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Publisher’s Letter

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It’s All About the Journey

appy New Year! Holy cow, it’s 2015. Time for some serious reflection. As a baby boomer with some gray hair at the temples and two generations of antecedents in my family, I am fascinated by how our views have changed as the years have passed. While some of the old timers may lament our youth’s epiphanies, I find many to be enlightened. Among the most striking shifts seems to be a new appreciation for the value of enjoying life in the moment. While by no means a new idea, what is so refreshing about this shift in thinking is the newfound understanding that with achievement comes sacrifices, and that it is naive to assume you can have it all, all at once. Many members of my generation grew up wanting to have more than our parents in many areas of our lives. We were willing to sacrifice short-term experiences for long-term gain. Aside from occasional vacations, the gift of choice would have to wait until retirement. The outcomes from this strategy are varied, but never more has there been a debate about this old way of thinking than amongst our own children. Today’s youth are good observers and have carefully assessed the kind of lives they want to live. Their conclusion repeatedly seems to be that life is all about the journey, not just about the destination. They are looking for quality in every experience. They are willing to structure their lives around smaller homes and less expensive cars. They adopt frugal fiscal behaviors and take more time off. They have a sincere concern for their personal health and, above all, care about meaningful social engagement. For them, even work itself needs to be more than a job generating income to pay the bills. It’s hard to argue with this lifestyle when you really take the time to think about what’s important. You see manifestations of this shift in thinking in the most basic of activities. Take, for example, how young folks get to work. Younger generations consider their method of transportation a significant experience. Some of the questions one might consider with respect to their commute are: Is it “green”? Will it benefit my health and fitness? Will I enjoy the experience? Does it offer a socially engaging opportunity? It is no surprise then that more and more people are walking, biking, or taking public transportation to work. I believe our youth are wise and that this shift in how they approach daily life will bring new energy, innovation and progress to our future. In this month’s issue, we feature a couple of these changes in how we get from here to there. We hope you find it interesting. And of course, since this is January, we take our annual look back with the “Best Of” issue—shining a light on who and what made Austin truly exemplary in 2014. I hope you enjoy and remember to always... Keep Austin Fit,

Publisher/CEO Louis M. Earle COO & Assistant Publisher Alex Earle Managing eDITOR April Cumming Creative & Social Director Weston Carls Editorial Assistant Madie Leon Copy Editor Alicia Dietrich, Rose M. Tharp Director of Marketing & Communications Carrie Crowe Senior Advertising Consultant Betty Davis Advertising Consultants Emily Vaughn, Brittany Summerford, Jessica Martinez Associate Digital Coordinator Gretchen Goswitz Writers Carrie Barrett, Joanne Blackerby, Steve Cuddy, Leana Mooradian, Sara Sanchez, Diane Vives, Anne Wilfong, Deanna Wolfe General Inquiries info@austinfitmagazine.com Advertising Inquiries ads@austinfitmagazine.com Submissions editors@austinfitmagazine.com fitfocus@austinfitmagazine.com Event Listings austinfitmagazine.com/events Subscriptions austinfitmagazine.com/subscribe 2201 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 220 Austin, TX 78705 p 512.407.8383 f 512.407.8393 Austin Fit Magazine assumes no responsibility for the content of articles or advertisements, in that the views expressed therein may not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or any magazine employee or contributor. This publication and all of its contents are copyrighted. Austin Fit Magazine is the assumed name of its publisher, Louis M. Earle, who has no interest in the business of Denis Calabrese who operates an exercise program under the assumed name of Austin Fit, which trains individuals to improve their jogging or running skills to participate in marathons. The views, opinions and other representations published in Austin Fit Magazine are not those of Austin Fit or any of its directors, officers, employees or agents.

Lou Earle, Publisher, CEO 10 • au sti nf Itm agazi ne.c om • 01.2 015

Please recycle this magazine photography by Dennis Burnett

January 2015 - The Best Of 2014 Issue  

We asked you to vote for the people and places that keep Austin fit. Here’s who and what made the cut.

January 2015 - The Best Of 2014 Issue  

We asked you to vote for the people and places that keep Austin fit. Here’s who and what made the cut.

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