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It’s 2300. The world’s music industry, to keep up with the modern technological advances, only produces beat-driven and digitally formed music with no lyrics. NATHAN ROBECK, a teenage American living in Nashville, finds an acoustic guitar in his grandfathers attic. With the guitar are countless CDs of old music from the 21st century that has long since been forgotten. Nathan begins to play the guitar and write songs, using the old CDs as inspiration. Once artist inspires him in particular, John Mayer. To say the least, Nathan is a natural. He is exceptional at singing and playing the guitar at the same time. After pouring through the Online Archives (libraries have become very rare - like museums) Nathan discovers how the songwriters of old shared their music with others and how it effected them. Amazed and inspired, Nathan attempts to play his music at a local coffee shop. The owner is incredulous that such a lost and old form of music could ever be appetizing to his customers and does not allow Nathan to play. In response, Nathan begins to play his songs on the street corner for people passing by. The startled people who walk by, who have never heard a guitar and a singer performing together, are astonished and intrigued. A small crowd forms. Nathan announces that he will play every day at the same time at the same place. As more and more people show up, Nathan is approached by the coffee shop owner, among other business owners who want him to play his music at their shops. Nathan’s fame grows. Soon Nathan is a well known figure Nashville but none of the major record labels will sign him: they see his style as antique and out of date and don’t believe it would sell. MARK SMITHSON, a audio tech for Columbia Records, hears about Nathan’s music. After many years under the scrutiny of his superiors, Mark decides to leave the company to secretly start producing Nathan’s songs. After meeting each other after one of Nathan’s local shows, Nathan and Mark agree to enter into business together. They fly out to Mark’s home studio in New York City. Mark begins to record Nathan’s first album.


When Nathan’s music hits the radio-waves, America is shellshocked. Most are so moved emotionally that they shut it off because they do not know how to handle it. Overtime, Nathan’s music begins to sell little by little as people begin to like the emotions that his music brings to them. Outraged, the record labels begin forming hate groups and attempt to bash Nathan’s music and reputation in any way possible. They win over large amounts of people. Nathan continues to perform and starts to play shows outside of Nashville. Nathan’s songs captures the heart of LYDIA MORSE, who is signed beat maker for Columbia Records. She begins going to Nathan’s shows secretly and the two become good friends. Spies for the major record labels discover that Nathan’s producer is Mark. When word reaches Columbia, they are furious and go to drastic measures to eliminate the threat that Nathan is to their wealth and audience: they hire assassins to kill him. Lydia hears of the assassination plans and rushes to tell Nathan and Mark as soon as she possibly can. The three call the police and barricade the door. No sooner had they went into Nathan’s attic that the door to the house bursts open. As the assassins comb the house, SWAT teams and police arrive on the scene and quickly apprehend the them. After being given a truth serum, the assassins are quick to rat out Columbia Records. In the aftermath of the arrests, the main executives of Columbia are all put behind bars and Mark is named owner of the business. With that, Nathan is brought on to the record label. Nathan sparks in America, and soon after the world, a revolution in emotion and expression. His music breaks the unemotional shell surrounding the people of 2300’s lives and opens them up to the true joys of life.


1

INT. JOHAN’S COFFEE - NIGHT

1

NATHAN ROBECK sits upon the stage, his golden guitar in his hands. As his hand moves rhythmically over the strings and he sings his passion into the mic, he surveys the people in the small coffee house. About thirteen people watch attentively, hanging on his every word. Nathan finishes his last song for the evening. The people cheer. NATHAN Thank you everybody! Thank you! I will be here next week, same time, same place. Have a good night! As the people disperse and fall to chattering among themselves, Nathan is approached by a tall man in a black suit and tie. The man has an accent of a New Yorker. MARK SMITHSON I have never heard anything like that. Kid, you’ve got something. I don’t know what the hell it is, but you got it. NATHAN That’s what they keep telling me. I’m Nathan. MARK Mark Smithson. Nathan continues to pack up his gear. Mark stands there appraising him for a moment. MARK Nathan erm... what did you say your last name was again? NATHAN Oh! Robeck. MARK Right. I’ve been watchin’ ya. Kid you’ve got something and I want to give it to America, no, to the world. Nathan stops packing his gear and stares at Mark. The coffee shop owner starts to bustle over with Nathan’s check for the night. Nathan waves him away.

(CONTINUED)


CONTINUED:

2.

MARK Let’s you and me enter into a partnership. You see, I work for that little nobody company over on 4th street. NATHAN Columbia...? MARK That’s the one. But the thing is those wise asses over there don’t think you got it. Thing is, I know you do. NATHAN I’m not really sure what you mean. MARK Kid, I’m gonna make you a superstar. A fuckin’ superstar. NATHAN They would never... they hate what I’m doing here. They think its bullshit. MARK It is bullshit, but its brilliant. NATHAN If you’re here to bash me, I’m not going to have it. I’ve got toMARK -did ya hear me kid? You’re brilliant. Those bastards over there at Columbia? Fuck ’em. I quit. I’ll tell you what. Right here right now, I’m gonna give you an offer. NATHAN I’m listening. MARK I will produce and record those little ditties of yours. I will pay for the studio and the marketing fees. All you gotta do, is keep writing them silly little songs.

(CONTINUED)


CONTINUED:

3. NATHAN What’s the catch? Catch? The playing on station in my friend, superstar.

MARK catch is you’re gonna be every internet radio this damn country. You are going to be a Fuckin’ superstar.

NATHAN And why should I sign with you? Whose to say you can do what you say you can do? I’ve heard of all them big shots over at Columbia. Haven’t heard your name. MARK (scoffs) Kid I’m your friend. No, I just became your best friend. I’m giving you a chance to do something. Thing is, all them record companies, their all wise-asses. To them, your a joke. A fuckin’ joke. I want to show them, and please I know you do to, that you got it. You’ve got something to say with that music of yours, kid. I see.

NATHAN

MARK Thing is, I’m your only friend out here. And I know what it takes to make you a superstar. We enter this partnership, and before you know it. Bam. Money. Bam. Woman. Bam. Your name in history. What do you say kid? NATHAN You are the first professional to approach me since I’ve started. You can do this for me? You can get my music out there? MARK Notta problem champ. Give me one year. If you’re not satisfied one hundred and ten percent. You’re out for good. None of them strings atatched. (CONTINUED)


CONTINUED:

4.

NATHAN (clasps hands with Mark) I think we just became very, very good friends.


5.

2

INT. DOORSTEP OF MARK SMITHSON’S APARTMENT - DAY

2

Nathan, still shivering from the frigid January air, rubs his hands together furiously to attempt to warm them. Having just arrived in New York yesterday, Nathan was forced to walk in the foreign city. Nathan knocks impatiently on the metal door for the third time. After the sound of many locks, the door swings inward. MARK Well don’t just stand there like a wise-ass! Come in, come in. NATHAN It’s good to see you to. MARK Yeah yeah you know I’m glad to see you. How was JFK? NATHAN Busy as hell. New York... this city isMARK Fuckin’ incredible ain’t it? Greatest city in the world. Yeah have a seat there, I’ll grab you a brew. We gotta discuss some things before we can get going with the money making. Mark bustles off to the kicten and returns after a minute with two cold drinks. He hands one to Nathan. NATHAN (takes a sip) Thanks. What is this stuff. MARK Just drink it. Its the best. Now whats that you got in that fucked up looking case? What is that thing called? NATHAN (takes out the guitar) This is a guitar. You strum with your right hand like this. And move your other hand like this to make the different notes.

(CONTINUED)


CONTINUED:

6.

MARK (looks confused) Notes? NATHAN Sounds. MARK Right right. You know how much that thing is probably worth? Hell, lets put it on eBay and we won’t have to do shit! NATHAN They have a bunch down in D.C. in a museumMARK -That right? NATHAN Yeah and they also have elecMARK -Imma give them a call. NATHAN (they laugh) This here is an acoustic guitar. In D.C. they have ones called electric. I would do anything to play one of them. MARK Tell ya what kid, these next couple bust your ass and electric guitars. that.

you work hard of months and you own of them I promise you

NATHAN If you say so. MARK Now I want to talk to you about Nathan why arn’t you drinking that brew - about how we’re gonna do this. You ever been in a recording studio before?


Austin Veldman T206 Reaction This was by far one of the coolest things I’ve done here at Bloomington. I have always been a creative person, and am set on doing the Creative Writing program here at IU, but this Telecom stuff is really catching my interest. This is the first time I have written a treatment for a story and than sat down and actually wrote part of the script out. I am not sure how the final copy has turned out, but it seems pretty cool to me. The most intriguing part for me was trying to imagine up these characters and how they would act and talk and react in the situations that I was going to place them. I guess it isn’t that different at all from writing fiction. It felt like the same process to me and it was just as fun. I would envision and act out each line and scene as I was writing it. Awesome. The idea that I was writing a script for a movie added that much more excitement to what I was doing. This was by far the coolest and most fun I have had with a school project here at Bloomington, and hell, high school too. As this class keeps going, I am starting to consider a major in Telecom more and more. I want to wait and see just how much potential I think I have and how much passion I generate for it. Hopefully the class continues to challenge me and keep me interested. Awesome project!


T206