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NurseClick JANUARY 2017

My research journey

Virtual pathways to enhance dementia care

Teamwork in the perioperative environment

Driving change to advance our profession


IN THIS EDITION

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SNAPSHOT

SNAPSHOT @ACN

IN FOCUS @ACN

IN FOCUS @ACN

In the news

Australian College of Nursing Update

Teamwork in the perioperative environment

Driving change to advance our profession

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IN FOCUS @ACN

EVENTS @ACN

EDUCATION @ACN

My research journey

What's your New Year's Resolution?

Progress your career with us today

Virtual pathways to enhance dementia care

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IN FOCUS @ACN

IN FOCUS @ACN

EVENTS @ACN

ACN welcomes the new QLD Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer

Australia one step closer in the battle against hepatitis C virus

Be a part of the 2017 National Nursing Forum

IN FOCUS @ACN

NMBA UPDATE What's happening in 2017?


WELCOME

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Welcome Adjunct Professor Kylie Ward FACN, CEO of ACN

Welcome to the January edition of NurseClick. With a new year bringing new opportunities for professional and personal growth, it seems fitting to highlight the value of postgraduate education, continuous learning and self-improvement within the first edition of NurseClick for 2017. At the Australian College of Nursing (ACN), we design and deliver bespoke professional development programs that match current needs in delivering excellence in health care. With FEEHELP now available across all of our graduate certificate courses, we encourage readers to consider expanding their professional skillset and knowledge base by studying with ACN in our highly informative article, Progress your career with us today. With the changing health profile of Australia’s aging population, it is increasingly important that we are educated and equipped to address the complex challenges facing our health care system now, and into the future. In their engaging piece, Virtual pathways to enhance dementia care, Anne Moehead MACN and Kathy de Souza discuss the development of a sophisticated online education system designed to tackle the excepted rise in the number of people diagnosed with dementia in Australia. Imbedding human factors training into education modules actively promotes a culture where contributions from all team members on patient

safety issues is encouraged. Reflecting on her own experiences as a perioperative nurse and educator, Menna Davis MACN emphasises the immense importance of cultivating a positive and open environment for effective surgical teamwork in her engaging article, Teamwork in the perioperative environment – human factors at work. A keen interest for theatre nursing is what lead to a distinguished career as an inspirational nurse leader for Adjunct Professor David Plunkett FACN. In an in-depth review of David’s inspiring journey to Chief Executive Officer of Eastern Health, we congratulate him on this appointment and celebrate his many achievements. Adjunct Professor Shelley Nowlan FACN is another nurse leader who is working tirelessly to lead our profession forward. This month, we welcome Shelley to her new role as the Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer for Queensland in our ongoing CNMO feature series. As an organisation dedicated to continuous improvement, ACN started the new year excited to build upon our great foundation as the preeminent and national leader of the nursing profession. Within this edition of NurseClick, we asked our staff to identify their New Year’s Resolutions as we embark on another prosperous year advancing nurse leadership to enhance the health care of all Australians.

Publishing details Publisher Australian College of Nursing Editors Sally Coen Design Nina Vesala Emma Butz Enquiries t 02 6283 3400 publications@acn.edu.au Advertise with ACN Send your enquiries to samuel.eaton@acn.edu.au

© Australian College of Nursing 2016 The opinions expressed within are the authors’ and not necessarily those of ACN or the editor. No part of this publication can be reproduced without permission from ACN. Information is correct at time of print.

If you are a nurse working in a general practice setting, the Nursing in General Practice (NiGP) Handbook is essential reading, and it’s FREE. The handbook contains details about employing and supporting RNs and ENs, the current regulatory environment, how to maximise the benefits, including the Practice Nurse Incentive Program and the range of MBS items that support nursing services in general practice.

NURSING IN GENERAL PRACTICE eral practice team A guide for the gen

All files marked ‘Stock photo’ or credited to iStock are representative only and do not depict the actual subjects and events described in the articles. Cover image: Pixabay ACN publishes The Hive, NurseClick and the ACN Weekly eNewsletter.

Order your FREE printed copy or download a PDF version.


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In the news National More people receiving homelessness support due to family violence Specialist homelessness services have seen a rise in client numbers in recent years, with a higher proportion of clients receiving assistance due to domestic and family violence, according to a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Too much TV linked to mental health issues for boys

Cancer drug approved by TGA offers hope to leukaemia patients

Introducing alcohol to teens may be a double-edged sword for parents

Boys who watch an average of two hours of television every day are more than twice as likely to develop conduct and emotional problems.

A drug that melts away cancer in some patients with advanced forms of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia has been approved by Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA).

Introducing children and teenagers to alcohol in the home may decrease the rate of binge drinking, but it is not without its risks, a study has found.

New research from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute has found a link between time watching television or playing video games and mental health among boys. Read more

Chance of heart attack doubles for those with no educational qualifications Those who leave school early have double the risk of a heart attack, according to a new Australian study. The research, published in the International Journal for Equity in Health, found those with no education qualifications had more than double the rates of heart attack (150%) relative to those with a university degree. The risk was around two-thirds (70%) higher for those with trade certifications and diplomas. Read more

Developed in Melbourne, Venetoclax, has been approved for some stage-four patients of the disease. The drug will be available to patients who have not responded to standard treatments, or for those who have not been able to undergo other therapies.

Many parents introduce their children to alcohol by allowing them the occasional sip at home, and research has found that while this increases the likelihood of children drinking full serves of alcohol by their mid-teens, it also makes them less likely to binge drink. Read more

Read more

Breakthrough could spell the end for wrinkles Wrinkled faces may not always be an inevitable part of ageing thanks to a ground-breaking new discovery. Scientists have identified a natural way to regenerate the fatty cells that keep skin looking smooth and young.

Marshalling the nervous system to fight diabetes Perth researchers believe that the part of the body that controls the fight or flight response could help ward off type 2 diabetes.

Not only could this lead to spectacular anti-ageing treatments, it may also pave the way to scar-free healing of wounds.

They hope to harness the sympathetic nervous system, which helps accelerate the heart rate and boosts blood pressure, to improve blood sugar levels. This could reduce rates of diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes, and even treat heart disease.

Read more

Read more

The report shows that national client numbers reached over 279,000 in 2015–16 (up from nearly 256,000 in 2014–15). Of those, 106,000 (38%) sought support due to domestic and family violence. Read more

New drug hope in fight against child cancer WA researchers may be close to a breakthrough in treating one of the most devastating childhood brain cancers — medulloblastoma. They believe a new class of drugs could make chemotherapy more effective and reduce the need for radiotherapy, which can cause serious side effects in children. Read more

Bee sting vaccine opens door to new allergy remedies A bee sting vaccine developed in Australia is opening doors to new remedies for a range of other insect, plant and pollen allergies. Researchers from Adelaide have developed a highly effective vaccine for European honeybee stings using a unique adjuvant. Read more


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World Drug for narcolepsy could help food addicts lose weight A drug used to treat sleep disorders could also reduce the impulse for food, according to a new study. Scientists discovered that a drug called Modafinil, usually used for narcolepsy, can reduce impulsivity, which is a factor leading to food addiction. Read more

Sedentary lifestyle particularly unhealthy for men Athletes who excel in individual sports are more likely to develop depression

E-cigarettes a good way to quit smoking, study suggests

Athletes in individual sports are more prone to developing depressive symptoms than athletes in team sports, new research suggests.

E-cigarettes could be a cost-effective way of helping people to quit smoking, according to an analysis conducted by a Dublin health authority.

The research surveyed 162 elite and 199 junior elite athletes in two cross-sectional studies.

Dublin's Health Information and Quality Authority revealed that more people using e-cigarettes would lead to more people successfully kicking the habit.

Read more

High-intensity exercise on the weekend offers similar health benefits as regular exercise

Read more

Adding thiamin to fish sauce may assist in tackling thiamin deficiency

Packing the recommended amount of weekly exercise into just one or two workout sessions may lower a person’s risk of death just as much as regular exercise, according to a new study published in the journal, JAMA Internal Medicine.

Australian and international researchers have found that adding thiamin to fish sauce has the potential to be a simple, low-cost and sustainable solution to improving dietary thiamin intake and preventing thiamin deficiency in Cambodia.

The study included data on the self-reported exercise habits and overall health of 63,591 adults in England and Scotland from 1994 to 2012.

Thiamin deficiency is still prevalent throughout South-East Asia. Fortification of fish sauce with thiamin is a practical solution given that the condiment is found in most Cambodian households.

Read more

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Dementia rates higher near busy roads People who live near major roads have higher rates of dementia, research suggests. Approximately 11% of dementia cases in people living within 50m of a major road could be down to traffic. Read more

Depressed patients are less responsive to chemotherapy, study suggests A brain-boosting protein plays an important role in how well people respond to chemotherapy, according to a team of international researchers. The study found that cancer patients suffering depression have decreased amounts of BrainDerived Neurotrophic Factor in their blood. Low levels make people less responsive to cancer drugs and less tolerant of their side-effects. Read more

In a study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers looked at the amount of time men and women spent sitting during work, school and at home. They examined obesity among participants by measuring the size of their waistlines and percentage of body fat. No matter the metric, the more men sat, the likelier they were to be obese. Read more

Sleep can help process traumatic experiences If a person sleeps in the first 24 hours after a traumatic experience, this may help them process and integrate distressing memories more effectively, according to a new study. The results of this study suggest that sleep could be used as an early prevention strategy for posttraumatic stress disorders. Read more


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Australian College of Nursing update

ACN welcomes findings from the Choosing Wisely in Australia 2016 Report ACN supports the findings by NPS MedicineWise in the Choosing Wisely in Australia 2016 Report, which reinforce the urgent need for a national conversation on the appropriate, safe and effective use of the country’s health resources. ACN President, Professor Christine Duffield FACN

ACN Vice President, Mrs Carmen Morgan FACN

ACN welcomes new Board President and Vice President ACN is pleased to welcome its newly elected President, Professor Christine Duffield FACN, and Vice President, Mrs Carmen Morgan FACN. Professor Duffield is an internationally renowned Professor of Nursing and Health Services Management at UTS and Edith Cowan University. Professor Duffield was first elected to the ACN Board in 2013 and has served as Vice President since December 2015. Professor Duffield has more than 10 years’ nursing experience in clinical and managerial roles in the health sector in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK. Furthermore, she has over 25 years’ experience in senior management, education and research roles in the university sector.

Mrs Morgan is the current Director of Nursing at Broome Hospital in WA and Regional Nurse Director for the acute, primary health care, mental health, aged care and public health practice areas. Mrs Morgan has more than 30 years’ experience as a nurse and in senior nurse leadership roles. Adjunct Professor Kathy Baker AM FACN (DLF) stood down from her position as ACN President in December, and will continue to contribute her vast wealth of skills and knowledge to ACN by remaining on the Board. The ACN Board would like to thank Adjunct Professor Kathy Baker AM FACN (DLF) for her service and leadership, and welcomes her continued contribution as a Board Director.

Australia’s health care system faces a number of complex challenges in providing high quality, innovative, safe and cost effective care. As consumer advocates in a range of roles, nurses are well placed to improve outcomes by utilising evidence to effect change that helps shape the health care landscape. ACN supports the recommended ‘Five Questions’ for consumers when speaking with health professionals. ACN CEO Adjunct Professor Kylie Ward FACN said, “ACN commits to advancing nurse leadership and is a strong consumer advocate. In 2016, as part of the Choosing Wise initiative, ACN provided five recommendations to eliminate unnecessary practices and improve patient outcomes. ACN will continue to work with NPS MedicineWise to advocate for patient needs.” Read the full media release here.

GET SOCIAL WITH ACN Follow the Australian College of Nursing on social media for up-to-date information, opportunities for members and interesting news and current events.

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Advancing nurse leadership www.acn.edu.au


IN FOCUS @ACN

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Teamwork in the perioperative environment – human factors at work Menna Davies FACN “Theatre nurses only pass instruments, there’s no teamwork in theatre…” This comment from an undergraduate nursing student prompted a lengthy response Menna Davis FACN from my colleague, ACN Higher Education Manager Emma Woodhouse MACN. She catalogued all of the aspects of perioperative care that nurses provide in collaboration with other members of the surgical team, during one of the most vulnerable period of a patient’s life – surgery. This is not an isolated comment, I have heard it many times during my career as a perioperative nurse and educator. By the very nature of its work, the operating theatres are isolated from other areas of the hospital, unable to be viewed (and understood) by other staff. In addition, not all nurses gain clinical experience in the perioperative environment during their undergraduate programs. It is little wonder then, that such ill-informed comments are made. Patients undergoing surgery are totally reliant on good teamwork to keep them safe during the perioperative period. Each member of the surgical team, including ancillary staff, have their own individual skills and responsibilities that combine to provide a safe environment and optimum conditions in which a successful surgical outcome can be achieved.

That is not to ignore the fact that at times teamwork and communication are less than optimum, thus contributing to adverse events occurring to surgical patients. UK researchers Flin, O’Connor and Crichton (2008) found that in 48 unexpected health-related deaths, a lack of non-technical skills such as poor communication and dysfunctional teamwork were the main contributing factors.

Non-technical skills The term non-technical skills refers to the social and cognitive skills which complement the technical skills of a surgical team and contribute positively to patient safety (Flin & Mitchell, 2011). Non-technical skills are components of human factors, defined as the interrelationships between the people and their environment. These non-technical skills include: • Ergonomics • Noise and distractions • Leadership • Decision making • Communication and teamwork • Situation awareness • Task management (Gillespie & Davies 2016) The last three non-technical skills in the above list were first identified by Flin et al (2008) who observed instrument nurses at work and developed a specific set of non-technical skills – the Scrub Practitioners' List of Intra-Operative Non-Technical Skills (SPLINTS). The same authors also identified similar non-technical skills for anaesthetists and surgeons with the additional skills of leadership and decision making.


IN FOCUS @ACN

Culture The aviation industry has provided valuable lessons on how human factors has improved communication and teamwork amongst the flight deck crew. Investigations into a series of plane crashes in the 1970s found the cause was not pilot error but rather poor teamwork and communication between the pilot and the flight deck crew (Alander et al, 2011). The hierarchical structure that existed on the flight deck discouraged questioning of the pilot’s actions by the crew, contributing to the subsequent air crashes. Several authors (Brindley & Reynolds, 2011; Bromiley, 2009) have explored the parallels between the flight deck of a plane and the operating theatre, particularly in relation to the hierarchical structure. This discourages effective communication between the surgeon (pilot) and ‘subordinates’ (nurses/flight crew) with the latter being afraid to speak up and question practice. Conversely, the operating theatre (flight deck) can be an environment where social chit chat can distract the team from focusing on key tasks. Both these situations can contribute to poor patient outcomes. Fortunately this culture within the operating theatre is gradually changing from the strict hierarchal structure evident during my introduction to the specialty over 30 years ago, where the surgeon ruled and no-one questioned them (or even spoke). This culture saw many nurses afraid to speak up, even when they knew that actions they were witnessing were likely to compromise patient safety. There can be no room for such a culture in contemporary health care. Human factors training

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is being seen as a way of changing the way in which teams work together.

Education Over the past decade there has been a global movement to improve non-technical skills amongst surgical teams. Current education programs on human factors for surgical teams are based largely on the work of Flin et al (2008) and also the work of Martin Bromiley, whose wife , Elaine, died in 2005 during what should have been routine sinus surgery. The contributing factors to her death were identified as poor teamwork and communication, a lack of situation awareness and poor decision making within a team of experienced surgeons and anaesthetists, as they unsuccessfully attempted to secure Elaine’s airway (Bromiley, 2009). Interestingly, it was the perioperative nurses present during the procedure who recognised that the team and Elaine were in trouble. They attempted to alert the team to further assistance available to them. However, they could not assert themselves sufficiently and were ignored by the surgical team. Since Elaine’s death, Martin Bromiley has used his knowledge of human factors, honed during his career as a commercial airline pilot, to set up the Clinical Human Factors Group in the UK. This group develop programs to improve the understanding and practice of human factors within health care teams. Human factors training actively promotes a culture where contributions from all team members on patient safety issues, planning care and most

“Theatre nurses only pass instruments, there’s no teamwork in theatre…”

importantly speaking up, is encouraged. The use of the World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist has played an important role in improving communication between surgical team members. It has assisted in focusing everyone on the key aspects of the patient’s care, so that everyone is on the same page (Gillespie & Davies, 2016).

reading on human factors and its positive impact on patient care, certainly influenced my practice and I began to incorporate SPLINTS into the perioperative education programs that I was involved in. Human factors training is also evident in other health care settings such as, intensive care, emergency departments and other areas where patient safety relies on good communication and teamwork.

Collaboration

There is no doubt that human factors play a vital role in patient safety during the perioperative period and are equally important as technical expertise. Human factors education can enhance the perioperative nurses’ role as patient advocate by creating a positive and open environment for effective surgical teamwork.

Changes entrenched within culture takes time and commitment, and the journey has not been an easy one for some surgical teams. It is pleasing, therefore, that The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) has taken the lead in promoting education of human factors. In 2014, they initiated a partnership with the Australian College of Nursing, Royal Australasian College of Anaesthetists and Australian College of Perioperative Nurses to form a working party to develop a human factors ‘roadshow’. Over the past two years, teams made up from all the organisations have travelled to hospitals in rural Australia facilitating interactive workshops with surgical teams on human factors. The content has been well received. Evaluations indicated the participants developed a greater appreciation of the value of non-technical skills within the surgical team and actively engaged in improving the way in which they communicated with each other (Davies & Shaw 2014). RACS’ overall aim is to find ‘champions’ within local surgical teams who can deliver interdisciplinary human factors training. In my career as a perioperative educator, I had been guilty of concentrating on teaching new staff the technical skills necessary for safe practice and devoting less time to the equally important nontechnical aspects of perioperative nursing practice. This changed after I attended a conference and heard Martin Bromiley tell the story of his wife’s death. His moving presentation and my subsequent

References Alander, D., Brooks, R., Carmack, D. & Legan, J. 2011, ‘Improve surgical safety by using CRM’, Journal of American Academy/American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons, vol 5, issue 7, pp,1–5 Brindley, P.G. & Reynolds, S.F. 2011, ‘Improving verbal communication in critical care medicine’, Journal of Critical Care, vol 26, pp. 155–159 Bromiley, M. 2009, ‘Would you speak up if the consultant got it wrong?’, Journal of Perioperative Practice, vol 19, issue 10, pp. 326-329 Davies, M. & Gillespie, B. 2016, ‘The perioperative team and interdisciplinary collaboration’, in L. Hamlin, M. Davies, M. Richardson-Tench & S. Sutherland-Fraser (eds), Perioperative nursing: an introduction, Elsevier, Sydney, pp.30 – 46 Davies, M. & Shaw, E. 2014, ‘Safer Australian surgical teamwork – a multidisciplinary human factors project,’ Australian College of Operating Room Nurses Journal, vol 27, issue 4, pp. 44 Flin, R. & Mitchell, L. 2011, Scrub practitioners’ list of intraoperative non-technical skills (SPLINTS), University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen. Flin, R., O'Connor, P. & Crichton, M. 2008, Safety at the sharp end: A guide to non-technical skills. Ashgate, Aldershot

EDITOR'S NOTE If you are interested in finding out more about the impact of human factors on teamwork in the perioperative environment, please watch the following videos, which reconstruct the case of Elaine Bromiley: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzlvgtPIof4 www.emcrit.org/misc/the-new-elainebromiley-videos/


IN FOCUS @ACN

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Driving change to advance our profession “David’s career with Eastern Health is one which infiltrates the world of both nurse leadership and patient care.”

Adjunct Professor David Plunkett FACN giving a keynote address at the 2016 National Nursing Forum.

ACN would like to congratulate Adjunct Professor David Plunkett FACN on his appointment as Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Eastern Health in September 2016. Dr Joanna Flynn AM, Chair of Eastern Health Board of Directors, appointed David Plunkett as CEO after an extensive career with Eastern Health spanning nearly 15 years. David’s career with Eastern Health is one which infiltrates the world of both nurse leadership and patient care. Graduating in 1988 David began his career with an interest in theatre nursing and pursued this interest with a Graduate Certificate in perioperative nursing. Yet a keen interest in both

the private and public health care sector saw David gravitate towards further business studies. With a Graduate Diploma in Business Administration and Management completed in 1997, David began to move towards the health care information and strategic planning sector. While still understanding the pivotal role of patient care, David understood that he could implement his knowledge of business management into a new role. This directional change saw David attend Mt Eliza Business School in 2001 to complete a Master of Business Administration, which was successfully completed in 2003.

David began his leadership career with Eastern Health in 2002 as Operations Manager. Being appointed the Director of Ambulatory Care saw David initiating and implementing changes as a leadership executive. It was at this stage of his career that David actively participated in the final business case redevelopment of Box Hill Hospital. This new implementation saw a newly developed change management strategy become successful within the Eastern Health environment. It was during this stage that David was able to merge his passion with his qualifications; implementing new models of care for surgical patients and ensuring staffing resources were aligned with this new model. This demonstrates a key moment in David’s impressive career. While undertaking further studies to increase operational performance, and strategically implement stronger business plans and models, David was also able to use his knowledge as a registered nurse to successfully implement new models of care. David was able to take his passion and delve into the history of surgical patients and care planning. David then moved his way forward and emerged as a key nurse leader at Eastern Health. His commitment and passion for Eastern Health saw him move through the ranks of this highly professional organisation; with titles such as Director of Nursing, Program Director, General Manager and finally the Executive Director of Acute

Health/Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer in 2013. David stayed in this role for over three years, providing executive and professional leadership to stakeholders, nurses, midwives and directors within the health service. David was appointed Acting Chief Executive Officer in July 2016. From his early days of hospital rounds up until this year, David has a passion for driving transformational change within the health care sector. In September 2016, David was appointed Chief Executive Officer, demonstrating a hard work ethic, keen eye for detail and an excellence in delivering quality patient care. ACN wishes to congratulate David on his excellent achievement. He was a keynote speaker at our 2016 National Nursing Forum, speaking about how the power of culture can be utilized to unleash your strengths and lead change in nursing reform. At last year’s Forum, it was also a privilege to invest David as a Fellow of the Australian College of Nursing. ACN wishes Adjunct Professor David Plunkett FACN all the best in his new role.

EDITOR'S NOTE Eastern Health is an ACN Platinum Affiliate. Visit our website to find out more about the ACN Affiliation Program and our Affiliation packages.


IN FOCUS @ACN

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My research journey Kaara Ray B. Calma BN RN, BN (Honours) Candidate, School of Nursing, University of Wollongong Â

Since the very beginning and throughout my undergraduate nursing course, I have always been passionate and enthusiastic about the field of research. To me, research in health is an integral part of continuous learning and development of knowledge and new innovations. Consequently it has great capacity to make significant implications on practice. I completed my Bachelor of Nursing in 2015 and am currently studying a Bachelor of Nursing (Honours) Degree at the University of Wollongong (UOW). For my project, I am currently working with a team of researchers to investigate the health planning and health needs of Australian nomads. My qualitative study is a small part of a larger national survey of Australian nomads. Using semi-structured interviews, my study explores the impacts of chronic conditions on our participants’ health, the barriers to health care (that they have experienced whilst being on the road), issues with self-management and how travelling has impacted their general wellbeing. Our study is paramount to the wellbeing of older Australian travellers living with chronic conditions, as we explore the challenges that impact on them optimally managing their health. In doing so, we aim to better understand these challenges and propose strategies to facilitate better health care to assist Australian grey nomads in their travels, health and lives.

UOW is currently building a strong research theme around primary and health care nursing. I wanted to take the opportunity to work with this group of outstanding, senior researchers because I am a firm believer that primary health care is at the forefront of effective patient care. Primary health care has always been an interest of mine, as I believe that its specialised focus on individuals in the community allow surveillance for early detection of issues that otherwise can escalate dramatically and lead to poorer health outcomes. I feel that advocating for this structure of health provision, as well as making individuals more aware of accessible health care that can be provided in the comfort of one’s home, empowers people to see health care as a concept that is approachable and worthwhile.


EVENTS @ACN

We asked our staff what was their New Year’s Resolution. Here’s what they said…

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EDUCATION @ACN

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Progress your career with us today

If you would like to find out more about FEE-HELP or our Graduate Certificates, please visit our website.

ACN is excited to announce that FEE-HELP is now available across our Graduate Certificate Courses. FEE-HELP is a loan scheme that assists eligible fee paying student’s pay all or part of their tuition fees. Students are eligible for FEE-HELP if they: • Are studying at an approved FEE-HELP provider • Meet the citizenship and residency requirements: • Are enrolled in an eligible unit of study by the census date for that unit; and

ACN is offering the following Graduate Certificate in 2017: Acute Care Nursing Aged Care Nursing Breast cancer Nursing Cancer Nursing

• Have not exceeded the FEE-HELP limit

Child and Family Health Nursing

At ACN, our Graduate Certificate courses prepare nurses for a rewarding career in the health and community services sector. We offer coursework programs that are academically challenging and professionally relevant, in an environment that encourages independent learning and interaction amongst peers, supported by tutors and nurse educators. Our courses provide the knowledge, skills and attitudes directly suited to working in specialist areas of health care and are designed to meet contemporary industry needs.

Community and Primary Health Care Nursing Critical Care Nursing Drug and Alcohol Nursing Leadership and Management Neonatal Care Orthopaedic Nursing Paediatric Nursing Perioperative Nursing Stomal Therapy Nursing


IN FOCUS @ACN

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Virtual pathways to enhance dementia care Anne Moehead FACNP OAM MACN and Kathy De Souza

“From the humble classroom to the comfort of one’s own home, education has come a long way.”

Education has come a long way. From the hot unair-conditioned class room with the uncomfortable chairs and rigid timetables to the virtual classrooms of today; where all learning tools are provided on an internet based platform. Learning materials are available online, in the comfort of one’s own home and at a time that suits the learner. Add to that, the opportunity to collaborate with others from rural, remote and city locations and you have the world of online learning. With the expected rise in the number of people diagnosed with dementia it is vital that clinicians are educated and equipped to deliver high quality care. The Dementia Care Competency & Training Network (DCC&TN) recognised this gap and have created a system that takes learning to a whole new level. Funded by NSW Health and overseen by five staff located in Northern NSW Local Health District, the DCC&TN have developed a system that not only provides online education but merges learning to practice to competency. They have achieved this by creating an effective, online interactive, fully facilitated education platform complemented by a self-assessment tool that measures dementia care delivery of clinical competency at three levels – essential, enhanced or expert. The education learning experience consists of five courses, each being awarded CPD hours on successful completion. Each facilitated course is made up of lessons, quizzes, forum postings and real time online chats. The first four courses on the list below are aimed at RN, ENs, allied health and medical staff whilst the fifth is aimed at AINs

and PCAs. Courses are free to all NSW Health staff, partners and members of the International Psychogeriatric Association (IPA): • Positive Approach to the Care of the Older Person with Dementia – 12 weeks – 30 CPD on successful completion • Positive Approach to the Care of the Aboriginal Person with Dementia – 6 weeks – 12 CPD on successful completion • Positive Approach to the Care of the Younger Person with Dementia – 7 weeks – 14 CPD on successful completion • Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia – 6 weeks – 12 CPD on successful completion • Person Centred Care in Dementia for Support Workers – 4 weeks

Throughout each course, facilitators encourage and support students to succeed. The DCCT&N stands proud with its high completion rates – currently sitting at 78% overall. The success of the courses is put down to the facilitated model of learning and the partnership that has been formed with the organisations that have helped to enrich and facilitate each course. This includes the Australian College of Nursing and The Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, both of which have endorsed and accredited the 12-week course. DCCT&N also partners with the NSW Agency for Clinical Excellence (ACI), International Psychogeriatric Association (IPA), Dementia Collaborative Research Centres (DCRC), Care of the Confused Hospital Older Person (CHOPs) and the University of Wollongong.

The Dementia Care Competency Framework was established in partnership with the University of Wollongong and in consultation with over 300 senior clinicians from various disciplines across NSW. The competency framework delivers an accessible, accredited self-assessment tool available online and across all settings whilst inspiring personal reflection and personal development. The process is supported through mentor review. From the humble classroom to the comfort of one’s own home, education has come a long way. The DCC&TN has created a user friendly platform that not only provides online education but merges learning to practice to competency and assists clinicians to translate their learning into practice.


IN FOCUS @ACN

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ACN welcomes the new Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer for Queensland In every state and territory across the country, our Chief Nurse and Midwifery Officers (CNMO’s) provide a vital professional link between the Department of Health, and the Australian nursing and midwifery community. Our CNMO’s play a key role in developing a collaborative and strategic approach to nursing and midwifery at a state and national level. They provide leadership, advice, information and guidance on all issues related to nursing and midwifery.

and commissioning of health services, Shelley has worked extensively in areas concerning the development and implementation of patient models of care and care innovations. Shelley is a visionary, people-orientated nurse leader with expertise in contemporary health care systems. Shelley has successfully implemented clinical leadership programs across the state and has achieved positive outcomes for professional and clinical care redesign. She is a valuable Fellow of ACN who will no doubt excel in this role. ACN looks forward to working alongside Shelley to drive transformational change across the Queensland health care system.

Free entry!

ACN NURSING & HEALTH EXPOS 2017

Adjunct Professor Shelley Nowlan FACN, Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer, Queensland Source: Queensland Health

ACN will be profiling CNMO’s throughout the next few editions of NurseClick. In this edition we welcome Adjunct Professor Shelley Nowlan FACN as the new Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer of Queensland.

Saturday 29 April 2017 8:30am – 1:30pm Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre

Adjunct Professor Shelley Nowlan FACN was appointed Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer for Queensland in September 2016. Prior to this role, Shelley held several senior executive roles within Queensland Health, most recently as the Executive Director of Nursing Services, Children's Health. Shelley has worked in a range of clinical and health administrative leadership positions at both a strategic and operational level. Alongside her significant experience in capital works programs

www.acn.edu.au/expos Adjunct Professor Shelley Nowlan FACN, Ann-Maree Sandeman-Mumford MACN, ACN Brisbane Key Contact Belynda Abbott FACN and Marie Burley FACN (DLF) at the ACN Brisbane Christmas Function.


IN FOCUS @ACN

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Australia one step closer in the battle against chronic hepatitis C virus An oral medication developed to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 (GT1) and genotype 4 (GT4) has been added to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) (Department of Health, 2017). ZEPATIER® is a once-daily tablet that is among a new division of HCV treatments, known as directacting antivirals (DAA’s) (ZEPATIER®, 2016). Many DAA’s have been proven to have the potential to cure HCV in the vast majority of people (MSD, 2017). Until now, the PBS only listed DAA singletablet medications for the treatment of GT1 infections (Department of Health, 2016).

According to Professor Gregory Dore, Head of the Viral Hepatitis Clinical Research Program, The Kirby Institute, UNSW, Sydney, the new PBS listing will provide additional reimbursed antiviral therapy to a group of patients living with HCV who previously had limited options (MSD, 2017). “This listing is great news for thousands of Australians, as it takes us one step closer to providing access to interferon-free antiviral therapy for all people living with HCV, including those who were previously hard to treat.” “Patients living with GT4 HCV either needed to pay for treatment privately, or receive an interferon-based treatment which is often associated with considerable morbidity and debilitating side-effects. “This is the first reimbursed highly effective, single tablet, interferon-free therapy for Australian patients living with GT1 or GT4 chronic HCV,” said Professor Dore.

What is hepatitis C virus? HCV causes both acute and chronic infection in people who have contracted the virus (World Health Organisation (WHO), 2016). Acute HCV infection usually has no symptoms and is only very rarely life-threatening (WHO, 2016). Approximately 15–45% of people with HCV recover from the virus within six months of infection without treatment (WHO, 2016). The remaining 55–85% of people with HCV will develop a chronic infection (WHO, 2016). Of those with chronic HCV infection, 15–30% develop cirrhosis of the liver within 20 years (WHO, 2016).

Key facts about hepatitis C virus • The hepatitis C virus is a blood borne virus, which is most often contracted through unsafe injection practices, inadequate sterilization of medical equipment, and unscreened blood transfusions (WHO, 2016). • Between 130–150 million people have chronic hepatitis C infection around the world (WHO, 2016). • Approximately 700 000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver diseases (WHO, 2016).

Read the latest in nursing research and practice in ACN’s digital journal, Collegian. Access to the peer-reviewed publication is free for all ACN Members via the My ACN member portal, members.acn. edu.au

Visit www.collegianjournal.com

• Antiviral medicines can cure approximately 90% of hepatitis C infection, however global access to diagnosis and treatment is low (WHO, 2016). PRESENTING THE INAUGURAL

• There is no vaccination for hepatitis C (WHO, 2016).

References Department of Health, 2017, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, viewed 1 January 2017, <http://www.pbs.gov.au/pbs/home;jsessionid=157xwbealqtyk1d0802gztelhy>

National Cosmetic Medicine Summit 3 – 4 March 2017 | Swissotel Sydney

Department of Health, 2016, General Statement for Drugs for the Treatment of Hepatitis C, viewed 1 November 2016, <http://www.pbs.gov.au/info/healthpro/explanatory-notes/general-statementhep-c> Department of Health 2015, Turnbull Government Invests Over $1 billion to Cure HEP C, viewed August 29, 2016, <http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/ publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2015-ley154.htm> World Health Organisation 2016, Hepatitis C, viewed 21 December 2016, <http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs164/en/> ZEPATIER 2016, Product Information, viewed 29 August 2016, <https://www.zepatier.com/>

www.informa.com.au/cosmedic17


EVENTS @ACN

“Make Change Happen is a celebration of nurses who use their voice to drive change across the Australian health care system.”

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

MAKE CHANGE HAPPEN

MASTERCLASSES

As the preeminent and national leader of the nursing profession, ACN is inviting nurses and undergraduates from all over Australia and around the world to submit an abstract for the 2017 National Nursing Forum (NNF).

Abstracts should be linked to our 2017 NNF theme, Make Change Happen. Make Change Happen is a celebration of nurses who use their voice to drive change across the Australian health care system. This theme will explore the creative and innovative way that nurses can make a difference to individuals, communities and social determinates of health at a local, national and global level.

In addition to oral and poster presentations, and following feedback received at the NNF 2016, we are also asking for people to put in expressions of interest to present a masterclass. Masterclass presentation submissions need to be contemporary, interactive and person centred. There are four masterclass sessions available and each successful masterclass will be delivered twice.

Last year’s NNF theme, The Power of Now, was met with excellent thoughts and innovative ideas. In 2017, we will carry these ideas forward and put The Power of Now into action. Whether you are a student nurse or retired, each of you have the opportunity to achieve your leadership goals and change the face of health care within Australia by utilising The Power of Now to Make Change Happen.

Let us know if you are a first timer in submitting abstracts or presenting. ACN welcomes the opportunity to nurture and promote new talent. Visit our website to read our abstract guidelines and to find out more about the 2017 NNF.

We welcome the opportunity to give undergraduates through to retired nurses the opportunity to share their learnings and their stories by giving an oral or poster presentation at our signature event. This is your opportunity to present on a national scale. All accepted abstracts provide the author with a guaranteed paper in one of ACN’s national publications throughout 2017/18.


NMBA UPDATE

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What’s happening in 2017? “This nationwide support service will offer 24/7 professional, confidential advice and referral about health issues for nurses and midwives, via telephone and online.”

The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (NMBA) wishes all nurses and midwives around Australia a very happy new year. In 2017, the NMBA will continue to ask for your input into key projects, including public consultation on the revised codes of conduct for nurses and midwives and the new Midwife standards for practice. The NMBA, supported by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA), is continuing to improve the registration process for nurses and midwives each year, making it easier than ever to renew online in 2017. We will also continue to support nurses and midwives to practice safely, with the launch of Nurse and Midwife Support, the national health support service for nurses and midwives which will provide around the clock advice, anywhere in Australia.

Code of conduct: public consultation and launch in 2017 In February 2017, all nurses and midwives will receive an invitation from the NMBA to give their feedback on the draft codes of conduct for their professions, as part of the public consultation before the codes are finalised. The new codes of conduct will be launched later in 2017. The codes of conduct set out the legal requirements, professional behaviour and conduct expectations for all nurses and midwives in all practice settings in Australia. The draft codes are research-based and have been through extensive consultation with the professions and other stakeholders. The NMBA looks forward to hearing your thoughts on the draft codes next month.

Midwife standards for practice Nurse and midwife support March 2017 will see the commencement of Nurse and Midwife Support – the national health support service for nurses, midwives, students and employers. This nationwide support service will offer 24/7 professional, confidential advice and referral about health issues for nurses and midwives, via telephone and online.

Deakin University is developing the new Midwife standards for practice, on behalf of the NMBA, and the public consultation on the draft standards is expected to open in May 2017. The project includes a review of the existing National competency standards for the midwife (2006) and is expected to be completed later this year. 

Internationally qualified nurses and midwives In 2017, the NMBA is developing a model for outcomes-based assessment for internationally qualified nurses and midwives (IQNMs). This model will allow a more consistent and robust assessment of IQNMs, and align with international best practice standards.

Registration renewal Registration renewal will open in March 2017 and it’s easier than ever to renew online. Registration fees fund all of the costs of regulating around 380,000 nurses, midwives and students of nursing and midwifery in every Australian state and territory. These fees cover the costs of setting and administering evidence-based registration standards as well as professional codes, standards and guidelines. These fees also contribute to the cost of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC). ANMAC is responsible for accrediting and monitoring more than 400 nursing and midwifery programs of study that lead to registration or endorsement: an essential component of the National Scheme. Some of the work the NMBA does for safer health care is communicated to nurses and midwives in our regular newsletters and bulletins, but you can also visit our website to find out more.

Profile for ACN Australian College of Nursing

Nurseclick January 2017  

NurseClick is the Australian College of Nursing's monthly e-zine focusing on topical articles.

Nurseclick January 2017  

NurseClick is the Australian College of Nursing's monthly e-zine focusing on topical articles.