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at everything, so I was pushing myself too hard at every workout. Of course, there were no real recovery sessions because those aren't often built into group plans. I never scheduled an “off season.” It was either “tri season” or “marathon season.” Plus, as a competitive athlete and member of several teams, I didn't want to show weakness. I didn't want to be viewed as vulnerable. Most importantly, I didn't want to feel like a slacker. Consequently, I spent the greater part of two years in a physical therapist's office recovering from two different surgeries on my hip and leg. Was it the group's fault? Absolutely not. I have no one to blame but myself. I wasn't taking personal responsibility or heeding the warning signs. I didn't pull my coaches aside and say, “I'm toast,” because I didn't want to hear the truth. I didn't want to hear, “Take a break.” Ironically, the break came anyway, albeit not in the form I wanted. That's why, when I made my return to training and competition, I wanted to do it the right way. I wanted to start with a base and foundation of fitness and strength. I wanted to remain as healthy as possible, even if it meant sacrificing speed. I want to enjoy this lifestyle for as long as possible. And, in the wise words of my husband, I want to “train to alleviate stress in life, not to create more of it.” Because of this, I've recently taken the lone ranger approach to my own training. In spite of coaching 20+ athletes of my own at any given time, I've actually hired separate coaches for myself. I work one-on-one with them to talk about pace, exertion, heart rate, power, and all of the other metrics that are unique to my needs. I have my own periodized schedules that build in breaks and recovery. I have specific workouts that require a tremendous amount of self-discipline and motivation. Do I work as hard as I did when I was training with groups? Absolutely. Most days, it's harder because there's no one

there to push me or distract me. Training solo is also more time efficient, and it provides much needed “me” time. Often, I crave those long training runs or solo swims. Does this mean I never train with people? Heck no! My most memorable days involve training with others: I love hopping into group rides or weekend shop rides, and I find joy in meeting friends for a swim at the Quarry. I'm just much better at balancing those days with achieving my own training and race goals. That, in turn, has made me a more balanced athlete. And, since recovering from those surgeries, I've set a personal best at the half-Ironman distance; I've re-qualified for the Boston Marathon; and I've trained for and raced two Ironman triathlons...mostly by training solo. Continued on page 104

Family Fun Training Plan for ThunderCloud Subs 5-Mile Turkey Trot

Weeks 5 - 9 (09/30/13 - 11/03/13)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Week 5 (9/30 - 10/6)

25 minutes (approx. 1 to 1.5 miles)

Rest or XTrain

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

Rest or XTrain

35 minutes (approx. 3 to 3.5 miles)

Rest or Xtrain

Week 6 (10/7 - 10/13)

25 minutes (approx. 1 to 1.5 miles)

Rest or XTrain

35 minutes (approx. 3 to 3.5 miles)

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

Rest or XTrain

35 minutes (approx. 3 to 3.5 miles)

Rest or Xtrain

Week 7 (10/14 - 10/20)

25 minutes (approx. 1 to 1.5 miles)

Rest or XTrain

35 minutes (approx. 3 to 3.5 miles)

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

Rest or XTrain

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

Rest or Xtrain

Week 8 (10/21 - 10/27)

25 minutes (approx. 1 to 1.5 miles)

Rest or XTrain

45 minutes (approx. 4 to 4.5 miles)

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

Rest or XTrain

45 minutes (approx. 4 to 4.5 miles)

Rest or Xtrain

Week 9 (10/28 - 11/3)

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

Rest or XTrain

45 minutes (approx. 4 to 4.5 miles)

30 minutes (approx. 2.5 to 3 miles)

Rest or XTrain

50 minutes (approx. 4.5 to 5 miles)

Rest or XTrain

Xtrain = cross training days. Give your legs a rest and enjoy other activities, such as swimming, yoga, or cycling. Beginners or New Runners: If you are starting from ground zero with this plan, I encourage you to take regular walk intervals during the prescribed workout. That's why you'll see both time and mileage recommendations.

Online

Download the entire Turkey Trot training program on Training Peaks here: http://ow.ly/o4t2X

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