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JANUARY 2018

smar t parenting • healthy homes

Serving Austin’s Families Since 1992

NEW YOU! Moms Build a Community of Fitness and Support

REVAMP IT

8 Ways to Overhaul Your Family Routines

Visit Our 20th Annual Camp Fair Jan. 20!

Plus:

SELF–CARE

Lisa Druxman Helps You Find Time for Yourself

WINNERS!

ARTICULOS EN ESPAÑOL

INSIDE!

CAMP FAIR | EDUCATION GUIDE | CALENDAR | COVER KIDS WINNERS!


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January 2018 austinfamily.com

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January 2018 austinfamily.com

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January 2018

contents 12

This mom got fit

smart parenting • healthy homes

14

Revamp your routines

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Time for self–care

columns

Calendar

en español

10 / Family Matters. Create a peaceful home environment

36 / January Events. Museum

11 / Asuntos Familiares. Crea un ambiente pacífico en casa

exhibits, family events, parenting events and story times

46 / Piensa Positivo.

18 / Lifelines. Is your young athlete being exposed to infection?

In every Issue

20 / The Learning Curve. Kids

on consumer products

and time management

5 / Play It Safe. Recalls 6 / Around Austin.

34 / Family Connections.

News and notes

Reality gets a makeover with AR, VR technology

47 / KidZone. An Ivory soap

48 / Just for Grins. Technology

fIlm revIew The Best of 2017

experiment and toddlers

Expectativas

Read online at: www.austinfamily.com/films

extras 22 / 20th Annual Camp Fair 23 / Summer Camp Guide 32 / Education Guide

follow us: tune in:

46 / Focus on Doctors Cover Kids Contest Winners! inside back cover

Catch Austin Family live on “Good Day Austin” every Friday morning and “Despierta Austin” the first Friday morning of each month.

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Heather Wallis is one fit mama! (See page 17) Here, nephew Cole gets in on the action. Photo by Jordan Ashley Photography.

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ave you made a New Year’s resolution yet? If you’re one of the 68 million Americans who make a resolution about health and fitness—vowing to get more exercise, eat more healthily or lose weight—you might want to turn to our feature articles for inspiration and motivation. First, our Q&A with author Lisa Druxman emphasizes the importance of “me” time in giving our lives balance and energy. Second, writer Sandi Haustein lets us in on her journey toward healthy living; it just takes a little discipline.

®

H

The New Year brings other changes, too. You might take this opportunity to revamp some of your family routines around meals, bath and bed time. Margaret Nicklas gives us some insight into teaching our kids about the passage of time. And Betty Richardson has advice for those of us who want to make a more peaceful home environment.

January 2018 Volume 25, No.10 PUBLISHER Kaye K. Lowak

editor’s note S H E R I DA MO C K Mock is an award–winning writer and the mother of two daughters.

EDITOR Sherida Mock: editor2003@austinfamily.com

COPY EDITOR Barb Matijevich

ADVISING EDITORS Dr. Betty Kehl Richardson, Barb Matijevich

But let’s not forget that January kicks off camp season here at Austin Family magazine. We’re excited to bring you our 20th annual Camp Fair on Saturday, Jan. 20, at the Palmer Events Center. You won’t want to miss this chance to meet nearly 100 summer camps on a more personal level. Happy New Year!

CALENDAR EDITOR Betty Kemper: calendar2003@austinfamily.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sherida Mock, Dr. Betty Richardson, Jack Kyser, Richard Singleton, Carrie Taylor, Brenda Schoolfield, Margaret Nicklas, Sandi Haustein and Sara Barry.

TRANSLATION Maribel Ruvalcaba

GRAPHIC DESIGN Susie Forbes & Kim Crisler

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Jordan Ashley Photography

ADVERTISING SALES Kaye K. Lowak: kaye2003@austinfamily.com

We are dedicated to serving the Greater Austin area by providing up–to–date information and ideas that promote smart parenting and healthy homes. We promote our clients’ businesses by increasing their customer bases and enhancing their public images.

Austin Family is published monthly by KKKemper Inc. Mailing Address: P.O. Box 7559, Round Rock, Texas 78683–7559 Phone Number: 512–733–0038 On the web at: www.austinfamily.com Advertising rates are available upon request. While we use great care in creating our display ads, mistakes can happen. Austin Family and the publisher are not liable for any damages arising from any typographical or mechanical errors beyond the cost of the ad. Austin Family does not necessarily endorse any of the advertisers, products or services listed in this publication. We do not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Subscriptions are available for $30 per year. Copyright 2018. All rights reserved No portion of Austin Family may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

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January 2018 austinfamily.com

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Play it product recalls

sa fe

Government Recalls Craft Kits, Chests and Quilted Jackets Toys R Us is recalling about 6,000 clay craft kits because mold can be present in the clay, posing a risk of respiratory or other infections in individuals with compromised immune systems, damaged lungs or an allergy to mold. The recall involves Totally Me! clay craft kits with model number AD11244 on the bottom of the box. Affected units were sold at Toys R Us and Babies R Us stores nationwide between January 2017 and October 2017 for about $10. Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled craft kits and return them to Toys R Us or Babies R Us for a full refund or store credit. Ikea is re–announcing the recall of about 17.3 million chests and dressers because they are unstable if they are not properly anchored to the wall, posing a serious tip–over and entrapment hazard that can result in injuries or death to children. The recall involves Malm and other Ikea chests and dressers taller than 23.5 inches. Affected units were sold at Ikea stores nationwide and online between January 2002 and June 2016 for between $70 and $200. Consumers should immediately stop using any recalled chest or dresser that is not properly anchored to the wall and place it in an area that children cannot access. Contact Ikea for a wall anchoring kit or a full refund. Oshkosh is recalling about 38,000 quilted jackets because the snaps can detach, posing a choking hazard. The recall involves Oshkosh Baby B’gosh quilted jackets in pink and gray in sizes newborn through 5T. Affected units were sold at Oshkosh, Bon–Ton, Kohl’s, Fred Meyer and other retail and department stores nationwide and online at oshkosh.com between August 2017 and September 2017 for between $35 and $40. Consumers should immediately take the recalled jackets away from children and return them to any Oshkosh store or contact Oshkosh for a full refund in the form of a gift card. The US Consumer Products Safety Commission works to protect the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from more than 15,000 types of consumer products.

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G O TO W W W. AU ST I N FA M I LY.COM F O R W E E K LY U P DAT E S O F A RO U N D AU ST I N N E WS

Must–Do This

Civic Lessons Approximately 60 middle and high school students from Central Texas took part in a Civics Day event at the Texas Capitol in December. The event capped a fall semester of action–based civics education provided by the nonpartisan nonprofit Generation Citizen. Throughout the school year, the students work with volunteer “democracy coaches” from UT Austin and St. Edwards University to develop policy change projects, which they present to volunteer judges for critique. “These students took a hot–button national issue and made it local and relevant to them,” says Meredith Norris, Central Texas Site Director for Generation Citizen. Those issues include police–community relations, affordable housing, dropout prevention and more. Musician SaulPaul opened the event with a motivational speech and performance. “I want to encourage you, I want to entertain you, I want to inspire you,” he told the crowd. “I want you to focus, not just today but in general. That’s the potential you have in you.” He then created an improvised hip–hop song using words offered by audience members and later performed his hit song “Rise,” featuring the young local singer Alexia Finney. “Civics is not taught to the extent that it used to be,” says Scott Warren, CEO of Generation Citizen. “What we’re trying to do is bring civics back to the classroom and make it action–oriented and relevant.” Generation Citizen was founded in 2010 in Rhode Island and expanded into Central Texas in 2016.

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Students gather in the rotunda of the Texas Capitol Extension for Civics Day.

January 2018 austinfamily.com

January 7

Free First Sunday at Bullock State History Museum

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Austin Family Magazine’s Summer Camp Fair at Palmer Events Center

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Texas Wildlife Day at Texas Memorial Museum

Human Trafficking The SAFE Alliance recently received a $7,500 grant from The Texas Bar Foundation to provide pro bono legal services to child and adult survivors of sex trafficking. The SAFE Alliance is an Austin nonprofit serving survivors of child abuse, sexual assault and exploitation, and domestic violence. Officials say the grant will provide critical funding to support SAFE Legal Services. The SAFE Alliance has partnered with the Office of the Texas Governor’s Criminal Justice Division, LifeWorks, and Allies Against Slavery to design and develop three new programs to address the complex needs of survivors. Supported by members of the State Bar of Texas, the Texas Bar Foundation has awarded more than $18 million in grants to law– related programs.

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Photo by Bells and Whistles Productions.

Arts and STEM Youth A group of 7th graders recently celebrated the culmination of their residency program with an evening of performance. The roboARTS program, a 12–week collaboration with The Paramount Academy for the Arts, Google Fiber and the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, brought together students who are interested in building and programming robots and students who are passionate about creative writing, music and performance.

Seventh graders at the Ann Richards School performed original pieces to cap their roboARTS semester in December.

Classroom instruction was designed to highlight the parallels between creative writing, songwriting and theatre and engineering and robotics, with the goal of ultimately enhancing students’ perception and mastery of each discipline. The program was facilitated by a professional teaching artist from the Paramount Theatre and engineering mentors from Science in a Suitcase. “The Paramount Academy for the Arts is thrilled to partner with Science in a Suitcase once again to promote the intersections of art and technology,” says Jennifer Luck, education and outreach director at the Paramount Theatre. The performance featured original scripts, songs and scenes created and written by the students. For more information about roboARTS, visit austintheatre.org/ roboarts.

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Charity Concert

The Moody Theater (ACL Live) will be the new venue for Any Baby Can’s annual fundraising benefit, Rockin’ Round Up. The benefit concert, featuring St. Paul & The Broken Bones, will take place on Thursday, Feb. 15. Officials for the nonprofit say moving the location of the annual concert allows Any Baby Can to open ticket sales to a wider audience and reach more people. This year’s Rockin’ Round Up will include an honoree awards presentation, live auction and live music. Sponsors for the event include Aquila and ABC Home & Commercial Services. Tickets cost $35 to $45 and can be purchased at bit.ly/RRU18ACLlive. For VIP tickets and sponsorship opportunities visit bit.ly/RRU18sponsorship. For more information about the Rockin’ Round Up, visit anybabycan.org/rru2018.

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More than 200,000 diapers were distributed directly to the Austin community in December’s Austin Diaper Volunteers with the Austin Diaper Bank Day, an event held by the hand out free packages at Austin Austin Diaper Bank. The Diaper Day in December. children’s disposable diapers were handed out free of charge to the public at the Dove Springs Recreation Center. “The Austin Diaper Bank was recently blessed with large donations of diapers, and we want to give them to Austin area families who need them most,” says Executive Director Holly McDaniel. “We’re seeing a lot of families that we’ve never seen before. We expected to help about 200 to 300 families today. It’s only 15 minutes into our event, and we’ve already served over 400 families.” The Austin Diaper Bank has found that “diaper need” impacts an estimated 12,000 babies and toddlers in Travis County alone. Disposable diapers are typically a requirement of most childcare centers and other childhood education programs. Federal assistance programs, such as SNAP and WIC, do not cover diapers. “Our mission is to ensure that no child suffers because their family struggles to afford a sufficient supply of diapers to keep them clean and healthy,” McDaniel says.

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Photo by Sherida Mock.

Photo courtesy of St. Paul & The Broken Bones. St. Paul & The Broken Bones take the stage for Any Baby Can in February.

Diaper Distribution


Photo by Charles Crie These leaning wine bottles are the work “Sortie de Cav” by Patrick Dougherty in Chateaubourg, France. Dougherty will create a similar installation in Pease Park in January.

Art in Nature This month, internationally–renowned artist Patrick Dougherty visits Austin to create one of his breathtaking Stickwork projects—a natural sculpture made completely of local tree saplings and sticks. The installation will take 21 days to build, using over seven truckloads of harvested materials from Stonewall, Texas, and several hundred local

volunteers to help assemble the sticks. Dougherty and his volunteers will begin construction on Jan. 8 in Pease Park, at Custer’s Meadow south of 24th St. Over the past 30 years, Dougherty has created more than 275 Stickwork pieces in parks, museums and other spaces worldwide, including projects in Belgium, France, Scotland, Japan and the US.

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68 million

Americans make health/ fitness resolutions Source: Forbes

36%

US adults get no physical exercise Source: CDC

$33 billion

Spent annually on athletic gear Source: Creditcards.com

January 2018 austinfamily.com

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family matters BETTY RICHARDSON Richardson, PhD, RNC, LPC, LMFT, is an Austin–based psychotherapist.

New Year’s Resolution: Create a Peaceful Home Environment

Q.

I’m a single parent with a full–time job. I live with my mother, who watches my children (ages 6 and 9) when they’re out of school. She says when I’m home, I’m making things stressful for her and the kids. I’ll admit I’ve had a lot of difficulties recently, and I’m easily angered. My mother has asked me to make a New Year’s resolution to stay calmer when I’m at home. What can I do about my anger?

A. Ask yourself: where can this anger be coming from? Is it PTSD over the difficult situations you mention? Do you perhaps have symptoms of a mood disorder, a hormonal imbalance, a medical problem or exhaustion? Or do you simply displace saved–up anger from work on the only safe people to dump it on? In any case, it would be good to see a physician and get a checkup, then see a mental health professional to work on the best way to deal with your anger.

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You say your mother tells you you’re creating a stressful environment. I’m sure you’d agree that stress is not good for you or your family. Stress plays a role in developing health problems. For adults like your mother, stress can contribute to medical problems, such as heart attacks and stroke. Children who are under stress can have behavioral and learning problems at school. So, when you feel yourself ready to yell and react with anger, what can you do? Here are some suggestions: 1. Stop and take in four or five deep breaths. Deep breathing has been shown to reduce anxiety and produce relaxation. Think: “I’m letting my anger go. I’m breathing in peace, and I’m breathing out peace.” 2. Let the kids know that your goal is a peaceful family. Ask your children to help you with this goal and seek their input on how they can help. 3. Don’t accuse others in the family, but think about possible solutions to situations, such as when the kids won’t cooperate. Would it help to have a contest such as, “Let’s see

who can be the first to start on homework, finish homework or get into bed?” 4. When you’re not ready to deal with a situation, why not say: “Let’s all take a time out or a break. Let’s stop and relax for five or 10 minutes.” 5. Set some family rules that are positive and kind. Ask the children and your mother to contribute. 6. Reward good behavior with positive words and hugs. 7. Set limits, such as, “Story time is two stories, then you need to go to sleep.” If the limit is two, don’t give in and read three stories. Children almost always test their limits to see where the boundaries are. 8. Remind your children what is coming, as in, “It’s 7:30. In 15 minutes you’ll need to brush your teeth. Bed time is in 30 minutes.” 9. Realize that children and others will make mistakes, so help them learn from those mistakes. Ask your child, “What could you do differently next time?” Stay calm when a child makes a mistake. 10. Remember that you’re your child’s teacher and role model. It’s likely that you’ll see your children being peaceful or creating chaos, depending on what they see you doing. Should you take on the challenge of that New Year’s resolution, I think you’ll find you like your home life better. And know that you’re not the only parent who needs to focus on creating a peaceful environment. I see this problem in my own clients, and I find it a challenge even for myself. af

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asuntos famIlIares BETTY RICHARDSON Richardson, PhD, RNC, LPC, LMFT, es una psicoterapeuta situada en Austin.

Propósito de Año Nuevo: Crear un ambiente tranquilo en el hogar Soy padre soltero con un trabajo de tiempo complete. Vivo con mi madre, quién cuida a mis hijos (de 6 y 9 años de edad) cuando están fuera de la escuela. Ella dice que cuando estoy en casa, hago las cosas más estresantes para ella y los niños. Admito que he tenido muchas dificultades recientemente, y me enojo fácilmente. Mi madre me ha pedido que cómo propósito de Año Nuevo, me mantenga calmado cuando estoy en casa. ¿Qué puedo hacer con la ira que siento?

P.

R. Pregúntese:

¿De dónde puede venir esta ira? ¿Pudiera ser Trastorno de Estrés Postraumático por las situaciones difíciles que menciona? ¿Tiene quizás síntomas de un trastorno del estado de ánimo, un desequilibrio hormonal, un problema médico o agotamiento? O simplemente se deshace de la ira acumulada del trabajo hacia las únicas personas seguras para descargarla. En cualquier caso, sería bueno que viera a un médico y obtenga un chequeo, luego ver a un profesional de salud mental para trabajar sobre la mejor manera de lidiar con la ira.

Yusted comenta que su madre le dice que está creando un ambiente estresante. Estoy segura de que estará de acuerdo que el estrés no es bueno para usted o su familia. El estrés juega un papel en el desarrollo de problemas de salud. Para adultos como su madre, el estrés puede contribuir a problemas médicos, como ataques cardíacos y derrames cerebrales. Los niños que están bajo estrés pueden tener problemas de comportamiento y aprendizaje en la escuela. Entonces, cuando usted se sienta listo para gritar y reaccione con ira, ¿qué puede hacer? Aquí hay algunas sugerencias: 1. Deténgase y respire profundo cuatro o cinco veces. Se ha demostrado que la respiración profunda reduce la ansiedad y produce relajación. Piense: “Estoy dejando ir mi ira. Estoy respirando paz, y exhalando paz.” 2. Hágales saber a los niños que su objetivo es una familia pacífica. Pídales a sus hijos que lo ayuden con este objetivo y solicite su opinión sobre cómo pueden ayudarlo. 3. No acuse a otros en la familia, pero piense en posibles soluciones a situaciones, como cuando los niños no

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cooperarán. ¿Ayudaría tener un concurso como, “Vamos a ver quién puede ser el primero en comenzar la tarea, terminar la tarea o meterse en la cama?” 4. Cuando no esté listo para lidiar con una situación, porque no dice: “Vamos todos a tomar una pausa o un descanso. Vamos a parar y relajarnos durante cinco o 10 minutos.” 5. Establezca algunas reglas familiares que sean positivas y amables. Pídales a los niños y a su madre que contribuyan. 6. Recompense el buen comportamiento con palabras positivas y abrazos. 7. Establezca límites, tales como, “La hora de leerles un cuento es de dos historias, después deben irse a dormir.” Si el límite es dos, no ceda y lea tres historias. Los niños casi siempre ponen a prueba sus límites para ver hasta dónde pueden llegar. 8. Recuérdeles a sus hijos lo que viene, como por ejemplo “Son las 7:30, en 15 minutos, tendrán que cepillarse los dientes. La hora de acostarse es en 30 minutos. 9. Tenga en cuenta que los niños y otras personas comentarán errores, así que ayúdelos a aprender de esos errores. Pregúntele a su hijo: “¿Qué podrías hacer de manera diferente la próxima vez?” Mantenga la calma cuando un niño cometa un error. 10. Recuerde que usted es el maestro y el modelo a seguir de sus hijos. Es probable que vea a sus hijos estando tranquilos o creando problemas, dependiendo de lo que vean que hace usted. Si acepta el desafío del propósito de Año Nuevo, creo que encontrará que le va a gusta más su vida en el hogar. Y tome en cuenta que usted no es el único padre que necesita enfocarse en crear un ambiente pacífica en casa. Veo este problema en mis propios clientes, y me parece un desafío incluso para mí misma. af

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This Mom Got Fit! by Sandi Haustein

young moms, wondering how they had lost their baby weight while I still carried mine around.

WHEN

I was in college, I was the skinny girl who could eat whatever she wanted and not gain a pound—bottomless chips and queso, huge bowls of pasta, bloomin' onions—you name it, I ate it. But 10 years, three pregnancies and three dress sizes later, I struggled with my self–image for the first time in my life. I constantly compared myself to other

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I hated going home to my small town, because people I had known my whole life didn’t recognize me. Strangers asked me several times when my baby was due when I wasn’t even pregnant. Then to make matters worse, a difficult loss plunged me into a deep depression, and I gained an extra 10 pounds on my already overweight figure. My overeating and obsessive soda–drinking was damaging my body, but I didn’t know how else to deal with the grief. I needed to exercise, but in my depression, the last thing I wanted to do was put on my running shoes. I couldn't start eating better, losing weight and feeling healthier unless I made a change, but I knew I didn't have it in me to do it alone. I decided to develop a competition

with friends who wanted to not only lose weight but build life–long healthy habits. I came up with a list of rules, hoping for three or four women to join me in accountability. To “qualify” for my competition, participants had to be at least 20 pounds overweight and willing to donate $10 toward a prize pot. Over a period of 15 weeks, we would earn daily points for drinking 8–10 glasses of water, eating six servings of fruits and vegetables, posting a detailed food journal, staying within a daily calorie goal and recording every 10 minutes of exercise. Each Monday, we would weigh in and earn points for every pound lost, and the

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person with the highest percentage of weight loss that week would earn extra points. At the end of the 15 weeks, the woman with the most cumulative points and the woman with the highest percentage of weight loss would split the prize money. I posted my competition rules on Facebook, and to my surprise not just three or four, but 21 friends committed to the competition we named “Girls Getting Fit.” These friends, from all different seasons of my life, bonded and cheered for one other with each pound lost, each goal reached and each new pair of fitting skinny pants. We supported each other through moments of failure, pulled muscles, job changes, deaths in the family and cancer treatments. We lost weight through good old–fashioned hard work, one small change at a time, and we had fun doing it together. The eight women who persevered to the end lost a combined total of 165 pounds, an average of over 20 pounds per person. Lynn, my friend battling cancer, was the winner of the most accumulated points. After incorporating exercise and healthy eating into her life, her recovery after radiation treatments went from three weeks to 10 days, amazing the doctors who’d been encouraging her for a long time to get healthy. Rachel, the winner of the highest percentage of weight loss, lost almost 17 percent of her weight and went on to run two 5Ks. Lori’s ratio of "bad" to "good" cholesterol improved dramatically, and after three years of being on antidepressants, Deanne was able to wean off medication.

I may not have been the Biggest Loser, but at the end of those 15 weeks, I had lost 23 pounds and more than two dress sizes. I learned to eat smaller portions and to view food as fuel instead of something with which to stuff my stomach when I’m bored or stressed. My husband and I discovered a love for kettlebells which somehow helped eliminate the back pain I had long experienced, and our family became more active, taking hikes on Saturdays and joining the YMCA to work out and swim. My weight loss and healthy lifestyle rebirthed self–confidence and a sense of beauty in me that had been missing for many years. The healthy habits I learned and the support of my Girls Getting Fit friends played an important role in my emotional healing, too.

I know I’m not the only mom who has let her health take a back seat during the early years of parenting. Maybe you’ve struggled with making healthy food choices or fitting exercise into your busy life, and you feel like you’ll never be in shape. Why not make a small change toward a healthier you or better yet, start your own competition? It might just be one of the best decisions you ever make—for you and your family. Sandi Haustein is a freelance writer who makes a mean smoothie and loves hiking with her husband and three sons.

Building Healthy Habits Girls–Getting–Fit Style • Drink 8–10 eight–ounce glasses of water a day • Aim for at least 6 servings of fruits and vegetables daily • Know how many calories your body needs • Keep a detailed food journal • Exercise—start small if you need to, but start • Set measurable, realistic goals each week • Be accountable to others

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Revamp Your Family Routines BY SA R A BA R RY

Are your family routines working? We all have routines for bedtimes and meals and getting out the door in the morning. As kids grow and family situations change, we need to adjust our routines. We might even need to change our routines throughout the year. Sometimes routines evolve on their own, but other times you’ll have to fiddle with things to find a new solution. As you try to sort out meaningful routines, you’re likely to get lots of advice from family, friends, other parents at the park and the stranger at the store. Asking for suggestions can be helpful, but tune out all the “you shoulds.” Tune in to the unique needs of your family to find the answer. Take a look at how these real parents rocked routines to get your ideas flowing.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

them a healthy snack when the rest of the family enjoys a later meal.

De–stress Dinner Prep. Getting dinner ready in a rush when everyone is hungry can be a recipe for crankiness. Try moving most of your prep to another time of day. If you’re home, prep for dinner right after breakfast or lunch when you’re already in the kitchen. Or use post–dinner time to prep tomorrow’s meal for the oven or slow cooker. Either way, you’ll cut the cleanup in half by doing the dishes from the meal you just ate plus tomorrow’s prep. BEDTIME NOT BY THE BOOK Bedtime routines are some of the earliest we create with our children. They often include baths, cuddling, stories and early lights out, but do they have to? These three families created bedtime rituals that go against the norm.

the day. Instead, she puts Anna to bed at 8:30. “Anna shares all her attention with others, so that hour when my husband and I get alone time with her is one of my favorite times of the day,” she says.

Play with Naptimes. Lisa Ahrberg has a different solution for bedtime. When her kids were toddlers, she kept them up, even when she knew they were tired. “My husband doesn’t get home until 7:30,” she says. “So if they were in bed when they wanted to sleep, he didn’t see them for days at a time.” To make up the difference, she adjusted their nap schedules until they were getting enough sleep even with the later bedtime.

Ever struggle to get dinner ready as kids melt down around you? These mealtime tweaks might help.

Eat Earlier. Julie Elias started making dinner shortly after her kids get off the bus. Dinner at 4:30 may sound crazy, but as she says, “They’re hungry.” An early dinner can cut out a lot of crankiness in tired kids.

Switch to an Evening Snack. If you’re tired of hearing your kids ask for “just one more” snack in the late afternoon, you’ve got another reason to try an early dinner. Follow up with an evening snack. And to avoid missing out on the family dinner, feed young kids in the late afternoon, then serve

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Juggle Bedtimes to Suit You. Older kids get to stay up later, right? Not at the Motta house. Mom Sarah puts her older boys to bed at 7:30, but preschool–aged Anna still naps. Sarah could have cut out the nap, but she really likes that time to herself during

Take Out the Bath. Baths are often part of the bedtime ritual, but since I put both my kids to bed by myself many nights, bedtime used to be hectic. I started giving my older daughter, Kathleen, her bath in the afternoon while her baby sister napped. Kathleen got more play time in the tub, and I got a streamlined bedtime, making “tubby time” and bedtime more relaxing for us both.

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THINGS WE HAVE TO DO Homework and errands are a necessary part of our daily or weekly routines. With creative thinking, you make these routines less of a chore:

Everyone Goes on Errands. Are errands squeezing all the family time out of your weekends? Try combining the two. Although going solo or taking a divide–and–conquer approach might be more efficient, having an everyone– goes policy allows for time together. To keep family time from being all work, play games in the car or stop for a treat when you’re done. Or plan a fun activity for when you get home, and build anticipation during the trip.

says. “And his work is of a much higher quality when he does it in the mornings.” Ellen adds that it’s not an ideal solution, but “it's what works best for him this year. We'll take each year as it comes.” Ellen has the right idea. If you’re ready to revamp your own routines, forget what you’re “supposed” to do and find what works for you, your child and

your family. Then check in periodically to make sure it keeps working. Pretty soon you’ll have creative routines that keep your family running smoothly. Sara Barry is a freelance writer and mom. She and her husband both work nontraditional schedules and have become creative with adapting their own family routines.

Leave Homework to the Last Minute. Some families have a homework–before–play rule, but kids often need a little down time or activity time before they can sit and do more work. Some kids may need a different schedule altogether. Instead of settling down after school to do homework, Ellen Weiner’s son does his in the mornings. “After a full day of school, he's too tired to focus,” she

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MAKING TIME FOR SELF–CARE

scratch and created a new way to do my to–do list based on the things that are most important to me.

Lisa Druxman Wants to See You Move BY S H E R I DA M O C K

Boom” as assistants blew bubbles to keep the stroller set entertained. Afterward, we chatted with Druxman and others about the power of exercise to build a healthy, happy life.

AFM: What are the broad strokes of The Empowered

Mama?

Druxman: It starts with just

Lisa Druxman loves to see moms make time for themselves. As a speaker, founder of Fit4Mom (a network of fitness programs) and the author of The Empowered Mama, Druxman recently visited Austin for a mega– workout in Zilker Park. There, she and a team of local Fit4Mom instructors led a group of 150 women—along with their children in strollers—through an hour–long Stroller Strides workout. The moms squatted and lunged to a call– and–response version of “Boom Chicka

reconnecting to what’s important to you. Sometimes we forget that, because we become so reactive in the day, just trying to get everything done. I realized myself that my to–do list was pages long, but nothing on that list had to do with what was most important to me: my kids, my marriage, myself. So, I started from

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Once I found Stroller Strides, I never stopped going, because it wasn’t about exercising, it was about the community of moms I found. I had friends and I had a destination. It wasn’t hard to create that routine once I realized that it was more than just a workout. I was a runner before my third pregnancy. January 2018 austinfamily.com

We do something in the book called an Ideal Week Schedule, where you plan your week like you plan for a budget. It doesn’t go exactly as you want in a budget, but at least there’s a plan. Most women feel overwhelmed and say that they’re out of balance because they don’t have time for self–care. I try to turn that upside down by putting the self–care in first. Then, it’s the little things like social media that you maybe don’t have time for or television. But if you put the self–care in first, you always feel closer to balance. Another thing I’ve been talking a lot about is, what’s your minimum effective dose for wellness? We have this vision of the perfect workout being at the gym and it’s an hour or whatever. And that might not be realistic if you’re a busy mom. But just ask yourself, what’s the minimum I need to get in every day to feel good? Maybe it’s 20 minutes of walking.

Once I got pregnant, I wasn’t able to run as much, and I let myself get in my head about it a little bit. I had to give myself some grace and realize that my body was doing a whole lot more than it had been doing before. If you can’t exercise to the same intensity, realize that your body is doing something way more important. We have so many different levels in our groups. We feel you; we get you.

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Maybe it’s having the time to meditate for five minutes. Whatever it is for you, just make sure you get in your minimum effective dose each day.

AFM: If you were to suggest one New Year’s resolution, what would it be? Druxman: To do what’s most important first. To focus on what’s important to you. Put your own oxygen mask on first.

AFM: Why do so many moms get overwhelmed and lose touch with themselves? Druxman: We try to be everything for everyone. Moms get so busy taking care of the house, taking care of the kids. Seventy percent of millennial moms are still working. It’s no longer about ourselves. So, we need to reconnect. We need to take some stuff off our plate to figure out how to make self–care a priority. I think it’s important to think about how you want your kids to one day live. Do you want them to be less stressed? Do you want them to eat healthier, to exercise more? If we want that for our kids, it’s up to us to model it, because they’re not going to see it anywhere else. Taking care of ourselves is a gift to not just ourselves but to our families.

Dot Aikman, 1 year rookie I get a community; that’s my big thing. It’s good to get a workout, and it’s nice to get exercise, but it’s also wonderful to have a village of moms. Everybody can empathize with each other. We all get what we’re going through. It’s really helpful.

Heather Wallis, 8 year veteran

AFM: If you only have 5 minutes for yourself in a day, what do you do? Druxman: Move. Our bodies are meant to move. I tell moms to only exercise on the days that you want to feel good. It will always raise your endorphins. It will always make you feel good. Even if it’s just getting out there and walking the dog, move your body. af

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One of the instructors was my neighbor, and as we were exercising, we kept running into each other. She convinced me to try a free class, and I tell everybody that my first class, I almost threw up because it was such a great workout. I was a soccer player, and so I wanted something that got me back into good shape. I started in 2009, and I’ve been coming every Monday, Wednesday, Friday since then. I’ve had two more babies since then, and my youngest is 4. When he goes to kindergarten, I don’t know what I’ll do. Those moms are my tribe.

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LIfeLIneS B R E N DA S C H O O L F I E L D Schoolfield is a freelance medical writer who splits her time between Austin and Seattle.

Steps for Preventing Infection in Young Athletes Practice Good Hygiene

Is Your Young Athlete Being Exposed to Infection? armups, cool downs, hydration and safety gear—organized sports are often set up to keep your young athlete safe. But have you talked to your child about avoiding germs? Children who participate in organized sports may be exposed to diseases caused by infection. According to Dr. Coburn Allen, an infectious disease specialist at Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas, most of these infections are viral, such as flu, stomach virus or pinkeye. But bacterial and fungal skin infections can be problems as well.

W

Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Infections “Honestly,” says Dr. Allen, “shared viral infections are quite common, especially in situations where people are in close contact. There have been outbreaks of diseases like viral meningitis from athletes sharing cups or ladles. Skin infections caused by

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bacteria and fungus seem to be more specific to athletes.”

• Clean hands often with soap and water or hand sanitizer. See “How to Wash Your Hands.” p. 19 • Wash hands before and after playing sports, before and after using shared training gear and after using the toilet. • Shower immediately after practices, competitions and games. • Wash uniforms and practice clothes after each use. Wear clean clothes and socks.

Don’t Share These Items Skin infections are spread by skin–to– skin contact or by touching a contaminated surface. Dr. Allen says, “Boils and impetigo are common types of staph infections. Other unique skin infections are herpes and pinkeye. Athletes’ foot and other fungal infections of the skin are often seen in athletes.” According to a recent survey, wrestling is the sport with the highest number of skin infections, followed by football. However, any athlete is at risk for a skin infection when sharing equipment, clothes or towels that have not been properly cleaned first. Some infections can be serious. “We don’t see a lot of life–threatening infections linked to athletic teams,” says Dr. Allen, “but certainly bacterial meningitis within a team might lead to many members of that team receiving treatment to prevent an outbreak,

• Don’t share hygiene items, such as bars of soap, sponges or razors. • Don’t share towels. • Don’t use a shared ointment that players get by scooping it out with their hands. • Don’t share water bottles or cups. Don’t drink from a common cup or ladle. • Don’t share mouth guards, braces, helmets or personal protective equipment.

Don’t Spread Infection • Don’t participate when you’re sick or have an uncovered skin infection that is draining. • Report abrasions, cuts and skin lesions to an appropriate person for evaluation, cleaning, treatment and bandaging based on your team’s policies. • Stay up to date on immunizations, including the flu vaccine.

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something we have been very successful doing in the US. Although rare, a germ from a staph infection can get into the blood stream and cause a child to become very sick rapidly. A child with a rash and fever should get medical care right away. Any young athlete who has altered mental status, confusion or seizures should get urgent medical care.”

Preventing Infections “Most of these infections can be prevented or at least decreased in frequency by practicing good personal hygiene and by not sharing towels or equipment that hasn’t been cleaned,” advises Dr. Allen. “Also, make sure your child understands not to share drinking cups, ladles or bottles.” (See sidebars for details.)

that are draining. Athletes who do this expose teammates to infection by not staying home and getting treatment or by not adequately covering their infections. Teams need to have policies that discourage these behaviors. Teams also need to have policies that encourage coaches or others to actively look for infections and address them early and extensively.” Several professional athletic associations, including the National Federation of State High

School Associations, have published guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and return of infected players to team participation. “Parents should monitor their young athlete for boils and spreading patches of abnormal skin or sores. Alert coaches and others if several team members develop the same signs and symptoms at the same time,” recommends Dr. Allen. af

Dr. Allen cautions, “It is crucial to avoid presenteeism—the concept that athletes should come to practices, competitions or games even though they are sick or have skin infections

How to Wash Your Hands • Wet your hands with clean, running water. Turn off the tap. • Apply soap. Liquid soap is better than bar soap at minimizing the spread of germs. • Lather your hands by rubbing them together. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers and under your nails. • Scrub for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song twice. • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water. • Dry your hands with a clean towel or air dry them. Source: CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/ when–how–handwashing.html)

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the learnIng curve MARGARET NICKLAS Nicklas is an Austin–based freelance journalist, writer and mom.

Kids and Time Management: What’s Reasonable? s every parent knows, very young children live in the present. They often mix together concepts of past and future, and may ask over and over when something is going to happen, no matter how many times you’ve explained. When does this start to change, and what is reasonable to expect in terms of a child’s understanding of time, or even planning in later years? The short answer is, it probably happens more slowly than you think. And, even when kids understand the basic building blocks of time management, they’ll still have to acquire the real–world experience needed to do meaningful planning.

A

The Early Years Research has found that children don’t fully understand time–marking systems, such as calendars and clocks, until well into elementary school— perhaps as late as age 10. So, while a

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4–year–old generally knows that “yesterday” is before “today,” and that an “hour” is longer than a “minute,” most children won’t know how far in the past “yesterday” was compared to “last week,” or how many hours are in a day until at least age 7. That’s according to the work of scholars like Katharine Tillman, PhD, who studies children’s understanding of time at the University of California, San Diego. In addition, while preschoolers have some understanding of time–related vocabulary and concepts, their early use of time–related words may give the impression that they understand them better than they actually do. Parents can help by being patient when children seem confused and by doing a bit of detective work. See if your child can calculate what time to leave for an appointment, if you tell him how long the trip will take and when the appointment begins. Ask your child to predict something using

a calendar. “Can you find your next birthday on this calendar? How many weeks is that from now? How many days?” These exercises also require a bit of math that your child may or may not be able to do, which helps explain why he may find using calendars and clocks challenging. When you understand where your child is in comprehending these processes, it’s easier to have realistic expectations of what he can do in terms of planning or tracking events.

Middle School and Beyond Just about the time your child has likely gained a more sophisticated understanding of how these systems work, she may be entering middle school, where students must zoom into organizational high gear. Here, your child will travel to many teachers and locations each day, often on a tighter schedule and covering more distance than before. She may have a rotating or rolling schedule, which

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means that conventions that probably helped her remember activities before—such as, we have “library” on Thursdays—may not exist anymore. With her own unique class schedule, your child must keep track of due dates for assignments and know which materials to carry each day. And she must do this without the “groupthink” she probably had in elementary school, where class–mates tend to move together as one.

(It’s more realistic and may help your child stay motivated.) Use color– coding and other visuals to make activities and deadlines more obvious; this will help your child prioritize and alert him to projects that run concurrently or overlap. See more tips at bit.ly/2iSuG6K.

Time management will be a lifelong process and one that will increasingly be about making personal choices rather than simply managing information. Helping your child develop time management skills that serve personal goals and wellness, along with external obligations, is a gift that is bound to keep on giving. af

In middle school, your child may also be expected to manage multiple, long– term and overlapping projects and—perhaps for the first time—do self–initiated “studying” for tests. Inherent in this process, your student must begin to grapple with estimating how long tasks will take and budget time accordingly, often without experience to tell her what’s involved.

Research has found that children don’t fully understand calendars and clocks until perhaps as late as age 10. So how can you help? First, acknowledge that this is hard stuff, even for adults. Beyond that, you can be a sounding board and a consultant—someone who knows your child’s unique situation and who can help her prioritize. Many schools and individual teachers have systems they want students to use to manage assignments and meet deadlines. You can help your child navigate these systems, while also sharing your own strategies and tools. The Child Mind Institute has a nice list of tips for older students. For instance, encourage your child to schedule breaks and fun time along with work. Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

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Reasons to Visit Austin Family Magazine’s 20th Annual Camp Fair BY S H E R I DA M O C K

We’re excited to bring you our 20th annual Camp Fair on January 20, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Palmer Events Center. We’ve made sure there’s something for everyone in the family, with a huge selection of camps for you to meet, all serving a variety of age groups, ability levels and interests. Whether you’re looking for half–day, full–day or overnight camps, this is the place to find them. But in case you need more, here are seven great reasons to place the Austin Family Camp Fair at the centerpiece of your weekend plans.

1. The location. The Palmer Events Center has everything to ensure your family is comfortable. There’s plenty of parking, and it’s a stroller–friendly venue. Plus, it serves as a great base for a day of family fun in Austin. After the camp fair, take the kids for a walk along the hike and bike trail or visit the playscape at Zilker Park. And if our fickle Texas weather makes indoor pursuits a better option, hang out at the new Central Library and explore the State Capitol Building.

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2. The price. It’s free! Bring the whole family; no need to leave anyone at home. 3. The camp staff. Each booth is staffed by friendly camp directors and camp counselors who are ready to discuss details and give you a feel for what their summer camp is like. 4. The info. This is a great opportunity to compare camps all in one go. Ask about which ages the camps serve. Find out about locations and whether the camps offer shuttle service. Learn which dates and times the camps will run. Ask about meals and snacks. Find out about application deadlines and fees. 5. The giveaways. That’s right! We’ll be giving away a family four–pack of tickets to Schlitterbahn, plus a variety of camp experiences all day long. Note that you must be present to win, so stick around and listen up—we just might be calling your name.

6. The activities. Each camp is ready to show your child their camp activities, whether it’s brushing a pony or making a movie or trying a science experiment. We’ll have camps that offer sports, financial literacy, nature, art, robotics, music, coding, drama and more. 7. The entertainment. Besides the camp booths, we’ll have a stage running live perfor– mances by musicians like Amy Edwards and Big Don plus a rock climbing wall for burning off a little extra energy.

All photos by Sherida Mock.

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YMCA of Greater Williamson County

YMCA of Austin

SPONSORED BY:

austinymca.org

ymcagwc.org

2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE DAY CAMPS Page 23 • OVERNIGHT CAMPS Page 29 • SPECIAL NEEDS CAMPS Page 31

DAY CAMPS

Camp Avalanche at Chaparral Ice Center

Austin Girls Choir

Austin Girls Choir camps include instruction on vocal skills, note reading, basic harmony and fun songs, with simple choreography. 512–453–0884 www.girlschoir.com Ages 8 – 16

Our campers fill their days swimming, going to the park, going on field trips, doing arts and crafts and—of course, ice skating! 2525 W. Anderson Ln. #400, Austin 512–252–8500 x160 www.chaparralice.com Ages 7 – 14 Camp Bow Wow

Badgerdog Creative Writing Summer Camp

Creative writing instruction led by professional writers for all skill levels in a fun but challenging environment. All campers become published authors. Several locations in Austin 512–542–0076 www.austinlibrary.org Grades 3rd – 12th Bright Horizons at Westlake

Our summer camp incorporates nature, science, technology, creative arts, and more, while using the surrounding community and special visitors as an extension of the camp. 4613 Bee Caves Rd., Bldg. B, West Lake Hills 512–640–1879 www.brighthorizons.com/austinfamily17 Ages 6 wks – 12 yrs

We’ve got it all for your dog. Camper cams, training, one–on–one snuggles and play time available. Austin N 512–670–2275 Austin SW 512–264–9663 Georgetown/Hutto 512–423–2196 Cedar Park 512–670–2275 www.campbowwow.com/austin Camp de Champs at Chaparral Ice Center

Offering 11 weeks of figure and hockey skating instruction. Campers get two lessons daily, public skate time, off–ice training, arts and crafts and a Thursday recital. 255 W. Anderson Ln. #400, Austin 512–252–8500 x 160 www.chaparralice.com Ages 6 – 13

Customize your Camp Guide search at austinfamily.com Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

Camp Doublecreek

Since 1971, Doublecreek is an activity– based day camp in Round Rock with free transportation from 12 locations for campers. 800 Doublecreek Dr., Round Rock 512–255–3661 www.campdoublecreek.com Ages 4 – 14 Country Home Learning Center

Join us for an incredible summer camp experience, featuring child approved special events, exciting weekly field trips and kids’ choice special interest clubs. 6900 Escarpment Blvd., Austin 512–288–8220 13120 U.S. Hwy. 183 N., Austin 512–331–1441 www.countryhomelearningcenter.com Ages 5 – 13 Dance Discovery

Various themed camps include storytime ballet, jazz, hip hop, gymnastics, musical theatre and drama–set design. Each camp week ends with a great show! Central Austin 512–419–7611 Avery Ranch 512–658–2996 www.dancediscovery.com www.averyranchdance.com Ages 3 – 14 Extend–a–Care for Kids Summer Day Camp

Weekly sessions consisting of sports, field trips, swimming, cooking, games and puzzles, reading, arts and crafts and January 2018 austinfamily.com

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2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE more. Weekly themes are based on children’s literature. Locations in AISD, DVISD and HCISD 512–472–9402 www.eackids.org Ages 3 – 12 Fantastic Magic Camp

Girlstart Summer Camp

Jump Gymnastics!

The programs achieve consistent positive outcomes by combining formal and informal educational strategies with challenging and relevant STEM curriculum. 1400 W. Anderson Ln., Austin 512–916–4775 www.girlstart.org Grades 4th – 8th

Voted Austin Family Magazine's Most Fun Camp in 2011, 2014, 2015. Theme–based gymnastics, games, activities, arts and crafts keep kids coming back. 2911 Manchaca Rd., Austin 2117 Anderson Ln., Austin www.jump–austin.com 512–593–6226 Ages 3 – 10

Kids discover their unique inner magic through learning magic tricks. Campers are surrounded by people both young and old who recognize and embrace that uniqueness. Locations throughout Austin 512–988–3045 www.magiccamp.com Ages 5 – 12

Join us spring and summer for our Music Together classes for children and their caregivers. 2700 W. Anderson Ln., Austin 512–371–9506 www.heartsongmusic.net Ages up to 9 yrs

Fun2Learn Code

Iron Horse Country Camp

Half–day and full–day computer programming camps, including Minecraft Mods in Java, Scratch programming, Python, video game design, web development, robotics, circuits and stop motion animation. Round Rock and Austin 512–900–8380 www.fun2learncode.com Ages 7 and up

Come enjoy the fun at this bike camp. Motorcycle and safety gear provided. Pool. Locations throughout Austin 512–917–5733 www.ironhorsecountry.com Ages 8 – 15

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Heartsong

Kiddie Academy CampVentures

The CampVentures program and curriculum feature themed events, activities and trips. From preschool to elementary school, children enjoy playing developmentally appropriate games. Pflugerville 512–989–7777 Round Rock 512–270–9988 www.kiddieacademy.com Ages 2 – 12 KidsActing Summer Camps

These award–winning camps feature full–scale musical or play productions. Camps for ages 4 – 8 are an intro to the performing arts. 16 locations in Austin metro 512–836–5437 www.kidsactingstudio.com Ages 3 – 19

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Leyla y la Ballena Spanish Immersion

Children join together to bring the story “Leyla y la Ballena” to life. Every week is dedicated to a theme, taught in an enthusiastic, fun–filled environment. 8707 Mountain Crest Dr., Austin 2700 W. Anderson Ln., Austin 107 Ranch Rd. 620 S., Lakeway 512–299–5731, 512–299–5732, 512–466–2409 www.austinbilingualschool.com Ages 2 – 11 Mad Science

Mad Science camps are filled with exciting, fun, hands–on science activities. Children become junior scientists for the week and experience a variety of science adventures. Locations in Austin metro 512–892–1143 www.austin.madscience.org Ages 4 – 12

Maker Tales

2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

This bilingual, literacy–inspired makerspace lets kids experience hands–on exploration in science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM). 7938 Great Northern Blvd., Austin 512–585–5456 www.tinkerteachers.com Ages 5 – 12 McKinney Roughs Nature Camp

Explore the outdoors and learn about wilderness skills and native plants and animals. Older campers enjoy swim– ming, a challenge course and raft trips. 1884 Hwy. 71 W., Cedar Creek 512–303–5073 www.lcra.org/naturecamp Ages 5 – 15 Moolah U

Kids learn how to make and appreciate money by starting their own business. Locations throughout Austin 512–443–8851 www.moolahu.com Ages 7–8

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2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Nitro Swim

Campers receive the highest quality swim lessons—non–competitive and competitive—around. Learn to wakeboard, kneeboard and water ski in a supportive environment from experienced pro staff. Cedar Park/Round Rock and Bee Cave 512–259–7999 www.nitroswim.com Ages 6 months and up

Paramount Theatre Summer Camps

Performing arts camps with sessions throughout Austin. All campers will be featured in a final performance on stage at the historic Paramount Theatre. Central and South Austin, Bee Caves and Far West 512–692–0526 www.austintheatre.org/camps Grades 1st – 10th Rio Vista Farm

Austin’s originator of English riding camps. Daily lessons taught by pro trainers, lots of horse time/care, arts

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and crafts, plus swimming for hotter afternoons. Friday shows for parents. 13013 Fallwell Ln. Del Valle 512–247–2302 www.riovistafarm.net Ages 7 – 16 Schlitterbahn

Enjoy water fun and resort accommodations at the hottest, coolest place in Texas. New Braunfels 855–246–0273 www.schlitterbahn.com All ages

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Spicewood Country Camp

2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Nine shady acres in northwest Austin with animals, music, swimming, crafts, sports and horseback riding. 6102 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin 512–346–2992 www.spicewoodcountry.com Ages 3½ – 10 Stepping Stone School

Join us for our summer break camp. Limited space available. Visit our website for full details. 17 locations in Austin metro 512–459–0258 www.steppingstoneschool.com Ages 5 –13

wood Country Sc Spice6102 Spicewood Springs Rd. hool 512-346-2992 • www.spicewoodcountry.com

9 am to 1:30 pm - extended care available Small classes with balanced activities & many opportunities for creativity and self expression Curriculum based • Barnyard animals • Music Highly recommended by parents! Mary Beth Bird, Owner/Director

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2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE Sunrise Neighborhood Youth Program

Throughout the summer, campers will be entertained by STEM challenges, team building games, arts and crafts, cooking, swimming, field trips and much more. 4430 Manchaca Rd., Austin 512–444–3326 www.sunriseaustin.org/ Grades pre–K to middle school

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Synergy Dance

Dance camps include ballet, tap, jazz, hip–hop, also included are tumbling, theatre, crafts and a performance on Fridays. Dance intensives for beginner to advanced. 2314 Bee Cave Rd. #C1, Austin 512–327–4130 www.synergydancestudio.com Ages 2 and up

YMCA of Austin Summer Day Camp

Safe and enriching summer day camps. Enjoy field trips, swimming, games and more in a character rich environment with the YMCA of Austin. 22 locations in Travis, Hays and Bastrop counties 512–236–9622 www.austinymca.org Ages 4 – 14

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2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE YMCA Williamson County

Offering a wide array of summer camp options and activities that are designed to make summer fun, exciting, convenient and safe. Hutto 512–846–2360 Burnet 512–756–6180 Cedar Park 512–250–9622 Round Rock 512–615–5563 www.ymcagwc.org Outdoor Adventure, K – 8th Specialty Camps, K – 8th Excursion Camps, K – 6th Kinder Camps, 3 yrs – K

OVERNIGHT CAMPS Heart o’ the Hills

Care–free, all–girls atmosphere, Guadalupe River, AC. Family style dining. Worldwide enrollment, personable. More than 40 activities. Ragsdale family owned and operated. 2430 Hwy 39, Hunt. 830–238–4650 www.hohcamp.com Girls ages 6 – 16

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2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE Camp Lantern Creek for Girls

Sugar & Spice Ranch Camp

A unique girls’ sleepaway summer camp created so girls can create art, find their voice, try new skills, be cheered on, get dirty, push boundaries, love nature and more. 4045 N. FM 1486, Montgomery 936–597–8225 www.camplanterncreek.com Girls ages 7 – 17

Bonding mothers and daughters through horses. Campers “own” horses for a week and do everything together as a team. All– inclusive week–long sessions, a great way to reconnect. Bandera, TX 830–460–8487 www.texashorsecamps.com Ages 5 and up

Camp Stewart for Boys

Low–tech, wholesome fun and growth through 70–plus activities. Ragsdale family owned, operated. Outstanding role model counselors, worldwide enrollment, home– style cooking. North Fork Guadalupe River. 612 FM 1340, Hunt 830–238–4670 www.campstewart.com Boys ages 6 – 16

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Texas Adventure Camp

Don't think of coming to this “Outback” adventure camp unless you’re looking for an action–packed, exciting week of fun and challenges. 325 Mission Valley Rd., New Braunfels 830–625–9105 www.newktennis.com/outback –texas–adventure–camp Ages 9 – 16

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2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE YMCA Twin Lakes Overnight Camp

New cabins have bathrooms and A/C. Experienced counselors, nutritious meals and new friends. All the activities you love and a whole lot more! 204 E. Little Elm Tr., Cedar Park www.ymcagwc.org/twinlakes Grades 3rd – 8th

SPECIAL NEEDS CAMPS Camp in Motion

Kids with mild to moderate cerebral palsy, or other similar neurological diagnoses, who have reasonable use of at least one arm and can follow directions. Dell Children’s Adaptive Sports Camp in Partnership with the YMCA of Austin Ages 5 – 21

Inquiring Minds

A program for gifted students to explore diverse subjects through an integrated, hands– on approach. Austin 512–203–4540 www.inquiringminds–austin.org

Ages 5 – 12 Summer Wonders

A program for gifted students to explore diverse subjects through an integrated, hands– on approach. 3901 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin 512–206–4070 www.summerwonders.com Ages 4 – 13

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2018

PRIVATE SCHOOLS Infant – Kindergarten ACE ACADEMY 3901 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY’S 910 San Jacinto, Austin CHALLENGER SCHOOL 15101 Avery Ranch Rd., Austin 1521 Joyce Ln., Round Rock 13015 Pond Springs Rd., Austin HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC SCHOOL 9400 Neenah Ave., Austin HYDE PARK SCHOOLS 3901 Speedway, Austin JARDIN DE NINOS INTERLINGUA 8707 Mountain Crest Dr., Austin 2700 W. Anderson Ln., Austin 107 R.R. 620, Ste. 300, Lakeway REDEEMER LUTHERAN SCHOOL 1500 W. Anderson Ln., Austin ST. ANDREWS LOWER SCHOOL 1112 W. 31st ST. AUSTIN CATHOLIC SCHOOL 1911 San Antonio St., Austin ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 300 E. Huntland Dr., Austin ST. HELENS CATHOLIC SCHOOL 2700 E. University Ave., Georgetown ST. IGNATIUS, MARTYR CATHOLIC SCHOOL 120 W. Oltorf, Austin ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC SCHOOL 2114 St. Joseph, Austin ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL 520 Washburn St., Taylor ST. STEPHENS EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 6000 FM 3237, Wimberly ST. THERESA’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL 4311 Small Dr., Austin WAYA PRESCHOOL 1314 Exposition blvd., Austin

1st – 5th

www.austingifted.org 512–206–4070 www.smcschoolaustin.org 512–476–1480 www.challengerschool.com 512–341–8000 512–255–8844 512–258–1299 www.holyfamilycs.org 512–246–4455 www.hp–schools.org 512–465–8344 www.austinbilingualschool.com 512–432–5317 512–299–5732 512–466–2409 www.redeemerschool.net 512–451–6478 www.sas.org 512–299–9800 www.staustinschool.org 512–477–3751 www.stfrancis–school.org 512–454–0848 www.shclions.org 512–869–3244 www.st–ignatius.org/school 512–442–8547 www.slcsaustin.org 512–614–6622 www.stmarystaylor.org 512–352–2313 www.ststeveschool.org 512–847–9857 www.st–theresa.org 512–451–7105 www.waya.org/preschool 512–475–2528

ACE ACADEMY CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY’S CHALLENGER SCHOOL HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC SCHOOL HYDE PARK SCHOOLS JARDIN DE NINOS INTERLINGUA REDEEMER LUTHERAN SCHOOL ST. ANDREWS LOWER ST. AUSTIN CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL ST. HELENS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. IGNATIUS, MARTYR CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. MICHAEL CATHOLIC ACADEMY 3000 Barton Creek Blvd. ST. STEPHENS EPISCOPAL SCHOOL ST. THERESA’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL THE BOYS SCHOOL OF AUSTIN 5206 Balcones Dr., Austin

see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K www.smca.com 512–328–2323 see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K www.theboysschoolofaustin.org 512–553–2690

6th – 8th ACE ACADEMY CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY’S CHALLENGER SCHOOL HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC SCHOOL HYDE PARK SCHOOLS REDEEMER LUTHERAN SCHOOL ST. ANDREW’S MIDDLE ST. AUSTIN CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL ST. HELENS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. IGNATIUS, MARTYR CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. MICHAEL CATHOLIC ACADEMY ST. STEPHENS EPISCOPAL SCHOOL ST. THERESA’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL

see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K see listing in 1st – 5th see listing in Inf – K see listing in Inf – K

9th – 12th

SPECIAL NEEDS ACE ACADEMY 3901 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin LET IT SHINE www.austinchilddevelopment.com 3701 W. Slaughter Ln., Austin

www.austingifted.org 512–206–4070

512–948–3063

HYDE PARK HIGH SCHOOL 11400 N. Mopac Expre. SAN JUAN DIEGO CATHOLIC SCHOOL 800 Herndon Ln., Austin SANTA CRUZ CATHOLIC HIGHSCHOOL 1110 Main St., Buda ST. DOMINIC SAVIO CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 9300 Neenah Ave., Austin

www.hp–schools.org 512–465–8333 www.sjdchs.org 512–804–1935 www.sccstx.org 512–312–2137 www.saviochs.org 512–388–8846

CHARTER SCHOOL N.Y.O.S 12301 N. Lamar, Austin

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www.nyos.org PreK–12th 512–583–6967

January 2018 austinfamily.com

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Education Guide MONTESSORI / PRESCHOOLS

BETHANY LUTHERAN FINE ARTS ACADEMY 10010 Anderson Mill Rd, Austin BRIGHT HORIZONS 4613 Bee Caves Rd, West Lake Hills BRIGHT HORIZONS AT ROUND ROCK 7210 Wyoming Springs, Round Rock BRIGHT HORIZONS FAMILY CENTER 2411 W. Braker Ln., Austin COUNTRY HOME LEARNING CENTER 1310 US Hwy 183 North, Austin 6900 Escarpment Blvd., Austin EXTEND–A–CARE FOR KIDS 77 area campuses FINE ARTS ACADEMY Allandale Avery Ranch KIDDIE ACADEMY OF PFLUGERVILLE 2617 Kelly Ln., Pflugerville KIDDIE ACADEMY OF ROUND ROCK 5080 N. AW Grimes Blvd., Round Rock

LET IT SHINE 3701 W. Slaughter Ln., Austin SPICEWOOD COUNTRY SCHOOL 6102 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin STEPPING STONE SCHOOLS Locations throughout Austin Metro

www. bethany–umc.org/finearts 512–258–6017 www.brighthorizons.com/austinfamily17

512–640–1879 512–341–0733 512–833–7090 www.countryhomelearningcenter.com 512–331–1442 512–288–8220 www.eackids.org 512–472–9402 www.dancediscovery.com 512–419–7611 512–658–2996 www.kiddieacademy.com/pflugerville 512–270–9988 www.kiddieacademy.com/roundrock 512–270–9988 www.austinchilddevelopment.com 512–948–3063 www.spicewoodcountry.com 512–346–2992 www.steppingstoneschool.com 512–459–0258

RESOURCES AUSTIN LEARNING CENTER 3355 Bee Cave Rd., Suite 203, Austin Tutoring, SAT/ACT FOCUS BEHAVIORAL ASSOCIATES 19019 TX–71 Spicewood, TX Applied Behavioral Analysis KIDSPA AUSTIN 5700 W. Slaughter Ln., Austin 10526 W. Parmer Ln., Austin Drop–in child care MOSAICS WEIGHTED BLANKETS 12741 Research Blvd., Austin Non–drug therapy for ADHD, ASD, SPD

www.austinlearningcenter.com 512–330–9007 www.focusbehavioral.com 512–646–9789 www.kidspaaustin.com 512–301–5772 512–828–5772 www.mosaicweightedblankets.com 512–567–8943 Anxiety or Insomnia

ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS

ARMSTRONG COMMUNITY MUSIC SCHOOL 404 Camp Craft Rd., Austin AUSTIN GIRLS CHOIR 3710 Cedar Street #215, Austin BITS, BYTES AND BOTS Austin area locations CAFÉ MONET 4700 W. Guadalupe, Austin 4477 S. Lamar Blvd., Austin CREATIVE BRICK BUILDERS 220 Sundance Pkwy, Round Rock DANCE DISCOVERY Allendale (Dance, Musical) Avery Ranch (Theatre) FUN2LEARN CODE Austin area locations GYMBOREE 4220 S. Lamar Blvd, #150, Austin 9333 Research Blvd., C–2, Austin 1335 E. Whitestone Blvd. #5120, Cedar Park HEARTSONG 2700 W. Anderson Ln., Austin JUMP GYMNASTICS 2919 Manchaca Rd., Austin 2117 Anderson Ln., Austin KIDSACTING Austin area locations MAD SCIENCE Austin & San Antonio locations MASTER GOHRING TAI CHI KUNG FU 6611 Airport Blvd., Austin NITRO SWIMMING 15506 Hwy 71, Bee Cave 1310 Toro Grande Blvd., Cedar Park SUNRISE NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH PROGRAM 4430 Manchaca Rd., Austin SYNERGY DANCE STUDIO 3425 Bee Cave Rd., Austin TexARTS 2300 Lohman’s Spur, Lakeway WAYA 1314 Exposition, Austin YMCA AUSTIN Travis, Hays & Bastrop Co locations YMCA WILLIAMSON COUNTY Williamson County locations

www.kidsactingstudio.com 512–836–5437 www.austin.madscience.org 512–892–1143 www.mastergohring.com 512–879–7553 www.nitroswim.com 512–861–7946 512–259–7999 www.sunriseaustin.org 512–444–3326 www.synergydancestudio.com 512–327–4130 www.tex–arts.org 512–852–9079 www.waya.org 512–473–2528 www.austinymca.org 512–335–9622 www.ymcagwc.org 512–792–2697

COLLEGE CREDIT AUSTIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE Locations in Austin–metro area Earn college credit in high school

Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

www.acmsaustin.org 512–474–2331 www.girlschoir.com 512–453–0884 www.bbbcomputer.com 512–415–4120 www.cafemonet.org 512–906–2200 512–892–3200 www.creativebrickbuilders.com 512–388–9003 www.dancediscovery.com 512–419–7611 512–658–2996 www.fun2learncode.com 512–900–8380 www.gymboreeclasses.com 512–444–9626 512–451–8644 512–259–7529 www.heartsongmusic.net 512–371–9506 www.jump–austin.com 512–593–6226

www.austincc.edu/startnow

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famIly connections R I C H A R D S I N G L E TO N Singleton, MACE, MAMFC, LPC, is the executive director at STARRY in Round Rock.

Reality Gets a Makeover with AR, VR Technology n the early fall of 2016, I was gathered with a group of friends playing softball in a local park. The park had the usual suspects: dog walkers, fitness gurus, ecstatic kids and us—goofy guys trying to relive the glory days of homeruns and hullaballoo.

I

But something was different. I kept seeing folks aimlessly walking around, staring at their phones. They seemed to be searching for something, but it wasn’t clear what was going on. Then it hit me like a virtual brick— Pokémon Go! These folks were playing the new game that had swept the world and redefined the future of augmented reality (AR). For decades, folks have been clamoring about the coming reality of virtual reality (VR). And in recent years, there’s been a lot of VR growth. It’s still catching on slower than the

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spontaneous, massively popular wave of AR. The difference is simple VR transports you to a virtual world, completely immersing you into another, completely digital reality. AR, on the other hand, transforms your real world into an immersive, new version of reality, right before your eyes. VR is still looking for its shining moment of success; AR is already here to stay. And as TeenSafe.com reports, “…augmented reality is poised to become the ‘fourth wave’ of the digital era (the first three being the PC era, the Internet era and the mobile era).” That’s a bold statement, but the success of video game superpowers and face altering fun–time apps like Snapchat have already seen that the sky’s the limit…literally. Snapchat has sky altering filters, and Skrite is an app company that hopes you’ll want

to use AR to completely change the way you do your messaging, opting to leave little notes hovering above your favorite skyline, written right under the beautiful arch of a scintillating rainbow or teetering on a towering mountain in real time. How fun! But AR is not just for fun and games. The AR revolution is changing the way we do life. Heads up displays (HUD) in cars are increasingly popular. Businesses are using AR to plan for projects and cast their newest vision. Design gurus are using AR to see what a remodel of an aging home might look like with a digital renovation applied in real–time. Even archeologists are using AR to reimagine with new eyes how ancient structures were positioned and purposed. Like with any new technology, however, there are challenges. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics

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Engineers (IEEE) published an online article almost a year to the day before the Pokémon wave hit, noting the uncharted waters of the way AR might affect brain development: “Research is incomplete, but some clinicians fear that children and teens whose reality testing was altered as children could go on to develop much more severe psychoses as adults. Children and teens with underlying psychological or emotional problems appear to be especially vulnerable.”

adoption of AR that the world had ever seen, it also saw some sad stories of kids being hurt and even killed by not paying attention to their real surroundings in a virtual world…a world that isn’t as easily rebooted as a frozen app.

AR is here to stay. Let’s be cautious and careful as we have fun with our new reality; only then can we augment our futures in ways that are healthy, safe and productive. af

Admittedly, this sounds over the top, but their sentiment isn’t uncommon. New technology always has its pendulum swinging ideas. When cars first emerged, folks wondered if there would be a speed at which people might turn to mush…and now we’re wondering something more sophisticated, but similar, about our children’s brains as they are inundated with AR. Perhaps more concerning than brains melting on AR are the almost certain challenges that will be added to already challenging issues such as social media. The fears of social media have been written about ad nauseam, and for good reason. Now add to that mix the ads and fads bombarding your child’s real/augmented world at unprecedented rates. And kids won’t be the only ones force– fed new conceptions of reality. One current YouTube video shows how our skylines could become a polluted parade of business advertisements as household names jockey for shelf space—not at the grocery store, but right before your eyes. As with all new technology, we parents need good boundaries. The summer of 2016 not only saw the most massive Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

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January

2018 calendar

C O M P I L E D BY B E T T Y K E M P E R

Museum Exhibits Page 36

Family Events Page 36

Museum Exhibits

American Spirits Through Jan. 7. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com or 512-936-8746. Photography and The American Road Trip Through Jan. 7. Blanton Museum of Art, 200 E. MLK Blvd. blantonmuseum.org or 512-471-5482. Austin at Mid–Century Through Jan. 14. Austin History Center, 810 Guadalupe St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7480. Read My Pins Through Jan. 21. LBJ Library, 2313 Red River St. lbjlibrary.org or 512-721–0200. Pong to Pokémon Through Mar. 18. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com or 512-936-8746.

Family Events

Monday 1

New Year’s Day Ice Skating on the Plaza ++ 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Whole Foods Market, 525 N. Lamar Blvd. $10 includes skate rental. wholefoodsmarket.com. Pfreeze Pflop! 10 to 11 a.m. Scott Mentzer Pool, 901 Old Austin–Hutto Rd., Pflugerville. FREE. pflugervilletx.gov or 512–990–6358. Christmas Light Show 6 to 11 p.m. Mozart's Coffee Roasters, 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. FREE. mozartscoffee.com or 512-477-2900.

Tuesday 2

Polar Bear Plunge 12 to 3 p.m. Morris Park Pool, 802 N. Avenue C, Elgin. FREE. elgintx.com or 512–285–6190. Tabletop Tuesday 5 p.m. Central Library, 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. FREE. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–7400.

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Parenting Events Page 38 •

CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Wednesday 3

Community Night 4 to 8 p.m. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. thinkeryaustin.org or 512–469–6200. Austin Barn Dancers ++ 7:30 to 9:45 p.m. Hancock Recreation Center, 811 E. 4th St. austinbarndancers.org or 512–453–4225. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Thursday 4

Living History Days ++ 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com or 512–936–8746. Brown Bag Lunchtime Concert ++ 12 to 1 p.m. Lakeway Activity Center, 105 Cross Creek Rd., Lakeway. tx–lakeway3.civicplus.com or 512–261–1010. First Thursday Austin ++ 5 to 8 p.m. S. Congress Ave., Barton Springs Rd. to Elizabeth St. firstthursdayaustin.com. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Friday 5

CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Saturday 6

Madrone Canyon Hike ++ 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Laura's Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. westbanklibrary.com or 512–327–3045. Children’s Book Fair 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave. wildflower.org or 512–232–0100. Austin Giant Chess ++ 12:30 to 3 p.m. Wooldridge Square Park, 900 Guadalupe St. giantchess.org.

Story Times Page 40

Despicable Me 3 (PG) 2 p.m. Windsor Park Branch Library, 5833 Westminster Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–9840. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Sunday 7

Free First Sundays 12 p.m. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave., thestoryoftexas.com or 512–936–8746. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Monday 8

CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Tuesday 9

Home School Tweens: 8 to 12 ++ 2 to 3 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St., Pflugerville. pflugervilletx.gov or 512–990–6375. Tween Movie Night: The Princess Bride (PG) 6 to 7:45 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St., Pflugerville. pflugervilletx.gov or 512–990–6375. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1; Tabletop Tuesday see Tuesday 2.

Wednesday 10

CONTINUING: Community Night see Wednesday 3; Austin Barn Dancers see Wednesday 3; Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Thursday 11

MLK Oratory Competition 6:30 p.m. St. James’ Episcopal Church, 1941 Webberville Road. mlkcelebration.com. CONTINUING: Brown Bag Lunchtime Concert see Thursday 4; Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

SUBMIT YOUR EVENT Visit austinfamily.com and click “Submit your event.” The deadline is the 5th of the month preceding the month of the event. If your event charges more than $15, send details to kaye2003@austinfamily.com for approval. View the magazine online at austinfamily.com

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Friday 12

2018 Travis County Youth Show 9 a.m. to midnight. Travis County Expo Center, 7311 Decker Lane. traviscountyyouthshow.org. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Saturday 13

Hands on History 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Williamson Museum, 716 S. Austin Ave, Georgetown. williamsonmuseum.org or 512–943–1670. CONTINUING: Austin Giant Chess see Saturday 6; Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1; 2018 Travis County Youth Show see Friday 12.

Sunday 14

When I Grow Up 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Asian American Resource Center, 8401 Cameron Rd. FREE. pipaustin.org/when–i–grow–up. Family Day 12 to 4 p.m. Umlauf Sculpture Garden, 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. umlaufsculpture.org or 512–445–5582. Go, Dog, Go! 2 p.m. Paramount Theater, 713 Congress Ave. FREE. austintheatre.org or 512–472–5470.

Family Movie Matinee: The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 2 to 3:45 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St., Pflugerville. FREE. pflugervilletx.gov or 512–990–6375. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Monday 15

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Martin Luther King Festival 9 a.m. MLK Statue, University of Texas Campus. FREE. mlkfestival.com or 512–657–3064. MLK Day Skate 12 to 6 p.m. Playland Skate Center, 8822 McCann Dr. $8. playlandskatecenter.com or 512-452-1901. CONTINUING: Ice Skating on the Plaza see Monday 1.

Tuesday 16

Finding Neverland 8 p.m. Bass Concert Hall, 2350 Robert Dedman Dr. broadwayinaustin.com or 512–477–6060. CONTINUING: Tabletop Tuesday see Tuesday 2; Home School Tweens: 8 to 12 see Tuesday 9.

Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

Wednesday 17

CONTINUING: Community Night see Wednesday 3; Austin Barn Dancers see Wednesday 3. Finding Neverland see Tuesday 16.

Thursday 18

Science Thursday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com or 512–936–8746. 2018 Austin Boat and Travel Trailer Show ++ 4 to 9 p.m. Austin Convention Center, 500 E. Cesar Chavez St. Adults $10. austinboatshow.com. Family Movie Night 6 to 8 p.m. Elgin Public Library, 404 N. Main, Elgin. elgintx.com or 512–281–5678. CONTINUING: Brown Bag Lunchtime Concert see Thursday 4. Finding Neverland see Tuesday 16.

Friday 19

Toddler Movie Matinee: Up (PG) 10 to 11:45 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St., Pflugerville. pflugervilletx.gov or 512–990–6375. CONTINUING: 2018 Austin Boat and Travel Trailer Show see Thursday 18. Finding Neverland see Tuesday 16.

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Saturday 20

Finding Neverland 2 and 8 p.m. Bass Concert Hall, 2350 Robert Dedman Dr. broadwayinaustin.com or 512–477–6060. Snow Day 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Science Mill, 101 S. Lady Bird Lane, Johnson City. sciencemill.org or 844–263–6405. Austin Family Magazine's 20th Annual Summer Camp Fair 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Rd. FREE. austinfamily.com or 512–733–0038. CONTINUING: 2018 Austin Boat and Travel Trailer Show see Thursday 18.

Sunday 21

Finding Neverland 1 and 7 p.m. Bass Concert Hall, 2350 Robert Dedman Dr. broadwayinaustin.com or 512–477–6060. Sunday Funday 1 to 4 p.m. Neill–Cochran House Museum, 2310 San Gabriel St. FREE. nchmuseum.org or 512–478–2335. CONTINUING: 2018 Austin Boat and Travel Trailer Show see Thursday 18.

Tuesday 23

CONTINUING: Tabletop Tuesday see Tuesday 2; Home School Tweens: 8 to 12 see Tuesday 9.

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Wednesday 24

CONTINUING: Community Night see Wednesday 3; Austin Barn Dancers see Wednesday 3.

Thursday 25

CONTINUING: Brown Bag Lunchtime Concert see Thursday 4.

Saturday 27

Texas Wildlife Day 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Texas Memorial Museum, 2400 Trinity St. FREE. tmm.utexas.edu or 512–471–1604. Winter Tree Fest 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave. wildflower.org or 512–232–0100. Read It, Sing It, Let Us Hear It Open Mic 1 to 4 p.m. Carver Branch Library, 1161 Angelina St. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–1010.

Sunday 28

Celtic Fest 12 to 6 p.m. San Marcos Activity Center, 501 E. Hopkins St., San Marcos. FREE. toursanmarcos.com or 512–393–8280.

Tuesday 30

Tween Hangout Night 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W.

Pfluger St., Pflugerville. pflugervilletx.gov or 512–990–6375. CONTINUING: Tabletop Tuesday see Tuesday 2; Home School Tweens: 8 to 12 see Tuesday 9.

Wednesday 31

Movie Matinee: Ice Age: Storks (PG) 2 to 3:45 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St., Pflugerville. pflugervilletx.gov or 512–990–6375. CONTINUING: Community Night see Wednesday 3; Austin Barn Dancers see Wednesday 3.

Parenting Events Any Baby Can offers free parenting classes in English and Spanish. Postpartum support group meets on Thursdays. 6207 Sheridan Ave. FREE. anybabycan.org or 512–454–3743.

Bridges to Growth offers early childhood parenting classes throughout the month. 805 W. University Ave., Georgetown. georgetownproject.org or 512–864–3008.

The City of Austin offers free car seat checks and Safe Baby Academy classes throughout the year at a variety of locations in the Central

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Texas area. Appointments and reservations are required. For dates and locations, email emspubed@austintexas.gov or call 512–972–SAFE (7233).

La Leche League of Central Texas hosts nine regular meetings in addition to play dates and gatherings in Austin, Round Rock, Killeen/ Temple, Bryan–College Station and Waco. All breastfeeding mothers, babies and mothers– to–be are welcome to attend. texaslll.org. YMCA offers a free Childhood Obesity Intervention Program at various locations throughout the month. austinymca.org or 512–236–9622.

Wednesday 10

Welcome Wednesday 8:30 to 10 a.m. Hill Country Christian School, 12124 Ranch Road 620 North. FREE with registration. hillcountrychristianschool.org or 512–331–7036.

Thursday 11

Open Campus Day 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Regents School of Austin, 3230 Travis Country Circle. FREE with registration. regents–austin.com or 512–899–8095.

Kinder Info Session 9:30 a.m. St. Andrews Episcopal School–– Lower, 1112 W. 31st St. FREE with registration. sasaustin.org or 512–299–9800. Caregiver Seminar: Dementia 6 to 8 p.m. AGE of Central Texas, 3710 Cedar St. FREE. tinyurl.com/agejanuary2018 or 512–600–9275. 7–12 Grade Preview Event 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Regents School of Austin, 3230 Travis Country Circle. FREE with registration. regents–austin.com or 512–899–8095.

Tuesday 16

Prospective Parent Coffee 9 a.m. St. Andrews Episcopal School––Lower, 1112 W. 31st St. FREE with registration. sasaustin.org or 512–299–9800.

Wednesday 17

Visitor Morning: Kindergarten ++ 9 to 11:30 a.m. Austin Waldorf School, 8700 South View Rd. FREE with registration. austinwaldorf.org or 512–288–5942. Experience St. Andrew's 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, 5901 Southwest Pkwy. FREE with registration. sasaustin.org or 512–299–9700.

Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

Prospective Parent Coffee 9:30 a.m. St. Andrews Episcopal School–– Lower, 1112 W. 31st St. FREE with registration. sasaustin.org or 512–299–9800.

Friday 19

Visitor Morning: Grade School ++ 9 to 11 a.m. Austin Waldorf School, 8700 South View Rd. FREE with registration. austinwaldorf.org or 512–288–5942.

Tuesday 23

All–School Preview 6 to 8:30 p.m. Hill Country Christian School, 12124 Ranch Road 620 North. FREE. hillcountrychristianschool.org or 512–331–7036. CONTINUING: Visitor Morning: Kindergarten see Wednesday 17.

Thursday 25

Prospective Parent Coffee 8:30 a.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, 5901 Southwest Pkwy. FREE with registration. sasaustin.org or 512–299–9700. CONTINUING: Visitor Morning: Grade School see Friday 19.

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Story Times Public library story time events listed here are free unless otherwise noted. Programs subject to change. Please contact before attending.

MONDAYS

Libraries closed Jan. 1 and 15

Terrific Toddlers Story Time 9:30 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd. leander.librarycatalog.info or 512-259-5259. Baby Time 10 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Infant Storytime 10:30 a.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045. Baby Story Time 10:30 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188. Baby Time 11 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375. Toddler Storytime 11:15 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188.

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Family Storytime 12:30 p.m. Laura’s Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045. Preschool Storytime 6:30 p.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

TUESDAYS

Signing Connection Storytime (Jan. 2 only) 9:15 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd., Leander. leandertx.gov or 512-255–2569. Baby and Me Lapsit 9:15 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd., Leander. leandertx.gov or 512-255–2569. Children’s Story Time 9:30 a.m. Dripping Springs Library, 501 Sportsplex Dr. dscl.org or 512-858–7825. Baby Bounce 9:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551. Lapsit Storytime 9:45 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. Bilingual Story Time 10 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375. Toddler Time 10 a.m. San Marcos Library, 625 E. Hopkins St. sanmarcostx.gov or 512-393-8200.

All Ages Storytime 10:15 a.m. Pleasant Hill Branch Library, 211 E. William Cannon Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3940. All Ages Storytime 10:15 a.m. Carver Branch Library, 1161 Angelina St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-1010. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. Spicewood Springs Branch Library, 8637 Spicewood Springs Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3800. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. Hampton Branch Library, 5125 Convict Hill Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9900. Spanish Circle Time 10:30 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188. Toddler Storytime 10:30 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. Toddler Storytime 10:30 a.m. Buda Library, 303 Main St. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899. Preschool Storytime 10:30 a.m. Elgin Library, 404 N. Main St. elginpubliclibrary.org or 512-281-5678.

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Baby Bumblebees Story Time (Jan. 9 and 23 only) 10:30 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. pl.beecavetexas.com or 512–767–6620. Spanish Bilingual Storytime (Jan. 9 only) 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Signing Bilingual Storytime (Jan. 16 only) 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Hindi Bilingual Storytime (Jan. 23 only) 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Preschool Storytime 10:30 a.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327–3045. Spanish Dual Language Storytime 10:30 a.m. Terrazas Branch Library, 1105 E. Cesar Chavez St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3625. Lapsit Storytime 10:45 a.m. Elgin Library, 404 N. Main St. elginpubliclibrary.org or 512-281-5678. Bilingual Story Time 11 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375. Spanish Dual Language Storytime 11 a.m. North Village Branch Library, 2505 Steck Ave. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9960. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Spicewood Springs Branch Library, 8637 Spicewood Springs Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3800. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Hampton Branch Library, 5125 Convict Hill Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9900. Preschool Time 11 a.m. San Marcos Library, 625 E. Hopkins St. sanmarcostx.gov or 512-393-8200.

Sensory Storytime 11:15 a.m. Carver Branch Library, 1161 Angelina St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-1010. Baby Bumblebees Story Time (Jan. 9 and 23 only) 11:15 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. pl.beecavetexas.com or 512–767–6620. Homeschool Storytime 1 p.m. Buda Library, 303 Main St. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899. Family Storytime 6 p.m. Buda Library, 303 Main St. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899. Storytime and Craft 6:30 p.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188.

WEDNESDAYS

Babytime 9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Toddlertime 9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Tales for Tots 9:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551. Lapsit Storytime 9:45 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600.

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Children’s Story Time 10 a.m. Dripping Springs Library, 501 Sportsplex Dr. dscl.org or 512-858–7825. All Ages Storytime 10:15 a.m. Howson Branch Library, 2500 Exposition Blvd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8800. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. North Village Branch Library, 2505 Steck Ave. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9960. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. Twin Oaks Branch Library, 1800 S. 5th St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9980. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. Old Quarry Branch Library, 7051 Village Center Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8860. Spanish Dual Language Storytime 10:15 a.m. St. John Branch Library, 7500 Blessing Ave. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7570. Spanish Dual Language Storytime 10:15 a.m. Dove Springs Rec Center, 5801 Ainez Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3840. Circle Time 10:30 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188.

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Baby Story Time 10:30 a.m. Lake Travis Library, 1938 Lohman's Crossing, Lake Travis. laketravislibrary.org or 512-263-2885. Preschool Storytime 10:30 a.m. Buda Library, 303 Main St. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899. Preschool Storytime 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Preschool Storytime 10:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551. Preschool Express 10:30 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411. Tot Time 10:30 a.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045. Toddlertime 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Toddler Storytime 10:30 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. All Ages Storytime 11 a.m. Manchaca Road Branch Library, 5500 Manchaca Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8700.

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All Ages Storytime 11 a.m. Cepeda Branch Library, 651 N. Pleasant Valley Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7372. All Ages Storytime 11 a.m. University Hills Branch Library, 4721 Loyola Ln. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9940. All Ages Storytime 11 a.m. Willie Mae Kirk Branch Library, 3101 Oak Springs Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9920. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Twin Oaks Branch Library, 1800 S. 5th St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9980. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. North Village Branch Library, 2505 Steck Ave. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9960. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Old Quarry Branch Library, 7051 Village Center Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8860. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. Story Time 11 a.m. Barnes & Noble Arboretum, 10000 Research Blvd. FREE. barnesandnoble.com or 512–418–8985.

The Signing Connection 11 to 11:30 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr, Austin. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188. French Dual Language Storytime (Jan. 10 only) 3:30 p.m. Central Library, 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7400. Japanese Dual Language Storytime (Jan. 24 only) 3:30 p.m. Central Library, 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7400. Bow Wow Reading 3:30 p.m. North Village Branch Library, 2505 Steck Ave. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9960. Arts and Crafts 6 p.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr, Austin. wblibrary.org or 512-789-3188. Pajama Storytime 6 p.m. Windsor Park Branch Library, 5833 Westminster Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9840.

THURSDAYS

Terrific Toddlers Storytime 9:30 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd., Leander. leandertx.gov or 512-255–2569. Preschool Storytime 9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

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Babytime 9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Tales for Tots 9:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551. Lapsit Storytime 9:45 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. Story Time 10 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375. Baby Lapsit 10 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411. All Ages Storytime 10:15 a.m. Windsor Park Branch Library, 5833 Westminster Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9840. Spanish Dual Language Storytime 10:15 a.m. Pleasant Hill Branch, 211 E. William Cannon Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3940. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. Milwood Branch Library, 12500 Amherst Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9880. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. Hampton Branch Library, 5125 Convict Hill Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9900. Toddler Storytime 10:15 a.m. Yarborough Branch Library, 2200 Hancock Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8820. Preschool Storytime 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Preschool Storytime 10:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551. Toddlertime 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Toddler Storytime 10:30 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. Tot Time 10:30 a.m. Laura’s Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045. Preschool Pals Story Time 10:30 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. pl.beecavetexas.com or 512–767–6620. Toddler Time 11 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411.` Story Time 11 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Spanish Dual Language Storytime 11 a.m. Little Walnut Creek Branch, 853 W. Rundberg Ln. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9860. Sign Language Storytime 11 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. All Ages Storytime 11 a.m. Manchaca Road Branch, 5500 Manchaca Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–8700. Spanish Dual Language Storytime 11 a.m. Little Walnut Creek Branch, 835

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Rundberg Ln. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–9860. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Milwood Branch, 12500 Amherst Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–9880. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Yarborough Branch, 2200 Hancock Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–8820. Sensory Storytime 11 a.m. Spicewood Springs Branch Library, 8637 Spicewood Springs Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3800. Toddler Storytime 11 a.m. Hampton Branch, 5125 Convict Hill Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512–974–9900.

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Sensory Storytime 11:15 a.m. Ruiz Branch Library, 1600 Grove Blvd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7500. Preschool Pals Story Time 11:15 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. pl.beecavetexas.com or 512–767–6620.

FRIDAYS

Babytime 9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Baby and Me Lapsit 10 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd., Leander. leandertx.gov or 512-255–5259. Story Time 10 a.m. San Marcos Library, 625 E. Hopkins St. sanmarcostx.gov or 512-393-8200. All Ages Storytime 10:30 a.m. Central Library, 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7400. Toddlertime 10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Family Fun Storytime 10:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551. Toddler Tales Story Time 10:30 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. pl.beecavetexas.com or 512–767–6620.

Toddler Storytime 10:30 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr, Austin. wblibrary.org or 512-789-3188. Older Preschooler Discovery Time 10:30 a.m. Dripping Springs Library, 501 Sportsplex Dr. dscl.org or 512-858–7825. Los Cuentos Bilingual Storytime 10:30 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411. Spanish Dual Language Storytime 11 a.m. Howson Branch, 2500 Exposition Blvd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8800. Family Storytime 11 a.m. Round Rock Library, 216 E. Main St., Round Rock. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. Bilingual Story Time 11 a.m. San Marcos Library, 625 E. Hopkins St. sanmarcostx.gov or 512-393-8200. Toddler Tales Story Time 11:15 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. pl.beecavetexas.com or 512–767–6620. Preschool Storytime 11:15 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr, Austin. wblibrary.org or 512-789-3188. Sensory Story Time (Jan. 12 only) 5 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

SATURDAYS

Family Storytime 10 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov or 512–401–5600. Family Storytime (Jan. 6 only) 10:30 a.m. Lake Travis Library, 1938 Lohman's Crossing, Lake Travis. laketravislibrary.org or 512-263-2885. Baby Time 10:30 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375. Story Time 11 a.m. Barnes & Noble Arboretum, 10000 Research Blvd. FREE. barnesandnoble.com or 512–418–8985. Storytime and Craft 11 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188. Family Storytime 12:30 p.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045. Saturday Story Time 1 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

SUNDAYS

Sensory Story Time 11 a.m. Laura’s Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

A noteable musical selection

paddle ball

retro toys juggling supplies

Art Gallery & Espresso Bar

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PIENSA POSITIVO by Leslie Montoya, life coach and host of Despierta Austin

Expectativas Toma unos minutos y reflexiona en lo siguiente. ¿Cuando fue la ultima vez que tuviste un crecimiento personal en tu vida? ¿Como te sentiste? El crecimiento personal produce felicidad instantáea va que es una de las necesidades del alma. Y la manera efectiva de llenar esa necesidad es mediante expectativas propias y no poniendolas en los demás. En este nuevo año que comienza, planteate expectativas reales que sabes que podras alcanzar. Y si te cuesta hacerlo, solo ten paciencia y persevera. ¡Piensa Positivo!

Expectations Take a few minutes and reflect on this: when was the last time you experienced personal growth? How did you feel? Personal growth produces instant happiness because it is a need of the soul. And an effective way to fulfill this need is by setting personal expectations and not putting them on others. This new year, start by setting real expectations that you know you will accomplish. If you find it difficult, just keep calm and persevere. Think Positive!

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focus on

DOCTORS advertisement

Dr. Rachel Montgomery, Lonestar Pediatric Dental Dr. Montgomery graduated from Baylor University in Waco, and followed up by attending the University of Texas Dental School in Houston. Her residency was completed at the Boston University School of Dental Medicine, with a specialty in pediatrics. Rachel can most likely be found spending time with her husband Marty and their precious boys. See ad on page 19 Dr. Marty Montgomery, Lonestar Pediatric Dental Dr. Marty Montgomery comes from a family where all the children were drawn to dental careers early in life. A graduate of Baylor University in Waco, Marty attended Tufts Dental School in Boston. He completed his residency at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, specializing in pediatrics. See ad on page 19 Dr. Betty Richardson Dr. Richardson earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in nursing, and a PhD in psych/mental health nursing. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist and a licensed professional counselor. She has over 30 years of experience working with individuals, couples, families, children and adolescents. See ad on page 42 Dr. Vigo Prior to 2005, Dr. Vigo had previously trained at Washington University Hospital in St. Louis and the world– renowned Cleveland Clinic. He has a special interest in allergies, food allergies, asthma and allergic skin conditions. He also prescribes allergy drops as therapy for appropriate patients. He is a regional speaker on topics that involve allergies and asthma and is in his fifth term as the President of the Austin Allergy Society. In addition, he sits on the Board of Directors for Texas Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Society. He is fluent in both English and Spanish. He is also a “former” allergic and asthmatic person. He spends time exploring the outdoors with his young kids. See ad on page 41

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KID

An Ivory Soap Experiment

Warning: Adult supervision required.

Here’s a great little experiment you can do at home that will demonstrate an important scientific principle: Charles’s Law. This law says that as a gas gets hotter, it takes up more space. Now, Ivory soap is a great way to show Charles’s Law, because the manufacturers have whipped air into the bar of soap. The air also makes a bar of Ivory soap float in water, while most brands of soap sink. When you microwave the soap, those tiny bubbles of air expand rapidly, and the whole thing turns into a billowy, pillowy puff of soap!

What You Need • Bar of Ivory soap (don’t try this with any other brand of soap) • Microwave–safe dish • Microwave oven

What You Do 1. Unwrap the bar of Ivory soap and place it in the dish. 2. With an adult’s help, microwave the soap for about 2 minutes. 3. Watch as the soap expands and billows! 4. With an adult’s help, remove the dish carefully and allow the fluffy soap foam to cool. 5. Play around with the soap foam—poke it, slice it or break off a bit and wash your hands with it. Yep, it’s still soap!

Good to Know The same process that causes Ivory soap to expand so much in the microwave works on popcorn kernels and marshmallows, too. There are tiny pockets of air in each kernel and each marshmallow that expand rapidly when heated. Photos by Sherida Mock Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

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just for grIns C A R R I E TAY L O R Carrie Taylor is a freelance writer, editor and mother of two boys.

Alexa, What Awful Thing Happens When a Toddler Discovers You?

version of a fiendish plot would go nowhere. Alexa—mature, sophisticated Alexa—would say she can’t play “poop,” because it’s a bodily function. And besides, what kind of monster would create a “poop” song accessible by a robot? Surely no professional musician would…but I was wrong.

We all know the risks of mixing too much technology into our kids’ lives. It seems like every corner of the internet is filled with articles about how our children are exposed too early to screens and tech, and how the repercussions of these consequential contacts could be monumental.

That day we discovered no less than five “poop” songs. And as we finished up our bedtime routine, I heard him humming the fifth poop song while he brushed his teeth. The worst part was, I found myself humming along with him.

I can’t help but think if we’d done something different—if we’d bought a robot named Benedict Cumberbatch—we I, too, have seen the negative effects of wouldn’t be where we are today. My days exposing children to technology too early. I’ve encountered behavior that may wouldn’t be filled with “poopy” earworms take months to reverse, if it’s possible at as potent as an extreme mashup of the all. And after much consideration, I know Chili’s “Baby Back Rib” song and a car dealership’s radio jingle. now it was a mistake to let my toddler learn how to interact with our robot Let my life be a lesson to you all: roommate, Alexa. preserve your child’s innocence and your sanity; unplug the Alexa. Just turn the “Alexa, play poop,” the toddler said one lights off gently, and we’ll all be better day. “Play a poop poop song!” for it. He cackled maniacally, but for a brief moment I assumed this 3–year–old’s

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Afm 2018 jan magazine  
Afm 2018 jan magazine  

Austin Family Magazine January 2018

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