGALITY TIP As this quilt is only a little wider than normal fabric width, I chose to use one length of backing fabric (180cm/68in long) and sewed strips of coordinating fabric to both long edges to make it wide enough. Most long-arm machine quilters like the backing to be 10cm (4in) larger all round than the quilt top, so I made this backing 135cm (53in) wide.

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curved edges of the blue triangles under the cream circle, glue and appliqué them all in place. Glue the red pointed circle over the centre section and needleturn all the edges under neatly. Then glue the green scalloped circle over the top of it, ensuring the scallops are centred in each star point, and appliqué it in place. To serve as a guide for the placement of the chain of squares, draw a line 23⁄8in inside the raw edges of the cream background square. This will give you a 171⁄4in square around the centre appliqué. Referring to the photo, arrange 48 squares on point over these lines – two of the corners of each square should lie on a line, as shown in Diagram 1. There are 12 squares along each of the four sides. Then add one more square in each corner. When you’re happy with the mix of colours, glue them in place. Irene says you might have to fudge a bit, but this is quite acceptable in this sort of quilt – then appliqué them in position. Trim the background to 201⁄2in square with the design centred.

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Centre block

to draw circles on light card to match the pattern shapes, cut them out and proceed in the same way.

Centre block appliqué

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Irene recommends pressing under the straight seam allowances on the blue triangles and red pointed circle (after clipping the inner corners) to make it easier. For most of the remaining appliqué, the seam allowance is swept under with the needle a little bit at a time as the 23⁄8in

shape is appliquéd to the fabric/ shape beneath it. Seam allowances of the inner curves can be trimmed to about 1⁄8in and inside corners and sharp curves need to be clipped almost to the traced lines to allow them to turn under. You needn’t turn under the allowance where it is overlapped by another shape. Irene also recommends appliquéing the layered centre pieces in Step 7 to each other before attaching them as a complete unit to the background fabric. Using the glue sparingly, begin by gluing the prepared brown circle to the middle of the orange star. Appliqué it in place with small, invisible stitches using fine thread to match the fabric being appliquéd. Then glue the orange star to the middle of the prepared cream spot circle and needleturn appliqué it in place. Centre the prepared cream spot circle on the 22in square of cream background fabric and glue it in place; however, don’t use glue close to the outer edge. Tuck the

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Border 1

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Mark the centre of each blue stripe strip and decide how you want the stripes to be placed – Irene has a wider blue stripe nearer the centre block. Also mark the midpoints on the edges of the appliqué block. Matching the centres, pin a border strip to the left and

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Corner of Border 1


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Place the block on a table with the strips lying flat over each other at the corners. Use a long quilter’s ruler and erasable marker to draw a 45-degree line across each border strip at the corners. To do this, place the ruler diagonally across the block from corner to corner and rule across the strips that are lying on top. Then move the ruler away, switch the order of the strips and rule a line across the other two strips. Repeat these steps on the other diagonal so each strip has a 45-degree line across it, as shown in Diagram 2. Fold the block diagonally, right sides together, and match the two diagonal lines on the strips at one corner. Check that the blue stripes printed on the fabric are matching exactly and then stitch from the inner corner to the outside edge on the marked line, reversing to secure the stitching at each end. Lay the block on the table again and check that the border sits flat with a neat mitred join and the stripes matching. If it does, trim the seam allowance to 1⁄4in and press it open. Repeat this step on the other three corners. The quilt should measure 23in square, raw edge to raw edge.

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right edges of the appliqué block. (The border strips should overhang the block at both ends.) Working with the block uppermost, start sewing 1 ⁄4in from the corner and finish sewing 1 ⁄4in from the other corner. Tie off the threads by using the securing function on your machine or backstitching at each end, being careful not to work any stitches closer than 1⁄4in from the raw edge of the block. Fold the first two strips out of the way and repeat Step 21 to sew the other two strips to the top and bottom edges of the block. The stitching should meet at the corners of the block and each strip should be separate at this point with the ends overlapping at each corner. Press the strips and seams outwards.

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Motif appliqué

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Join the three 5in fabric-width cream strips end to end, press the seams open and crosscut two strips 5 x 60in. (This step is unnecessary if you cut your cream strips in one piece down the length of the fabric in Step 1.)

Quilt Layout Diagram

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Starting with the starfish motifs at the top, space 13 motifs evenly down each 60in strip in order – you should finish with starfish motifs. Glue them in place when you’re happy with the arrangement and needleturn appliqué them, starting with the underlying shape of each motif. For the three short cream strips at the top of the quilt, space the same motifs as for the first four on the long strips evenly down each one so they’ll be aligned across the quilt with those on the longer strips once the quilt is assembled. Glue and appliqué them in place. For the three short strips at the bottom of the quilt, evenly arrange the same motifs as the last four on the long strips. Glue and appliqué them in place.

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Assembly

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Join the six 5in fabric-width blue toile strips end to end in two sets of three, press the seams open and crosscut a total of four strips, 5 x 60in from the joined strips. (This step is unnecessary if you cut your toile strips in one piece down the length of the fabric in Step 3.) Referring to the Quilt Layout Diagram, lay out the blue toile strips, appliquéd long and short cream strips and centre appliqué block on the floor, a large table or design wall. Rearrange the strips that are interchangeable if it helps to balance the colours of the appliqué fabrics. When you’re happy with the arrangement, join the strips

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Diagram 2

Horizontal strip on top at the corner

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Diagram 3

into units. Sew the top and bottom units to the centre block and press the seams towards Border 1. Then sew the long left and right units to each side, matching the centre points and pressing the seams away from Border 1, to complete the quilt top.

Finishing

32

After removing the selvedges from the backing fabric, cut one length, 68in and cut it in half to make two strips about 21 x 68in. Then cut two strips, 12in across the width of the fabric from the remainder. Assemble the pieces as shown in Diagram 3, pressing the seams open. The quilt top, batting and backing are ready to take to a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, lay out the backing fabric on the floor, right side down,

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Homespun


How did you start your sewing career? I sewed clothes for my children when they were young but didn’t really enjoy it. In the early 1990s, I was reading an American craft magazine in which I saw an Ocean Wave quilt and I thought, “I can do this”. (Yes … an Ocean Wave quilt was my first quilt!) Of course, I knew nothing about accuracy (1⁄4in seam – what’s that?), cutting with a rotary cutter – I don’t think they were invented then, and best of all – cotton? Who needs just cotton when there were so many other fabulous textured fabrics? I used really thick batting and actually hand quilted it. It must have been fun, because I was hooked after that. What would you do without sewing? I’d go crazy if I didn’t sew! What are the stitching tools you couldn’t live without? My lightbox; my 20in square ruler; Frixion pen; Roxanne’s glue. Do you cherish the time you spend in your workroom/studio? Oh yes – I do have a day job plus a ‘hundred’ other things I do, so giving myself time to sew is very important for me.

Getting to know …

IRENE BLANCK and secure it with masking tape. Smooth the batting on top, ensuring it is free of wrinkles. After pressing the quilt top, lay it on top of the batting, right side facing up, and baste the three layers together with safety pins or thread. Quilt as desired. Irene’s quilt was professionally machine quilted by Rebecca Rae, of A Stitch N Line. She custom quilted a swirl design around all the appliqué motifs and feather designs in Border 1 and the blue toile strips using cream thread. Trim the excess backing fabric and batting 1⁄4in outside the edge of the quilt top.

35 36

What is it that you love about it most? It unleashes my creativity. Also, I have made so many wonderful friends through my craft. What would you like to change about your workspace? Get a bigger studio … but I think that’s a far distant dream, I’m afraid. How many different crafts do you do? Just one – quilting. Do you take your stitching with you on holidays? I take my stitching everywhere! I always have a tin with the essentials ready to be picked up, and whenever I go out of the house for any length of time, I take my sewing. I always prep lots of sewing when I go on holidays – whether I sew or not is irrelevant. I just dread the thought of having time on my hands and not having any sewing. Have you got lots of projects waiting to be done? I don’t believe you can call yourself a true quilter if you don’t have more than 10 projects waiting to be done. If you had one secret sewing wish, what would it be? To make my quilt designing and teaching my full time job.

37

Join the binding strips end to end with diagonal seams to make one length, trim the seams to 1⁄4in and press them open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, sew the binding to the edge of the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams below for details. Turn the binding over and hand stitch it to the back of the quilt. Label and date your quilt.

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IRENE’S FABRICSELECTION TIP The fact that this quilt is based on an antique one doesn’t mean that you can’t have fun with fabric selections. Look closely at my appliquéd shapes. I’ve used bold spots on petals, checks and florals on starfish and text prints – in both English and Chinese – in the centre block.

For contact details for Irene Blanck, of Focus on Quilts, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

Binding diagrams

40cm (16in)

Rule a line along the 45-degree fold

Mitring corners

Join the ends by matching the fold line and the drawn line and sewing them together. Trim the seam, press it open and refold the binding, then finish sewing it to the quilt.

Homespun

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T

JEC

PRO

02

GULL COTTAGE

Warm weather means weekends at the beach, and any respectable seaside cottage will be decked out in all the coastal trappings. Debbie von Grabler-Crozier added a couple of charmers to the mix with her sail-away boat bag and matching tablemat and her fish softie with mixed-fabric scales.

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Homespun


Homespun

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JEC

PRO

02

Materials Bag Q 30cm (3⁄8yd) natural linen (outer bag panels) Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) blue and white check fabric (outer bag panels, handles and appliqué) Q 25cm (1⁄4yd) red gingham (outer bag panels, frills and appliqué) 52

Homespun

Q Fat eighth each of white tone-on-tone print and navy print fabric (outer bag panels and appliqué) Q 75cm (7⁄8yd) red and white spot print fabric (lining and outer bag panels) Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) lightweight batting Q Ranger Archival Ink: jet black

Q Beach-themed stamps – Debbie used Eline’s beach house by Marianne Design Q 30mm (11⁄8in) red button Q Magnetic bag closure Q Scrap of heavy fusible interfacing Q 4 x 39cm (11⁄2 x 151⁄2in) stiffening (bag bottom) Q 18cm (7in) navy zipper (outside back pocket)

Q 10cm (4in) of 8mm (5⁄16in) red patterned grosgrain ribbon (zipper pull) Q Hot-glue gun and glue stick Fish softie Q Fat eighth each of red gingham, red and white spot print, navy print, white tone-on-tone print, blue and white check and natural linen fabrics (fish)

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Q Two 10mm (3⁄8in) blue buttons (eyes) Q 60cm (3⁄4yd) natural twine (hanger) Q Fibre fill Q Thin card Tablemat Q Fat quarter of natural linen Q Fat eighth each of red and white spot print and navy print fabric Q Scraps of white tone-ontone print, red gingham and blue check fabric (appliqué) Q 30 x 45cm (12 x 18in) backing fabric

Q Beach-themed stamps – Debbie used Eline’s beach house by Marianne Design Q Ranger Archival Ink: jet black All projects Q Black machine-sewing thread (appliqué) Q Perlé 8 cotton in dark blue (hand quilting) Q Ecru hand-quilting cotton Q Paper for appliqué templates and patterns Q Water-erasable marker Q Fabric-glue stick Q Sewing machine with freemotion, zipper and 1⁄4in feet

BAG Preparation and cutting

1

From the natural linen, cut: • One square, 27cm (101⁄2in) (bag front panel) • One rectangle, 6 x 42cm (21⁄4 x 161⁄2in) (stamped front panel). From the blue and white check fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 10 x 27cm (4 x 101⁄2in) (bag front pocket panel) • One rectangle, 10 x 31cm (4 x 113⁄4in) (bag back panel) • Two strips, 12 x 70cm (43⁄4 x 28in) (handles). From the red gingham, cut: • One rectangle, 10 x 31cm (33⁄4 x 113⁄4in) (bag back panel) • One strip, 5 x 20cm (2 x 8in) (pocket frill) • Two strips, 5 x 80cm (2 x 32in) (top frill). From the navy print fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 10 x 17cm (4 x 61⁄4in) (front pocket) • One rectangle, 11 x 31cm (41⁄4 x 113⁄4in) (bag back panel). From the white tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 8 x 31cm (3 x 113⁄4in) (bag back panel). From the red and white spot print fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 9 x 27cm (3 x 101⁄2in) (bag front panel) • One rectangle, 10 x 17cm (4 x 61⁄4in) (front pocket lining) • One rectangle, 11 x 31cm (4 x 113⁄4in) (bag back panel)

2 3

4 5

6

Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q General sewing supplies Finished sizes: bag 30 x 40cm (12 x 16in) plus handles; fish softie 26 x 17cm (101⁄4 x 61⁄2in) plus hanger; tablemat 26 x 42cm (10 x 161⁄2in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the projects. It is recommended that fabric, except the linen, be 100% cotton, and that all fabrics be pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric and batting 107cm (42in) wide. The appliqué

• Two rectangles, 32 x 42cm (121⁄2 x 161⁄2in) (lining) • One rectangle, 28 x 46cm (11 x 18in) (back zipper pocket). From the lightweight batting, cut: • Two rectangles, 33 x 45cm (13 x 17in) (bag front and back) • One rectangle, 10 x 17cm (4 x 61⁄4in) (front pocket). Trace the appliqué shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto paper, label them and cut them out on the lines. Pin the paper shapes to your selected fabrics and cut a total of four small hearts, one boat, two sails and one flag from leftover coloured fabrics and one large heart from natural linen. Cut them out around the edge of the paper. Select the stamps you want to use and stamp them on the 6 x 42cm (21⁄4 x 161⁄2in) rectangle of natural linen with jet black ink. Allow them to dry.

short end of the navy print/batting rectangle, right sides facing and raw edges level. Place the 10 x 17cm (4 x 61⁄4in) red spot print lining rectangle on top, right sides together, and stitch. Fold the red spot lining down over the batting and the frill will sit up. Press the seam without flattening the frill. Hand quilt 5mm (1⁄4in) below the seam with ecru thread. Layer the pocket over the bottom half of the blue check rectangle, matching the side and bottom edges, and machine baste 3mm (1⁄8in) from the edges. (Don’t worry about the raw edges at the sides of the frill as they are enclosed in the seams later on.) Join the 27cm (101⁄2in) linen square to the left edge of the pocket panel and the 9 x 27cm (3 x 101⁄2in) red spot rectangle to the right edge. Sew the stamped strip to the top of the panel to complete the bag front.

7

13

8

14

9

15

Assembly Bag front For the front pocket, lay the 10 x 17cm (4 x 61⁄4in) rectangle of batting on the wrong side of the corresponding navy print fabric rectangle and sew close to the edge. Fold the 5 x 20cm (2 x 8in) red gingham strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching. Press. Sew a line of long machine stitches close to the long raw edges, leaving long threads at both ends. Pull up the gathers to measure 10cm (4in). Pin the frill on one

10

11 12

technique is raw-edge freemachine stitched (some fraying is to be expected) but the instructions can be adapted to your preferred method. Metric and imperial cutting measurements are provided: they are not interchangeable, so use one set consistently. Seam allowances of 1cm (3⁄8in) are used unless otherwise stated. Instructions are given for using the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

DEBBIE’S SCRAPS TIPS Keep your scraps well organised. Grade them by size, if you can – a plastic zip-lock bag will do if you haven’t got the space or budget for plastic boxes. The scraps can be used for appliqué and lots of other things: there’s no need to cut into a fresh piece of fabric when a small piece will do for a shape. You’ll feel very virtuous!

Homespun

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16

Centre the bag front panel from Step 15 on a rectangle of batting and hand quilt 5mm (1⁄4in) from each of the seams with dark blue Perlé 8 cotton. Trim the batting even with the front panel.

Appliqué

17

Arrange the appliqué shapes on the bag front panel as shown in the photograph. The base of the boat hull should be 4cm (11⁄2in) above the bottom raw edge. Use the fabricglue stick to hold them in position. Set up your machine for freemotion straight stitch and thread the top with black thread. Sew twice around each appliqué shape just inside the raw edges. Then stitch the mast and bowsprits freehand.

18

19

Sew the red button to the middle of the linen heart above the pocket.

Bag back

20

Arrange the blue check, red spot, white tone-on-tone, navy print and red gingham rectangles in order. Sew them together on the long edges. Centre the bag back, right side up, over the other rectangle of batting and top stitch 5mm (1⁄4in) on either side of the seams. Trim the batting even with the back panel. Back pocket Fold the 28 x 46cm (11 x 18in) red spot rectangle in half, wrong sides together and short edges matching, and press the fold. This will be the bottom edge of the pocket. Open out the rectangle again and measure down 5cm (2in) from one short end. Draw a 1 x 17cm (3⁄8 x 7in) horizontal rectangle on the wrong side of the fabric, as shown by the dotted lines in Diagram 1. Pin the pocket rectangle, right sides together, on the bag back panel, centred between the left and right edges, raw edges matching at the top and with the rectangle you drew in Step 23 towards the top edge. Machine stitch on the outer lines of the rectangle you drew in Step 23 through both layers, pivoting neatly at the

21 22 23 24

Steps 18-19

5cm (2in) 1cm (3⁄8in) 17cm (7in)

Diagram 1

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Homespun

Bag back

corners. Use a small pair of sharp scissors to cut on the unbroken line in the middle of the rectangle through all layers; then cut carefully into the corners without cutting the stitching. Push the pocket fabric through the opening, to the wrong side of the back panel and fold it down over the batting. Working with the batting side facing up, press the rectangular opening flat and pin the top edge of the pocket to the top edge of the bag back. Turn the panel over so that its right side is facing up. Centre the zipper, also right side facing up, underneath the opening and pin the zipper tape to the panel. Use a zipper foot to sew around the edge of the rectangle to secure the zipper to the panel, being careful not to break the needle by sewing over the metal ends. Tie the red patterned grosgrain ribbon to the zipper pull. Fold the bottom of the pocket up on the pressed crease and pin the short end in place at the top of the panel. Keeping the back panel out of the way, sew the side seams of the pocket – that it, sewing through the two layers of pocket fabric only. Pin the front and back bag panels together, right sides together; check that the zipper is near the top edge, not the bottom one, on

25 26

27 28


6mm (1⁄4in)

1.5cm (5⁄8in)

Diagram 2

the back panel. Sew around the side and bottom edges of the bag. Referring to Diagram 2, fold the bottom corners with the side seam matching the bottom seam to make a triangle. Sew across 1.5cm (5⁄8in) from the point and trim the surplus. Hot glue the 4 x 39cm (11⁄2 x 151⁄2in) rectangle of stiffening to the inside base of the bag.

29

Frill

30 31

Join the 5 x 80cm (2 x 32in) red gingham strips end to end to make a circle. Repeat Step 11. Matching the seams, pin the frill to the top of the bag at the sides, right sides together and raw edges level. Pull up the gathers so the frill fits the top edge of the front and back of the bag. Machine stitch it in place using a 5mm (1⁄4in) seam.

Lining

32

Cut two 5cm (2in) squares of heavy fusible interfacing. Position them at the centre top on the wrong side of the lining rectangles, about 3cm (11⁄4in) down from the top edges. Fuse them in place. Sew the side and bottom seams and box the corners of the lining rectangles, as described in Steps 28-29, but leaving an opening in one side seam for turning. Leave the lining inside out. Attach the magnetic clasp halves to the lining at the interfacing reinforcement according to the manufacturer’s instructions, making sure they align correctly with each other.

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Handles

35

Fold the 12 x 70cm (43⁄4 x 28in) blue check strips in half,

wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. Open them up, fold the raw edges in to the centre crease and press. Fold them in half again on the original crease and press. Sew down both long edges. Top stitch three parallel lines for decoration. Pin the ends of the handles to the top of the bag over the frill, placing them 8cm (3in) in from each side. The raw edges should be level, and the handles should hang down the outside of the bag front and back panels. With right sides together, put the outer bag inside the lining, matching the side seams and raw edges. Pin. Sew around the top of the bag through all layers, sewing the handle areas again for strength. Turn the bag right side out through the opening in the lining and sew the opening closed. The frill should stand up with the handles behind it. Press the top edge of the bag below the frill. Hand quilt 6mm (1⁄4in) below the seam in dark blue Perlé 8 cotton to finish.

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Fish softie

FISH SOFTIE Preparation and cutting

40 41 42 43

Trace the fish and scale shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto paper and cut them out. From the linen, cut: • Two rectangles, 10 x 23cm (4 x 9in) (fish head). From the blue check fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 26 x 23cm (101⁄4 x 9in) (fish body and tail). From the assorted fat eighths, cut: • A total of 45 scale shapes using the pattern.

Step 34 Homespun

55


44

From the red gingham, cut: • Two strips, 2.5 x 20cm (1 x 8in).

Assembly

On each fish, glue a strip of red gingham over the seam between the head and body/raw straight edge of the scales and sew close to each long edge with black thread. Fold the length of twine in half and lay it over the right side of one fish shape where the mouth would be; the ends of the twine should overhang the edge of the fish by about 1cm (3⁄8in). Machine stitch it in place securely within the seam allowance. Match the two fish shapes, right sides together, and sew around the shape, leaving an opening on one side; take care not to catch any of the twine (except the ends you’ve basted) in the seam. Clip the curves and turn the fish right side out. Stuff the fish with fibre fill and slip stitch the opening closed. Use ecru quilting thread to sew lines of running stitch through the tail as indicated on the pattern. Sew the buttons in place for the eyes: go through the head from one button to the other, pulling the thread firmly to indent the face slightly.

TABLEMAT Preparation and cutting

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From the natural linen, cut: • One square, 21cm (8in) (centre) • Two rectangles, 9 x 28cm (31⁄2 x 101⁄2in) (stamped panels). From each of the red and white spot and navy print fabrics, cut: • One square, 15cm (51⁄2in) and cut it on one diagonal to yield two half square triangles of each fabric (corner triangles). Trace the curvy heart and boat appliqué shapes (or re-use the ones from the bag) from the Pattern Sheet onto paper and cut them out on the lines. Pin the paper shapes to the fabrics and cut four curvy hearts from natural linen and the hull, sail and flag shapes from your selected appliqué fabrics. Repeat Step 9, leaving at least 1cm (3⁄8in) of fabric clear around the edges for the seam allowance.

45 46

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47

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48

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Join each linen rectangle to a blue check rectangle on one 23cm (9in) edge. Position the fish pattern over each pieced rectangle in turn, with the seam matching the line on the pattern. Trace around the pattern with an erasable marker. Leaving the tail and head areas clear, arrange the scales on each of the body shapes in an offset overlapping pattern and glue them in place. Don’t worry that some of the scales will overhang the traced lines. Set up your machine for freemotion straight stitch and thread the top with black thread. Freemotion stitch just inside the curved edges of all the scales. Put the fish pattern over each rectangle again, matching the lines you traced in Step 46, and trace around it again. Cut the fish out on the lines.

Tablemat

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Assembly

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Sew the red half-square triangles to opposite sides of the linen square, matching centres, and press the seams outwards. Repeat


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Getting to know … DEBBIE VON GRABLER-CROZIER Why this particular craft? I love fabric. The new styles and colours and designs each month are so exciting, and I love to see my stash grow. Making something that’s very practical and beautiful at the same time is uplifting. Have you tried plenty of others? Oh! yes. I also write patterns for painting, paper crafts, beading, jewellery and general crafts. I have always liked working with my hands and making things. The designing came from not always having a specific item for a pattern and learning to improvise. When I lived in Australia (in the days before internet shopping), we were pretty rurally isolated (difficult to explain to people here in Europe) and I couldn’t always get the exact thing that I needed. But the show needed to go on! Enter the improvisation. And a new career grew out of it. If you weren’t doing this, what else would you be doing? I’d be a doctor. That was where I was heading, and I had to stop that particular study and return home to help care for my dad, who had a brain tumour. That took me 400 miles from my university, and returning afterwards was impossible. I went on to do six university qualifications by distance education (which was introduced in the interim) and I’m happy with that. I wouldn’t go back for anything. I’ll always be interested in health, and science happily runs my life. I am so happy to be able to combine that side of my life with creativity, and I use my maths every day in my work. Who taught you your crafting skills? It started on holidays to my nana’s house. We cooked

this step to sew the navy half-square triangles to the other two sides. Repeat Steps 17-18 to appliqué the boat to the linen and the four hearts in the half-square triangles, as shown in the photograph. Sew a stamped linen rectangle to the left and right edges of the appliquéd centre panel and press. Trim the mat to 28 x 44cm (11 x 171⁄2in) and pin it on the rectangle of backing fabric, right sides together. Sew around the edge, leaving an opening along one side for turning.

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together and sewed together. I learned to sew around age eight on an original old Singer sewing machine. I inherited that lovely machine from my nana, and it is my prize possession. My mum taught me very fine hand sewing and embroidery, too, so I had the best of all of worlds. I’m German, and my German grandmother, although far away geographically, kept me well supplied with inspiration with German imagery and traditions. I love to use them in my designs, even now. Any good stories from those lessons? I remember my nana recycling to make dolls clothes for my toys. Bits and pieces were reborn as really pretty things, and I still have some of them. I didn’t like dolls when I was growing up – I found them very creepy. So I used the clothes on my stuffed animals. I had lots of those from Germany. I like that one grandmother sent me the toys and the other one made me things to go with them. It is possible to have closeness across the world. What does this craft mean to you? It’s my life and my livelihood. I love the relationship that I form with my editors all over the world and I really enjoy sharing my ideas with everyone. I think about craft every day and I love to make my house beautiful. I never lose sight of the fact that I get to work at my dream job. I will never take that for granted. It has been hard work to get to this point, and I acknowledge that every day. Is it hard to find time to do it or is it a profession? It’s a profession. A couple of my qualifications are very specific to the job that I do and the rest is very hard work. My pet hate is when people say how lucky it is to do what I do. It didn’t just happen; I work at it every day and never take it all for granted. I treat it like a ‘proper job’, too. My family knows that when I go into my room to work, then the work must come first unless someone is on fire! I respect this job, and so do the other people around me. The whole household has grown along with it. From where do you draw inspiration? From all around me. My German traditions are very important to me, and I love nature. Flowers and birds are favourite choices, and I find that the same themes constantly weave in and out of my work, year after year. Why this skill – and this style? It’s interesting and absorbing. I like to make things in an

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Trim the corners and surplus backing fabric, turn the mat right side out and push the corners out gently. Press. Slip stitch the opening closed neatly. Hand quilt beside the seam lines on the linen in dark blue Perlé 8 cotton and on the red and navy print fabrics in ecru thread to finish.

64

For contact details for Debbie Von Grabler-Crozier, of The Folk Art Factory, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine. Step photo courtesy of Debbie.

accessible style and things that will fit into any household. I also like to perfect the hand-sewing techniques and keep older traditions going. What are your favourite materials to work with? I love cotton fabrics because of their colour and handling qualities, but making bags using furnishing weight fabrics is also great. The finished product is satisfying. I’m loving the woven ribbons around at the moment. They make beautiful trims and bring a project together. Do you ever see yourself stopping or diversifying? Not really. I had a break at one point while I went back to university and did some more study, but I came back to this. It was like a homecoming. I write articles for health, science, travel and food, too, so I am still using other qualifications, and this stops me from straying seriously. Where do you live and work? I live in England, in the beautiful county of Norfolk, and that in itself is a bit of a dream. I have a room that’s ‘mine’, and it’s the best insulated room in Europe! My lovely husband has lined the walls with shelves and they are full of fabrics and boxes with interesting things in them. I find it hard to tidy, because I forget what’s in the boxes and when I start looking, I get sidetracked. How would you describe your style? I like a retro folklore style, but it changes. I’ll go through phases where everything is very bright and then change and all my patterns will be quite muted. Flowers will feature heavily in one lot of patterns and then black and white geometry. Are you married with children? I’m married, and we have a beautiful son. He is eighteen now, and I’m so proud of him. A few years after my dad died, Mum became unwell and she moved in with us, so we have a strange and mixed-up household by many standards. We have a cocker spaniel, Sally, who is my boss and companion (read: colleague) at work. We also have Checkmate, the cat, who lords it over all of us and keeps order in the kingdom. What is your advice for beginners? Keep at it and learn all that you can. Don’t just learn to put in a zipper by watching one video or reading one book. Compare and contrast. Every one adds something, and then you build up a more complete picture of a technique. You never know when that lightbulb will go on.

DEBBIE’S DESIGN TIPS Use a water-erasable fabric marker to mark lines accurately. It makes your work much more professional looking. But, funnily enough, measuring with a ruler isn’t always the way to go. Check things by eye, stand back and look at your arrangements to make sure that they look good and, if you’re still not sure, take a photo. The camera never lies and will reveal imperfections – try it and see.


The Patchwork Angel AUSTRALIAN AFTERNOON QUILT Ever wonder what our Aussie critters get up to on a relaxing afternoo n? Frill Neck Lizard likes a run with her iPod, Joey likes a jump. Koala would love a nap if only the choir birds would find a different tree. Goanna is flat out like a lizard drinking (for you non-Aussies, that’s a bit of Australian slang) and Echidna uses her natu ral abilities to her advantag e! Finished size is 42 in × 45 in. This lovely pattern comes pre-printed on quality cotton fabric all ready for you to stitch. We are offering it as a pattern with pre-print only $99 plus p&h, as a full kit $156, a full kit with threads $188.90 or as a BLOCK OF THE MO NTH program for $29.95 including p&h over 6 mon ths. Please note that once you have committed to a BOM program you must complete the full program As always fabrics will be simila r to those shown but not the same .

RIE NAGEd as a BOM s E M MY rn a igne

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AND Don’t forget we now ow w stock quality y yarns for Knitting and Crochet!

SHOP ON OUR SECURE WEBSITE 343 Mons Road, Forest Glen n Qld 4556 On the Sunshine Coast just one hhour north of Brisbane Take exit 200 on the Bruce Highway Ph 07 5477 0700 Email info@patchworkangel.com.au

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Sho ge C Michele se Faux Spon ruct the o st R n Vanilla calico to co uring was in lo la o p c cake using inting rs. The ruction by pa d e y la e cak nst n, an after co solutio applied ric with a tea paste. White the fab ’ was texture eate rolled am o cr the ‘cre n was used t aves before o le t t d o n aint. polyc hed roses a crylic p ) c a it t h s it d w d an e o r N u l7 3 olo being c Homespun Vo (From

Jam Tarts Lorraine Teigland, of ikatbag, made a whole batch of jam tarts in lemon, lime, pineapple, strawberry, raspberry and orange flavours. She has a simple pattern available for sale, if you’d like to partake of some of these felt fancies – just visit www.ikatbag.com/p/patterns-for-sale.

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FLOATING ON AIR

When soft summer breezes shift and stir these curtains, the delicate dandelion seeds appear airborne. The flutter of soft lawn fabric on the evening air and the subtlety of the embroidery pay tribute to the work of Melissa Grant (and Libby Richardson).

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Materials Q Off-white 100% cotton lawn: see Note and Steps 1-2 to determine the yardage required Q 100% cotton fine machine-embroidery thread to match the lawn (hems) Q Size 60-70 sharps machine needle Q ThreadworX hand overdyed stranded embroidery cotton in Coffee ’n Cream (1115) (replaced Needle Necessities Latte Supreme (168)) Q Fine crewel handembroidery needle Q Embroidery hoop Q Fine-pointed erasable fabric marker – see Note Q Sheet of A4 cardboard Q Ruler and mechanical pencil Q Spring wire for curtain hanging Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, French knot, straight stitch Design areas: 24 x 19cm (91⁄2 x 71⁄2in) and 22 x 20cm (83⁄4 x 8in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabric be 100% cotton lawn, pre-washed (as lawn may shrink) and well ironed. These café curtains were designed to fit the lower half of a window. Measure the finished length and width you want your curtains to be and refer to Steps 1-2 and Diagram 1 for guidance about yardage and 66

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www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


hems. When you’ve determined the amount you need, add at least 10cm (1⁄8yd) to allow for shrinkage and straightening of the grain. Bear in mind that cotton lawn is sold in a variety of widths, so this may also impact the amount you need.

Don’t apply fabric stabiliser to the back of the embroidery as this will mar the semi-sheer effect of these curtains: using an embroidery hoop will help prevent the fabric from puckering. As parts of the traced design will be stitched

with only one strand of embroidery thread, lines may not be completely covered by the stitching. For this reason, Melissa recommends using a water-erasable fabric marker such as the Elize Water Erasable Pen so the marks can

be removed after the stitching is complete. Instructions are given for using the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

Finished width of curtain

Add 2cm (3⁄4in) for the side hem

Finished length of curtain

Add 2cm (3⁄4in) for the side hem

Add 3cm (13⁄8in) for the top hem

10cm (4in)

Add 4.5cm (2in) for the bottom hem

4cm (11⁄2in)

Diagram 1

Diagram 2

Dandelion head

Preparation and cutting

fold the edges over again to the 9mm (3⁄8in) line to make double-fold hems. Machine stitch 8mm (5⁄16in) in from the edges with matching machineembroidery thread and a slightly longer than usual stitch length. Press. For the top hem for the wire pocket, fold the edge under to the 9mm (3⁄8in) line and press. Then fold it again to the 18mm (3⁄4in) line and press. Machine stitch 2mm (1⁄8in) up from the bottom edge of the pocket, reverse stitching at both ends, and press. Leave the ends open to thread the wire through. For the bottom hem, fold the raw edge under to the 9mm (3⁄8in) line. Then fold it again to the 36mm (11⁄2in) line and press. Machine stitch 2mm (1⁄8in) in from the top and bottom of the hem, reverse stitching at each end, and press. Repeat Steps 4-6 to hem the second curtain the same way. Tape the Pattern Sheet with one of the dandelion embroidery designs to a table. Place a curtain over it, right side facing up, so that the design is positioned 10cm (4in) from one side edge (with the seeds scattering towards the centre) and 4cm (11⁄2in) up from the lower edge,

as shown in Diagram 2. If you’re using a heavier fabric, you might need a light source such as a lightbox or backlit window to see the design through the fabric.

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Before you start cutting the fabric to size for your window, it’s vital to ensure the fabric grain is straight as the curtains won’t hang nicely if the grain is skewed in either direction. Also remove the selvedges, as they can cause puckering. Measure your window to determine the finished length and width of your curtains and add 8cm (31⁄4in) to the length and 4cm (11⁄2in) to the width to allow for the hems. Melissa’s café curtains were designed to hang on a spring curtain wire on the lower half of a window with the hems finishing above the sill. Refer to Diagram 1 as a guide for cutting. For accurate, even hems, Melissa recommends making a cardboard folding guide. On a long edge of the A4 sheet of cardboard, measure and rule three fine pencil lines parallel to the edge at 9mm, 18mm and 36mm (3⁄8in, 3⁄4in and 11⁄2in). For the side hems, fold the edges over to the 9mm (3⁄8in) line and press with the cardboard still in place; slide the cardboard along the fabric and repeat the folding and pressing until the whole length of each side has been pressed. Then

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Embroidery

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Begin embroidering the design by backstitching the seed stems radiating from the centre of the seed heads with one strand of thread. Using two strands of thread, work the seeds in angled straight stitches.

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MELISSA’S STARTING TIP When working with two strands of thread, cut an extra-long single strand and thread both ends through the needle, creating a loop at the other end. Bring the needle to the front of the work where you want to start, but don’t pull the loop through the fabric. When you go down again, take the needle through the loop and pull the thread through, leaving a neat, invisible start to your stitching.

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Scattered seeds

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Work French knots at the ends of some stems using two strands of thread. The scattered seeds are stitched the same as the ones on the seed head, but start and end each one separately very neatly on the back, as threads carried across the back of the work would show. Backstitch the dandelion stems and leaf outlines with two strands of thread. Use one strand of thread to backstitch the inner leaf details. The lines of backstitch sit quite close together and give the effect of shadow work, although there is no herringbone stitch used. When the embroidery is complete, and before ironing it, remove all traces of the watererasable marker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Allow the fabric to dry. (Ironing can

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make the ink of some erasable markers permanent.) After pressing the main fabric areas of the curtains, put the embroidered areas face down on a clean thick towel and press them lightly from the wrong side to avoid flattening the stitches. Thread the spring wire through the top hems of the curtains and suspend them on your window to finish. This is usually done by screwing little hooks into the frame. The eyes on the spring wire go over the hooks, putting the wire under a little tension so it stays straight. For contact details for Melissa Grant, of One Day in May, Creations by Melissa Grant, or Libby Richardson, of Artsmart Craft Cottage, turn to the Stockists pages at the back of the magazine.

MELISSA’S EMBROIDERY TIPS This embroidery is sewn without a stabiliser on the back of the work so that the fabric remains semi-transparent when it’s backlit by a window. Using an embroidery hoop and taking extra care with the tension of your stitches will help to prevent the fine fabric from puckering as you stitch. The semi-transparency of the fabric means that any untidy ends or threads carried across the back will show as shadows on the front. Be mindful of this as you stitch: hold your work up to the light to check for shadows as you sew. I used a single strand of thread to anchor loose threads to other stitches on the back of the work.

Dandelion leaves and stems

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Good to Great Sewing

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Darling Dandelions Take a deep breath, puff and make a wish for at least some of these designer products, which capture the ethereal ereal delicacy of dandelion’s elion’s white ‘parachute’ hute’ seeds.

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01 We’re dreaming of refurnishing with this striking cotton duvet cover set by Baksana. Contact Luxury Linen for your own. 02 A gentle reminder to see the positive in every situation – this inspirational art print is by Black & Type Designs. 03 The sweet ‘Dandelion Wish’ letterpress greeting card by Elum Designs is printed on repurposed cotton rag paper. 04 This ceramic Cabo set (milk jug, sugar bowl and coffee mug, which comes with an oak coaster) is waiting to be used for your any-time-of-day coffee break. Contact Love Lee Home. 05 Don’t let this sunny cushion cover drift away! Contact Black Eyed Susie for this cheerful piece. 06 Almond Tree Designs’ notebook is evocative of childhood walks in the park, blowing at dandelions, searching for four-leaf clovers, making daisy chains … 07 The Paper Crafterie stocks elegant stationery and rustic packaging products. The gift tags shown here are available in a pack of 24 and come finished off with baker’s twine. 08 We’ve picked Grey Little Mouse’s sweet passport cover decorated with hand embroidery as the perfect gift for that special traveller in your life.


window shopp

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14 13 09 Radiating lines, ivory tones and a pure wool composition combine for a minimalistic look and plush feel. The Cornermill rug is available from Zanui. 10 Glide on Benefit’s ‘Ultra Plush’ lip gloss for a kissable pout. Get in touch with Adore Beauty for more information. 11 Simple and beautiful – this porcelain bottle vase has a glazed finish and is available from Clare Loves. (The front and back of the vase are both shown.) 12 Another stationery treasure from The Paper Crafterie – scribble down your memories and wishes in this lovely pocket-sized notebook. 13 Calm and fragility are illustrated beautifully on this triptych Mangowood carved artwork. Available from Earth de Fleur Homewares. 14 Pin on a touch of nature to complement your outfit. This brooch is made from Tasmanian timbers with laser-cut detail. Contact Dick and Dora for further details. 15 These lovely coral baby shoes by evie lala can be tied with a bow or wrapped around the ankle for a ballet-shoe look. 16 Lighten up with the bright and dazzling replica Richard Hutten ‘Dandelion’ light. It’s available from Lucretia Lighting.

WHERE TO BUY Q Adore Beauty: (03) 9380 8521, www.adorebeauty.com.au.

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Q Almond Tree Designs: (03) 8609 9288, www.almondtreedesigns.com.au.

Q Black & Type Designs: @blackandtype, www.blackandtypedesigns.etsy.com.

Q Black Eyed Susie: www.blackeyedsusie.etsy.com. m. Q Clare Loves: +44 1494 874 101, www.clareloves.co.uk.

Q Dick and Dora: 0408 303 126, www.dickanddora.com.

Q Earth de Fleur Homewares: 1300 760 664, www.earthhomewares.com.au.

Q Elum Designs: www.elumdesigns.com. Q evie lala: www.evielala.com.au, info@evielala.com.au.

Q Grey Little Mouse: www.greylittlemouse.etsy.com. Q Love Lee Home: 0432 273 801, www.loveleehome.com.au.

Q Lucretia Lighting: (03) 9510 5999, www.lucretiashop.com.au.

Q Luxury Linen: +64 (9) 307 6242, www.luxurylinen.co.nz.

Q The Paper Crafterie: www.papercrafterie.com. Q Zanui: 1300 668 317, www.zanui.com.au.

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Kiss Chasey

Jemima Flendt is all heart when it comes to her latest quilt design. Using the prettiest-ever Liberty florals, she showers us with love and affection – in a very tangible form.

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Materials Q 16 fat quarters in a variety of floral prints. Jemima used a mix of red, pink and yellow Liberty of London Tana Lawn prints Q 3m (31⁄4yd) grey spot print fabric (background) Q 3.6m (4yd) backing fabric

Q 55cm (5⁄8yd) red floral print (binding) Q Batting at least 180cm (70in) square Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q Sewing machine with 1 ⁄4in foot Q General sewing supplies

Finished size: 163cm (64in) square Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric 107cm (42in) wide.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


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Large Heart Block Assembly Diagram

Preparation and cutting

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From each of the assorted floral print fabrics, cut: • Two squares, 41⁄2in (G) • Eight squares, 3in (H) • Six squares, 21⁄2in (I) • Eight squares, 2in (J) • Four squares, 11⁄2in (K). From the grey spot print fabric, cut: • 10 strips, 3in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut them into 128 squares, 3in (A) • Four strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut them into 64 squares, 21⁄2in (B) • Seven strips, 2in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut them into 128 squares, 2in (C) • Three strips, 11⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut them into 64 squares, 11⁄2in (D) • Four strips, 41⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut them into 64 rectangles, 41⁄2 x 21⁄2in (E)

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• Four strips, 81⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut them into 64 rectangles, 81⁄2 x 21⁄2in (F). From the red floral print fabric, cut: • Seven strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding).

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Large heart blocks

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To make a large heart block you will need: four A squares and two B squares cut from grey spot print fabric; and one G square, four H squares and two I squares all cut from the same floral print fabric. Draw a light diagonal line from corner to corner on the wrong side of each of the floral H squares. Match each of them with a grey A square, right sides together. Sew 1⁄4in on either side of the line. Cut along the drawn line and press the squares open to make half-square triangle units. Trim them to measure 21⁄2in square. Refer to Diagram 1.

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Lay out patches in three rows, as shown in the Block Assembly Diagram. Begin assembling the block by sewing each floral I square to a half-square triangle unit, double checking that the triangle unit is orientated correctly. Then join these units to the left and right edges of the floral G square. Press. Sew the patches in the top and bottom rows together, then sew the rows together, carefully matching seams. Your block should measure 81⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat Steps 4-9 to make a total of 32 large hearts – two from each of the assorted floral fabrics.

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Small heart blocks

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To make a small heart block you will need four C squares and two D squares cut from grey spot print fabric; and one I square, four J squares and two K squares all cut from the same floral print fabric. Repeat the process described in Steps 4-9 to make a total of 32 small heart blocks. The half-square triangle units should be trimmed to 11⁄2in square. Each of your small heart blocks should measure 41⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Sew a grey E rectangle to the left and right edges of each block. Press. Then sew a grey F

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Diagram 1

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Small Heart Block Assembly Diagram

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Getting to know …

JEMIMA FLENDT How did you start your sewing career? When I was about 16, I piled up a heap of my mum’s scraps and started making quilts. I had always loved sewing at school and, as I got older, I started taking classes at the local quilt store. I was quickly hooked. As I started to have my

rectangle to the top and bottom edges. Refer to the Block Assembly Diagram. Your small heart blocks should now measure 81⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

Assembly

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Lay out the blocks in eight rows of eight blocks each, alternating the large and small hearts. Play with the arrangement until you have an array of colours and prints that you like. Sew the blocks in each row together, then sew the rows together, carefully matching seams.

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Finishing

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Cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths, remove the selvedges and sew the two pieces together side by side. Press the seam open. The quilt top, batting and backing are ready to take to a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re going to do the quilting yourself, smooth the backing fabric on the floor, right side down, and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is smooth. After pressing the quilt top, lay it on top

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own family and my friends had children of their own, I found that I loved making quilts for all these newborns and kids. What would you do without sewing? Bake – I love baking and all things sweet. I love making cakes and desserts, and I guess if I weren’t sewing, I’d have loved to pursue a career as a pastry chef. What are the stitching tools you couldn’t live without? Good-quality thread. Bloc-Loc rulers – I just couldn’t live without the HST ruler. A decent unpicker and pins that suit the purpose for the seam, such as fork pins for all those open seams. Do you cherish the time you spend in your workroom/studio? I really do love that I get to spend time creating and sewing up a storm in my sewing studio. Being able to quilt and sew all day as my ‘work’ is a dream. What is it that you love about it most? I am lucky to have a large room to work in, and it’s filled with lots of fabrics, quilts and things that inspire me to constantly create. What would you like to change about your workspace? I’d love some more storage – the fabric is starting to ‘grow’ on top of the

of the batting, right side facing up. Baste the three layers together with thread or safety pins. Quilt as desired. Jemima’s quilt was professionally machine quilted by Carol Brady of the Quilting Cottage with an all-over swirling design. Trim the excess batting and backing fabric 1⁄4in outside the raw edges of the quilt. Cut the ends of the 21⁄2in red floral binding strips at a 45-degree angle. Join the strips end to end to make one length and press the seams open. Fold the strip in half, long edges matching and wrong sides together, and press.

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shelving, and I have a large selection of thread colours that I really need to sort better. How many different crafts do you do? Aside from quilting, I love to crochet. I like making baby blankets and scarves and cowls with different yarns. Do you take your stitching with you on holidays? Absolutely – it’s probably one of the first things I pack, as I love to stitch while waiting for planes or travelling on them. I also happily stitch while taking long car trips. I find it passes the time and is a great way to relax. Have you got lots of projects waiting to be done? My head is buzzing with so many projects that I want to get started on. I have bought a few new books of late and some new fabric ranges that I’m dying to start projects with. I do try to keep my WIP (Works in Progress) to no more than three items. I like working on about this number of projects at a time and finishing them before I move on. If you had one secret sewing wish, what would it be? I’d love to publish a quilting book one day. I love teaching quilting and encouraging others to sew and create. Sharing my love of quilting in print would be a dream come true.

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With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 49 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch it by hand to the back of the quilt. Label and date your quilt.

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Jemima used Liberty Fabrics, which are available from The Strawberry Thief, www.thestrawberrythief.com.au. For contact details for Jemima Flendt, of Tied with a Ribbon, or Carol Brady, of the Quilting Cottage, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

JEMIMA’S FABRIC SELECTION TIPS

make a heart from several different fabrics for a really scrappy look.

• Be bold and brave with your choice of background fabrics: they don’t always have to be cream or a pale neutral. • You can make your quilt using as many different fabrics as you wish – perhaps using each fabric to make only one heart block, not two as I did. You could even

JEMIMA’S ACCURACY TIP I used a Block-Loc Half-Square Triangle ruler to trim my half-square triangle units. Using this ruler ensures that I achieve accurate squares with perfect points every time – without fail.

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What a cute idea!

THE NEVER-LOSE NEEDLE KEEPER There’s not a stitcher alive who hasn’t misplaced a needle and spent hours patting the carpet under the sofa, feeling behind cushions and despairing that this fine but fierce tool will only reveal itself embedded in the skin of children or pets. All hail Jennie Pickett, who has solved the problem. She put a sew-in magnet in an English paper-pieced hexagon to make a magnetic needle-landing spot on projects. The hexagon is basted around the magnet and then hand sewn to the case. You can find out more about Jennie’s ingenuity by visiting her Clover & Violet website (www.cloverandviolet.com) or instagram.com/cloverandviolet.

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TULLIVER’S TRAVELS

When a turtle-neck tortoise decides to go a-rambling, it’s done at a leisurely pace and with all the necessities – camera, map and lunchtime sandwich in a brown bag. Jennifer Goldsmith created this Lilliputian adventurer and equipped him with a strap-on backpack shell. Homespun

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“I love to go slow wandering, along the mountain track, and as I go I love to sing, my shell knapsack on my back.” Adventure� Check�List�  Camera  Lunch  Map

Materials Q 20 x 50cm (8 x 20in) tan wool felt (body) Q 20cm (8in) square of rusty brown wool felt (shell) Q 30cm (12in) square of burnt umber wool felt (backpack and spots on shell) Q 25cm (10in) square of aqua wool felt (jumper) Q 15 x 20cm (6 x 8in) lime green wool felt (jumper and lettuce) 82

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Q 10 x 30cm (4 x 12in) black wool felt (camera) Q 15cm (6in) square of white wool felt (jumper embellishment, camera and map) Q 10cm (4in) square of orange wool felt (jumper embellishment) Q 15cm (6in) square of light blue wool felt (map and camera Q 10cm (4in) square of red wool felt (camera, map and tomato)

Q 10cm (4in) square of olive green wool felt (map) Q 10cm (4in) square of cream wool felt (sandwich bread) Q 10cm (4in) square of light grey wool felt (camera) Q 10cm (4in) square of yellow wool felt (cheese) Q 10 x 15cm (4 x 6in) latte brown wool felt (sandwich bag) Q Two 7.5mm (5⁄16in) black safety eyes Q Waxed dental floss

Q One 15mm (5⁄8in) blue button (jumper) Q Stranded embroidery thread in red and aqua Q Two 15mm (5⁄8in) ‘bow tie’ sliders (backpack straps) Q 12cm (43⁄4in) brown dress zipper (backpack) Q Set of four 35mm (13⁄8in) bear joints with screws, nuts and disks Q Screwdriver and spanner for joints Q Fibre fill and stuffing tool

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Q Awl (optional) Q Air-erasable marking pen Q Pinking shears (optional) Q Cardboard or template plastic (patterns) Q Sewing machine Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Buttonhole stitch, ladder stitch, whip stitch

Finished size: 30cm (12in) Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. Set your sewing machine to a shorter than usual stitch length to give smoother seams. Remember that you are making a left and right side of the figure, so you will need to reverse (turn over)

Preparation and cutting

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Trace all the shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto paper or template plastic, transferring all the markings and labels. If you’ve used paper, Jennifer recommends gluing the patterns to cardboard for extra accuracy and durability. Cut them out carefully on the lines. To use the templates, lay them right side up on the appropriate wool felts and trace around them with an air-erasable fabric-marking pen. Transfer markings. To trace a pattern in reverse, flip the template over, so that it is right side down on the felt, before tracing around it. Cut the shapes out on the traced lines. From the tan felt, cut: • One body and one in reverse • One side of head and one in reverse • One back of head • One tail and one in reverse • Two rectangles, 12 x 20cm (43⁄4 x 8in) (arms and legs). From the rusty brown felt, cut: • One shell. From the burnt umber felt, cut: • Six small circles (shell spots) • One backpack backing panel • Two rectangles, 2.5 x 16cm (1 x 61⁄4in) (zipper panel) • One rectangle, 5.5 x 18cm (21⁄4 x 7in) (backpack gusset) • Four rectangles, 1.5 x 18cm (5⁄8 x 7in) (upper backpack straps) • Two rectangles, 1.5 x 28cm (5⁄8 x 11in) (lower backpack straps). From the aqua felt, cut: • One jumper front • One jumper back and one in reverse • One rectangle, 2.5 x 24cm (1 x 91⁄2in) (jumper collar). From the lime green felt, cut: • Two jumper sleeves

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some of the templates – this is noted on the patterns. A seam allowance of 5mm (1⁄4in) is used throughout and is included in the patterns. Backstitch at the beginning and end of each seam to secure the stitches. Although felt doesn’t have a true right and wrong side, their appearance sometimes

• One leaf (jumper embellishment) • One lettuce leaf (sandwich). From black felt, cut: • Two rectangles, 6 x 7cm (23⁄8 x 23⁄4in) (camera) • One rectangle, 1.5 x 26cm (5⁄8 x 101⁄4in) (camera strap). From white felt, cut: • One medium circle (jumper embellishment) • One small circle (camera) • One rectangle, 9 x 11cm (31⁄2 x 43⁄8in) (map). From orange felt, cut: • One large circle (jumper embellishment). From the light grey felt, cut: • One rectangle, 3 x 7cm (11⁄4 x 23⁄4in) (camera). From light blue felt, cut: • One rectangle, 8 x 10cm (31⁄8 x 4in) (map) • One rectangle, 1 x 2cm (3⁄8 x 3⁄4in) (camera). From the olive green felt, cut: • One land mass (map) • One small island (map) • One large island (map). From red felt, cut: • One rectangle, 1.5 x 2.5cm (5⁄8 x 1in) (camera) • Two circles about 1cm (3⁄8in) diameter, cut by eye (map) • Two circles about 2cm (3⁄4in) diameter, cut by eye (slices of tomato). From the cream felt, cut: • Two slices of bread (sandwich). From the yellow felt, cut: • A shape similar to the lettuce leaf but slightly smaller (cheese). From the latte brown felt, cut: • Two rectangles, 7 x 8cm (23⁄4 x 1 3 ⁄8in). If you have pinking shears, use them to trim one short edge of each rectangle (sandwich bag).

differs; study each of the felts you are using and decide which side you’ll treat as the ‘right’ side. Instructions are given for using the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

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10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

JENNY’S FELT STITCHING TIPS • Because the seam allowances on this project are quite narrow, always check that you’ve caught both layers of felt in the stitching when sewing two shapes together. • Felt has more body than, say, quilting fabrics, so the seams can need a bit of ‘persuading’ to lie flat. I run the thick end of a chopstick along the seam on the inside of my shapes and push it gently to flatten the seam allowance before stuffing. • Waxed dental floss is a terrific ‘thread’ to use when hand stitching seams through felt – such as joining Tulliver’s head to his body. The wax makes it easy to pull through the layers and less likely to break.

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Match the two body shapes, right sides together. Slip the tail between the two layers where marked on the pattern, with its straight edge extending just a little beyond the curved edge of the body. Check that the darts on the two body shapes match, then pin the shapes together. Sew around the body leaving the straight neck edge and the opening in the back open. Trim the protruding edge of the tail and the seam allowance around the curves. Keep the body wrong side facing out for now. Head Match the two side head shapes and pin them together. Sew from A to B. Sew the dart in the back of head shape in the same way as you did in Step 21 with the body darts. Match the side heads shape from Step 23 with the back of head, right sides together. Pin first at the neck and the centre top of the head, then ease the curved edges between them on each side and pin. Sew around the shape, leaving the neck edge open. Turn right side out. Eyes Use an awl or the point of small sharp embroidery scissors to make small holes in the head at each of the marks for the eyes. Cut out two small circles of tan felt by eye and make small holes in the centre of each one. Gently push the stem of a safety eye through one of the holes in the face. Reach inside the head and put one of the felt circles on the stem, then add the backing piece that comes with the eye onto the stem and push it up to meet the wrong side of the face. Press the eye and backing together firmly to secure them in position. Repeat to fit the second safety eye. Assembly With the body wrong side facing out and the head right side facing out, slip the head into the body through the opening at the top of the body. Make sure that the nose is pointing towards the belly, not the back. Align the centre face seam with the centre seam on the belly. Insert your fingers inside the head and push out towards the

23 24

25 26 Tortoise Arms, legs and tail On one of the 12 x 20cm (43⁄4 x 8in) rectangles of tan felt, trace two legs and two arms, leaving at least 1⁄2in between them. Match this rectangle to the other one, with the traced lines facing up, and pin them together, with the pins in the centre of the shapes so you won’t have to move them as you sew. Sew on the traced lines, leaving the openings where marked. Cut the shapes out 4mm (a little less than 1⁄4in) outside the lines. Clip into the seam allowance around the curves. Turn each limb right side out.

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19

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20

Pin the two tail shapes, right sides together, and sew around the curved edge, leaving the straight edge open. Clip into the seam allowance around the curves. Turn the tail right side out. Body Sew the darts on the body and body reversed shapes. To do this, fold each shape right sides together so that the edges of the dart are aligned. Pin them together, then sew from the outer edge to the point. Before sewing the darts on the body reversed shape, double check that you will be creating a mirror image of the first body shape.

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shoulders so that the raw edges around the neckline on the body and head are aligned. Pin the neckline and sew around it with small neat backstitches using dental floss. (Jennifer says that sewing this seam by hand is much less frustrating than attempting it by machine.) Turn the head and body right side out through the opening in the back. Jointing From scraps of leftover tan felt, cut eight circles about 11⁄2in in diameter by eye. Snip a small hole in the centre of each circle for the bolts to fit through. Each joint consists of two wooden disks, two washers, one bolt, one lock nut and two of these felt circles. Referring to the pattern for placement, make small holes in the inner side of the arms and legs and in the body for the joints using sharp-pointed embroidery scissors. Before making the holes, check that you are creating left and right arms and legs – once the holes are made, they’re there for good! Place a washer onto a bolt, then a wooden disk and then a felt circle. Insert this loaded bolt inside a limb and poke the end through the hole you made for it. Then insert the bolt end through the corresponding hole in the body. Inside the body, slip a felt circle, wooden disk, washer and nut over the bolt end. See Diagram 1. Use a screwdriver and spanner to tighten the joint. Repeat this step for the other three limbs. Adjust the tension on the joints to fine tune them for uniform movement.

Stuffing Stuff the tortoise, beginning with the head. Use small bits of fibre fill and take your time, sculpting the face and body as you work. Continue stuffing the body quite firmly. Close the opening in the back by working ladder stitching with doubled sewing thread. Stuff the arms and legs and close the openings in the same manner as the body. Jumper Pin the large orange circle in the centre of the jumper front. Stitch it in place 3mm (1⁄8in) inside the circumference using matching thread. Repeat to sew the medium white circle in the centre of the orange one. Pin the leaf at an angle across the white circle. Stitch it in place and add some extra lines of stitching for the veins. Take all the thread tails through to the wrong side of the jumper and tie them off securely. Top stitch 5mm (1⁄4in) from the cuff edge on each of the jumper sleeves. Top stitch around three edges of the collar – one long edge and both short ones – in the same manner. Then top stitch close to each angled edge on the jumper back shapes, where marked on the pattern. Pin a sleeve to one side of the jumper front, matching the edges marked shoulder seam and C marks. Sew this seam. Repeat to pin and sew the other sleeve to the other edge of the jumper front.

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JEC

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33

29

34

30

35

31

PRO

36 37

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Tortoise – side view

“My bare essentials - how embarrassing!” Bolt Washer Disk Felt circle Limb Body Felt circle Disk Washer Nut

Jumper – front view

Diagram 1 Homespun

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Jumper – back view Start

Backpack – front view

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Repeat Step 38 to sew the other shoulder seam edge of each sleeve to the shoulder seam edge of the jumper back shapes. Before sewing, double check that the angled edges of each jumper back shape are in the centre on the back of the jumper. Pin the long edge of the collar that you didn’t stitch in Step 37 to the collar edge of the jumper, right sides together. Sew it in place. Fold the jumper and sleeves in half, right sides together. Sew from the cuff end of a sleeve to the underarm, pivot, then sew the side seam down to the bottom edge. Repeat to sew the sleeve and side seam on the other side. Fold the jumper so you can match the short straight edges of the jumper back shapes and sew the centre back seam. Turn the jumper right side out. Sew a line of stitching 5mm (1⁄4in) from the bottom edge all the way around the jumper. Overlap the edges of the upper jumper back and collar and mark where you will position the button and buttonhole. Use small sharp embroidery scissors to cut a slit in the collar just large enough for the button. Work buttonhole stitch by hand in matching thread around this

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44

40

45

41

46

42

47

43

Diagram 2

cut to prevent stretching. Sew the button to the other end of the collar. Rotate Tulliver’s arms up. Gently pull the jumper over his head and push his arms into the sleeves. Do up the button.

Shell and backpack

Repeat the method from Steps 34-36 to appliqué six small circles to the shell where marked on the pattern. Sew the darts on the shell by folding the shell, right sides together, to match the edges of a dart and sew from the edge to the point. Unfold the shell, then re-fold it to match the edges of the next dart, and so on. Pin a 2.5 x 16cm (1 x 61⁄2in) rectangle of burnt umber felt to one long edge of the zipper tape, right sides together. Stitch. Repeat to sew the other rectangle to the other long edge of the zipper tape. Fold the felt rectangles over so that they are right side facing up and finger press them flat. Top stitch along each strip of felt close to the seams you’ve just sewn – this will help keep the zipper panel flat. Trim the panel – the zipper tape and the felt rectangles – 1.5cm (5⁄8in) past the metal stops on the zipper at each end. Measure the

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width of your zipper panel. It needs to be the same width as the burnt umber gusset rectangle; if they’re different widths, trim the wider one to match the narrower one. Sew one short end of the gusset rectangle to one end of the zipper panel, right sides together. Then sew the other end of the gusset rectangle to the other end of the zipper panel to make a band of felt+zipper. Match the upper backpack strips in pairs, wrong sides together. On each pair of strips, top stitch down one long edge: start 3mm (1⁄8in) from one short edge and work 3mm (1⁄8in) away from the long raw edge until you’re about 12mm (1⁄2in) from the other short end, then curve towards the centre. With the needle down, pivot to curve back to the opposite long edge and then up the other side, and across that short end to your starting point, as shown in Diagram 2. Trim the felt 3mm (1⁄8in) outside the curved stitching to create a tapered end to the felt strips. Feed one end of a lower backpack strip through the bow tie slider and move the slide along the felt until it is in the centre of the strip. Fold the strip in half, short

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ends matching. Start 3mm (1⁄8in) from the raw short ends, top stitch down one long edge as you did in Step 49 until you’re about 1.5cm (5⁄8in) from the slider. Pivot, stitch across the width to the other long edge, then back up to the starting point, as shown in Diagram 3. Repeat with the second lower backpack strip. Pin the four backpack strips to the backpack backing panel where marked on the pattern, referring to Diagram 4. Work two lines of stitching near the end of each strip. Pin one edge of the gusset to the edge of the shell with the zipper panel centred around its top edge, right sides

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together, then sew it in place. Open the zipper. Pin the other edge of gusset to the backing panel with the upper straps at the top, near the zipper. Fold the straps and pin them to the centre of the backing panel to keep them clear of the edges, then sew this seam. Turn the backpack right side out through the zippered opening. Thread the tapered end of each upper strap through the slider and adjust their length. Fit the backpack on Tulliver.

Start

54 Map

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Pin the green land mass to the blue ocean rectangle, matching three straight edges. Pin the two islands in place. Top stitch them 3mm (1⁄8in) inside their raw edges. Add some additional stitching for creeks and mountains. Work running stitches by hand to add the beginning and end points of Tulliver’s hike and the path between them. Centre the blue rectangle on the white one and top stitch it in place 3mm (1⁄8in) inside its raw edge.

Diagram 3

Diagram 4

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Sandwich

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Camera

Lay the lettuce leaf, cheese and slices of tomato on one of the slices of bread and arrange them a little haphazardly. Lay the other slice of bread on top so that its edges match those of the underlying slice of bread and when you’re happy with the look, top stitch around the upper slice of bread to hold the layers together. Match the two sandwich bags together and top stitch around three edges. If you’ve used pinking shears to trim one short edge, this is the edge to leave open. Pop the sandwich in the bag.

Map

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Camera

Sandwich

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Lay the grey rectangle on top of a black one with three edges matching and top

Backpack – back view


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Getting to know … JENNIFER GOLDSMITH How much time to do you spend creating your wonderful toys? I wish I could say that I have my nose to the felty grindstone every working day. Unfortunately, I do tend to get a bit distracted at times. It’s easy to work away at creating when the ideas are flowing and all the other life bits and bobs are bubbling away nicely. It’s all about finding a happy balance that works for me and my family. I do try to work at least four days a week, while the kids are at school. How can you bear to part with them? When I first started to make my own designs, it was the easiest thing in the world to send my softies and such out into the world. That was what they were made for and, for the most part, I was making to order. You can’t keep everything – not if you don’t want to be buried under felt, fluff and stuff! I think that’s why I decided to try my hand at sharing my designs as patterns. It allows me to dream, trouble shoot, tweak and perfect an idea (which are my favourite bits) and move on to the next one while still having the satisfaction of seeing my work going out into the world to be enjoyed by others. Where do most completed softies go? Prototypes ALWAYS go to the children. They have some crazy little one-offs in their collections. Oddly enough, they tend to prefer them to the final designs. These days, most of my finished works are bought by people who like what I do enough to want to own a little bit of it. Being able to offer artist-made originals is one of the great pleasures of doing what I do. I sell them through my Etsy and Madeit stores. It’s nice to know that there are little clutches of my critters all over the world. Many of them are not alone. People often collect more than one. It’s one of the biggest compliments when someone comes back to buy “just one more”. I’m terribly thankful to everyone who buys one of my creations. I just wish I could go to some of the places my toys do! What are the plans for the future of your crafting business? I’m never very good at

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thinking of what I do as a business because it’s just ‘what I do’. I’m also a bit hindered by the fact that I suffer from Shiny Things Syndrome. I’m easily inspired and I tend to get distracted very easily by the next thing. I always finish each design or softie that I start but I have to admit that business direction has always been a juggling act for me. At times, I think the future for me is pattern design and only pattern design … but then patterns have to be distributed, and I’m only one person and that market is so huge. Then I think perhaps my happy place is making one-off creations … but then you need to market them, too, and while you’re doing that, you’re not making. Is this what they call a swings-androundabouts situation? At the moment, I just do a little from Column A and a little from Column B and hope that everyone is happy. I’d love to find a crafting business mentor one day and explore the full potential of these silly little creations that live in my imagination. I’d also like to dabble in fabric design, whether it be through digital printing using Spoonflower or more home-based printing, like block or screen printing. Oh! I’d like to write and illustrate a children’s story book, too … and make the characters of the books into softies. If truth be told, there are too many things on my to-do list! Have you got a favourite part of toy making? I really love it when the character and story of the softie reveal themselves as I work my way through my making process. Everything I make starts as a crazy pencil sketch. Often on the back of someone’s homework or an envelope to hand. I’ve actually had to wait until Monday to continue with one design because my scratchings were handed in by my child at school on Friday and I needed to wait for the teacher to hand them back. Goodness knows what she would have thought if she’d turned the page over. In my scribbles, the softie is usually doing something or is wearing something quite distinctive. That’s when a penguin dons a flight helmet to fly or a tortoise packs his shell with a camera and sandwich, and my pattern-making skills have to run to catch up. In my mind, he stops being a toy and he starts being a tortoise that’s not too distantly related (because tortoises live for such a very long time) to Darwin’s own globetrotting Harriet. Maybe he’s heard of her through his Aunty Enid’s stories and feels he has inherited some of her wanderlust? From here my process turns to … if he were to wander what would he need? Well, he’d need a map, for sure, and something to eat. Would he need binoculars? Of course … but maybe a bit hard to fashion accurately from felt, so he’d definitely need a camera to take snaps. Inserting character and humour into something that would never have existed if you hadn’t taken the time to sit

and make it takes creating to the next level for me. Meeting a new softie’s personality is a delight. Another aspect that brings me joy – although others may find it odd – is when something like a head gusset just fits! First time! No juggling! I love that, because a lot of what I do in the early stages of a design is often only judged by eye. I think I see it as a good omen. I’ve been known to have ‘sit back moments’ when the lines I’ve drawn on paper correspond perfectly when they make the leap to 3D. It’s a relief and a moment of joy at the same time. How long do they take to make? How long is a piece of string? Sometimes, sitting and making a new design can take weeks. Things don’t fit, fabrics are just not right or the lines just don’t translate to 3D the way you’d hoped. Often, these designs turn out to be the best, because they’re the ones you give the most thought and time to. Although I have been known to design, make and write the pattern in a matter of a couple of days. Perhaps timing is more down to planetary alignment than my skill with needles and sharp things. What’s your idea of the perfect crafting weekend? For me, crafting always happens at home. It’s my happy place and where all my materials are to hand. I’m always happy to have people join me to sew and, in fact, am probably more productive myself when people are around. Creating with friends is a wonderful way to pass time. I find that I’m always more inspired when I have a house full of people and the jug is boiling for tea to go with a piece of cake. The quiet and solitude of an empty room do nothing for my creative thoughts. Does your family get involved much? As far as making Frazzy Dazzles tick, it’s mostly down to me. With that being said, there’s nothing like a 14-year-old boy to help you with tech support. When things crash and important files can’t be found, I call for him and, in moments, the world is good and green again. Hubby troubleshoots other technical hiccups for me, helps me stay on track with planning what I’m doing next and acts as a sounding board for me when I need it. He’s terribly good to me. He also doubles wonderfully as courier. He travels around the countryside for work and has been known on more than one occasion to deliver patterns along the way. Our daughter is in charge of encouraging words. She loves every softie that rolls off the machine and has a good eye for colour and line. I often ask her thoughts on what I’m making, and she always comes back with useful and honest opinions. You can’t buy that kind of input! Whether they know it or not, I couldn’t do any of what I do without my family. They believe in me and support me in a hundred different ways every day.


stitch close to its bottom edge. Pin the red rectangle about 1cm (3⠄8in) inside the top and right edges of the grey one. Pin the light blue rectangle in the centre of it. Top stitch just inside the edge of the light blue rectangle to secure everything together. Top stitch the white circle next for the lens. Fold the black camera strap in half, long edges matching. Sew close to the long raw edges. Pin the ends of the strap to the upper edge of the camera front 1cm (3⠄8in) in from the top corners. Check that the strap doesn’t have any twists in it. Baste across the ends

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of the strap to hold them in place, then remove the pins. Lay the other black rectangle on top of the camera front, right sides together. The strap should be between the two layers and away from the edges so it isn’t caught in the seam. Sew around the edge of the camera, leaving a 2cm (3⠄4in) opening in the bottom edge. Turn the camera right side out and stuff it lightly. Ladder stitch the opening closed.

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For contact details for Jennifer Goldsmith, of Frazzy Dazzles, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

“Time for me to head for home.�

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ichelle Holmes’ romantic stables studio is actually part of a creative co-op of jeweller, ceramist, blacksmith, baker, dressmaker, painter and model-maker. A candlestick-maker would complete the picture beautifully, but alas … Still, the scenery (serene rural England, grand manors, church steeples) and stables setting (all cobbly and charming) is storybook perfect. Or as Michelle says, “It has a very English look about it – a little Jane Austen, to be honest.” A LITTLE Jane Austen??? Good grief, she even has newts and baby wagtails strolling into her studio. And isn’t that Mansfield Park in the background? We should apologise in advance to all those readers, designers and stitchers out there who have to make do with regular rooms (or even just corners of regular rooms) for their sewing. They may find it unsettling to stack their surroundings up against Michelle’s fabulous Archangel Studios. But this is simply too lovely not to share. And, prepare yourself, because Michelle’s following description only rubs salt into the studio wounds. “The workshop is deep in the countryside. You take a single-track lane, which winds through fields and little woods to one side and a stream to the other. An area near to the centre is now part of the National Forest, so there are quite large stretches of trees. I often see deer, rabbits, pheasants, badgers and skylarks as I drive down and return home. There are no street lights, so the stars in winter are very bright and the moon is often to the left of the lane as I drive home. It seems to dance along the hillside. The stable block is Georgian. It used to house horses and estate workers. Now, there are workshops. My window looks down towards the main house, Staunton Harold Hall. There is a lake to the front of the house and lawns. Swans and moorhens happily live on the lake. A church sits next to the house, which is owned by the National Trust. The courtyard is well sheltered from the winds and catches lots of sunshine. In the summer, I sometimes start the day with a cup of Earl Grey outside on a bench and have a chat with Janet the Jeweller.”

Welcome to my

WORKROOM

What do you do after the horses have bolted? Fret or think a little creatively? Let’s turn to the inspirational MICHELLE HOLMES for the ultimate solution – a fabulously moody old-stables studio that puts all others in the shade. By Susan Hurley 92

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Photography: Steve Bond Images

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“It’s a little Jane Austen, to be honest”

STORYBO O STABLES K

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Why a nag would choose to bolt in the first place is unfathomable. But that was donkey’s years ago, and the Ferrers Centre, as it is known, has been operating successfully ever since. Michelle Holmes has worked here for the past 14 years. “I actually grew up in a small village not far from here. I used to ride my bike onto the estate and loved the walled garden; it still had ancient greenhouses and little doorways, and I used to think it was like something out of The Secret Garden book.” Capturing that child’s imagination has ultimately led to stitched artworks that now capture the hearts of viewers. Michelle is a fine embroiderer who paints pictures of dreamy blue moons and windswept beaches, complete with gulls and lighthouses, using just fabric and thread. And stay tuned to Homespun for a Designer Edge feature about Michelle and her wonderful Miss Betty series of embroideries. They tell wondrous stitched tales of a sweet little

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A FEW OF MY FAVOURITE THINGS

character who has come to life via Michelle’s imagination and skill. Sketches of observed characters, buildings and wildlife are the starting points for her “embroidered worlds”. Linen, cotton, silk and heavy-weight calico are the foundations for building her stitched wonders. Onto these Michelle adds patches, dyes, appliqués and embroideries – piecing and layering until she reaches the charming complexity that characterises her work. The resultant art pieces are not only expertly executed, they are hauntingly nostalgic, snatching at dusty recollections tucked somewhere at the back of your consciousness. “They are

fragments of my vision and my journey,” says Michelle. “I think they resonate with viewers because they bring back memories. It’s very exciting for me when this happens. As I have got older, I think I put more of my own story into the pieces. I open my studio to the public several days a week, so I’m able to see people’s responses to the work.” The studio the public is stepping into is as captivating as they works they are viewing. Most of the furniture has been bought for next to nothing from places that were closing or churches getting rid of pews – and very often the items are connected in some way to sewing. There are a couple of lovely old desks,

THE HABERDASHERY CABINET – I got it from Boons, a Leicestershire haberdashery shop that was closing after many years. It’s made from oak, glass and brass and has gold leaf on its feet – love the worn quality of the gold leaf. Part of its charm is that the lady who owned the shop polished the brass trim every week until it shone. MY PERUSING DESK – I bought it at The Bothy, which is a little antique/ reclamation/gardening shop. It’s 19th century and would have been a clerk’s desk. I like the solidness of it and the patina of the wood. It is a lovely burntumber colour and perfect for laying work on to check composition. THE TAILOR’S TABLE – Originally from a Leicester tailoring business that had run for three generations. The wedges that hold the legs together and the scores of little marks and writing in the top, marking out cutting sizes, only add to its charm. NORFOLK STORAGE TINS – I’ve collected tins since childhood. And I now keep buttons and ribbons in them. THREAD CABINET – My mother’s friend found this. It had belonged to a shop in a nearby village, which, again, was closing. It has two drawers and is oak and has compartments inside for the threads. There is gold and black lettering on the back. Once upon a time, it would have sat on a shop counter. I keep special threads in it.

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a bishop’s chair reclaimed from an old church and an ex-haberdashery-shop cabinet. “It has 16 drawers with brass handles and is oak and glass. It’s so evocative of tailors and outfitters, and I love it. I also have a work table, which is a new addition, from a tailor in Leicester who was closing down after being in the same building for three generations. I love this table. It has marks and grooves in the top, and I just think about all the suits that have been cut out on it … the skills and the craftsmanship it has witnessed.” There is, of course, an old stable door leading 96

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to the workshop side of the studio, which has one window overlooking the imposing Staunton Harold Hall (not Mansfield Park, after all!). “A holly tree is outside this window, and I have put a bird feeder onto a branch so I can watch the birds as I make a cup of tea. “The main shortcoming is the cold. The ceilings are very high, and the door wide, as it was originally made for horses to pass through. The floors are stone, too, so in winter, I have to wrap up in lots of layers. “The aesthetic has evolved quite naturally over the years. I didn’t set


out with a definite plan. It is very much a working space. I like the idea that there are a few beautiful solid pieces and then other things just come and go, like collections of twigs or shells or postcards. In that sense, it’s a bit like my work – there tends to be solid patches of appliqué with lighter drawings overlayed.” Find out more about Michelle Holmes by visiting www.archangelstudio.co.uk or www.facebook.com/MichelleHolmes Embroidery. Or you can email her direct on michelle@archangelstudio.co.uk. Homespun

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CK QUI CH STIT

SILHOUETTE PETS CUSHION

In cartoons, they’d be hissing, barking and chasing. On Jessie Fincham’s doubledesign cushion, they’re the most compatible of critters – on one side blue stripes with a dachshund sporting a neckerchief and, on the other, pink gingham framing a bowed cat. Quick to make. Cute as anything to decorate with.

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Materials: Q 2 fat quarters of fabrics Q Scraps of black felt Q Handsome scraps of fabric and ribbon Q 30cm (12in) zip Q 40cm (16in) insert

Here’s how:

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Cut a 43cm (17in) square from both fat quarters for the cushion sections. Using a crayon, transfer the dog and cat (see templates on our Pattern Sheet) onto black felt and cut out. Transfer the neckerchief template onto the fabric scrap, cut out and secure to the felt dog using straight stitch. Tie a ribbon bow around the cat and trim the ends. Find the centre of the cushion by folding diagonally, then diagonally again. Pin the cat to the centre and sew around, 3mm (1⁄8in) from the edge. Repeat for the dog on the other fat quarter square.

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With right sides facing and using a longer stitch length, sew along one side of the cushion, 2.5cm (1in) from the edge. Iron the seam open. Pin the zip in place on the central seam, with it facing up towards the seam. Using a zipper foot, sew a straight line at either side of the zip, carefully guiding it to correctly align. Turn and sew the sides of the zip to box it in (see diagram). Use a seam ripper to remove the stitches from the central seam. This will expose the zip. With the zip at least half open, continue to sew the remaining three sides, using a 2.5cm (1in) seam allowance. Trim the corners, sew a zigzag stitch to prevent any fraying, and then trim the edges further using pinking shears. Turn the cushion right sides out, push out the corners and put the cushion insert inside.

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50

MAKES

Edited by Ame Verso

Edited by Ame Verso

This sweet project is just one of many lovely stitching ideas featured in a new book called 50 Fat Quarter Makes, edited by Ame Verso and published by David and Charles. It is distributed locally by Capricorn Link (Australia) and is available from leading craft outlets or by mail order – phone (02) 4560 1600 or email sales@capricornlink.com.au.

FAT QUARTER MAKES

RTERS MADE USING FAT QUA FIFTY SEWING PROJECTS 1/26/15 12:12 PM

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In the scheme of garden quilts, Katrina Hadjimichael’s design is more Versailles than urban courtyard. You can practically picture Marie Antoinette sweeping through its elaborate borders. Hence the French name and its splendid regal formality.

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Materials Q Fat quarter of light tan print fabric (centre block background) Q 65cm (3⁄4yd) dark cream print fabric (appliqué background) Q 70cm (3⁄4yd) red mottled print fabric (Borders 3 and 5) Q 1m (11⁄8yd) dark green print fabric (Borders 7 and 9) Q 2.3m (21⁄2yd) floral print fabric (Border 10 and binding) – see Note Q 20cm-30cm (1⁄4-3⁄8yd) of fabrics in a range of green, red, blue, orange and brown print fabrics (piecing and appliqué) 102

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– see Katrina’s Fabric Selection Tips Q Fusible web Q Tear-away stabiliser, such as Vilene Stitch and Tear Q Machine threads to match the appliqué fabrics Q 2.5m (25⁄8yd) extra-wide backing fabric – see Note Q Batting at least 240cm (94in) square Q 9mm (3⁄8in) bias tape maker (appliqué stems) Q 5mm (1⁄4in) wide fusible tape (optional) – see Katrina’s Fusible Tape Tip Q Cardboard (circle templates) Q Rotary cutter, ruler and cutting mat

Q Sharp 2B pencil Q Sewing machine with ¼in foot Q General sewing supplies Finished size: 224cm (88in) square Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that all fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabrics 102cm (42in) wide except for the extra-wide backing fabric, which is 275cm (108in) wide. A seam allowance of 1⁄4in is used throughout for the piecing. The appliqué method used is fusible web

with machine blanket stitch, but the instructions can be readily adapted for other techniques. Katrina’s floral print fabric for the outer border was cut across the width of the fabric and joined. If you prefer to cut border strips down the length of the fabric so that there won’t be any seams in them, you will need to buy just a little more fabric – 2.4m (23⁄4yd). In Step 52, cut the border and binding strips down the length of the fabric, not across it. Instructions are given for using the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Centre appliqué block

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From the light tan print fabric, cut: • One square, 13in (background). Trace the appliqué shapes for the centre block from the Pattern Sheet onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving about 1⁄2in between them. Cut them out outside the traced lines. Cut out the centres of the larger shapes, leaving about 1⁄4in of fusible web inside the traced lines. See Diagram 1. Reducing the amount of fusible web behind the appliqué shapes makes the finished quilt less stiff. Even if you decide not to bother for most of the shapes, it’s important that you do this for the centre oval and the large red flowers, given their size and the layering of other shapes on top of them. Select the fabric for each shape and fuse the shape to the wrong side of it. Katrina used the dark cream print fabric for the appliquéd centre oval. Cut each shape out carefully on the line. Remove the backing paper from the oval. Fold the tan square in half in each direction and finger press to lightly crease it. Do the same with the oval. Position the oval on the background square, matching centre creases and press with a warm, dry iron to fuse it in place. Centre a 12in square of stabiliser on the

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wrong side of the background fabric and pin it in place. Thread the sewing machine with thread to match the oval and set it up for machine blanket stitch. Sew a sample piece in the same fabrics to check that the length and width of the stitch is suitable for the size of the shape being appliquéd, and that the tension is correct. If your machine doesn’t have a blanket stitch, you may be able to adjust the blind hem stitch to a very short stitch length and wider than usual width to mimic the effect. Otherwise, use a small zigzag stitch with the length and width set to about 2. Sew around the oval with the stitch covering the edge of appliqué fabric. Pivot the fabric with the needle down on the outside of the shape to sew around the curves. Arrange the shapes for the flowers and leaves on the oval and background, referring to the photograph as a guide. Fuse them in place. Repeat Steps 6-7 to blanket stitch around all raw edges of the appliqué shapes using threads to match or complement your chosen appliqué fabrics. Carefully tear away the stabiliser from the wrong side of the block. Trim the background square to 121⁄2in keeping the design centred.

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Border 1

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From your assortment of print fabrics, choose eight light fabrics and eight medium-dark print fabrics. From each fabric, cut: • One square, 51⁄4in. Cut each square twice across the diagonals, yielding four quarter-square triangles from each one. Only two of each will be used in this border. Put the others aside until Step 41. To make an Hourglass block, you will need a set of two light triangles cut from the same fabric and two medium-dark triangles cut from the same fabric. Sort your triangles into 16 of these sets – one for each Hourglass block. To make each block, join each light triangle to a medium-dark triangle along one short edge. Press the seam towards the darker triangle. Then sew the two pieced triangles together, matching the centre seam. See Diagram 2. Your blocks should measure 41⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Lay out the Hourglass blocks around the edges of the centre block, referring to Diagram 3. Note that every second block has been rotated 90 degrees. When you have an array of colours and prints that you like, sew the three Hourglass blocks on the left and right of the centre block

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Diagram 1

Diagram 2 Homespun

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Diagram 3

together in two columns. Join the columns to the left and right edges of the centre block. Press. Join the remaining Hourglass blocks in two rows of five blocks each, then sew them to the top and bottom edges of the centre block, carefully matching seams. Your quilt should now measure 201⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

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Border 2

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From the remaining dark cream print fabric, cut: • Two strips, 7in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut each strip to yield two rectangles, 7 x 21in (appliqué background). Fold each strip in half in each direction and finger press to lightly crease it. Lay each strip over the Border 2 appliqué pattern on the Pattern Sheet, aligning the creases with the broken lines. Use a sharp

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pencil to lightly trace the lines for the stems on to the right side of the fabric. From an orange print fabric, cut: • Eight bias strips, 7⁄8 x 9in (stems). Working at your ironing board, feed a fabric strip into lower part of the bias tape maker and the 5mm (1⁄4in) fusible tape into the upper groove with the paper side facing up. See Diagram 4. Pin the end of the strip to the ironing board after it emerges from the bias tape maker, then pull the bias tape maker along the strip of fabric with one hand and press the fabric with an iron in the other. This creates a strip that has the raw edges folded into the centre on the wrong side of the fabric with fusible tape fused to it. Repeat for all the bias strips for the stems. Peel the backing paper off each stem strip and position it in place along a traced line on the dark

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Diagram 5

cream fabric. The stem should extend past the traced lines a little at each end, so that its raw ends will be covered by the flower and buds. Fuse each stem in place, then appliqué it. Trace one large and one small circle from the Pattern Sheet onto paper. Cut them out roughly and glue them to cardboard. When the glue has dried, cut them out accurately and smoothly on the lines. Trace around the circles on the wrong side of your fabric, leaving 1⁄2in between them. You will need to trace eight large circles and 16 small ones. Cut the shapes out of fabric by eye ¼in outside the traced line. Work a line of running stitch close to the edge of the fabric shape, centre the appropriate cardboard circle on the wrong side of the fabric and pull up the thread to gather the edge over the cardboard. See Diagram 5. Fasten the thread. Press the circle well from both

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Getting to know … KATRINA HADJIMICHAEL Do you teach your skills to others? I have been teaching my own original quilt designs for the past 14 years at various shops around Sydney. My two sons are now old enough to look after themselves (for short periods!), so I’m now able to travel a bit further to teach. I have enjoyed teaching at AQC, in Melbourne, and the SA Quilt Encounter, in Adelaide, as well as visiting Victor Harbor, Wodonga and Broken Hill. Does your teaching help build crafting communities? In January this year, I travelled to Palmerston North, in New Zealand, to

sides, loosen the stitching and remove the cardboard. Repeat this step to prepare all of the appliqué circles. Repeat the processes you used for the centre block to complete the appliqué on each dark cream strip. Trim the strips to measure 61⁄2 x 201⁄2in with the appliquéd centred. Sew a strip to the left and right edges of the quilt with the stems curving towards the centre block. Press. From your assortment of print fabrics, choose four light fabrics and four medium-dark print fabrics. From each fabric, cut: • One square, 71⁄4in. Cut each square twice across the diagonals, yielding four quarter-square triangles from each one. You will only use two of them in this border. Repeat the process described in Steps 11-12 to make four large Hourglass blocks. They should measure 61⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

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teach at the 2015 NZ Quilt Symposium. This was a fabulous experience, being part of a large contingent of tutors who taught a huge number of enthusiastic quilters. I am finding wherever I go, quilters speak the same language and share that love of buying and sharing great fabric, cutting it up and assembling it again into a work of art. Quilters instantly have a connection to each other that transcends age, culture and status. What’s your studio space like? I have a very small house with a confined sewing space – not a studio at all. I’m in the middle of all family activity, but this allows me to be cooking dinner, with the washing machine going, while I quickly fussy cut a few hexagons. Yes, my life is busy and a bit crazy! Do you like to work on lots of projects at once? I used to work on more embroidery projects, especially cross stitch, but now I only have time for patchwork. I usually have at least one major machine-pieced project on the go and several hand-appliqué projects in various stages of development. I am very busy with constant pending deadlines for quilt shows and magazine commissions. Does technology play a part in your design process? I love to access the computer, especially to search images of historic designs: stained glass, mosaic tiles, architecture etc. I often use historic designs as inspiration for a starting point for a new quilt. I find that, once I begin, further

inspiration comes and the quilt will tell me what it needs next. I also use my Electric Quilt 7 software program to check that measurements will work and arrange the colour placement. Your Jane Austen series has been a great success, hasn’t it? My most successful venture has been my Jane Austen Quilt Collection – so far, a series of seven completed quilts named after the houses and places featured in Jane Austen’s novel, Pride and Prejudice. These quilts have a definite antique flavour and feature lots of hand appliqué and English paper piecing. They’ve been hugely popular with my students and have afforded me many opportunities to travel and share my love of appliqué, particularly hexagons. In September, I travelled to the United Kingdom to accompany a tour based in Bath – called ‘The Life and Times of Jane Austen’ and organised by Whitecroft Traditional Tours. A number of my students came on the trip. Very exciting. Another recent venture has been to offer my Pemberley quilt pattern for sale through Riley Blake fabrics. Sue Daley has designed a new range of fabric called ‘Pemberley: In the Era of Jane’ for Penny Rose fabrics, which was launched in May and goes on sale soon in Australia. Do you take any stitching with you when you travel? I do take my hand sewing while travelling, but I haven’t perfected doing hexagons on the plane yet!

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Join an Hourglass block to each end of the remaining two appliquéd strips, referring to the photograph for the correct orientation of the blocks. Then sew these strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Your quilt should now measure 321⁄2in square.

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From the red mottled print fabric, cut: • Nine strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Put five of them aside for Border 6. Trim two of the remaining strips to 321⁄2in and the last two to 361⁄2in. Join the 321⁄2in strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Press. Join the 361⁄2in strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Your quilt should now measure 361⁄2in square. Border 5 is made from 28 Uneven Nine-patch blocks: 14 light blocks and 14 dark. Katrina made a pair of matching blocks from each fabric combination that she used.

To make a pair of Light Uneven Nine-patch blocks for Border 4, choose one light fabric and one medium-dark fabric from your assortment. From the light fabric, cut: • Two rectangles, 2 x 81⁄2in (A) • One rectangle, 31⁄2 x 71⁄2in (D). From the medium-dark fabric, cut: • One rectangle, 31⁄2 x 81⁄2in (B) • Two rectangles, 2 x 71⁄2in (C). Sew a light A strip to both long edges of the B dark strip.

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Diagram 6 Homespun

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31⁄2in C

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Diagram 7

Light Uneven Nine-patch Block Assembly Diagram

Dark Uneven Nine-patch Block Assembly Diagram

KATRINA’S FABRIC SELECTION TIPS • When selecting fabrics for a new quilt project, I like to think of a word or two that will describe the theme or ‘flavour’ of the quilt – such as ‘heritage’, ‘spring’ or ‘soft and lacy’. As I consider each fabric for the quilt, I ask myself whether that word applies to it or not – and if it doesn’t, then I don’t include it in my selection. • The success of this quilt depends on choosing a variety of large- and small-scale prints as well as tone-on-tone prints in a range of tones from very light to deep rich colours to give good contrast in the design.

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Crosscut the strip set into four segments, 2in, as shown in Diagram 6. Sew a dark C strip to both long edges of the light D strip. Crosscut the strip into two segments, 31⁄2in, as shown in Diagram 7. Referring to the Light Uneven Nine-patch Block Assembly Diagram, sew an AB segment to the left and right edges of each CD segment to complete the blocks. They should measure 61⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. Repeat Steps 30-34 to make a total 14 blocks – seven pairs of matching blocks. The Dark Uneven Nine-patch blocks are made in exactly the same way – simply substitute dark fabrics where you previously used light ones and light ones where you previously used dark ones. Make a total of 14 blocks – seven pairs of matching blocks – referring to the Dark Uneven Nine-patch Block Assembly Diagram. Lay out the Uneven Ninepatch blocks around the edges of the quilt, alternating light and dark blocks. When you have an arrangement that you like, join the six blocks on each of the left and right edges of the quilt in two columns, then sew them to the quilt. Press. Join the remaining blocks in two rows of eight, then sew these rows to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Your quilt should now measure 481⁄2in square. Join the five red strips you cut in Step 27 end to end to make one long strip. From it, cut: • Two strips, 21⁄2 x 481⁄2in • Two strips, 21⁄2 x 521⁄2in. Join the shorter strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Then join the longer strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Your quilt should now measure 521⁄2in square.

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Lay them out around the edge of the quilt, rotating every second block. When you have an array of colours and prints that you like, join the 13 blocks on each of the left and right edges of the quilt in two columns, then sew them to the quilt. Press. Join the remaining blocks in two rows of 15, then sew these rows to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Your quilt should now measure 601⁄2in square. From the dark green print fabric, cut: • 14 strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Put seven of them aside for Border 9. Join the remaining seven together end to end to make one long strip. From it, cut: • Two strips, 21⁄2 x 601⁄2in • Two strips, 21⁄2 x 641⁄2in. Put aside the remainder of the strip until Step 50. Join the shorter strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Then join the longer strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Your quilt should now measure 641⁄2in square. From the remaining assortment of print fabrics, cut: • 34 squares, 41⁄2in of light fabrics • 34 squares, 41⁄2in of medium-dark fabrics. Lay them out around the edge of the quilt, alternating the light and dark squares. When you have an array of colours and prints that you like, join the 16 squares on each of the left and right edges of the quilt in two columns, then sew them to the quilt. Press. Join the remaining blocks in two rows of 18, then sew these rows to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. Join the seven dark green strips you put aside in Step 44 and the left over part of the strip from Step 45 end to end to make one long strip. Measure your quilt vertically through the centre. Trim two strips this length from the long strip. Sew the strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Measure your quilt horizontally through the centre. Trim two strips this length from the long strip.

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From your assortment, choose 28 light fabrics and 28 mediumdark fabrics. Repeat Steps 10-13 to make a total of 56 small Hourglass blocks that measure 41⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. You could use the surplus triangles from Step 10 to make some of the blocks if you wish.

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Sew them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press. From the floral print fabric, cut: • Nine strips, 61⁄2in across the width of the fabric (Border 10) • 10 strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding). Repeat Steps 50-51 to add Border 10 to the quilt using the 61⁄2in floral strips.

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Finishing

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The quilt top, backing fabric and batting are now ready to take to a long-arm quilter. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth out the backing fabric on the floor, right side down, and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top, ensuring it is smooth. Lay the quilt top, right side up, over the batting and baste the three layers together with thread or safety pins. Quilt as desired. Katrina’s quilt was professionally machine quilted by Veronica Appleyard of Appleyard Cottage Quilting using a continuous edge-to-edge curving design. Trim the excess batting and backing ¼in outside the raw edge of the outer border. Join the binding strips you cut in Step 52, end to end, to make one long strip and press the seams open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the quilt with a ¼in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 49 for details. Turn the binding over and hand stitch it to the back of the quilt. Then you can label and date your quilt.

55 56 57 KATRINA’S FUSIBLE TAPE TIP If you’re unable to source a roll

KATRINA’S STRIP PIECING TIP When I make strip

of 5mm (1⁄4in) fusible tape or your bias tape maker doesn’t have the upper slot to accommodate it, simply cut strips 1⁄4in wide from sheets of fusible web. Feed the fabric through the bias tape maker and press it. Then fuse the strips of fusible tape to the wrong side of the bias strip of fabric. This is more fiddly than working with a roll of fusible tape and feeding it through the bias tape maker, but it will work just as well.

sets and cut segments from them, as I needed to do for the Uneven Nine-patch blocks in Border 4, I always cut the strips a little bit longer than necessary. That means that I don’t have to be absolutely precise in aligning the short edges of the strips as I join them – I’ve given myself a little bit of ‘wiggle room’ to trim the ends of the strip sets straight before I cut the segments from them.

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For contact details for Katrina Hadjimichael or Veronica Appleyard, of Appleyard Cottage Quilting, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine. Homespun

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MEOW AT THE MOON

Hounds howling is soooo last night! Raquel Blasco much prefers the sweetness of silhouetted cats basking in heavenly moonlight, and she has bagged the idea in multicoloured felt. 110

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Materials Q 50cm ( ⁄8yd) china red wool felt (bag) Q 40cm (1⁄2yd) mottled straw wool felt (bag) Q 25cm (3⁄8yd) English mustard wool felt (flower petals and waves) Q 15cm (1⁄4yd) wool felt in each of frosted green (waves and roof tiles) and green (waves) 5

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Q 10cm (1⁄8yd) wool felt in each of ocean and peacock blue (waves and flower petals) Q 25cm (10in) square of wool felt in purple heather (oval and large cat) Q Scraps of felt in marble (moon) and grape (small cat) Q Stranded embroidery thread to match the

purple heather and grape felts Q Perle No 12 cotton in red, aqua, grey and yellow-green Q Two red felt-covered buttons, 15mm (5⁄8in) (bag sides) Q Six red wooden buttons, 18mm (3⁄4in) (flowers) Q One red wooden button, 22mm (1in) (flowers)

Q One 15mm (5⁄8in) magnetic sew-in snap closure Q Two wooden bag handles, 14cm (51⁄2in) wide at their base Q Four 10mm (3⁄8in) bag feet Q Fusible web Q Freezer paper Q Template plastic and permanent-marking pen

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Finished size: 25cm high x 38cm wide x 9cm deep (10 x 15 x 31⁄2in)

Q Heat-erasable fabricmarking pen (such as a Pilot Frixion pen) Q Fabric appliqué glue Q Hole punch Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Q General sewing supplies

Stitches used: Blanket stitch, running stitch, straight stitch, whip stitch Note: Read all instructions before starting the project.

Requirements are based on felt 90cm (36in) wide. Although felt doesn’t have a true right and wrong side, their appearance sometimes differs; study each of the felts you are using and decide which side you’ll treat as the ‘right’ side. Instructions are provided in both metric

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Preparation and cutting

Trace the shapes for the bag (A/D) and the roof tiles and waves (H-Q) from the Pattern Sheet onto the matt side of the freezer paper. Cut them out accurately on the traced lines. Diagram 1 indicates where each shape is used in the bag. Each scalloped shape extends all the way to the next seam or straight edge, meaning there are multiple layers of felt in these areas. From the china red wool felt, cut: • One rectangle, 59 x 40cm (231⁄4 x 153⁄4in) (D inner bag)

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• Two rectangles, 14 x 8.5cm (51⁄2 x 33⁄8in) (B bag sides) • One rectangle, 10 x 12cm (4 x 43⁄4in) (C interior pocket). From the English mustard wool felt, cut: • One rectangle, 22.5 x 30cm (9 x 12in) (J waves) • One rectangle, 2 x 18cm (3⁄4 x 7in) (K roof tiles). From the peacock blue wool felt, cut: • One rectangle, 9.5 x 25cm (33⁄4 x 10in) (L waves) • One rectangle, 4 x 11cm (11⁄2 x 41⁄2in) (M waves). From the frosted green wool felt, cut: • One rectangle, 11 x 18cm (41⁄2 x 7in) (N waves). From the green wool felt, cut: • One rectangle, 12 x 30cm (43⁄4 x 12in) (O waves). From the ocean wool felt, cut: • One rectangle, 8 x 19cm (31⁄2 x 71⁄2in) (P waves) • Two rectangles, 5 x 22cm (2 x 81⁄2in) (Q roof tiles). Lightly fuse the freezer-paper pattern for the bag (A/D) you made in Step 1 onto the large rectangle cut from English mustard wool felt for shape A (outer bag). Cut the shape out immediately next to the edge of the freezer paper. Gently remove the freezer paper. (It will retain some of its stickiness.) Now fuse it lightly to the large rectangle cut from red wool felt and cut the shape out (lining). Use the method from Step 9 to fuse each of the H-Q patterns to the rectangles cut from felts, as listed above, and cut out the shapes for the roof tiles and waves. Trace the appliqué shapes for the oval, moons and cats from

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and imperial measurements. Choose one measurement system and use it throughout. Instructions are given for using the printed Pattern Sheet in the magazine, but, as an alternative, you can download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

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• One rectangle, 9 x 27cm (31⁄2 x 105⁄8in) (E bag base) • Two rectangles, 14 x 8.5cm (51⁄2 x 33⁄8in) (F bag sides) • One rectangle, 9 x 12cm (31⁄2 x 43⁄4in) (G interior pocket) • Two rectangles, 15 x 40cm (6 x 153⁄4in) (H roof) • One rectangle, 3 x 18cm (11⁄4 x 7in) (I roof tiles) • Eight rectangles, 2 x 8cm (3⁄4 x 3in) (R handle loops). From the mottled straw wool felt, cut: • One rectangle, 59 x 40cm (231⁄4 x 153⁄4in) (A outer bag)

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Diagram 2

the Pattern Sheet onto the matt side of the fusible web leaving at least 1⁄2in between them. These shapes have been printed in reverse for your convenience. Cut the shapes out about 1⁄4in outside the traced lines. Fuse the shapes to the wrong side of the appropriate felts, then cut each shape out accurately on the traced lines. To make the ‘confetti’ and the small flowers, use a hole punch to cut circles from a range of different felts. Raquel created some of her flowers by punching six circles from one felt for the petals with a circle punched from a different felt for the flower centre. Other flowers had a felt circle for their centres, with embroidered petals.

12 13 RAQUEL’S TEMPLATE TIP If you don’t have access to freezer paper, you can make templates from template plastic. However, the size of the template needed for the outer bag will mean that you will need a very large sheet of template plastic.

RAQUEL’S FABRICMARKING TIP If you see any marks made with your heat-erasable fabric-marking pen on your finished bag that you forgot to remove by pressing the felt as you were working, use a hair blow-dryer for a few seconds to heat the area until they disappear.

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Add the shapes for the two cats. Whip stitch them in place using two strands of matching embroidery thread. Now pin shapes H-Q on the bag, referring back to Diagram 1 and the photographs. Start with shape N on what will be the back of the bag. Then pin O, P and M in place as you work towards the centre of the bag shape. On the front half of the bag shape, pin L in place covering the bottom edge of the oval. Then lay J over the centre of the bag shape; its curved edges should overlap the bottom edge of L and M. Pin a red H shape to the very top and bottom edges of the bag. On what will be the back of the bag, pin Q and then K shapes on top of it. On the front of the bag, pin Q, then I on top of it. For the confetti and the small flowers, use a tiny dab of fabric glue on the wrong side of each punched circle to attach them to the bag. Press them firmly in place. Once you’re satisfied with the placement of all these shapes, use Perle No 12 threads and a variety of embroidery stitches to appliqué them in place, referring to the Stitchery Guide on page 116. Position the E rectangle cut from red felt in the centre of the J shape. Blanket stitch its two long edges to the J shape using aqua thread.

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Peel the backing paper off the felt appliqué shapes. Position the oval on the mustard outer bag A shape, 4cm (11⁄2in) from the top edge. See Diagram 2. Fuse it in place. Work running stitch in red Perle No 12 thread 5mm (a scant 1⁄4in) inside the outer edge to appliqué it to the outer bag. Referring to the photo as a guide, fuse the large and small moon shapes on the oval. Repeat Step 15 to appliqué them, using yellowgreen Perle No 12 thread for the large moon and aqua for the small one.


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20mm (3⁄4in) 25mm (1in)

Diagram 3

Back of bag

8cm (31⁄4in) Base of bag

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Make marks 20mm (3⁄4in) from each long edge of the E rectangle and 25mm (1in) from each short edge, as shown in Diagram 3. Use small sharp embroidery scissors to make small slits at these marks. Working from the outside of the bag, push both prongs of a bag foot through each slit. If your bag feet have washers, slip them over the prongs. Open up the prongs in opposite directions and flatten them on the inside of the bag.

3cm (11⁄4in)

Diagram 4

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Make marks in the centre of the short straight edges of the red D bag shape, 3cm (11⁄4in) from the edge, as shown in Diagram 4. Sew one side of the magnetic snap in place over each mark. Pin the C rectangle of mottled straw felt so that its top long edge is 8cm (31⁄4in) from the short straight edge of the red D bag shape. Pin the G rectangle of red felt on top of it with the three raw edges

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matching. Blanket stitch both layers of felt in place using red thread. Glue punched circles of felt in place on the pocket as a decorative flower. Trace the petal shapes for the small, medium and large threedimensional flowers from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic using a permanent-marking pen. Cut the shapes out on the traced lines.

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STITCHERY GUIDE Roof on front of bag

Waves on front of bag

Roof on back of bag

Waves on back of bag

Design area

Thread

Stitch

H roof

Red

Whip stitch along the inner straight edges only (leave the scalloped edge free)

Q roof tiles

Red

Running stitch through the Q shape only as decoration 5mm (1⁄4in) from the scalloped edge

I roof tiles

Red

Whip stitch along the scalloped edge to attach I to Q and A

Embroidered flowers

Red

Straight stitches of various lengths

J wave

Red

Blanket stitch the scalloped edge to attach J to L

A outer bag

Red

Running stitch about 5mm (1⁄4in) above the top edge of the J and L waves

H roof and & Q roof tiles

Red

As for front of bag

K roof tiles

Red

Whip stitch along the scalloped edge to attach K to Q and A

J wave

Red

Blanket stitch the scalloped edge to attach J to P and M

M wave

Red

Blanket stitch the scalloped edge to attach M to O and P

P wave

Grey

Whip stitch along the scalloped edge to attach P to O

O wave

Red

Running stitch about 5mm (1⁄4in) above the top edge of the P wave

J wave

Red

Blanket stitch the scalloped edge to attach J to P and M

M wave

Red

Blanket stitch the scalloped edge to attach M to O and P

P wave

Grey

Whip stitch along the scalloped edge to attach P to O

O wave

Red

Running stitch about 5mm (1⁄4in) above the top edge of the P wave

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Trace around these templates on the appropriate felts using the heat-soluble fabric-marking pen. Raquel traced one large flower and six medium flowers on English mustard felt, one medium flower and two small flowers on frosted green felt and five small flowers on peacock blue felt. Cut the shapes out on the traced lines. Eliminate any pen marks by pressing the shapes. Using the photographs as a guide, centre each small flower on a medium one. Centre one of the small+medium flowers on the large one. Pin this

29 3D flowers

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small+medium+large flower in the centre of the bag back. Sew the 22mm (1in) red wooden button on top of it, stitching through all the layers of the bag to hold the flower in place. On the small+medium flower pairs, work straight stitches in contrasting thread from the centre of the small flower along each petal. Sew them to the bag with a red wooden 18mm (3⁄4in) button in their centre.

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Assembly

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Match the A and D bag shapes, wrong sides together. The pocket on the D


Getting to know …

RAQUEL BLASCO Why this particular craft? Good question! It’s the first time someone’s asked me that. I love to draw and to imagine fantastic worlds, and this was my only passion for a lot of time. One day (several years ago), a friend invited me to a patchwork class. In this class, I discovered appliqué; I made an apron with sheep for my husband and I fell in love with the whole appliqué process because it’s like drawing but with fabrics. That day, I decided I wanted to be a patchwork designer. Have you tried plenty of others? Of course – I’ve always loved handcrafts. I think the only thing I haven’t tried (with threads and needles) is the punch needle. I grew up in a neighbourhood of painters and antiquarians, spending much time in their studios, dreaming of being able to do the wonderful things they did. I had my first watercolour paints when I was very, very young and kept them as treasures for more than 30 years. But when it was time to go to university, I chose to study biology, since I thought artistic studies weren’t as good a career option. But, when I graduated, I decided to take several courses in decorative painting, furniture restoration/conservation

bag should be behind what will be the back of the outer A bag. Cut a rectangle of template plastic to measure 8 x 26cm (3 x 10in). Use scissors to round the corners so the sharp edges don’t pierce the felt. Slip the plastic between the A and D shapes, directly behind the appliquéd E rectangle. Pin the A and D layers together – use pins along each long edge of the E rectangle to keep the template plastic in place between the layers. Blanket stitch the edges of

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and handcrafts. And these remained my craft world until the day I discovered patchwork. Any funny stories along the way? My mother can’t believe I sew – in fact, before my first patchwork class, I’d never sewn. I hated the idea. So, when she first saw my work, she was astonished that I had taken to stitching, until I explained: “Mum, this isn’t sewing, this is drawing ... sewing is stitching hems on pants and skirts.” She thought it was very funny. If you weren’t doing this, what would occupy your time? There are only two other things in the world I’d want to be doing right now: (1) To work as a furniture restorer. But that simply wouldn’t work, since I can never part with a piece of furniture I’ve restored. And that’s a big problem when you’re restoring furniture professionally for other people. And (2) to be a children’s-book illustrator. I hope this dream comes true one day! Who taught you your crafting skills? My grandmother was very skilled with a crochet hook, and one of my aunts is a professional embroiderer. I admired all their works, but when I was young, I only enjoyed cross stitching, painting and working with wood. Once I discovered appliqué and patchwork, I was a keen learner – although, while I love to teach, I think I am a little over-eager as a student. So most of my knowledge came from my own trial and error. Is it hard to find time to do your stitching or is it a profession? For me, it’s a profession but, in either case, it’s hard sometimes to find time in the course of daily life. Do you think of your craft as passion or a spare-time-filler? I like to think that this craft is my life. From where do you draw inspiration? Do you know the song “Love is all around me”? Well … inspiration is all around me! The only things that I need are eyes and a bold imagination to find all the inspiration I need. And I have a very bold imagination. Why this skill – and this style? When I began drawing, Tim Burton and Remedios Varo were my inspiration. Because of them, Maggi Co’S Village, my magic world, exists: a world where

it’s easy to let the imagination fly. My original world made of paints and papers became a world made of colours and fabrics. What are your favourite materials to work with? Wool felt is my favourite material; I think its possibilities are infinite, and it’s a pleasure to work with. Many people prefer acrylic felts. But, for me, the colours and the touch of wool felt are amazing. Do you ever see yourself stopping or diversifying? My brain cells are always working, thinking, imagining, so, my answer is: diversifying. I just hope I don’t lose my personal style. What’s your daily home life like? At home, there’s just me and my husband. The place has lots of books, guitars (my husband plays guitar) and, of course, loads of fabrics, threads, painting tools (he paints too). Many of our friends are artists: writers, musicians, painters. My husband writes short histories, and he has many of them published in books. So, when we’re not working, we’re out at concerts, art exhibitions, book launches etc. Where do you live and work? I have a room in my home in Spain with a big table, two big bookshelves and a big closet. This room is officially my working place but in my enthusiasm for the creative process I tend to invade the whole house. I often use my living room as workspace, too – not too handy if you’ve got guests for dinner! Do you teach your skills to others? I love to teach and I do it whenever I have the opportunity. How would you describe your style? People describe my style as ‘naïve’ but I’m not sure that’s true. Maybe my style has some naivity – the simplicity of form, the use of bright colours, its children's-art references – but I like to think my style is sweet and magic! What makes it unique? I like to think it’s unique because I aim for a world where all is possible, a world without borders, where what you imagine comes true (villages with two moons, owls with moustaches, whales with flower hairpins). Any embarrassing botch-ups along the way? Of course, but we must learn from these ‘moments’ and move on.

A and D together except for the short straight edges. Match the R rectangles of red felt together in pairs, wrong sides together. Work running stitch close to each long edge in red thread to hold the two layers together. Measure the bag handles to determine how far apart the handle loops need to be on your bag. Fold each stitched rectangle in half, short edges matching. Insert the raw ends of two folded

loops between the A and D layers on each short straight edge, keeping enough of each loop above the edge of the bag to allow you to insert the bag handle later on (or, if the handles you are using require, thread the felt loops through the handles now). Pin the loops in place, then blanket stitch across the short straight edge to join the A and D layers and hold the loops in place; you need to stitch across the loops on both

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the A and D sides of the bag to ensure a secure join. To make the sides of the bag, match each red F rectangle with a mottled straw B one, wrong sides together, and pin in the centre of the rectangles. Referring to Diagram 5, pin, then blanket stitch the B+F rectangles to the bag using red thread – the straw B rectangle should be inside the bag and the red F one on the outside. Raquel recommends stitching in the direction indicated by the numbers and arrows. Note, also, that there will be about

35 36

25mm (1in) of the B+F rectangle that remains unstitched. Fold the top, unstitched edge of each B+F rectangle over to give a mottled straw cuff, and hold it in place by stitching a 15mm (5⁄8in) red, felt-covered button through the layers. Attach the handles to the loops if you haven’t already done so.

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For contact details for Raquel Blasco, of Maggi Co’S Village, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine.

1

2

2

1

4

3

3

4

Diagram 5

1525 Frankston-Flinders Road Tyabb 3913 1 Ph/Fax: +61 3 5977 3332 E: query@magicpatchquilting.com.au

www.magicpatchquilting.com.au w

‘Bessie’s Sampler’ Bessie’s Sampler is our latest Block of the B Mo Month. It features an array of beautiful blocks m made in the latest reproduction fabrics. P Priced at $35 per month for 12 months. P Postage & handling $3 per month extra.

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Summertime BLUES

Crocheted rugs move from winter firesides to summer verandahs. As warm days dissolve into crisp twilight, this periwinkle-and-ivory throw will help take the sting out of frisky coastal breezes.

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Creation: Zuhause Wohnen; Photography: Olaf Szczepaniak; Jahreszeiten Verlag/Picture Media

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Materials Q Patons Big Baby 4 ply 100g balls: seven balls each of Sky (2554) and Cream (2656) Q 3.00mm (UK 11) crochet hook – see Note Q Wool needle for finishing Finished size: 180 x 130cm (71 x 51in) approx. Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. This is an intermediate skill level crochet project. Use only the yarn specified. Other yarns are likely to produce different results. Quantities are approximate as they can vary between crochet workers. Check the ball bands to ensure that all yarn of each colour is from the same dye lot. Australian/UK crochet terminology is used; North American readers should consult a crochet manual to ensure they interpret the instructions correctly. There is no direct US equivalent for a 3.00mm crochet hook.

Tension This rug has been designed at a tension of one motif measuring 7.5cm (3in) across, using a 3.00mm hook. If the motif is smaller than 7.5cm (3in), use a larger hook; if motif is larger, use a smaller hook.

Abbreviations beg = begin/ning; ch = chain; cont = continue; dc = double crochet; dtr = double treble; htr = half treble; lp/s = loop/s; rep = repeat; 122

Homespun

sl st = slip stitch; sp = space; st/s = stitch/es; tog = together; tr = treble

Special abbreviations Double popcorn = (4tr in next dc) twice, enlarge lp on hook, then remove the hook and insert it from front to back into the first of the 8tr just made, pick up lp and draw it through the st, reducing the lp to working size. Join = enlarge the lp on the hook, then remove the hook, insert the hook from front to back between 2dtr on the final round of the adjoining motif, pick up lp and draw it through the st, reducing the lp to working size.

First flower motif Using the 3.00mm hook and

Sky, make 10ch and join with a sl st in the first st to make a ring. 1st round – 1ch, 24dc in ring, sl st in first dc. 2nd round – 3ch, 3tr in same place as sl st, 4tr in next dc, enlarge lp on hook, then remove hook and insert it from front to back into the 3rd ch at beg of the round, pick up lp and draw through ch, reducing lp to working size, 8ch, *miss 1dc, double popcorn, 8ch, rep from * six times, sl st in 3rd ch at beg. 3rd round – 1ch, (1dc, 1htr, 2tr, 2dtr, 2tr, 1htr, 1dc) in each 8ch lp to end, sl st in first dc. Fasten off.

Second flower motif Using the 3.00mm hook and Cream, make 10ch and join with a sl st in first ch to make a ring.

Work 1st and 2nd rounds as for the first flower motif. 3rd round – 1ch, (1dc, 1htr, 2tr, 2dtr, 2tr, 1htr, 1dc) in each of the first six 8ch lps, (1dc, 1htr, 2tr, 1dtr, join, 1dtr, 2tr, 1htr, 1dc) in each of the next two 8ch lps, sl st in first dc. Fasten off.

Assembly Repeat the second flower motif in alternating colours, joining them to the previous motif on the opposite side of the join until there are 24 motifs in one strip. Make a further 16 strips of motifs in alternating colours, at the same time joining them to the sides of the motifs in the previous strips as you go. Do not press. Sew in the ends to finish.

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


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Another cute idea!

THE SHIRT OFF YOUR (FELLA’S) BACK In B-grade movies, women nag men about cleaning out their closets. Well, Chrissann Gasparro, from Ducklings in a Row (ducklingsinarow.com), has an ulterior motive that she uses for good – good stitching, that is. “Every time my husband announces that he’s going to sort through his clothes and get rid of old items, I hover over him like a ravenous vulture circling a horse

carcass,” says Chrissann. “I wait with baited breath for an old button-down shirt to hit the giveaway pile, then swoop in and nab the shirt with my sharpened craft talons.” This is how she converts discards into decor: • Wash and iron the shirt. • Turn the shirt inside-out and place a cushion insert inside at the chosen position. If you’re using the pocket as a feature of the finished cushion, make sure you have the insert strategically positioned to show off the pocket. • Pin along the edges of your cushion insert, making sure it’s a snug fit.

• Remove the cushion insert. • Trim off the excess fabric, leaving a decent seam allowance. Neaten edges. • Sew along your pin lines. • Turn the shirt right way out. • Re-insert your cushion and button up! Then you can embellish it with whatever motifs you choose. (Chrissann went for a pocketed heart, felt spectacles and a little felt Blackberry.) You can find out much more about this clever designer idea by linking through to www.ducklingsinarow. com/2012/03/diy-pillows-madefrom-daddys-shirts.html. Homespun

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SYMPHONY OF LIFE Just as separate musical instruments come together as sweeping concert performances, Val Laird’s individual blocks ‘band together’ in a crescendo of orchestrated style.

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Materials Q 50cm ( ⁄8yd) white quilter’s muslin (block background) Q 60cm (3⁄4yd) raspberry medium-scale print fabric (sashing, border and binding) Q 10cm (1⁄8yd) aqua medium-scale print fabric (cornerstones) 5

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Q 30cm (3⁄8yd) aqua toneon-tone print fabric (block frames) Q 20cm (8in) squares of assorted print fabrics: four red, three aqua, two cream and two beige (appliqué) Q 90cm (1yd) backing fabric Q Batting at least 90cm (36in) square

Q Anchor Stranded Embroidery Cotton in Medium Beauty Rose (57), Light Surf Blue (168), Dark Stone Grey (273), Medium Light Nutmeg (362), Medium Nutmeg (363), Dark Desert (375), Medium Linen (392), Dark Linen (393), Fern Green (843),

Light Larkspur (928) and Very Light Beauty Rose (1094) Q Size 8 crewel embroidery needle Q 50cm (1⁄2yd) fusible stabiliser such as Whisperweft Q Machine-sewing threads to match the appliqué fabrics

www.homespun.net.au/homespun-patterns


Q Cream sewing thread for piecing Q Rayon machine-quilting thread in white Q Fusible web Q Black .01 permanent pigment pen Q 2B pencil Q Rotary cutter, ruler and mat

Q Sewing machine with walking foot Q General sewing supplies Stitches used: Backstitch, French knot, satin stitch, stem stitch Finished size: 81cm (32in) square

Violin

Xylophone

Preparation and cutting

6

1

From the white quilter’s muslin, cut: • Two strips, 8in across the width of the fabric and crosscut nine squares, 8in (block backgrounds). From the raspberry medium-scale print fabric, cut: • Eight strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 24 strips, 21⁄2 x 81⁄2in. Set aside the remaining strips for the binding. From the aqua medium-scale print fabric, cut: • One strip, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric and crosscut 16 squares, 21⁄2in (cornerstones). From the aqua tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: • One strip, 81⁄2in across the width of the fabric. Crosscut 18 strips, 1 x 81⁄2in. Trim the remainder of the strip to 71⁄2in wide and from it crosscut 18 strips, 1 x 71⁄2in (block frames). From the backing fabric, cut: • One strip, 4in across the width of the fabric and trim it to 4 x 32in (hanging sleeve).

2 3

4 5

Note: Read all the instructions before starting the project. It is recommended that fabrics be 100% cotton, pre-washed and well ironed. Requirements are based on fabric and stabiliser 112cm (44in) wide. Seam allowances of 1⁄4in are used throughout. The appliqué method is fusible

From the fusible stabiliser, cut: • Two strips, 8in across the width of the stabiliser and crosscut nine squares, 8in. Centre the squares of white quilter’s muslin over the embroidery designs on the Pattern Sheet and trace them with the pigment pen. Keep the traced lines very fine so they will be completely covered by the stitches. Lightly mark the position of the appliqué shapes (shown as dotted lines) with the pencil. Putting a light source such as a lightbox or brightly lit window behind the pattern makes it easier to see the design through the fabric. Fuse a square of fusible stabiliser to the back of each square. Trace the appliqué shapes that have been printed in reverse from both sides of the Pattern Sheet onto the smooth side of the fusible web, leaving about 1⁄2in between the shapes. Cut them out roughly and fuse them to the wrong side of the selected appliqué fabrics with a warm iron. Cut the shapes out carefully on the lines. Transfer any embroidery details onto the appliqué shapes with the pen.

web with machine blanket stitch. Two strands of embroidery cotton are used throughout. Instructions are given for using the printed patterns in the magazine, but you can also download the digital patterns from www.homespun.net.au and print them out.

Tuba

7

Timpani

8

Trumpet Homespun

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9

Remove the backing paper and position the appliqué shapes on the right side of the white squares where marked, layering them in the correct order where there is more than one shape. Fuse them in place with an iron.

Appliqué

10 Clarinet

Thread the sewing machine with thread to match the first appliqué shape and set it up for machine blanket stitch. It’s a good idea to test the stitch on a sample piece in the same fabrics to check that the length and width of the stitch is suitable for the size of the shape being appliquéd, and that the tension is correct. If your machine doesn’t have a blanket stitch, you may be able to adjust the blind hem stitch to a very short stitch length and wider than usual width to mimic the effect. Otherwise, use a small zigzag stitch with the length and width set to about 2. Sew around the appliqué shape with the stitch covering the edge of appliqué fabric. When you need to turn, stop with the needle down on the outside of the shape, rotate the work as needed, then continue sewing. Where the area being appliquéd is very narrow or intricate, such as on the trumpet, change to straight stitch and sew along the edges of the shape. Repeat Steps 10-11 to appliqué all the instruments,

11 French horn

12 Bass drum

VAL’S APPLIQUÉ TIPS I like to machine blanket stitch around my appliqué shapes because it’s so quick and the stitches are all even. However, on small or intricate areas, the blanket stitching can look very untidy, so I change to a straight machine stitch for those sections.

VAL’S SATIN-STITCH TIPS I find that satin stitching a circle or oval shape is easiest if you start in the centre rather than at one of the sides. I start in the middle and work to the left edge, then come back to the middle and work to the right edge.

Harp

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changing the thread colours as needed.

Embroidery

13

Refer to the Stitchery Guide on the next page for the stitches and thread colours to use for each design and refer to the photographs for the colour placement of the raspberry and aqua flowers. When the embroidery is complete, place the blocks, face down, on a clean, thick towel and press them gently from the back to avoid flattening the stitches. Trim each block to measure 71⁄2in square, keeping the designs centred.

14 15

Assembly

16

Sew a 1 x 71⁄2in aqua tone-ontone strip to the left and right edges of each block, pressing the seams outwards. Then sew a 1 x 81⁄2in strip to the top and bottom edges, pressing as before. Referring to the photograph of the quilt, arrange the nine blocks in three rows of three with 21⁄2 x 81⁄2in raspberry sashing strips between them and 21⁄2in aqua squares at the intersections. The pattern of raspberry strips and aqua squares is repeated for the border. Join the rows in turn, starting with the aqua squares and raspberry strips in the top border. This step is repeated for each of

17 18

Don’t make your stitches too small at the sides to help keep them a good shape.


STITCHERY GUIDE

Violin

Design area

Thread

Stitch

All lettering

Dark Stone Grey (273)

Backstitch with French-knot dots

Music notes

Dark Stone Grey (273) or Dark Linen (393)

Backstitch and satin stitch

Aqua flower petals

Light Larkspur (928) and Light Surf Blue (168)

Backstitch

Raspberry flower petals

Medium Beauty Rose (57) and Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Backstitch

Flower centres

Medium Light Nutmeg (362) or Medium Nutmeg (363)

Satin stitch

Leaves

Fern Green (843)

Backstitch

Strings and chinrest

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Stem stitch

Tuners on tailpiece

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Backstitch and French knot

Pegs

Medium Light Nutmeg (362)

Backstitch filled with satin stitch

F-holes

Medium Light Nutmeg (362)

Backstitch

Mallet handles

Dark Linen (393)

Stem stitch

Mallet heads

Dark Linen (393)

Backstitch filled with satin stitch

Contours on bell

Medium Linen (392) Stem stitch

Stem stitch

Mouthpiece, valves and tubes

Medium Linen (392)

Stem stitch

Hoop, legs and feet

Dark Desert (375)

Stem stitch

Side bars

Dark Desert (375)

Backstitch

Xylophone

Tuba

Timpani

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STITCHERY GUIDE cont ... Trumpet

Clarinet

French horn

Design area

Thread

Stitch

Contours on bell

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Stem stitch

Mouthpiece, valves and tubes

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Stem stitch

All contour lines

Medium Nutmeg (363)

Backstitch

Staff

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Stem stitch

Treble clef

Medium Beauty Rose (57)

Stem stitch

Mouthpiece and tubes

Medium Beauty Rose (57)

Stem stitch

Contours on bell

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Stem stitch

Valves

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Backstitch

Tension rods

Light Larkspur (928)

Stem stitch

Tension-rod nuts

Light Larkspur (928)

Backstitch filled with 3-wrap French knot

Contour lines

Medium Linen (392)

Stem stitch

Drumstick handles

Medium Linen (392)

Stem stitch

Drumstick heads

Dark Linen (393)

Stem stitch

Lower contours and strings

Very Light Beauty Rose (1094)

Stem stitch

Scroll

Medium Beauty Rose (57)

Stem stitch

Bass drum

Harp

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Getting to know … VAL LAIRD

How did you come up with this unique idea? To celebrate our wedding anniversary each year, my husband and I like to go to a symphony orchestra concert. There are so many instruments in the orchestra, and each section is so different, but together they create the most beautiful sound. It made me think about life being like a symphony, full of separate experiences, incidents and emotions, but together they combine to make our life a work of art. The best way I know of expressing that is to make a quilt. Is this typical of your style? Totally! I have two loves in my craft, embroidery and appliqué, and each block in this quilt features

the sashing rows and the bottom border. Press the seams towards the cornerstones throughout and replace the strips in the layout as you go. For each of the block rows, sew a sashing strip to the left edge of every block, join them together and add the final sashing strip to the right end of the last block. Press these seams towards the raspberry strips and replace the rows in the layout as before. Join a border/sashing strip to the top of each block row, nesting the seams so they match perfectly, and press all the seams away from the blocks. Join the rows together and add the bottom border row to the lower edge of the last block row.

19

these two passions. I’m also very fond of flower designs, so there’ll always be plenty of them in my work. If you could have three sewing/crafting wishes, what would they be? (1) I’d LOVE to be able to draw. I wasn’t in the right queue when the sketching gifts were given out. Thankfully, I have a very talented 12-year-old grandson who draws and who loves to help his grandmother. He drew all the instruments for this quilt. (2) My second wish is that I might keep producing fresh interesting designs that will bring joy to those who stitch them. (3) My third wish is that my designs might have that special WOW factor! It blesses my socks off when someone says “Wow!” when they see my work! What are you most proud of with your stitching skills? I can’t really be proud of something that has been given to me as a gift. I feel blessed to have the ability to design beautiful projects and to be able to share them with others. Does this hobby keep you very busy? I’m overjoyed that I am now retired, have good health, reasonable eyesight and lots of time to do craft. Because my stitching and designing is just a hobby, I’m free to do as much or as little as I like. Most weeks, the balance leans to the MUCH side of the scale!

right side up, on top of the batting and baste the three layers together with safety pins or thread. Fit the walking foot to the machine and thread it with white rayon quilting thread. Stitch in the ditch of all the sashing/border seams and then quilt carefully around the appliqué shapes, ensuring you don’t obscure the embroidery. Trim the batting and backing fabric 1⁄4in outside the edge of the quilt top. Join the remaining 21⁄2in raspberry strips end to end with diagonal seams to make one length, trim the seams to 1⁄4in and press them open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, sew the binding to the edge of the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go and referring to the Binding Diagrams on page 49 for details. Turn the binding over and hand stitch it to the back of the quilt.

22

20

23 24

Finishing

25

21

Lay the backing fabric, right side down, on a large table or the floor and secure it with masking tape. Smooth the batting on top and ensure it is free of wrinkles. After pressing the wallhanging top, lay it,

26

Do you lie awake at night, thinking of new ideas? All the time! My ‘Ideas’ file is overflowing, and I will never live long enough to bring them all to fruition. What’s next on the agenda? More of the same. If I ever stop loving what I do, then maybe I’ll be up for a new challenge or two, but at the moment, I just love stitching and designing, so expect lots more bags, wall quilts, table runners, cushions and accessories. What would you change – if anything? I wouldn’t change anything on this quilt now, but my original plan to have lots of squares from the fabric range bordering the blocks would have been a disaster. I cut all the squares and carefully laid them out around the blocks but it was too busy and detracted from the embroidery and appliqués. Now, I love how the red and aqua bring the quilt to life and put the focus where it should be. Have you always done handcrafts? Right from an early age, when I played with sewing cards and learned how to knit while my mum patiently fixed up the dropped stitches. I’m blessed to have been born into a home where both my parents were very skilled with their hands and both did beautiful craft work. What’s the best part of doing what you do? Finishing a project! I’m a finisher and have an immense amount of satisfaction when I can look at something that I have completed.

27

Fold under a 1⁄4in hem at each short end of the hanging sleeve strip and press. Turn them under by another 1⁄4in, press and then machine sew the hems in place. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching and sew the raw edges together. Press a lengthwise crease 1⁄2in each side of the seam line. On the back at the top with the raw edges of the sleeve seam against the backing, pin one crease line 1⁄4in below the hand stitched binding. Slip stitch the crease line to the backing, being careful that your stitches don’t go through to the front. Then slip stitch the second crease line to the backing 1in below the first one. This creates a sleeve with some fullness to accommodate a hanging rod, but without it showing above the top of the quilt. Label and date your wall quilt to finish.

28

For contact details for Val Laird, of Val Laird Designs, turn to Stockists at the back of the magazine. Homespun

133


E IN D A M UTES MIN

ZENKIDUS

Make them for your kids or let the kids make them for themselves! Half their charm is in their basic shapes and clunky stitching. And the facial features can be sewn or glued on. They are cute, crazy felt cuddlies from the studio of Trixi Symonds.

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ADULTS

30-40 minu You’ll need: Q Felt Q Embroidery floss Q Needle Q Pins Q Stuffing Q 2B pencil or white Glasochrom pencil Q Wiggly eyes (optional) Q Hot glue gun (optional)

Here’s how:

1 2

Take two 12in squares of different coloured felt. Draw a 7 x 9in rectangle onto one of the squares. This will be your sewing line.

3

Cut out eyes, a nose and mouth from scraps of coloured felt. Pin and sew them into place. If you want you can use wiggly eyes. Place this 12in square of felt face up on top of the second 12in square of felt. Pin them together. Sew around the sewing line, leaving a 3in gap for stuffing. Push in small amounts of stuffing until your Zenkidu feels nice and squishy. Pin and sew the opening closed. Your Zenkidu is still framed by a

4 5

6 7

margin of felt. Draw arms and legs onto this margin and cut fringes in the margin at the top and/or sides for hair. Now cut off the felt from around the arms, legs, and hair. Each arm will still have two layers of different coloured felt. Cut off the top layer so that only the back layer of felt is being used for the arms. With a lowtemperature glue gun, use one or two small blobs of glue to stick the arms onto Zenkidu’s torso.

8 9

KIDS

tes

1-2 hours

Trixi Symonds is the author of Sew Together Grow Together: Hand Sewing Projects for Parents and Children. She teaches hand sewing to children from her home studio in Sydney and holds workshops for parents and children at various venues. Trixi shares creative kids’ craft and sewing ideas on her Coloured Buttons blog, www.colouredbuttons.com.

Homespun

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CK BLOTHE OF NTH MO

PART 10 – FINAL

CHINA SHOP

There are mixed feelings when it comes to completing a major project. One the one hand, there is the sense of accomplishment. But on the other, it’s like farewelling an old friend. But this glorious quilt will be a source of continuing joy for the maker and the viewer, thanks to the concept and creativity of Kaffe Fassett, Kathy Doughty and the great designers at Material Obsession. Here are their instructions for assembling, quilting and finishing the beautiful China Shop quilt

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Homespun

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CK BLOTHE OF NTH MO

Materials Q Mad Plaid in Mauve (PWBM037) fabric (sashing and binding) Q Backing fabric Q Batting Q Wonder Clips (optional) 138

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Q General sewing supplies as before Note: Read all the instructions before starting the assembly. As there are many sashing strips in this quilt, it’s

recommended that you pin them together in labelled groups as you cut them to make the process simpler. Press all the seams towards the sashing strips. This quilt is assembled in vertical columns/units.

t e Month projec This Block of th 10 er ov ed has been publish pun, from issues of Homes ber, 2015. m ve No to February ired to qu The materials re ilt were qu e et pl make the com bruary’s issue. published in Fe bscriptions Contact the su order back to department Zinio or the to on g lo issues or ay newsstands Apple/Google Pl tally. to get them digi


Trimming guide

1

7

2

8

3

9

4

13 14

15

6

22

23

10 20

18

21

27

33

28

34

35

30

25

36

31

small Wonder Clips to hold the binding in place while we slip stitch it to the back of the quilt. The clips are more effective than pins in keeping the binding in place while sewing it down, especially at the corners.

1

From the Mad Plaid in Mauve fabric, cut: • 26 strips, 11⁄2in across the width of the fabric (sashing) and crosscut them as listed in Step 2. • 10 strips, 21⁄2in across the width of the fabric (binding). From the 11⁄2in sashing strips, crosscut: • Five strips, 11⁄2 x 101⁄2in, pin them together and label them Column 1 • Five strips, 11⁄2 x 101⁄2in, pin them together and label them Column 5 • Five strips, 11⁄2 x 81⁄2in, pin them together and label them Column 2 • Five strips, 11⁄2 x 81⁄2in, pin them together and label them Column 4 • Four strips, 11⁄2 x 81⁄2in; two strips, 11⁄2 x 241⁄2in; and three strips, 11⁄2 x 421⁄2in (joining them if needed); pin them together and label them Column 3 horizontal • Two strips, 11⁄2 x 421⁄2in (joining them if needed); pin them together and label them Column 3 vertical • Two strips, 11⁄2 x 131⁄2in; pin them together and label them Column 3 • Trim the selvedges off eight strips and join them, end to end, to make one long strip (vertical sashings).

2

Trimming

3

When trimming the blocks, centre the vase or plate between the left and right edges of the background. Measure the appliquéd vase (or plate or glass) at its widest point and halve the number to establish the centre point of the block,

Trim to height

Trim to width

1, 4, 6, 32, 35, 37

151⁄2in

101⁄2in

2, 5, 33, 36

111⁄2in

101⁄2in.

3, 34

121⁄2in

101⁄2in

7, 8, 11, 12, 26, 27, 30, 31 (see note in Step 7)

131⁄2in

81⁄2in

9, 28

121⁄2in

81⁄2in

10, 29

151⁄2in

81⁄2in

Centre panel

241⁄2in

241⁄2in

19, 20

81⁄2in

241⁄2in

15, 23

241⁄2in

81⁄2in

14, 16, 22, 24

81⁄2in

13, 17

131⁄2in

421⁄2in

18, 25

131⁄2in

81⁄2in

21

131⁄2in

241⁄2in

37

Quilt Layout Diagram

Cutting

Blocks

BINDING TIP We use

24

17

11

12

32

29 16

5

19

26

then trim the sides as needed to finish at the correct size with the appliqué centred. With the exception of the centre block, trim the bottom edges of the blocks 1 ⁄4in below the pressed creases; with the exception of the plates in Blocks 7, 20 and 26, this will also include the bottom 1⁄4in of the appliqué shape – it will be caught in the seam so that each vase and glass ‘sits’ on the shelf once you sew on the sashing strip. Then trim the top edge to arrive at the correct height for each block. Measure in at least two places in each direction and use a quilter’s ruler when cutting to ensure that the blocks remain true rectangles and the corners are all 90 degrees after trimming. For Blocks 7, 20 and 26, ensure there is 1⁄4in seam allowance below the plates so they sit on the shelf after assembly.

Assembly

4

Lay out all the blocks in position on a design wall or similar surface; don’t include the sashing strips at this stage. Where you made blocks that match – such as Blocks 1, 6, 32 and 37, you might want to swap some around to achieve a pleasing balance of colours. Add the five 11⁄2 x 101⁄2in sashing strips to the layout for Column 1. Join the blocks and sashing strips in Column 1. Keep the blocks in the correct order to maintain the symmetry of the design. Replace the column in the layout. Repeat Step 5 for the blocks and sashing strips in Column 5.

5

6

⁄12in

8

7

In the same manner, repeat Step 5 for the blocks and sashing strips labelled Column 2 and the blocks and sashing strips labelled Column 4. Centre column Sew a 11⁄2 x 241⁄2in sashing strip to the top and bottom edges of the centre panel. Then join Block 19 to the top edge and Block 20 to the bottom edge of the panel. Sew 11⁄2 x 81⁄2in sashing strips to the top and bottom edges of Blocks 15 and 23. Then sew Block 14 to the top of Block 15 and Block 16 below it. Sew Blocks 22 and 24 to the top and bottom edges of Block 23. Sew a 11⁄2 x 421⁄2in sashing strip to the right edge of Blocks 14/15/16 and to the left edge of Blocks 22/23/24. Join Blocks 14/15/16 to the left edge of the centre panel and Blocks 22/23/24 to the right edge. Sew a 11⁄2 x 421⁄2in sashing strip to the top and bottom of the centre group. Then join Block 13 to the top and Block 17 to the bottom.

8 9

10 11 12

Homespun

139


13

Join Blocks 18, 21 and 25 side by side with 11⁄2 x 131⁄2in sashing strips between them. Sew a 11⁄2 x 421⁄2in sashing strip to the top edge of this unit, then sew it to the bottom edge of the centre panel to complete Column 3. Vertical sashings Measure each of your columns vertically through the centre. They should all be the same length. If necessary, unpick seams and re-sew them until they are. From the very long sashing strip, cut four strips to this measurement.

14 15

OUR FABRICS: This quilt contains a variety of large, splashy floral prints and is made entirely from Kaffe Fassett Collective fabric for Westminster, distributed in Australia by XLN Fabrics, chosen by Kaffe Fassett and the Material Obsession design team.

140

Homespun

16

Sew the columns together in the correct order, inserting a vertical sashing strip between them.

Finishing

17

Remove the selvedges and cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths. Join the pieces side by side and press the seam open. The quilt top, backing and batting are ready for a long-arm quilter as they are. If you’re doing the quilting yourself, smooth the backing fabric on the floor with the right side down and secure it with masking tape. Lay the batting on top and ensure it is free of wrinkles. Lay the pressed quilt top over the batting with the right side facing up and baste the three layers together with thread or safety pins. Quilt as desired. Material Obsession chose to have China Shop quilted on a domestic machine by Bhajan Atwal and asked for diagonal rows of stitching 2in apart in a blending colour. The appliqué on this quilt sits beautifully beneath

18

19

the quilting and the repetitive nature of the lines suits the symmetry of the design. You might imagine that you’re looking through a leadedglass window to a row of shelves in a dresser. Trim the excess batting and backing fabric 1⁄4in outside the raw edge of the quilt top. Join the binding strips you cut in Step 1 with diagonal seams to make one length, trim the seams to 1⁄4in and press them open. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. With raw edges together, stitch the binding to the edge of the quilt with a 1⁄4in seam, mitring the corners as you go. Refer to the Binding Diagrams on page 49 for details. Turn the binding over and stitch it by hand to the back of the quilt. Label and date your quilt.

20 21

22

For contact details for Kaffe Fassett, Kathy Doughty and Material Obsession, turn to the Stockists pages at the back of the magazine.


Blessington Quilt Challenge inspired by the theme…

Secret Dreams

If you're new to quilting or a seasoned quilter, the BQC is for you!

Create your story... FIRST PRIZE:

Quilt your story...

$12,000 Total Value. Includes a trip for two to the International Quilt Fesitval in Houston 2017!

RUNNER UP PRIZE:

$3,000 Blessington Gift Certificate

VIEWERS CHOICE:

$1,500 Blessington Gift Certificate

FINISHED QUILT SIZE:

KEY DATES:

No smaller than 24in x 40in (60cm x 100cm) and no larger than 60in (150cm) square.

Blessington

Share your story...

1st December 2016

Online Entry Submitted with Photos

3rd February 2017

Finalists Notified

28th February 2017

Finalist Quilts Received

Academy 2017

Announcement of Winners. (April TBC)

2018

Finalist Quilts returned to owners

in conjunction with

Find all the information you need to get started at blessington.com.au/bqc/


HOMESPUN PROUDLY PRESENTS

CHINA SHOP 2015 NEW BLOCK OF THE MONTH

CREATED BY KAFFE FASSETT & KATHY DOU GHTY

Fabric distributed by XLN Fabrics 02 9621 3066 www.xln.com.au


AVAILABLE IN COMPLETE KITS CONTACT A STOCKIST CLOSEST TO YOU. LIMITED SUPPLIES. BOOK NOW!

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The latest new leaves, from handbooks to hardcovers, inspiration to instruction.

The Complete Quilter by Jessica Alexandrakis, $39.99 Jessica Alexandrakis has

All Points Patchwork by Diane Gilleland, $29.99 If you’ve become interested in English paper piecing (EPP), you must add this book to your craft library: it’s a sensational guide to everything you needed to know about this technique. Diane covers all the basics in detail before providing an overview of how to design and work with different shapes: hexagons, diamonds, jewels, tumblers, octagons, pentagons and curves. Be very clear: this is NOT a book of instructions for particular EPP projects. (Although there are photographs of a number of quilts, softies, tablemats and cushions made with EPP, they are for inspiration only.) This is a technique book that will enable you to master the art and progress to designing your own projects, if you wish. For example, there are seven pages just on how to cut fabrics for EPP, and 10 pages on how to baste them to paper templates, all illustrated with clear, close-up photographs. And to top it all off, Diane has a wonderful writing style: it’s easy to read and understand, and she comes across as warm, friendly and helpful. You couldn’t ask for more. Highly recommended. Published by Storey Publishing. Available in craft shops or by mail order from www.candobooks.com.au. Phone (02) 4560 1600 or email sales@capricornlink.com.au.

Stitch Kitsch by Jennifer Heynen, US$22.95 en Jennifer Heynen

44

Happy Sewing Projects

from Home Decor to Accessories

Published by Stash Books. Available in craft shops or as an e-book from www.ctpub.com Phone +1 925 677 0377 or email ctinfo@ctpub.com.

144

Homespun

Not many of us have as much time to sew as we would wish, so Jennifer Heynen wants to ensure that the projects she sews are unique, special and fun. The goal of her book is to instil greater confidence in her readers so they can relax and enjoy the process of creating. To this end, she’s designed 11 projects, and for each, created three variations using a wide variety of embellishments. By adding ribbons, trims, appliqué or stitching to a project, you take something basic and make it wonderful. The projects are all straightforward and include a mug rug, zippered purse, appliquéd wallhanging, tote bag, cushion and a softie. It’s exciting to see how different they can look with only a few added extras – and simple ones at that – so you may well find yourself using Jennifer’s basic project instructions as a launching pad to developing your own version. And once you’ve enjoyed success, your crafting life might never be the same.

created a first-rate introduction and reference book for novice and intermediate quiltmakers. She covers all the important information and skills that are needed to enjoy success and, although much of this doesn’t naturally lend itself to being a scintillating read, she manages to present it in an interesting way. Lots of diagrams and photographs illustrate the text, and the presentation in easily digestible snippets and sections makes the pages eye-catching. Upfront, you’ll find an overview of tools and fabrics, followed by a primer of quiltmaking techniques, from the all-important 1⁄4in seam and how to rotary cut through chain piecing and using templates to curved piecing, foundation-paper piecing, a variety of appliqué techniques, English paper piecing and improvisational and freehand styles. Each technique is demonstrated with instructions for making a block. In the projects chapter, there are detailed instructions for a cushion, sewing-machine cover, table runner and a sampler quilt.

Published by Sally Milner Publishing. Available in craft and book shops. Phone (02) 4835 6212 or visit www.sallymilner.com.au.


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Knitting Fabric Rugs by Karen Tiede, $29.99 This book is an excellent adventure if you’re looking for opportunities to extend your knitting repertoire. Karen Tiede shares everything you need to know about creating floor rugs and wallhangings using strips of fabric cut from old clothes. She discusses the kind of clothing to use, how to cut it up and how to store the ‘yarn’. Her chapter on colour is practical and useful. She provides insights on designing your own projects, including how to construct designs so that your knitting doesn’t become so heavy that it’s uncomfortable to hold. Then come the projects, each shown in full as well as in multiple close-ups. The instructions are clear and are accompanied by diagrams and charts to make them easy to follow. They include chapters on stripes, tessellations, log cabin, spirals and free-form designs.

Published by David and Charles. Available in craft shops or by mail order from www.candobooks.com. au. Phone (02) 4560 1600 or email sales@capricornlink.com.au.

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Homespun

145


6 5 4

On the road NEW ZEALAND

TOUR GUIDE 1 GERALDINE 2 RANGIORA 3 MAPUA 4 DEVONPORT 5 KAIWAKA 6 WHANGAREI

3

2 CHRISTCHURCH 1

1. Geraldine

THE PIN TIN

one and three Where’s Geraldine: We’re approximately a the scenic inland on ch quarter hour drive south of Christchur Tekapo Lake ding inclu , route to the lakes and mountains and Mount Cook. find us in the main Where in Geraldine: 9 Talbot Street. You’ll We are on the left ing. cross strian pede the street, right beside as you head south through town.

146

Homespun

and Reon Who plays host: Owned and operated by Lisa guy). kinda es” (although Reon is more a “behind the scen who a, Rhon with You’ll find Lisa in store most days, along . timer is our super-helpful and friendly partfor everyone Worth visiting because: We have something colourful selection and vast a e’s Ther – even a chair for the men! Christmas, novelty s, floral na, Kiwia ding inclu of patchwork fabrics, along with a great and licensed prints and many more fabrics, almost anything range of quilting and patchwork supplies – there – we also you could possibly need. But it doesn’t end knitting supplies, and carry a great selection of wools, patterns zips and threads, ns, ribbo ns, haberdashery galore, including butto feet up, your warm to need and much more. And should you tion. selec ry hosie and socks come in and check out our including What we recommend: We have lots of kits, like your fabrics you if and red), (pictu io A Fashionista’s Stud s in each ‘cupcake’. precut, our cupcake stand has three fat tenth available by the bolt We also love our Kiwiana fabrics, which are or as various-sized precuts. Island Address: 9 Talbot Street, Geraldine, South Phone: +64 3 693 1122 Email: lisa.thepintin@gmail.com Website: www.thepintin.co.nz


2. Rangiora

QUILTERS QUARTERS

Where’s Rangiora: Only 30 minutes ’ drive north from Christchurch, Rangiora is a great little town with lots to offer. With lovely boutique stores up the high street and plenty of wonderful eateries to choose from , Rangiora is a town on the mend, with lots of new developmen ts. When you visit Rangiora, you’ll find there is plenty to see and do.

3. Mapua

Where in Rangiora: The Wareho use Complex, 9 High Street. In the more industrial part of Ran giora, we’re situated in The Warehouse Complex – you can’t miss it! Who plays host: Pauline and her helpful staff. Worth visiting because: We have a great range of products for you to browse through on your visit . You’ll find haberdashery, a fantastic selection of battings, patt erns and threads galore. We also have tonnes of fabrics from Tilda, Moda, Riley Blake, Kaffe Fassett, Tula Pink , French General and more – a lot of variety for different tastes. We also sell sew ing machines and offer machine service and repairs, and stock the extremely popular Handi Quilter Sweet Sixteen. Ask us for information on this Sweet Sixteen longarm machine; with its host of great features, it’s easy to see why it’s one of the best sit-d own models on the market. What we recommend: We love the Miracle markers by Miracle Chalk. Use this fantastic product to mark out designs on your work; it can easily be removed with a steam iron. We also love the Sewline Fabric Glue Pen for a quick, convenient and effective way to hold fabric for sew ing – easier than using pins. Address: The Warehouse Complex , 9 High Street, Rangiora, South Island Phone: +64 3 313 6765 Email: quil tersquarters@clear.net .nz Website: www.quiltersquarters.co .nz

CUSHLA’S VILLAGE FABRICS

Where’s Mapua: To the west of the city of Nelson, on the South Island, right on the coast, overlooking the Tasman Bay. Where in Mapua: 136 Aranui Road. Aranui Road is the main road through town, and you’ll find us on the way down to the famous wharf. Who plays host: Cushla and her experienced team look forward to welcoming you in Mapua, and our Devonport staff also have a wealth of knowledge and all look forward to seeing you soon. Worth visiting because: Cushla’s is renowned for stocking a superb variety of latest fabrics and ranges at all the stores, including Moda, Riley Blake, Northcott, Indigos, Miss March, Christmas, Oriental goldovers and a great selection of New Zealand fabrics. As Janome stockists, we offer the latest deals and accessories for patchwork, quilting and general sewing. We also offer a range of classes, so contact us to find out more. Don’t forget to visit Cushla’s original store in historic Devonport, in Auckland. What we recommend: We work hard to bring you the latest in kitsets and block of the month programs. The majority of kitsets, including quilts, bags, table runners and home accessories are designed in store by our creative staff. Classes are a great way to learn new techniques, and we have a great range of visiting tutors teaching for us. Our selection of

specialty haberdashery is at all stores. Feel free to talk to us about your needs, and we’ll be more than happy to help. Pictured is our quilt Waters Edge, just one of the many exclusive kitsets available. Address: 136 Aranui Road, Mapua, Nelson, South Island Phone: +61 3 540 2011 Email: Cushla.Fabrics@xtra.co.nz Website: cushlasvillagefabrics.co.nz

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4. Devonport

CUSHLA’S VILLAGE FABRICS

Where’s Devonport: Devonport is only a stone’s throw across the harbour from Auckland city – only a short ferry ride or drive by car. With two large hills to walk or drive up for some of the best views in Auckland, along with lovely shops, cafes and beaches all around, Devonport is a must see. Where in Devonport: 38 Victoria Road. You’ll find us on one of the main shopping streets through Devonport, a leisurely stroll up from the wharf. Who plays host: Francie, Margaret and San-Marie look forward to welcoming you to the store. Worth visiting because: Like our sister store in Mapua, we are Janome stockists. We have a wide range of fabrics, suiting many different tastes and needs, including children’s, batiks, black and whites, Orientals, Riley Blake ranges and Moda, especially French General. You’ll also find general haberdashery supplies and all you need for your patchwork and quilting, and to inspire you, we have books and kits, many of which are our own designs. We run classes from beginners to advanced, and throughout the year have several international tutors visiting us. We have also just launched our website, and don’t forget to follow us on Facebook to keep up to date with what’s going on in both of Cushla’s stores. What we recommend: We have a great selection of block of the month quilt programs, including our new block of the month,

5. Kaiwaka

THE APPLE BASKET PATCHW ORK SHOP

Where’s Kaiwaka: One and a half hours north of Auckland. Where in Kaiwaka: 1914 State High way 1. We’re on the main highway that runs through Kaiwaka, in a sweet little cottage – you can’t miss us. Who plays host: Owner Ngaire Willi ams, with help from Cherry and Bronwyn, who are in store on different days.

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My Menagerie. Our special version will feature a unique kiwi appliqué block. Address: 38 Victoria Road, Devonport, Auckland, North Island Phone: +64 9 445 9995 Email: shop@cushlasvillagefabrics.co.nz Website: www.cushlasvillagefabrics.co.nz

Worth visiting because: We desi gn our own patterns, so there are patterns and kits not available anywhere else: you know you’re working on a unique project when you buy our patterns and kits. Our range of fabrics inclu de the very popular Tilda, Kaffe Fassett, Tula Pink, Moda, Mich ael Miller and a whole raft of blenders and backers. For knitters and crocheters, we have a wool room packed with lots of yarn s. You’ll also find a selection of Sue Spargo Eleganza thread, DMC stranded and Colourstreams hand-dyed silk ribb ons and threads. We sell Pfaff sewing machines and offer num erous classes designed around using your Pfaff sewing mac hine, and we also run workshops for handwork and sma ll projects. What we recommend: We just love the Tilda range of fabrics and we run a Tilda Club, where mem bers can pick up or are sent their pack bi-monthly – an exciting treat to receive in the mail! One of our most popular pattern/ kits are the Elegant Christmas hangings: there is a choice of differen t designs to choose from, all designed by Ngaire Williams. The re is still time to get one done for this Christmas, as they don ’t take long to make. Address: 1914 State Highway 1, Kaiw aka, North Island Phone: +64 9 431 2443 Email: applebasketquilts@xtra.co.nz Website: www.applebasketquilts.co .nz


6. Whangarei

NTRE

BERNINA NORTHLAND SEWING CE

of Northland, just Where’s Whangarei: Whangarei is the hub garei while you two hours north of Auckland. Stay in Whan explore the greater Northland area. CBD of Whangarei, Where in Whangarei: 22 John Street. In the rk of the movie carpa the directly across from the entrance to road for the the s acros walk theatre. Park in the building and cheapest parking option.

ien, Maree and Who plays host: Sandy leads the team of Franc including Bernina/ Liz. Between us, we have in depth expertise, , quilting, knitting work Bernette sewing-machine knowledge, patch ent Bernina resid our Nick, crochet and handwork. We also have nts. reme requi cing servi and Bernette technician, for all your rship deale ette Bern and ina Bern the Worth visiting because: As worth Wark from area, cal raphi geog wide a for Northland, we cover north, and coast to in the south, right up to Cape Reinga in the very and includes batiks, coast. Our fabric range is bright and colourful , including NZ wool, cottons and Kiwiana. We stock quality yarns We also stock DMC rino. cottons, alpaca, sock yarns and possum/me Whangarei the to host threads and embroidery needs and play month. each of day Tues Embroiderers’ Guild the on the third Awl as Point Ball r Clove the loves y What we recommend: Sand g, as an sewin while r finge -long extra an as s her ‘go-to tool’. It work ion ment to folding, just aid to turning corners or scoring fabric for ing trimm for re Snips a few of its uses. Sandy also loves her Famo quilt – this is our North True our is red Pictu ds. threa g and cuttin land. North d signature quilt, featuring sights from aroun land North , Address: 22 John Street, Whangarei Phone: +64 9 438 7654 Email: sandy@northlandsewingcentre.co.nz Website: northlandsewingcentre.co.nz

United Stitches By Rosalie Quinlan A Stitch & Switch Program! 5 and 10 month options available. Contact the store or visit our website for more details.

Shop 4a 4a, 20 Argyle Street, Street Stree et Camden NSW 2570 Phone: 02 4655 8348 Email: sales@thestitcherscupboard.com.au P Log onto our website for year round specials at

www.thestitcherscupboard.com.au Homespun

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FAERIES IN MY GARDEN

BROTHER AUSTRALIA

GIFT OF THE MONTH CLUB 2016

INNOV-IS NQ3500D SEWING AND EMBROIDERY MACHINE

Gorgeous Gardening Bag was one of our six projects from the 2015 Gift of the Month Club. Join now for our 2016 program, $39 plus $7 p&h every second month (six in the year).

The Innov-is NQ3500D computerised sewing and embroidery machine is ideal for hobbyists of all skill levels. It’s part of Brother’s new NV series – the range is an exciting new chapter for sewing enthusiasts. Includes 290 built-in stitches, 173 built-in embroidery designs, My Custom Stitch feature and 35 designs featuring Disney characters.

Phone: (07) 3869 0808 Email: shopatfaeries@bigpond.com Website: www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au

Phone: 1300 880 297 Email: brothermarketing@brother.com.au Website: www.brother.com.au

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LEUTENEGGER

CYNTHIA’S ARK

SEW EASY FABRIC

FREE NEEDLECRAFT PROJECTS

ENGLISH PAPER PIECING SUPPLIES

YOU SO CAN WITH TOUCAN

There are lots of free cross-stitch projects available to download on our website, including cute and contemporary ideas for adding a touch of handmade love to baby and nursery items.

We have a large range of English paper piecing supplies from Sue Daley Designs, with papers in various sizes, acrylic templates and kits, including our Hexagon Flower Coaster kits.

The fun new Toucan range comes in three colourful motif prints plus stripes and flowers, perfect for summer craft projects and quiltmaking.

Phone: (02) 8046 4100 Email: cservice@leutenegger.com.au Website: www.leutenegger.com.au

Phone: (08) 8527 2120 Email: sales@cynthiasark.com.au Website: www.cynthiasark.com.au

Email: syd@sewgroup.com Website: www.sewingcraft.com

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CLOVER

STITCHES FROM THE BUSH

JANOME AUSTRALIA

THE BOW MAKER

NEW TILDA FABRICS

SKYLINE S7

Create unique and beautiful bows with ribbon and fabric, and embellish your creations with beads and buttons. Available in small, medium and large sizes,

‘Autumn Tree’ and ‘Sweetheart’ are new ranges from Tilda, and they won’t last long! As a special offer for Homespun readers, these are just $40 each, posted (Australia only).

The NEW Quilting Model features a pivot function, automatic foot-pressure adjustment, variable zigzag, 1,000 stitches per minute AcuFeed System and colour screen.

Phone: +81 6 6978 2220 Email: info@clover-mfg.com Website: www.clover-mfg.com

Phone: (07) 4676 4184 Email: sftb@bigpond.com Website: www.stitchesfromthebush.com.au

Phone: 1300 JANOME or 1300 526 663 Email: vic@janome.com.au Website: www.janome.com.au

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Latest fabrics • Block of the month • Books and patterns • Open weekends • Prompt mail order is our specialty

Each month you receive a 1.5 metre pack of themed fabrics. $38 per month plus postage. Bonus surprise with your mail out in January, April, July and October. Join anytime at www.cynthiasark.com.au or ring Cynthia on 08 8527 2120.

STASH BUIL BUILDING FABRIC CLUB

Fancy Fox & Hazel Hedgehog Prompt mail order is our specialty 26-28 Prince St, Rosedale edale VIC 3847 P: 03 5199 2777 E: jennifer@lilylane jennifer@lilylane.com.au com au

lilylane.com.au

Like us on Facebook to rece rec receive exclusive offe offers and specials.

www.

Annie’s Cottage Crafts Designed by McKenna Ryan. Completed design size is 35 5½ ½” x 35½ ½”.

Halloweenies

Moon Shadow

as patterns, v Available A BOM and kits. Designed by McKenna Ryan

Snow Buds

PO Box 2 St Helen Helens, Tasmania 7216 • P: 03 6373 6203 203 • M: 0428 882563 E: info@anniescottagecrafts.com.au • www.anniescottagecrafts.com.au


STOCKISTS & CONTACTS

THIS MONTH’S DESIGNERS’ CONTACTS PROJECT 1: MISS NANCIE Irene Blanck Focus on Quilts Phone: 0425 717878 Website: www.focusonquilts.com.au Email: blanckirene@gmail.com PROJECT 2: GULL COTTAGE Debbie von Grabler-Crozier The Folk Art Factory Blog: sallyandcraftyvamp.blogspot.co.uk PROJECT 3: FLOATING ON AIR Melissa Grant One Day in May, Creations by Melissa Grant Website: onedayinmay.com.au & Libby Richardson Artsmart Craft Cottage Website: www.artsmartcraft cottage.com.au PROJECT 4: KISS CHASEY Jemima Flendt Tied with a Ribbon Email: tiedwitharibbon@gmail.com Website: www.tiedwitharibbon.com Instagram: @tiedwitharibbon PROJECT 5: TULLIVER’S TRAVELS Jennifer Goldsmith Frazzy Dazzles Email: jenny@frazzydazzles.com Website: www.frazzydazzles.com Etsy: www.etsy.com/shop/ frazzydazzles PROJECT 6: FLEUR Katrina Hadjimichael Email: kat.had@bigpond.com Blog: katrinahadjimichael.blogspot.com Facebook and Instagram: Katrina Hadjimichael PROJECT 7: MEOW AT THE MOON Raquel Blasco Maggi Co’S Village Website: www.maggicosvillage.com Blog: www.maggicosvillage. blogspot.com PROJECT 9: SYMPHONY OF LIFE Val Laird Val Laird Designs Email: vlaird@exemail.com.au Phone: (07) 5497 5283 Blog: val-laird.blogspot.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/ ValLairdDesigns BLOCK OF THE MONTH: CHINA SHOP Kaffe Fassett www.kaffefassett.com Kathy Doughty Material Obsession 72 Roseby Street Drummoyne NSW 2047 Ph: (02) 9819 6455 Email: info@materialobsession.com.au Website: www.materialobsession. com.au Blog: www.materialobsession. typepad.com

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melia Kates Ph: (02) 9553 7457, email: sales@ameliakates.com.au, website: www.ameliakates.com. Annie’s Cottage Crafts Ph: (03) 6376 2727, email: info@ anniescottagecrafts.com.au, website: www.anniescottagecrafts.com.au. Appleyard, Veronica – Appleyard Cottage Quilting Ph: 0407 416 053. Ashford Wheels & Looms Ph: 1800 653 397, website: www.ashford.co.nz/yarn. Asia Discovery Tours Ph: (02) 9267 7699, website: asiadiscoverytours.com.au. Australian Country Spinners Toll Free: 1800 337 032, ph: (03) 9380 3888, website: www.auspinners.com.au. ellarine Sewing Centre Ph: (03) 5221 3034, email: bellarinesewingcentre@outlook.com, website: www.bellarinesewing centre.com.au. Bernina Australia Ph: 1800 237 646 or (02) 9899 1188, email: bernina@bernina.com.au, website: www.bernina.com.au. Bernina Northland Sewing Centre NZ. Ph: +64 9 438 7654, email: sandy@northlandsewingcentre.co.nz, website: northlandsewingcentre.co.nz. Birch Haberdashery & Craft Ph: (03) 9450 8900, website: www.birchhaby.com.au. Blanck, Irene – see box at left. Blasco, Raquel – see box at left. Blessington Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@blessingtongroup.com.au, website: blessington.com.au. Brady, Carol – Quilting Cottage Website: www.quiltingcottage.com.au. Brother Australia Ph: 1300 880 297, website: www.brother.com.au. aroline Sharkey Email: caroline@carolinesharkey.com.au, website: www.carolinesharkey.com.au. Charles Parsons & Co See Craft Project – Charles Parsons & Co. Clover Mfg Co., Ltd Ph: +81 6 6978 2220, email: info@clover-mfg.com, website: www.clover-mfg.com. Country Dawn Quilting & Patchwork NZ Ph: +64 9 438 4856, email: shop@countrydawn quilting.com, website: www.countrydawnquilting.com. Cushla’s Village Fabrics NZ Ph: (Devonport) +64 9 445 9995, (Mapua) +64 3 540 2011, email: shop@ cushlasvillagefabrics.co.nz, website: www.cushlasvillagefabrics.co.nz. Craft Depot Ph: (02) 9980 8966, email: mailorders@craftdepot.com.au, website: www.craftdepot.com.au. Craft Project – Charles Parsons & Co Ph: (toll free) 1300 364 422, email: info@craftproject.com.au, website: www.craftproject.com.au. Cynthia’s Ark Email: sales@cynthiasark.com.au, website: www.cynthiasark.com.au. ewdrop Inn Patchwork & Craft Ph: (07) 4124 9320, email: sales@dewdropinn.com.au, website: www.dewdropinn.com.au. Doughty, Kathy – see box at left. Dragonfly Fabrics Ph: (08) 8948 0691, email: dragonfabric@bigpond.com, website: www.dragonfabric.com.au.

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chidna Sewing Products Ph: (07) 3390 3600, email: sales@ echidnaclub.com.au, website: www. echidnaclub.com.au (Townsville store: Ph: (07) 4740 4512, email: rhonda@echidnaclub.com.au). aeries in My Garden Ph: (07) 3869 0808, email: shopat faeries@bigpond.com, website: www.faeriesinmygarden.com.au. Fassett, Kaffe – see box at left. Flendt, Jemima – see box at left. oldsmith, Jennifer – see box at left. Grant, Melissa – see box at left adjimichael, Katrina – see box at left. Horn Australia Ph: (08) 8209 2800, email: horn@horn.com.au, website: www.horn.com.au. Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machines Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@blessingtongroup.com.au, website: www.husqvarnaviking. com/au. anome Ph: Toll-free 1300 JANOME; Vic (03) 8586 3100; NSW (02) 9624 1822; WA (08) 9248 6689; Qld (07) 3256 3477; SA (08) 8356 7700, website: www.janome.com.au. JJ’s Crafts NZ Ph: +64 6 844 0680, email: info@jjscrafts.co.nz, website: jjscrafts.co.nz. ornacraft Sewing Centre Ph: (08) 8522 3246, email: sales@kornacraft.com.au, website: www.kornacraft.com.au. aird, Val – see box at left. Legend and Lace Ph: 0417 084 245, email: Wendy@legendandlace.com, website: www.LegendandLace.com. Leutenegger Ph: (02) 8046 4100, email: cservice@leutenegger.com.au, website: www.leutenegger.com.au. Lily Lane Ph: (03) 5199 2777, email: jennifer@lilylane.com.au, website: www.lilylane.com.au. Lyn’s Fine Needlework Ph: (02) 9686 2325, email: lynsneedlework@aol.com, website: www.lynsfineneedlework.com.au. acs Crafts Wholesalers and Distributors Ph: (02) 8824 1111, email: mailorders@macscrafts.com.au. Magic Patch Quilting Ph: (03) 5977 3332, email: query@magicpatchquilting.com.au, website: www.magicpatch quilting.com.au. Material Obsession Ph: (02) 9819 6455, email: info@ materialobsession.com.au, website: www.materialobsession.com.au. My Patch Fabrics Ph: (02) 4455 4087, email: sew@ mypatchfabrics.com.au, website: www.mypatchfabrics.com.au. npoint Patchwork & Needlecraft Ph: (02) 4968 0094, email: shop@onpointpatch.com.au, website: www.onpointpatchwork andneedlecraft.com. atches ‘N’ Things Ph: (08) 9072 1760, email: PnThings@westnet.com.au. Pick Up Stitches Ph: (03) 5422 6614, email:

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pickupstitches@bigpond.com. Pfaff Sewing Machines Ph: (02) 4337 3737, email: info@blessingtongroup.com.au, website: www.pfaff.com/au. uilters Quarters NZ Ph: +64 3 313 6765, email: quilters quarters@clear.net.nz, website: www.quiltersquarters.co.nz. ainbow Patchwork Ph: (02) 6622 3003. Email: info@ rainbowpatchwork.com.au, website: www.rainbowpatchwork.com.au Richardson, Libby – see box at left. ew Many Stitches Ph: (02) 4628 4437, email: sewstitches@bigpond.com. Sewn and Quilted Ph: (03) 9877 1664, email: carol@sewn andquilted.com.au, website: www.sewnandquilted.com.au. Singer Ph: (02) 9620 5922, email: info@singerco.com.au, website: www.singerco.com.au. SSS Sewing & Craft Supplies Ph: 1300 888 778, website: www.sewingcraft.com. Stitches from the Bush Email: stitchesfromthebush@ bigpond.com, website: www.stitchesfromthebush.com.au. he Apple Basket Patchwork Shop NZ. Ph: +64 9 431 2443, email: applebasket quilts@ xtra.co.nz, website: www.applebasketquits.co.nz. The Crewel Gobelin Ph: (02) 9498 6831, email: enquiries@ thecrewelgobelin.com.au, website: www.thecrewelgobelin.com.au. The Patchwork Angel Ph: (07) 5477 0700, email: info@ patchworkangel.com.au, website: www.patchworkangel.com.au. The Patchwork Box Ph: (02) 4861 2517, email: sales@ patchworkbox.com.au, website: www.patchworkbox.com.au. The Pin Tin NZ Ph: +64 3 693 1122, email: lisa@thepintin.co.nz, website: www.thepintin.co.nz. The Quilters Shack Ph: (07) 4154 4486, email: girls@ thequiltersshack.com, website: www.thequiltersshack.com. The Stitcher’s Cupboard Ph: (02) 4655 8348, email: sales@ thestitcherscupboard.com.au, website: thestitcherscupboard.com.au. The Village Patch Ph: (03) 5475 2391, email: enquiries@villagepatch.com.au, website: www.villagepatch.com.au. Tranquility Crafts N’ Supplies Ph: (03) 9375 3575, email: tranquilitycrafts@bigpond.com.au. Travelrite International Pty Ltd Toll free: 1800 630 343, outside Australia: +61 3 9836 2522, email: michelle@travelrite.com.au, website: www.travelrite.com.au. on Grabler-Crozier, Debbie – see box at left. VSM Australia See Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machines or Pfaff Sewing Machines. LN Fabrics Ph: (02) 9621 3066, email: info@xln.com.au, website: www.xln.com.au.

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And sew this is

Christmas

Be inspired this Christmas with Brother’s state-of-the-art Sewing and Craft Machine range. Create and collaborate with ease to transform your creative ideas into festive projects to share and enjoy together. After all, why should Santa be the only one with a workshop?

$699 NS55 Sewing Machine with 135 stitches & 10 one-step buttonhole styles BONUS QUILT KIT VALUED AT $199

NEW

$699 Introducing the new ScanNCut CM900 Wireless | 30% larger screen | 12"x 24" scanning

Visit brother.com.au to ďŹ nd your closest dealer today *Offer exclusive to Brother Sewing Machine Dealers and valid from November 1 to December 31 2015, Spotlight and Lincraft are non-participating dealers.

be sure to check out our social pages for exciting announcements!

/brotheraustralia

/brotherau



Issue#16.11 Nov 2015