Issuu on Google+

Building for a healthy future Mayo Clinic Health System’s $28M expansion opened to the public on Jan. 7

T

he first phase of Mayo Clinic Health System’s expansion project in Austin opened to the public Monday, Jan. 7 after about 19 months of construction. “We are excited to open this state-of-the-art facility for patients in Austin area,” said Mark Ciota, M.D., CEO at Mayo Clinic Health System – Albert Lea and Austin. “Under Rod Nordeng’s leadership and through the efforts of many, this project has been completed on time and on budget. I want to express my gratitude to the community for their support of this project.” The $28-million, 85,600-square-foot expansion opened about four months ahead of schedule and in three phases. The first phase, open since Jan. 7, is the lower level — which includes rehabilitation

Mark Ciota, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System - Albert Lea and Austin, greets employees this January before the ribbon cutting on the new expansion. Eric Johnson/photodesk@austindailyherald.com services, orthopedics, podiatry and the pain clinic — and the first floor — which includes the eye center, retail pharmacy,

the Mayo Clinic Store and Jazzman’s, a coffee shop. The second phase, open since Jan. 14, is the third floor, which includes

OB/GYN, family medicine and internal medicine. The final phase, which opened Jan. 21, is the second floor, including

family medicine. “This prepares Austin to move ahead and be the leader in healthcare moving forward,” Ciota

said. “The space is designed so that we have more team based care, which is how healthcare is moving nationally.” There will be a open house on Saturday, Feb. 2, from 10 a.m. to noon, when members of the public will be able to tour the expansion. “The planning for this building started in 2008, and we are very pleased with the outcome,” said Rod Nordeng, vice president of operations. “We look forward to its role in serving our patients and their family members.” Nordeng said it feels great to have the expansion complete. “We’ve been so busy with the project, including normal workloads, that you really don’t take an opportunity to step back and appreciate it,” he said. “So for many of us, this is our opportunity to step back and go, ‘wow, this is something special.’”

A LOOK AT THE NUTS AND BOLTS 962,000 Pounds of structural steel

14,000

Bolts used to hold the structural steel together

20,557 Cubic yards of sand removed

2,135

Truckloads to haul all that sand away

80

Miles of lowvoltage and computer wire

< A construction worker cuts away excess metal while working on the first floor of Mayo Clinic Health System's new expansion in Austin in January 2012. Herald file photo

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013


2

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

Congratulations Mayo Clinic Health System

A special supplement to the AUSTIN DAILY HERALD


A special supplement to the AUSTIN DAILY HERALD

Congratulations Mayo Clinic Health System

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

The outside of the Mayo Clinic Health System expansion took shape while work continued inside in September 2012. At that point, construction was already a month ahead of schedule.

Now & Then A LOOK AT THE EXPANSIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PROGRESS PHOTOS BY ERIC JOHNSON

A construction worker stands on the steel frame in January 2012.

SEE MORE PHOTOS ON PAGES 6 & 7

ABOVE: The main staircase between the main floor and lower level. BELOW: Jason Schwingle, left, and Scott Vantries work on a reception area in September 2012.

Construction workers do ceiling work on the expansion in March 2012.

Vice President of Operations Tammy Kritzer leads a tour through the lower level of the expansion in January.

Tom Adams of All Metro Glass finishes work in January on a staircase connecting the first floor to the lower level.

Mark Ciota, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System - Albert Lea and Austin, tours the lower level of the expansion this January.

3


4

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

Congratulations Mayo Clinic Health System

A special supplement to the AUSTIN DAILY HERALD

Art for health’s sake Numerous works of art highlighting scenes from around the area and other parts of Minnesota are featured throughout the expansion, including some by local artists PHOTOS

RIVER FLOOD

PROVIDED BY MEDICAL CENTER STAFF

SHORELINE REFLECTIONS Silk, free-reverse appliqué

Oil on linen

By Tom Maakestad of Marine on the St. Croix, Minn.

By Tim Harding of Stillwater, Minn.

Tom Maakestad grew up in rural Northfield, Minn., into a family of artists who had farmers as neighbors. Today, he and his family reside in Marine on St. Croix and they vacation in Door County, Wis. His landscapes speak of the countryside familiar to him, as well as the southern Minnesota river valleys and farmland where he spent his childhood. His attraction to the land with its patterns and colors aid him in composing paintings which leads the viewer into a rich and varied landscape. Maakestad received his bachelor of arts degree from Luther College and continued his studies at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. His work can be found in numerous private and corporate collections, including Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and the U.S. Embassy Residence in Oslo, Norway.

A SLICE OF LIFE, MOWER COUNTY, MINNESOTA

AUSTIN NATURE SERIES Shoreline Reflections by Tim Harding

Photographic essay

By Nate Howard of Austin

Nate Howard has been photographing Austin, Minn., and the surrounding communities since 1998. Born and raised in the Midwest, he learned photography in high school in Michigan. Experimenting with other forms of art, it was the camera that Nate never set aside. He brings a documentary approach to his photographs, revealing beauty and compassion in the world around him. Working in the rural Midwest, Nate appreciates the slow pace and sense of family in the small communities. While out wandering with his camera, Nate looks at the subjects of his pictures as not simply subjects, but members of his family, the family of humanity. Nate made many of these photographs with an all-manual, medium format, film camera. The simplicity of the camera demands a focus and attention for the moment to trip the shutter. This study and reflection on what is seen in the viewfinder creates photographs that involve emotion and respect, one frame at a time.

NATURE'S ELEMENTS

Hot patina on copper, brass and aluminum By Jon Michael Route of Frederic, Wis.

Jon has traveled full circle back to the small, rural town where his studio is located, barely one block from the hospital room where he was born in 1954. Jon worked in an architectural metals firm and as a jeweler before striking out on his own as an independent craft artist. He has twice been invited to teach at the University of Wisconsin-Stout, in Menomonie, Wis., and has given many workshops throughout his career on the technical aspects of his craft. Color is a very exciting and different path for me because for more than 20 years I built my business and reputation on pewter, a very gray metal. I knew the first time I tried the hot patina process that I had found a basis for a new direction. There is something about the process of discovery that is very exciting. Ultimately it is very pleasing aesthetically and immensely gratifying for your artistic soul to create a new path you can believe in. —Jon Michael Route

SUMMER SAMPLER AT JAY C. HORMEL NATURE CENTER

Stained glass, mosaic on panel

One installation, displayed to the right of the front information desk, is a five-piece mosaic by Barbara Keith, a Lanesboro, Minn. based artist. The five panels include a landscape, birds, fox, otter and nest.

Barbara Keith

of Lanesboro, Minnesota My path to mosaics began when I took a class on how to create stained glass windows. After making several, there was a lot of scrap glass so I decided to try making a mosaic. From the beginning, I loved working with glass. It is a beautiful medium which is striking when viewed up close or from a distance. I am fascinated by the play of light and color, as well as an ability to create the illusion of depth with glass.—Barbara Keith Austin Nature Series was inspired, in part, by some of Larry Dolphinʼs (Director/Naturalist, J. C. Hormel Nature Center) most memorable moments with nature. Among those was seeing a fox on its hind legs reaching up as it tried to catch a butterfly. Another was watching an otter swimming on its back while playing with a fish. Whether a broad view of a lovely landscape or magical moments such as these, nature will surprise and delight if one takes time to enjoy it.

Austin resident Virginia Larsenʼs account of the piece:

I saw an amazing sight: five large glittering, shining, glowing pictures of nature scenes, made of colored glass shards. I could hardly believe my eyes, so fascinated was I by the effect of small pieces of glass in a wide range of colors arranged in transformed yet recognizable shapes. I read the information next to them: stained glass artist Barbara Keith lives in Lanesboro; the scenes depict actual observations made by Larry Dolphin, naturalist at our J.C.Hormel Nature Center. For example, a small red fox on his hind legs, swatting at a butterfly; an otter on his back in a stream, playing with a fish on his tummy; the brook with sunlight shattering on its ribbed surface. I stood there in awe and then realized that tears were running down my face. As if the artist had captured holiness and rendered it accessible to us for free. For more information about Barbara Keith visit her website, barbarakeithdesigns.com. The site includes of clip from KSMQʼs “Off 90” highlighting her work.

The Mosiac by Barbara Keith

Painted, carved wood and steel

By Emily Wilson of New Market, Ala.

These stylized components represent a bit of natureʼs delight found at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center. Looking closely, one will find butterfly weed, blue indio, Virginia bluebells, prairie blazing star or black eyed Susan. The trees and shrubs represented in this piece are white oak, ironwood, and American plum, among others. For those with wings find monarch butterfly, American woodcock, black capped chickadee, bluebird, to name a few. —Emily Wilson Emily Wilson received a bachelor of fine arts degree in painting from Memphis College of Art. After discovering Mexican folk art figures, she decided to pursue graduate studies in wood at the Appalachian Center for Crafts in Tennessee.

Artwork to be placed in remodeled spaces upon completion in the coming months of 2013:

—Dobbinʼs Creek. Oil on canvas. Shirley Tapp, Dexter —Summer on the St. Croix.Acrylic on canvas. Barb Cafourek,Austin —Bird of feature No. 1 (goldfinch).Acrylic on canvas. Barb Cafourek,Austin —Bird of feature No. 2 (bluebird).Acrylic on canvas. Barb Cafourek,Austin —Prairie Garden, J.C. Hormel Nature Center. Oil on canvas. Kay Middlebrook,Austin —Elements fromAustin #1 and #2. Pastel drawings on paper. ShelleyAquion Brandon,Austin —Red Poppies. Watercolor. James Wegner,Austin —Summertime. Watercolor. Bonnie Lee,Austin.

Monarch by Leo Sewell

Austin studentsʼdrawings featured on third floor: Mower Refreshed Take 5 project

Mower Refreshed askedAustin elementary students to draw what Take 5, Mower Refreshedʼ s concept of mental fitness, meant to them. Five studentsʼ drawings were selected to be professionally matted, framed and hung on the third floor of the expansion. —Tunes: Molly Garry, Gr. 4, Pacelli Elementary —Bubbles: Anastasia Mitchell, Gr. 5, Pacelli Elementary —Reading on a Hillside: Shyanna Deters, Gr. 4, Neveln Elementary —My Dog Charlie: Isabella Pihlstrom, Gr. 5, Banfield Elementary —Flying Kites: Arianna Shapinsky, Gr. 5, Banfield Elementary

Tim Harding uses a technique he developed called free-reverse appliqué. It makes use of the intrinsic properties of the textile while creating an interesting interplay of surface and structure. He also creates the illusion of a three-dimensional space with painterly techniques such as light and shadow, foreground Donʼt and background, touch and perspective. Please note: The pixel-like quality Works of art of his work—where are fragile. To different colors next help us preto each other are serve these blended together treasures, when viewed from a please do not distance—is an aptouch. proach associated with painting styles such as Pointillism and Impressionism. Tim Harding has been influenced by numerous arts, historical and cultural practices including traditional oriental kimono forms, Monetʼs impression of light on water, and pattern painting portraits of Chuck Close. Yet, for Harding, a key influence comes from the connection he sees between modern painting and primitive ethnographic artifacts.

MONARCH

Found object, assemblage on copper By Leo Sewell of Philadelphia, Pa.

Statistics show everyone generates tons of trash, every year. Yet, as the saying goes, one manʼs trash is another manʼs treasure. This is certainly true for Take a sculptor Leo Sewell. closer Leo Sewell spent look his childhood in AnPatients and napolis, Md., where visitors have an he lived near a naval opportunity to base dump. As a experience the boy, he rummaged artwork on a through the discardself-guided art ed objects and often tour of the facilbrought things ity during the home. His father public open showed him how to house on Satuse a few tools and urday, Feb. 2 then challenged him from 10 a.m. to to do something with noon. Art locahis newly found tions are denottreasures. At age ed on the map 10, he began asincluded on sembling the obPage 8. jects into whimsical, representational forms—from a lifesize duck to a 24-foot stegosaurus. In all of his work, the viewer is invited to enjoy the assemblage as a whole, and close-up to explore the hundreds of familiar objects. In Monarch, some of the objects were contributed by members of the Austin community.

Other pieces

—Miao Womanʼs Jacket, Baby Carrier and Childʼs Jacket. Cotton, cross-stitch, batik, appliqué. Guizhou, China —Hupil Childrenʼs Clothing and Carrying Cloth. Cotton, wood, embroidery, weaving. Guatemala. —Summer on the Cedar River. Oil on canvas. Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn. —Autumn at Hormel Nature Center. Oil on canvas. Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn. —Austinʼs Mill Pond. Acrylic on canvas. Sally Gerhart, Brownsdale, Minn. —Beyond the Fence. Oil pastel on paper. Barbara Agerter, Rochester, Minn. —Hummingbird No. 1, Hummingbird No. 2. Hand-built earthenware with slip and glaze. Cathy Kiffney, Chapel Hill, N.C. —Winter in Todd Park. Oil on canvas. Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn. —Spring by East Side Lake. Oil on canvas. Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn. —Mayan, Aztec and Kente. Woven cotton with linen. Kelly Marshall, Minneapolis, Minn. Untitled (triptych). Quilt, Japanese paper, silk, metal leaf. Lucinda Carlstrom, Atlanta, Ga. —Roosevelt Bridge. Acrylic on canvas. Sally Gerhart, Brownsdale, Minn. —Catching Butterflies, Letting Butterflies Go. Dry point etching and monotype print. Paula Schuette Kraemer, Madison, Wis. —Patchwork, Traditions and Sashico. Woven cotton with linen. Kelly Marshall, Minneapolis, Minn.

Medical center employeesʼ photography also on display

Several medical center employees submitted their own photography for an opportunity to have their work displayed throughout the expansion and soon-to-be renovated areas. The photographs chosen depict different landscapes along with intimate views of nature, and include those from: Lori J. Johnson – Clinic Conference Room (2nd floor) John C. Coppes, M.D. –Administration Conference Room Bob Stoffey, M.D. – Administration Conference Room Tim Rietz, M.D. – Clinic Conference Rooms (LL and 2nd floor), hospital conference room (2nd floor)


A special supplement to the AUSTIN DAILY HERALD

On the move

Congratulations Mayo Clinic Health System

Providers, departments staying put

I Same-Day Surgery (select LL in the south elevators) I Patient Education — Bechly, Godeke, Heimer, Skare (main level Clinic South) I Specialty (Dermatology, ENT, Endocrinology, Neurology, Urology) — Hectorne, Dettmer, Bhagra, Young, Gujral (select second floor south elevators) I Cardiology/Heart Center — Keenan, Moore, Nelson, Rosendahl (select second floor South elevators) I Pediatrics — Chawla, Scherger, Wheeler (select third floor south elevators) I Psychiatry and Psychology — Chauhan, Curran, DeWani, Imig, Rioux (select floor 1A south elevators) I Sleep Clinic — Kubas (select floor 1A south elevators) I General Surgery — Cunningham, Grimm, Smith (select floor 1A south elevators)

A GUIDE TO WHERE DEPARTMENTS MOVED

Inside look at the Mayo Clinic Store.

An examination room.

5

Photos provided by Mayo Staff

LOWER LEVEL NORTH

FIRST FLOOR NORTH

THIRD FLOOR NORTH

I Podiatry — Collier, VandeKieft (select LL in north elevators) I Orthopedics — Barnes, Ciota, Kirsch, Poczos (select LL in north elevators) I Pain Clinic — Goins, Kumar (select LL in North elevators) I Rehabilitation Services — Physical Therapy, Cardiac Rehab, Massage (select LL in north elevators) I Radiology Services for patients seeing these providers to go lower level (all others main level South)

I Mayo Clinic Store I Pharmacy (inside the Mayo Clinic Store) I Jazzmanʼs Coffee Shop I Eye Center — Engman, Loppnow, Middlebrook Second floor North departments and providers (effective Jan. 21) I Family Medicine — Agerter, Case, Cheruiyot, Dibble, C. Holtz, Kleis, McGaffey, R. Poczos, Stith and Whited

I Internal Medicine — Nazmul and Olson I Family Medicine — Angstman, Rau and Rietz I OB/GYN — Coppes, Evans, Nace, Oberbrockeling, Pickering, Rees I Pediatrics — DeSilva (only, Chawla, Scherger, Wheeler will remain at desk 3 off the South elevators)

(departments and providers )

Jazzman’s Cafe & Bakery.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

Main entrance.

(departments and providers )

(departments and providers )

The entrance to the Mayo Clinic Store.


6

Healing garden part of medical center expansion FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

Over 400 plants are included in the medical center’s new outdoor healing garden, located to the right of the new entrance. “Early on in the design process for the expansion, we had the option of using the area for parking, but we knew it was more important to have green space and the garden area,” said Rod Nordeng, vice president of operations. The Austin Auxiliary made a substantial donation to the project to see the healing garden become a reality. The garden was designed by Sargent’s Landscape Nursery Inc. in Rochester, which did all of the landscaping for the project, and features benches and wall seats.

Now & Then

Congratulations Mayo Clinic Health System

A special supplement to the AUSTIN DAILY HERALD

A LOOK AT THE EXPANSION’S PROGRESS

PHOTOS BY ERIC JOHNSON

ABOVE: Construction continues on the first floor of the new addition in February 2012. BELOW: The hospital began showing off its exterior as construction progressed in March 2012.

As our name suggests, we do it all when it comes to your converged technology needs. From superior designs to installations that will not disrupt your business. Our record of success for working in highly regulated industries with the most demanding requirements is unrivaled.

Construction workers reel in the final structural beam for the roof at Mayo Clinic Health System’s new medical center expansion in February 2012.


A special supplement to the AUSTIN DAILY HERALD

Congratulations Mayo Clinic Health System Employees of Mayo Clinic Health System tour the first floor and lower level of the new expansion project this January.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

7

By the numbers

2008

Project planning started

172

Design meetings

ABOVE: By November 2012, the inside of the expansion was well on its way to taking shape, as patient registration, pictured left, in the lower level, and other rooms and work spaces were installed, pictured right. BELOW LEFT: A construction worker does duct work in a hallway of the hospital expansion in September 2012. BELOW RIGHT: Rod Nordeng, vice president of operations, cuts the ribbon on the expansion this January.

47

People on average attended bi-weekly construction meetings

2

Hours it took a team of physician leaders, project leaders and managers to select all the furniture for the project

2013

The year work is supposed to start on the 34,000 square-foot remodel, Phase 2 of the expansion


Lower Level Floor Plan

1

!"#$%"&'("%)*+,-'.' /,.0*12',1)*"%13,1#

2

3 Registration

Radiology

4

!"#$%&'()(*%+,"'-.%/#0-,1%0.$2*"0,0%-.,%3$''$2()4 "5-2$56%()%780-()90%),2%,:;")0($)%"5,"0<%

Physical Therapy

4 Pain Clinic

1

Shoreline Reflections. Silk, free-reverse appliqué.

2

River Flood. Oil on linen.

4 Ortho

Tim Harding, Stillwater, Minn.

4

Tom Maakestad, St. Croix, Minn. Podiatry

Migration. Wood carved with polychrome.

3

Don Gahr, Springbrook, Wis.

4

A Slice of Life.* Photographic essay. Nate Howard, Austin, Minn.

5

Monarch. Found object, assemblage on copper.

6

Austin Nature Series. Stained glass, mosiac on panel. Babara Keith, Lanseboro, Minn.

7

Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn.

Main Level Floor Plan

Leo Sewell, Philadelphia, Penn.

5

8 9 10

Autumn at Hormel Nature Center. Oil on canvas.

Optical Shop

Summer on the Cedar River. Oil on canvas. Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn.

9

Jazzman’s

10

Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn.

Spring by East Side Lake. Oil on canvas.

12

Austin’s Mill Pond.* Acrylic on canvas.

13

Catching Butterflies, Letting Butterflies Go.*

14

Nature’s Elements.

Eye Center

8 12

11

Sub-Waiting Area

13

Mayo Clinic Store

Glenn Quist, Elk River, Minn.

Roosevelt Bridge.* Acrylic on canvas. Sally Gerhart, Brownsdale, Minn.

7

6

Winter in Todd Park. Oil on canvas.

11

15

Main Entrance

Children’s Waiting Room

Pharmacy

Sally Gerhart, Brownsdale, Minn. Second Level Floor Plan

Dry point etching and monotype print. Paula Schuette Kramer, Madison, Wis. 14

Hot patina on copper, brass and aluminum. Jon Michael Route, Frederic, Wis.

Waiting Room

Beyond the Fence. Oil pastel on paper. 15

Barbara Agerter, Rochester, Minn.

16

Mayan, Aztec and Kente.*

17

Patchwork, Traditions and Sashico.*

18

Summer Sampler at Jay C. Hormel Nature Center.

Registration

Family Medicine

Woven cotton with linen. Kelly Marshall, Minneapolis, Minn.

16

Physical Therapy 17

Woven cotton with linen. Kelly Marshall, Minneapolis, Minn.

Painted carved wood and steel. Emily Wilson, New Market, Ala.

19

20

Hummingbird No.1 and No. 2. Hand-built earthenware with slip and glaze. Cathy Kiffney, Chapel Hill, N.C.

Third Level Floor Plan

Take 5 Artist Series.* Crayon on paper. Tunes Molly Garry, Gr. 4, Pacelli Elementary 18

Bubbles Anastasia Mitchell, Gr. 5, Pacelli Elementary

Waiting Room

Reading on a Hillside Shyanna Deters, Gr. 4, Neveln Elementary My Dog Charlie Isabella Pihlstrom, Gr. 5, Banfield Elementary Flying Kites Arianna Shapinsky, Gr. 5, Banfield Elementary

21

Registration

19

Family Medicine

20 OB/GYN

21

Physical Therapy

Internal Medicine

Miao Woman’s Jacket, Baby Carrier and Child’s Jacket.*

22

Cotton, cross-stitch, batik, appliqué. Guizhou, China

22

Hupil Children’s Clothing and Carrying Cloth.* Cotton, wood, embroidery, weaving. Guatemala

Coffee Shop North Elevators Pharmacy Registration

*These pieces are in patient care areas, in respect to patient privacy, please refrain from touring outside of the public open house on Sat., Feb. 2 from 10 a.m. to Noon. Please note: Works of art are fragile. To help us preserve these treasures, please do not touch.

Restrooms Retail Shop Stairs


Congratulations Mayo Clinic Health System