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JUNE 13 • RAD Zoo (Library) 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

JUNE 20 • Minnesota Zoomobile (Library) 1:30 p.m. • Locos Por Juana (Paramount Theatre) 6:30 p.m.

JUNE 27 • Mr. Twister (Library) 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

JULY 11 • Mixed Nuts (Library) 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

JULY 18 • National Eagle Center (Library) 1:30 p.m. • Feufollet (Paramount Theatre) 6:30 p.m.

JULY 25 • Mad Science of Iowa Plus+ (Library) 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

TUESDAYS • Storytime at 10:30 a.m. • Drop-in Craft 1:30 - 2:30 p.m. WEDNESDAYS • Performers 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. THURSDAYS • Games and Legos 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

ANYTIME READING GAME

Read for 30 minutes at the Library. Stop at the Information Desk for a timer and instructions.

AUGUST 1 • Greg Skillestad (Library) 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

AUGUST 8 • Bob Kann (Library) 1:30 p.m. • Oliver Mtukudzi (Paramount Theatre) 6:30 p.m.

AUGUST 15 • Monroe Crossing (Paramount Theatre) 1:30 p.m.

AUGUST 22 • Arts Triathalon - Details to be Announced

AUGUST 29 • Jim Jayes (Library) 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.


What will you discover about summer? Traditions: —Freedom Fest, This page —Vision 2020, Page 5 —Mower County Fair, Page 7 —75 years of Spam, Page 16

Out & About: —Austin dog park, Page 8 —CRWD, Page 11 —Hormel Nature Center, Page 14 —Jellystone rebuilds; camping, Page 17 —Whispering Willows, Page 19 —Shooting Star Trail, 20 —Farmersʼ market, Page 24 —On the grill, Page 26 —Pool, Park and Rec., Page. 27 Sports: —Off to the races, Page 9 —Chateau Raceway, Page 15 —Places to golf, Page 37 Small town festivals: —Clear Lake, Page 15 —150 years of GM, Page 21 —Lyle, Page 28 —Adams, Page 28 —LeRoy, Page 29 —Brownsdale, Page 30 —Hayfield, Page 31 —Blooming Prairie, Page 32 —Rose Creek, Page 32

Arts & Entertainment: —Soundtrack to summer, Page 6 —Austin Artworks Festival, Page 25

On the cover: The log cabin at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center.

Austin Daily Herald 4

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

TRADITIONS: FREEDOM FEST

Celebrating freedom

FREEDOM FEST JUNE 30-JULY 4 By Adam Harringa

When Austin’s annual celebration rolls around this July, it will be all about families coming together. “It’s one of the events that truly brings out everybody in town,” said Jeff Baldus, Member Relations & Major Events Coordinator and the Austin Area Chamber of Commerce. “It’s always a great time.” Festivities start Saturday, June 30 with a five-mile run, a children’s fishing contest, a bike race a geo-caching contest, a car show and a street dance. Old favorites remain, but newer activities such as The Hormel Institute second annual “Walk for a Cancer-Free World,” and the Little Miss Sparkler & Firecracker King Pageant are expected to draw a crowd, too. Running June 30-July 4, Freedom Fest attracts thousands of residents and visitors and culminates with the “Grand Old Fourth” celebration, which includes a parade and fireworks. New this year are the “Amazing Budabi Brothers” juggling act, a bird show with a bald eagle from The Raptor Center in Minneapolis, and water wars organized by the Austin Fire Department. Baldus said the Chamber hasn’t finalized the schedule, so there still may be a few events to add. The parade route will stay the same, marching down Main Street from Eighth Avenue NW to Ninth Place SW. The Morning Lions will also host their annual Fly-In Breakfast from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 1 at the Austin Airport. Bandshell Community Park is the center of activities for food, music and family entertainment July 3-4. The Chamber has scheduled continuous stage entertainment along with children’s rides, carnival games and contests, food concessions, and arts and crafts show. Costumed characters and magicians will entertain throughout the grounds. Bandshell stage entertainment includes musical and dance performers, with the Austin Community Band, The Austin Symphony Orchestra, 3 Lane Band, the Austin Big Band, The Schell’s Hobo Band and Six Mile Grove. Baldus said Bandshell Park are always popular, with families setting up with blankets and picnic baskets. “Seeing the families come together is always a neat thing,” Baldus said.

Veteran Dan Stewart looks to the crowd as someone calls his name during the parade last year. Herald file photo AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


NEW TRADITIONS: VISION 2020

Eyes on tomorrow By Adam Harringa Unless you’re new to Austin or just woke from a coma, chances are you’ve heard of Vision 2020. The grassroots community betterment project was launched in 2011 and after narrowing 4,000 submitted ideas to 91 and then 30, it now has 10 major ideas to implement by the end of the decade. “This is the most inclusive, open civic project of its kind that Austin, Minnesota, has attempted,” Vision 2020 chair Gary Ray said after unveiling the top 10 ideas. Vision 2020 stems from a meeting with city officials of

Dubuque, Iowa, in February 2011. There Austinites learned how Dubuque went from having a 23 percent unemployment rate to being named the best small city to raise a family by Forbes Magazine and was ranked seventh in the country for job growth by economy.com, all in a little over a decade. Now, Austin hopes to mirror that success with 10 ideas of its own starting this summer. The group formed 10 project committees in May and is just beginning to define the visions in more concrete terms. To join the movement, contact the Austin Area Chamber of Commerce at 507-437-4561.

Vision 2020 at a glance What: A grassroots community betterment project charged with implementing 10 major initiatives by 2020. Who: Anyone interested. To sign up as a project committee member, visit vision2020austin.com. For more information, call the Austin Area Chamber of Commerce at 507-437-4561.

The Top 10: —Community Wide Technology (Wireless and fiber optic Internet throughout Austin) —Expanded Bike/Walk Trail System (Connect existing trails, add new ones and create bike paths on main streets) —Community Recreational Center (New recreation campus possibly with aquatic center, practice facilities and healthy living programs) —Embrace and Maintain our Waterways (Clean rivers and ponds) —Gateway to Austin Attraction (I-90 overpass attraction between Fourth St. NW and 14th St. NW) —Revitalization of Austin Utilities Building (Includes moving Spam Museum to Utilities Building and attracting specialty shops, businesses and eateries) —Education Leaders (Develop a unique city-wide learning campus) —Downtown Austin a Destination Point (Attract businesses downtown, develop a park/plaza gathering area) —Business Friendly Environment (Attract businesses and economic development on 18th Ave. NW) —Community Pride and Spirit (Create positive community spirit)

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: PARAMOUNT THEATRE, CONCERT FOR THE CURE By Jason Schoonover The Paramount Theatre is about to kick off a first this summer. “This is the first time we are doing an official summer season,” Executive Director Jennie Germain said. The Paramount debuts its Summer Under the Stars at 7:30 p.m. June 2, with a performance by Charlie Parr and the Bosso Poetry Company.

Though the Paramount traditionally has a number of shows scheduled each year, Germain said an official summer season allows for more promotional efforts. “That’s pretty exciting for us,” she said. More than a dozen events are planned this summer at the historic theater. The Galactic Cowboy Orchestra will play a show at 7:30 p.m. July 12 with Bethany Larson and the Bees Knees.

“Bethany Larson is actually from Austin, and her band is kind of making it big in the cities right,” Germain said. The show will be recorded and broadcast by KSMQ and KMSU. Germain also said the Paramount is working to line up some local performers for the Austin Art Works Festivals as part of the open house at the Austin Utilities Building, but the performers haven’t been finalized yet.

A soundtrack to Austin’s summer — PARAMOUNT SCHEDULE —

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Charlie Parr and the Bosso Poetry Company

Rubber Soul the Tribute

When: 7:30 p.m. June 2 Tickets: $12 in advance, $15 at the door, $5 for students

Austin native Bethany Larson and the Bees Knees will play with Galactic Cowboy orchestra July 12 at the Paramount.

Patsy Cline Story with Coco Walters When: 7:30 p.m. June 16 Tickets: $10 in advance, $12 at the door, $5 for students

Locos Por Juana (Latin Groove)

Photo provided

presented by Austin Public Library, the Paramount and Riverside Concerts When: 6:30 p.m. June 20 Tickets: Free

Six Mile Grove during Freedom Fest Where: Bandshell Park (Paramount is rain site) When: 8:30 p.m. June 3 Tickets: Free

Oliver “Tuku” Mtukudzi (Afro-Zimbabwe) presented by Austin Public Library, the Paramount and Riverside Concerts When: 6:30 p.m. Aug. 8 Tickets: Free

Monroe Crossing, bluegrass and barbecue When: 6 p.m. Aug. 15 Tickets: Concert only — $14 at the door, $5 for students; Piggy Blues barbecue and concert — $20 in advance, $25 at the door.

Zenshin Daiko Hawaiian presented by Austin and Rochester CVBs Where: Bandshell Park When: 7 p.m. June 21 Tickets: Free

When: 7:30 p.m. July 26 Tickets: $15 in advance, $17 at the door, $5 for students

Galactic cowboy Orchestra / Bethany Larson & the Bees Knees When: 7:30 p.m. July 12 Tickets: Free

Feuffollet (Cajun)

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presented by Austin Public Library, the Paramount and Riverside Concerts When: 6:30 p.m. July 18 Tickets: Free

Where: Hormel Historic Home (Paramount is rain site) When: 6:30 p.m. July 24 Tickets: Free

Various performers as part of Austin Art Works Festival Where: Austin Utilities Building When: Aug. 25 & 26 Tickets: Free

Seibel Center Fundraiser Variety Show When: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 31 Tickets: TBA

Delmar Ramaker Memorial Concert for the Cure By Jason Schoonover The Delmar Ramaker Memorial Concert for the Cure is moving to a bigger venue. Jeff and Georgia Ramaker are planning the annual concert in honor of Jeff’s brother who died of colon cancer in 1998. Jeff said he and his wife are looking for anyone to volunteer or sponsor

6

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

the concert. “That’s how we’ll make the show bigger and better each year and make more money,” Jeff said. The Ramakers will likely move the show to a new venue: the Mower County Fairgrounds grandstand. “We’re moving to a bigger venue, and we’re hoping that will increase seating

space and appeal to people,” Jeff said. The concert — featuring Six Mile Grove with Bob Wooten and Leland Martin — is scheduled for Aug. 25. Jeff said he is looking for another act. For the Ramakers, the concert started as a way to honor Delmar’s memory. “For me, it’s a way to honor him every year and raise money for cancer,” Jeff said.

Besides honoring his brother, Jeff said, the Lyle Area Cancer Auction has helped by allowing him to meet other people affected by cancer. “It’s well worth the time put into it,” he said. “The rewards are great.” People interested in volunteering or sponsoring can call the Ramakers at 507208-6085 or 507-325-1284. AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


TRADITIONS: MOWER COUNTY FAIR

Racing toward the fair By Adam Harringa

Madison Christenson goes for a ride last year on the midway of the Mower County Fair. The 2012 fair is planned for Aug. 7-12.

Prepare for major car crashes this year at the 2012 Mower County Fair. The fair, Aug. 7-12, is adding figure eight trailer races, which organizers hope draws a crowd. The event features demolition cars pulling trailers and racing around an eightshaped track, ensuring plenty of collisions in the intersection. “Any time you have a crossover, you have some excitement,” said Joel Nelson, media coordinator for the fair. The race is the grandstand event on Friday, Aug. 10. Grandstand entertainment, which is $10 per person and free for children 5 and under, also includes motocross on Tuesday, a demolition dirby Wednesday and Sunday, a truck and tractor pull Thursday, and bull riding on Saturday. The free fair will also highlight the county’s

Adam Maxfield, of Austin, rounds a turn in a cloud of dust during the 250 B heat race in the Motokazie motocross show at the grandstand. Herald file photo strong suits: livestock, industry, agriculture, creativity and musical talent. The fair’s opening ceremonies are at 7 p.m. Tues-

day, Aug. 7. For the 30th year, Merriam’s Midway will host carnival rides. The fish and game building will also be

back this year. The free stage will feature an array of performers like the an Elvis Presley impersonator, a Garth Brooks impersonator and karaoke. Nelson said they are still working on finalizing that lineup. Thursday will be a day dedicated to senior citizens, and there will be a tent of various activities for seniors. With the help of sponsorships from area businesses, the fair will be free again this year. “We’ve worked hard to keep it a free fair,” Nelson said. “It’s a good place to meet your friends and visit. Our commercial exhibits have been very strong.”

Herald file photo

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

7


OUT & ABOUT: AUSTIN DOG PARK

Hobbes, a lab and golden retriever mix belonging to Dave Goettsch, takes it easy and fetches a soft Frisbee while the people do the heavy lifting putting up fence at the dog park in May. Herald file photo

Dogs to have their day all summer long By Kevin Coss and Jason Schoonover Austin residents can look forward to enjoying the weather with their dogs sans-leash this summer. A new dog park, located near the intersection of Main Street S and Ninth Place SW, will allow area dogs to enjoy a fenced-in green space dedicated to them. The park will be free to use. Official rules of the park will likely include keeping dogs leashed on the way to and from the park and having all dogs properly licensed, inoculated and healthy. Behind the dog park is the volunteer group SPARK (Start a Park for Austin’s Respectable K-9s), which worked with the Austin Area Foundation to see the park through from conception to fruition. SPARK organized several fundraisers, found volunteers to install fencing and approached the City Council about getting city workers to help drive the fence posts in. “It’s just phenomenal to see how quickly it’s going up,” said SPARK President Martha Hauschildt during the fence installation. Hormel donated the fencing from its corporate office, which pleased SPARK officials, but required a little more manual labor. Vol-

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

unteers had to use pliers to remove old clamps. “We saved some money, but also it’s a community project,” Hauschildt said. With the fencing, Hauschildt estimated SPARK has received about $20,000 in donations. The 100-foot rolls of wire were difficult to move around the nearly one-acre dog park, but Hauschildt said she was pleased to see wrestlers volunteering to help with the heavy lifting. She said they’ll be able to look at the project with pride when they see the park used for years to come. Although the park is technically ready able to be used, SPARK officials weren’t ready to declare it finished. “It’s not officially open,” Hauschildt said. “People are using it because the fence is there.” SPARK still has to install doors and perform some final touches on the fence. The park will be officially open toward the end of May. Hauschildt said an event is in the works to dedicate the park. Austin Mayor Tom Stiehm praised the dog park as a good example of citizens showing initiative and proving that “you don’t have to come in front of the council” to get projects done. AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


SPORTS: RUN/BIKE RACES

Off to the races By Rocky Hulne Whether you’re looking to just get in a little exercise or trying to finish in front of the pack, there are plenty of road races and bike races being held around the Mower County area this summer. The action gets started June 2 as Austin hosts the Darren Dash, which honors and celebrates the life of Darren Lewis, who was a competitive runner. The race starts and ends in Lafayette Park, which is located on South Main St. at Eighth Ave. SE. Water stops are provided and the first 200 applicants will receive a goodie bag. There will be a half marathon, a 5K, and a kiddie fun run. On June 30, Austin will host the five-mile Hog Jog, which is part of Freedom Fest. The race starts and finishes at East Side Lake. The 2x4 Bike Ride, which gives riders a chance to see two states and four counties, starts in St. Ansgar, Iowa and goes through Minnesota with an option of a 25-mile, 35-mile or 50-mile ride. The Jordan Ressler ‘JR Foundation 2-mile and 4-mile Run/Walk’ will be held in Blooming Prairie July 20 and is on the BP golf course.

•Saturday, June 16 — 2x4 Bike Ride, starts in St. Ansgar and goes into Minnesota with options of 25-mile, 35-mile or 50mile rides: Ride starts at 8 a.m. •Saturday, June 30 — Hog Jog: Race starts at 8 a.m. •Saturday, June 30 — Dan Ulwelling 25-mile bike race in Austin, noon. •Wednesday, July 4 — Awesome Blossom five-mile run/walk in Blooming Prairie: 5-mile race starts at BP High School at 8 a.m.; 2-mile race starts at BPHS at 9 a.m. •Saturday, July 7 — April Sorensen Memorial Half Marathon, Albert Lea to Hayward: Race starts at 7:30 a.m. •Friday, July 20 — Jordan Ressler ‘JR Foundation 2-mile and 4mile Run/Walk’ in Blooming Prairie: Race starts at 5 p.m. on the BP golf course. •Saturday, July 14 — Shooting Star Trail Bike Ride, starts in Rose Creek: Race starts at 7 a.m. for 100-milers, 8 a.m. for everyone else. •Saturday Aug. 18 — STRIVE Wellness 4-mile run and kids runs in Owatonna, 9 a.m. •Saturday, Aug. 25 — Rochester Half Marathon and 5K: Race starts at 8 a.m.

SCHEDULE •Saturday, June 2 — Darren Dash in Austin: Race starts at 8 a.m.

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OUT & ABOUT: CRWD

A return for aquatic recreation By Matt Peterson Perhaps it’s too soon for most to view the Cedar River as a recreational asset, but people are trying to change that. The Cedar River Watershed District since last year has been enrolling local groups in an Adopt-a-River program, which it borrowed from the Department of Natural Resources and employed north of Austin to the Iowa border. Participants take trash bags and small boats along while each group scours its own stretch of the Cedar. Justin Hanson and Tim Ruzek of the CRWD were happy to see eight groups rake the river for trash last summer, and three groups have committed to the program in 2012, Hanson said. “I think it has been very successful,” Hanson said, who also pushed for legislation with Ruzek last year to designate a portion of the Cedar as a State Water Trail. They succeeded, which means with DNR

funding, the Cedar may someday receive canoe access points and its own page on the DNR’s website with river conditions and coordinates of access sites and other features. Now Vision 2020 committee members have joined the clean-water surge, as well. Community officials and volunteers strongly indicated that they want the Cedar for recreation and local lakes for swimming. Hanson said Vision 2020 efforts only bolster CRWD’s efforts as CRWD officials focus on water quality, and -Justin Hanson Vision 2020 committees can focus on creating the recreational activities. Even the local Izaak Walton League received $15,000 in DNR funds to clear buckthorn from a north portion of the Cedar, of which Ikes President Jim Stiles believes could also someday be an access point. Those interested in joining or forming a group within the Adopt-a-River program can contact the Mower Soil and Water Conservation’s office at 507-434-2603.

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Open Streets Albert Lea – June 2 Eddie Cochran Weekend – June 8, 9, 10 Strawberry Festival on Broadway – June 30 Merriam’s Carnival – June 30 - July 4 3rd of July Parade 4th of July Fireworks 4th of July Car Show – July 4 April Sorensen’s Memorial Half Marathon – July 7 ACT Theatre “Oliver” – July 12-15, July 18-21 Wind Down Wednesdays – July 18 Battle of the Bands – July 21 Freeborn County Fair – July 31 - August 5 Wind Down Wednesdays – August 15 “Echo’s from the Past” A Journey into History – August 15 Cruise to the Cove – August 23 BIB Kansas City Barbeque Contest – August 24 & 25 Autumn in the Village – September 16 Fountain Lake Power Boat Races – September 16 Fall Festival on Broadway – September 22 Big Island Rendezvous – October 6 & 7

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OUT & ABOUT: JAY C . HORMEL NATURE CENTER

The great outdoors right at home in Austin By Kevin Coss Austin residents looking to get their fill of the outdoors this summer will find a range of opportunities for all ages at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center. Austin residents can find many of them during the Summer Solstice Ecoblitz, a free, familyoriented event that takes place on June 23. Activities will include timed canoe races at the pond, “scooping the pond” to search for aquatic insects and touring the hiking trail on access vehicles, said John Duren, environmental education intern at the Nature Center. One activity, geocaching, will allow participants to hunt for hidden objects using GPS coordinates. Those interested in attending the Ecoblitz can register in person or by calling the Nature Center at 507-437-7519. A smaller variety of similar opportunities will take place regularly from 1 to 5 p.m. on Thursdays, the Nature Center will host Thursday Nature Play, Duren said. Families can look forward to canoeing, pond scooping and other activities. Several days during the summer will feature special guests, including dragonfly expert Kurt

Isaac Arnold, left, Ivy Arnold, and Landen Brown check out the treasure they unearthed while geocaching last summer at the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center's Ecoblitz, part of Austin's Fun Day. Herald file photo Mead and Native American storyteller Keith Bear.

Duren said the Nature Center has a lot to offer first-time visitors.

“If you’ve never been here before, a lot of hiking and bird-watching activities are available,” Duren said. May and early June are the best times to go bird-watching, since the tree cover is not as thick and is less likely to obscure birds from view. The trail is relatively flat terrain that stretches about ten miles through the Nature Center’s 507 acres of land, Duren said. A lot of the trail, which is free and open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., goes through prairie. Other parts lead past deciduous trees, which shed their leaves in the winter, and a few coniferous trees, sometimes called evergreens. There’s also a visitor center, which feature educational and interactive activities as well as a few live animals like snakes and salamanders, will still be open. The Nature Center will offer summer classes for all ages, especially for ages 14 and younger. Duren wants to remind visitors part of the Nature Center’s rules are that it doesn’t allow pets, and visitors are not permitted to remove plants or animals from the area. “One of the things we do is try to preserve that nature as much as possible,” he said.

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AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


OUT & ABOUT: CLEAR LAKE, IOWA; CHATEAU RACEWAY

Little town, big weekend By Matt Peterson Clear Lake is the little town that goes big almost every weekend during the summer. The big staple of Clear Lake, however, is the Fourth of July celebration, June 29 through July 5. Seven days are jam-packed with plenty to do, including a carnival, live bands, an arts and crafts fair, parade, fireworks and way too much more. But summer isn’t over after Fourth of July in Clear Lake. Bicycles, Blues & BBQ Festival is July 6 to 8. There’s three days of biking, barbecue, pancakes, fundraisers and most exciting, a $13,500 race purse plus $3,500 in merchandise prizes for the weekend bicycling event. July still carries on with an independent film festival, Antique Boat Show and Lakeside Dixie Fest. The summer wraps up with an early August car show and then end-ofsummer beach party. Check out clearlakeiowa.com for more information.

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

Chateau 2012 calendar

May 25 USMTS Guttormson Memorial, hot lap at 7 p.m. and races to follow June 1 Kids free, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow June 8 Gold Rush, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow June 15 Bike giveaway, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow June 22 UMSS Spring Car Special, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow June 29 Car Rides, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow July 6 Fireworks, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow July 13 Ice Cream night, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow July 20 Candy Drop and Vintage Cars, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow Aug. 3 Gold Rush, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow Aug. 10 Cornbelt Late Mod-

els, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow Aug. 17 ROC/Autograph Night, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow Aug. 24 Car Rides, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow

Aug. 31 USMTC Chase for the Hunt, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow Sept. 13 Border Wars, 9 p.m. Sept. 14 Border Wars, hot lap at 7 p.m., races to follow

Brady Krohnberg (26) leads the first heat into the front straightaway during the Pure Stock heats last year at Chateau Raceway. Herald file photo

Raceway revs up for 2012 Friday fun By Rocky Hulne There’s nothing quite like a Friday night at the race track. The summer will be roaring once again at Chateau Raceway in Lansing as racers come from all around the area to hit the track every Friday night. Chateau features USRA Modifieds, IMCA Stock Cars, WISSOTA Midwest Modifieds, WISSOTA Street Stocks, Chateau Pure Stocks and Hornets. The track is a third of a mile with semi-banked dirt and a clay/black gumbo mix. Chateau will host the UMSS Sprint Car Special June 22 and the Cornbelt Late Models Aug. 10. The USMTS Chase for the Hunt will be held Aug. 31.

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TRADITIONS: SPAM TURNS 75

The summer of Spam By Adam Harringa Love it or not, Spam is a part of Austin history. And this summer will be all about the Hormel Foods Corp. canned luncheon meat’s 75th birthday. The first can of Spam rolled off the factory line on July 5, 1937, according to Hormel, and the company will celebrate the spiced ham’s anniversary — along with the completion of its corporate office expansion — with an open house on July 28. Hormel Foods will honor the community and home of the Spam brand in Austin with a late-month festival full of entertainment and history. “The Spam brand has been loved by millions of families for 75 years. The fact that recipes from all around the world have been passed down from generation to generation is a testament to the relevancy of the Spam brand,” Spam brand product manager Nicole Behne said in May. In 1936, Geo. A. Hormel & Company devised a recipe for a 12-once can of spiced ham. But the new product was quickly copied by competitors, according to Hormel, so thenpresident Jay C. Hormel decided to coin a brand name with a distinct identity. Hormel says it offered a $100 prize for the best name, and Kenneth Daigneau, actor-brother of Hormel Vice President Ralph Daigneau, came up with Spam. Hormel soon began a marketing campaign, and radio commercials played across the country. During World War II in 1941, Hormel shifted to wartime production, and Spam became a staple for Allied troops, Hormel says, and as production increased, the canned meat gained notoriety as “the ham that didn’t pass its physical” and a “meatball without basic training.” But Spam survived, and Hormel sold 1 billion cans of Spam by 1959, 3 billion by 1980 and 4 billion by 1986. According to Hormel, more than 122 million cans of the Spam family of products are sold worldwide each year, including 90 million in the U.S. Hormel says Hawaii has the highest consumption of Spam per capita. “Spam products evoke a sense of community and inspire creativity. Consumers are always coming up with new and exciting ways to eat Spam,” Behne said. “Hormel Foods is very proud of its all-American iconic brand.” To celebrate 75 years of Spam, Hormel launched its first campaign spokescharacter, “Sir Can A-Lot,” in TV and online commercials this year.

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

Recipes for Austinʼs favorite canned meat

Spam Italian Rice Salad

Ingredients (10 servings) • 2 cups long-grain white rice • 9 green onions, chopped • 1 1/2 teaspoons paprika • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil • 2 (14.5-ounce) cans chicken broth • 1 (12-ounce) can Spam Classic, cut into strips • 1 (10-ounce) package frozen peas, thawed and drained • 1 green bell pepper, cut into 1/4-inch strips • 1 red bell pepper, cut into 1/4-inch strips • 1 (3.5-ounce) package Hormel Pepperoni • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley

Directions • In 3-quart saucepan, cook rice, onions, paprika and cumin in oil over medium heat until onion is tender. Stir in broth. Reduce heat to low; cook 20 to 30 minutes or until rice is tender and all liquid is absorbed. • Meanwhile, in skillet, sauté Spam Classic over medium heat 4 to 5 minutes. • In serving bowl, combine rice mixture, Spam, peas, bell peppers, pepperoni and parsley; mix well.

Spam Cupcakes

Ingredients (12 servings) • 2 (12-ounce) cans Spam Classic • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten • 2/3 cup quick-cooking oats • 3/4 cup milk • 1/3 cup packed brown sugar • 2 tablespoons white vinegar • 1 tablespoon water • 1 teaspoon mustard • 4 cups Hormel Country Crock Loaded Mashed Potatoes • Snipped fresh chives

Mini Maple Spam Doughnuts

The Herald is looking for more unique Spam recipes. If you would like to share, email them to adam.harringa @austindaily herald.com. Directions • Heat oven to 350°F. Lightly coat muffin pan with cooking spray. • In large bowl, grate Spam Classic. Add eggs, oats and milk; mix well. • Fill muffin cups two-thirds full with Spam mixture. With back of spoon, lightly press mixture into cups. • In small bowl, whisk together brown sugar, vinegar, water and mustard; lightly spoon glaze mixture over Spam mixture. • Bake cupcakes 25 to 30 minutes or until mixture is set; remove from oven. • Place oven rack 2 to 3 inches from heat source; heat broiler. • Top each cupcake with potatoes; broil 2 to 3 minutes or until potatoes are lightly browned. Garnish with chives.

Ingredients (24 servings) • 1 cup all-purpose flour • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda • 1/4 teaspoon salt • 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon buttermilk, divided • 1 large egg • 1 tablespoon butter, melted • 1 (12-ounce) can Spam With Bacon • 3/4 cup powdered sugar • 1 teaspoon maple flavoring

Directions • To make dough, in large bowl, whisk together flour, brown sugar, baking soda and salt. • In small bowl, whisk together 1/3 cup buttermilk, the egg and butter. Add to flour mixture. Spoon mixture into pastry bag fitted with large round tip. (Or snip corner of resealable plastic food storage bag.) Refrigerate 1 hour or until chilled. • Cut Spam With Bacon into 12 slices. With 1 1/2-inch cookie cutter, cut 2 rounds from each slice Spam. Cut small circle from center of each round of Spam; reserve scraps. • In large greased skillet, cook Spam rounds until golden; set aside. Finely chop reserved Spam scraps. Cook in same skillet until golden brown. • Heat oven to 325°F. Grease mini doughnut pans. • Fill doughnut molds evenly with chilled batter; top each with Spam round. Bake 10 minutes or until doughnuts spring back when cooked. Let cool in pan 5 minutes before turning onto wire rack. • To make glaze, in small bowl, combine powdered sugar, remaining 1 tablespoon buttermilk and the maple flavoring. Stir until mixture becomes runny. Drizzle glaze over warm doughnuts. Sprinkle with finely chopped Spam. AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


OUT & ABOUT: JELLYSTONE REBUILT/CAMPGROUNDS

Jellystone ready for busy summer after rebirth By Matt Peterson

The new ranger station at Jellystone Park is nearly complete. The owners expect all of its indoor features to be open this year. Herald file photos

A devastating fire last fall was far from enough to keep the owners of Jellystone Park from throwing in the towel. “There was no question we would rebuild,” said Tammy Westrich, who operates Jellystone Park with her husband and parents, just east of Austin on Interstate 90. After six months of rebuilding and a brandnew, state-of-the-art lodge, gaming room, event center and bath/shower house, Jellystone is open for business — with much more to offer. The new lodge, called the Ranger Station, offers new Jellystone merchandise, a larger kitchen and dining area, weekend buffets, more games, an adult room with cable and WiFi and an event center for celebrations. The pool and waterslides still remain but are now accompanied by a brand new showering

facility with washers and dryers, as well. Adjacent to that building lies a new outdoor event center for concerts and movies. “Oh, there’s no comparison,” Westrich’s father and Jellystone owner Don Tolney said about the facilities then and now. Westrich clearly remembers how one thing stood out after the fire: the statue of Yogi Bear still standing among the pile of rubble. That’s when she knew things would be OK. And with her campground owner/operator certification, she’s had the ingenuity to employ some new practices. Westrich mentioned Jellystone will offer a new feature: daytime summer passes. Westrich said visitors who don’t want to camp can now have full access to all of the camps features. Furthermore, people passing by on the interstate will be able to call in and order food to go. For more information, go to beavertrails.com.

AREA CAMPGROUNDS By Trey Mewes What’s The best part about summer? Camping! There’s plenty of outdoor opportunities for aspiring Mower County campers and summertime is the best time to enjoy staying outside. You don’t have to go far to find good, clean outdoor fun with many of the amenities you’d find at home.

River Bend Campground 13380 State Highway 105 Lyle 507-583-2979 About: Take a trip to the River Bend Campground for a picturesque camping experience. Offers basic amenities, firewood and playground at wooded sites along the river.

Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp Resort at Beaver Trails 21943 630th Avenue, Austin 507-584-6611 About: Come down to Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp Resort for good old fashioned fun. There’s camping, a pool (complete with waterslide), volleyball, a giant jumping bag and a theme every weekend this summer perfect for a family outing.

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

Lake Louise State Park 1.5 miles north of LeRoy on County Road 14. 507-352-5111 http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks /lake_louise/index.html About: Lake Louise has got campgrounds, swimming beaches, bike trails and more. Connected to the as-yet-unfinished Shooting Star Trail, this camp also has horse trails and a canoeing class on June 12. Open through Labor Day.

Oakwoods Trails Campground 23614 890th Ave Austin 507-437-6165 About: The perfect place for ATV offroading. There’s large campsites for tenting and RVs, volleyball, fishing and more than six miles of trails, including a mud bog, speed strip and water run.

Austin-Albert Lea KOA 84259 County Road 46 Hayward I-90, Exit 166 507-373-5170 About: A great place for RVs and cabin rentals. There’s a large pool, a game room, theme weekends, a nine-hole golf

course and driving range next door, not to mention a spacious meeting hall.

Myre — Big Island State Park 19499 780th Avenue Albert Lea 507-379-3403 http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks /myre_big_island/index.html About: Make time this summer for hiking, camping, canoeing and even a little geocaching at Albert Lea’s own state park, just three miles southeast of town. This is the last summer that state parks are offering a Geocaching Wildlife Safari, so intrepid explorers need to start combing through Myre — Big Island as soon as possible.

Brookside Campground 52482 320th Street Blooming Prairie 507-583-2979 About: Ready for some relaxing fun? Brookside has plenty of amenities, from wagon rides to volleyball, a heated pool to an arcade and movie rentals. It’s got fishing, canoeing, volleyball and plenty of picnic tables, fire rings, and camp space for a Three youngsters pose outside Brookside Campsummer getaway. ground in Blooming Prairie. Photo provided FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

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Rose Creek

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Adams

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Rose Creek

Rose Creek

Adams

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LeRoy

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


OUT & ABOUT: WHISPERING WILLOWS

Grand getaway: In-laws open scrapbook retreat By Trey Mewes Looking for a nice, relaxing, artistic vacation close to home? Look no further than the Whispering Willows cottage in Adams, Minn. Whispering Willows, the brainchild of sisters-in-law Christi Kiefer and Michele Merten, is a twist on the cottage home concept: a “quilting and scrapbooking retreat home.” “It’s similar to if you would go and rent a cabin up north,” Kiefer said. “You get the entire house to use.” The duo created one of the most unique crafts and scrapbooking opportunities in southern Minnesota in fall 2010 after spending time with their husbands in Faribault. While the men were ice fishing, Kiefer and Merten, both scrap-

booking aficionados, thought about hosting their own getaway. “We both said, ‘Geez, maybe we should buy a lakehouse and we’ll convince our spouses to go in with us,’” Kiefer said. “Everything snowballed from there and one thing lead to another.” After finding the perfect home in Adams — Kiefer lives in Taopi and Merten lives near Adams — the two set to work creating a haven for artistic enjoyment. The 3,000-square-foot house can accommodate up to 12 guests, and is completely furnished with everyday items and plenty of craft supplies. The main floor is set up for artistic excursions, including scrapbooking, knitting, beading, quilting and more. The upstairs has a massage room where guests

can enjoy some quiet in a massage chair, while the home’s downstairs has a living room area including a TV and DVD player. While many use the four-bedroom, threebath home for creative endeavors, Kiefer said Whispering Willows has hosted wedding parties, mom and daughter trips, people interested in biking the Shooting Star Trail, and even a few massage therapists hired by the guests. “We just wanted the house to feel very comfortable and at home,” she said. Whispering Willows Cottage is located at 107 Third St. in Adams. For more information, contact Whispering Willows at 507-4387577 or visit http://whisperingwillowscottage.com.

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AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

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OUT & ABOUT: SHOOTING STAR TRAIL

Bicyclists taking advantage of new, longer Shooting Star Trail By Matt Peterson Bike riders can pedal the local trails a little bit further this summer. The Shooting Star Trail, which received a DNR grant and expansion last November, now stretches its way into Rose Creek. “We’ve been waiting 10 years for this,” said Becky Hartwig, Prairie Visions committee member and owner of Rose Pedaler in Rose Creek. The trail passes right by the

Rose Pedaler cabin and gift shop, which recently switched to a quick-stop, deli-style store where riders can grab sandwiches, desserts, soups, burgers and more. Hartwig hopes to soon hold a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new trail extension. A $456,000 cost share with the Department of Natural Resources extended the trail from Adams to Rose Creek last fall, so the trail now runs about 22 miles — all the

way from Rose Creek to LeRoy. Further plans aim to connect the trail to Austin, and someday, the Blazing Star Trail in Albert Lea. Mower County Public Works Director Mike Hanson said the county will look for another DNR grant for the extension; and though he said the county is moving closer to securing funds, nothing is final. “It’s not finalized yet, but it’s getting closer,” he said, and added the project

could take about three months and will cost several hundred thousand dollars. For now, Hartwig and bike enthusiasts are excited for the Shooting Star Trail’s 14th annual bike ride, which will be held July 14 and offer a 100-mile ride, 60-mile ride and 45-mile ride. The trail will also be host to a family bike ride day on Oct. 6, 2012. Register online and find up-to-date information on fees and options at shootingstartrail.org.

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AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


TRADITIONS: SMALL TOWN FESTIVALS

Grand Meadow celebrates 150 years of history By Matt Peterson Grand Meadow is ready for a celebration 150 years in the making. Grand Meadow’s annual town celebration, Meadowfest, will be held from June 22 to 24, and will serve as the town’s sesquicentennial celebration. It’s going to be much bigger than anyone has seen, according to event coordinators. According to 12-year Meadowfest committee member Greg Lamp, the community has done its homework. “In addition to the traditional events, we’ve got quite a number of additional events coming,” Lamp said, and added that 2012 will host nearly twice as many activities as last year. Among continuing events like a car show, mud bog, and dozens of kids’ games — committee members have spent seven years bringing in some of the most interesting events they could find.

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

GR A N D M E A D OW : M E A D OW F ES T June 22-24 And with 150 years’ history to rehash, Mower County Historical Society Executive Director Dustin Heckman is jumping on board, as well. He has helped organize several events at the Grand Army of the Republic Hall, including an Abe Lincoln impersonator. Heckman and Lamp will participate in a vintage baseball game between the Rochester Roosters and Grand Meadow Nine, and a cemetery walk will feature actors portraying some of Grand Meadow’s most famous and influential figures. As always, events will carry the festival late into the afternoon Sunday, but that’s not all; Lamp said this year’s Fourth of July fireworks will be twice as spectacular, as well. For up-to-date information, go to cityofgrandmeadow.com/meadowfest.

Mike Braaten checks out an Oldsmobile 442 belonging to Dewey Lonergan last year at Meadowfest in Grand Meadow. Herald file photo

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OUT & ABOUT: AUSTIN AREA FARMERS’ MARKET

Home grown, home sold By Trey Mewes The Austin Area Farmers’ Market is back this summer and better than ever. The market is open from 3:30 to 6 p.m. Mondays at Oak Park Mall and made a big move to N. Main Street from 3:30 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays. “I have always dreamed about making our farmer’s market a vibrant place to be, and I think the move is the best thing we could do,” said Heidi Harrabi, Farmers’ Market organizer.

The move back to Main Street came after several downtown businesses sought ways to liven things up during the week. Residents can expect to see some occasional live entertainment and a few downtown business stalls when the Farmers’ Market comes every Thursday. There will still be all the homemade and homegrown products people have come to love, from soap to fresh produce and more. The Farmers’ Market is scheduled to run Mondays and Thursdays every week through Sept. 27.

The Austin Area Farmers’ market is moving to Main Street this year with the hope of giving businesses a chance to take part, too. Herald file photo

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: AUSTIN ARTS FESTIVAL

Festival to show plant’s potential By Eric Johnson

Celebrating art

At its heart, the idea of the festival is Some art-minded Austin residents simple awareness; highlighting the various aren’t waiting for Vision 2020 to come avenues of art. “We want to celebrate the arts in into fruition eight years down the line. Plans are coming into play to convert Austin,” Rietz said. A lot of eyes were focused on the utilithe downtown Austin Utilities building into a house for art for two days in August. ties building with a variety of ideas The Austin Artworks Festival will be held swirling around the atmospheric complex, Aug. 25-26 and will feature art from all fueled by the idea of what it could be. “We wanted to show what that space areas including music and food. It’s a move by organizers to tout what is possi- would look like as an arts venue,” Germain said. “I think it’s a ble at the old building great place. There and Vision 2020. are a lot of archiConversion of the tectural aspects Austin Utilities building that would be inwas one of 10 ideas reteresting.” vealed as the final Vision 2020 projects back in Future: Near April. and far “The idea is go get While the applipeople into the utilities cation process hasbuilding and get people n’t been opened interested,” said Bonnie yet, artists can exRietz, one of the event pect to see someorganizers. thing very soon. According to the ViOne of the biggest sion 2020 idea, the utillimitations will be ities building will be the number of part of an “arts corriartists. The turbine dor” that will run along room will be the Fourth Avenue south in only room availdowntown Austin. It will When: Aug. 25-26 able inside the include well known What: Featuring art, music main building as buildings like the and food well as the outside Hormel Historic Home garages. and Paramount Theatre. Where: Austin Utilities It will become The idea actually building increasingly imcame from ideas being portant when you thrown around in the add everything Hormel Foundation’s finance committee. A core group of about else along with ideas still being consid20-25 people split into five different com- ered. Already, five food venders have been finalized. There has also been thoughts mittees. “A lot of people are involved in moving given to glass blowers, sculptors and possible activities for kids. this forward,” Rietz said. But for the time being the committee is In the beginning, however, the idea wasn’t an arts festival. According to Jennie just looking forward to the several appliGermain, project director, it started off cants it hopes it gets. The hope for the festival itself is that it with more of a broader range. “At the time we were talking about arts continues, even if it doesn’t continue in and culture in Austin in general,” Germain the utilities building. “The group is going to meet afterwards said. “We weren’t sure where Vision 2020 and talk about what went well,” Rietz said. was going at the time.”

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

Plans for the utilities building include both inside and outside spaces as well as possibly closing Fourth Avenue. However, space inside will be limited to only the main turbine room. Herald file photo “We’re really excited to have another festival.” The festival, though still some months away, has a good start not only to showcase the arts in Austin but to take this first move toward a Vision 2020 goal. “I’m excited,” Germain said. “To have this first step it means things are actually starting to come together.”

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OUT & ABOUT: ON THE GRILL

Cooking goes outside By Trey Mewes

Ole Barn BBQ owner Bob Nelson and kitchen manager Marc Shapiro grill hot dogs, chicken, and burger patties behind Ole Barn BBQ. Photo by Trey Mewes

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

The summer sun means one thing for food enthusiasts: It’s time to get out the grill. While summertime is the perfect time for some outdoor grub, there’s plenty of debate surrounding the big question whether to barbecue or to grill. “Honestly, they go hand in hand on some times,” said Bob Nelson, owner of the Ole Barn BBQ restaurant in Austin. When making ribs, or brisket, or pork shoulder, Nelson said it’s important to have low heat and a long, slow cooking time to draw out the barbecue flavor before cranking the heat up to finish. Make sure you know how hot your meat needs to cook. Chicken, for example, needs to barbecue at a slightly higher temperature than other meat. Make sure your heat source is steady, and be willing to experiment with different sauces and heating sources like flavored wood chips to give your meat a little extra zing. For things like burgers and hot dogs though, there’s no question the grill is king. “By far it’s the grill,” he said. “You’ve got get steaks, chicken breasts, you’ve got to get it on that grill. There’s no question it’s the best taste you’re going to see.”

Of course, grilling purists prefer charcoal and wood as opposed to gas and electric heating, according to Nelson. Lump charcoal is making a comeback as the eminent grilling method to bring out the best taste in meat as well. Getting the perfect burger takes a little time, however. Cooks-to-be need to season burger patties (on both sides) while getting the grill up to between 400 and 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Once the prep’s done, the good cook uses one of the best tools he or she has: patience. “Let the burger cook,” Nelson advises. “A lot of people will grab that thing right away.” Cooks need to let burgers sit for a while before turning. If the burger sticks, then it’s clearly not ready. “The food will tell you when it’s ready to be turned,” Nelson said. And above all else, don’t play peekaboo with your meat. “Don’t keep lifting the lid,” advises Marc Shapiro, Ole Barn BBQ kitchen manager. “No peekaboo.” There’s plenty of things to cook on a grill as well. Everything from seasoned vegetables to even pizza can be cooked on a grill, provided you have the equipment and patience to sear some good eats.

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


OUT & ABOUT: MUNICIPAL POOL, PARK & REC

From the pool to sports, Park and Rec. offers many youth activities By Kevin Coss As temperatures rise and the days grow longer, the Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry hopes youth will get outside and enjoy the weather. “They want kids off the couch and involved,” said Department Director Kim Underwood said. “It’s a great opportunity [for children] to check out a sport and see if they like it.” Youth programs this summer include tee ball, tennis, swim lessons, track, soccer, archery and golf, with varying age ranges for each activity. Over 500 children participated in these programs last summer, according to a 2011 department review. That number doesn’t include those who went out for sports in associated youth programs— like basketball and softball—and those included in the mixture of 417 youth and adults registrants who took swim lessons. Underwood said the benefits of summer programs extend beyond the healthful effects of exercise. “It teaches them participation, good sportsmanship and team camaraderie,” she said. One of the department’s goals this year is to get young high school students to participate in sports like kickball. “We’re really trying to get into that age group,” Underwood said.

Ian Krause, left, and Tony Shada jump into the Austin Municipal Swimming Pool last year after a break. Herald file photo Youth programs don’t start until June 11, and Underwood said many activities are still open. Apart from archery and tennis, which the department limits in size for certain age groups, activities typically expand to fit their registrants. Summer activities in Austin aren’t restricted just to youth. The department will also offer adult volleyball, softball, kickball and Square Bag Round Hole leagues, though

the deadlines for many of these sports have already passed. Twice during the summer, the department will host a free track meet. The event will allow children and adults, with the minimum age being 3. Participants can show up at 6:15 p.m. at Wescott Field on June 19 or July 19. “No preregistration,” Underwood said. “Just go on that day.” To combat the summer heat, the Austin Municipal Pool will open at 1 p.m. June 11. The pool includes a main pool, splash pad and water slide. Pool membership tags will be available at the pool once it opens and at the Park and Rec. Department before that. This year, the department offers a $10 discount for those who sign up for lessons and a swim tag at the same time, Underwood said. There will also be a 10-week Saturday swim lessons program for those who can’t make it on weekdays. At the end of the summer, even pooches can take a dive. The Doggie Dip will invite Austin dog owners to bring their canines along. The event is scheduled for Aug. 24, which is after the pool’s regular season end date of Aug. 19. “You can take your pet to the pool and either swim with them or let them swim,” Underwood said. There could be dog-related prizes and events, she added.

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TRADITIONS: SMALL TOWN FESTIVALS LYL E: INDEPENDENCE D AY

little bit bigger,” she said.

June 29 - July 1 INSIGHT: More than 100 years of tradition will continue this summer in Lyle. Lyle’s Independence Day Celebration returns with an early Fourth on June 29, 30 and July 1. “It’s just a fun time, you know, small town celebration that’s pretty big for the size that we are,” said Lyle City Clerk Diana Witt. Since the festival is before the Fourth, Witt said it attracts many people from outside of town who come to see family and friends. “I just know that there’s a lot of people in town that weekend,” Witt said. The festival really peaked in the 1960s and ‘70s, but Witt said it’s been growing steadily in recent years. “It’s just that every year it grows just a

A DA MS : DA IRY D AYS June 8 - 10

ACTIVITIES: The weekend kicks off with food specials, a beanbag tournaments and music at Lyle Liquor on Friday night. On Saturday, the truck, tractor and semi pull returns at 10 a.m., and the classic car show runs 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The day caps off with an 8 p.m. street dance at the Legion. Sunday kicks off with a church service in the park. The grand parade is at noon. During the parade, the 1962 Lyle boys’ basketball team that went to state will celebrate its 50th anniversary, and there will be a brief ceremony in the park for the team after the parade. Other events include Little Miss Lyle at 3 p.m., and a 4 p.m. talent show highlights a packed day that concludes with fireworks at dusk. “I know that last year it was spectacular,” Witt said.

INSIGHT: At least one Adams resident is hoping a new summer event will help boost a high school sport. Paul Kurtz is planning the first annual Southland Silver Smash, a wrestling tournament to be held in conjunction with Dairy Days at the football stadium at 7 p.m. June 8. “Our main reason is to get kids more interested in wrestling,” Kurtz said. Kurtz said he’s hoping for more than 100 wrestlers from preschool through eighth-grade. Applications are available at www.the guillotine.com/youth/1112/opens/southland smash.html

The cost is $20 and is only by pre-registration. Registrations must be post-marked by May 29. Kurtz said he hopes the event will be a boost to Dairy Days, and he said he hopes it becomes a yearly event that is well attended. He said he already has wrestlers signed up from Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. ACTIVITIES: Many of the Dairy Days events will be at the fire hall or city park. There will be a golf tournament at Cedar River golf course, parade at 1 p.m. Sunday and many other events.

Look to the Austin Daily Herald all summer for coverage on small town festivals and other events.

www.austindailyherald.com

Floats and flag carriers get ready to kick off the parade in Lyle last year during the annual Fourth of July Celebration. Herald file photo

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


TRADITIONS: SMALL TOWN FESTIVALS L E R O Y: S U M M E R F E S T July 20-22 INSIGHT: LeRoy is getting ready to celebrate summer in style again this year, as Summer Fest is scheduled for July 20 to 22. "I think it's a time for a the community to come together and showcase some of the fun things we have to do here," said

City Clerk Patty White. ACTIVITIES: Festivities get underway Friday with a free family movie, a bean bag tournament and a street dance featuring the band Dirty Word. LeRoy's garden tours return Saturday. The second annual Ray Kiefer Memorial Tractor Pull will be held at Northern Country Co-Op. Saturday will also feature a car and motor-

cycle show, co-ed volleyball tournament, a triathlon and duathlon, a used book and video sale at the library, the windsor chop supper, and the day will close with a variety show by the LeRoy Community Theater at the high school gym. On Sunday, the fire department’s chicken feed will be held earlier in the day. "That brings in large amounts of people," White said. The parade will follow at around 2 p.m.

LeRoy firefighters Danny Hanson and Scott Osmundson, back, compete in the water wars last year at LeRoy's Summerfest. Herald file photo

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

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TRADITIONS: SMALL TOWN FESTIVALS B R O W NS D A L E F E S T July 20-22 INSIGHT: Brownsdale residents will have a good time for a good cause in July. Brownsdale Fest will return to combine fun, fellowship, fundraising and information. Along with being the annual summer festival, the weekend event also ties in fire safety. "Obviously the awareness is a big thing for us," said organizer David Pike. The event raises funds for the department to buy things that aren't in the budget, like defibrillators, rescue sleds and thermal imaging equipment. The firefighters will also have booths set up for fire safety equipment, including a booth to inspect and refill fire extinguishers.

ACTIVITIES: Brownsdale Fest gets underway with a car show, beer garden, concessions and a silent Auction Friday, July 20. The night closes with music by DJ Sound. Saturday starts with breakfast served by the firefighters, who later host a hog roast that night. There will also be inflatables in the park, a beer garden, bingo games and a bean bag tournament. There will be sidewalk sales Saturday, with many

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businesses and booths open with items for sale. "It's good for the businesses to attract people into town," Pike said said of Brownsdale Fest. DJ Sound will be back to provide music for a "Tropical Night" Saturday, but people are encouraged to bring costumes, with the best ones receiving prizes. The Rohler Rink will be offering deals all weekend for $3 admission.

* Bedding Plants (opens in April / May) * Strawberries (June) * Taking orders for Blueberries, Cherries & Peaches (July - August) * Apples (August - December) * Fresh Bakery (Homemade Pies) (507) 765-4486

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


TRADITIONS: SMALL TOWN FESTIVALS H AYFIELD: HE Y D AYS July 26-29 INSIGHT: It will be a homecoming in Hayfield the last weekend in July. Hey Days is celebrating its 25th anniversary of the festival this summer.The celebration will feature the return of the popular Budweiser Clydesdales for an entire week. “We’re just trying to do things a little bigger, the parade will be bigger, the fireworks will be bigger,” said organizer Lana Mindrup. A B-25 bomb plane from World War II will be on hand to mark the occasion. Rides will be available Saturday, and the plane will fly over the

parade Sunday. Also returning will be the Old Fashioned Firefighters Chicken Fry, which will expand for the anniversary into a reunion for past fire chiefs and firemen. ACTIVITIES: The Thursday queen coronation will also be a reunion, as many past queens are expected to be on hand. There will be a number of other events throughout the weekend, like a car show, an antique tractor show, a mud bog, antique fire trucks, inflatables for kids and fireworks.

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Ryan’s Foods 4 East Main Street • Hayfield, MN 55940 Video, Lottery, Food Stamps, WIC Delivery Wednesday - Call by Noon Senior Citizen Day every Wednesday: 5% discount Laundromat - located behind the store

507-477-3804

Tony Wright, of Rochester, plows through the mud during the mud bogs last year at Hey Days in Hayfield. Herald file photo

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

31


TRADITIONS: SMALL TOWN FESTIVALS B LOOMING P R A IRE: FO URTH O F JU LY July 3 - 4 INSIGHT: The Fourth of July will be a chance for Blooming Prairie residents to show what their town is all about. “It showcases your community,” said Becky Noble, Blooming Prairie Chamber of Commerce director. Noble said there’s a lot going on in the community people don’t know about, because many people just pass through on U.S. Highway 218. “A lot’s going on that you don’t see if you don’t get off 218,” she said.

Cailyn Bussler, 4, winds up to launch a frog as part of a game in Blooming Prairie’s Park last year during the Fourth of July celebration. Herald file photo

Street Dance will be held Tuesday night. The parade will be one highlight Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., followed by performances by drumlines Su Fu Du and Sticks of Fury. Sweet Rides Car Show and a tractor pull will also be held Wednesday. A number of events will be available in Central Park over the weekend, including bingo, mini golf, a magic show and more. Bands Mischief and Mayhem (a piano act), the Morning Kings and Arrows at Dawn will play leading into the fireworks, which cap the festival at dusk Wednesday.

ACTIVITIES: The two days kick off with an antique tractor show Tuesday, July 3, followed by a pedal tractor pull. A magic show, teen dance and the J&H

RO SE C REEK : FUN DAYS July 13 - 15 INSIGHT: Rose Creek’s Fun Days will kick into high gear July 13 to 15, featuring a diverse set of events from dinners to kickball. “It’s just a fun weekend,” said Wendy Landherr, one of the organizers. ACTIVITIES: The festival kicks off — literally — Friday night with the eighth annual Black Sox Kickball Tourney.

Events continue Saturday with the annual Firemen’s Windsor Chop Supper. The second annual car show will be at noon Sunday as a benefit for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. All of the fees will go to the AFSP. A number of other events will be held throughout the weekend, including softball and basketball competitions, kids games and activities, hole-in-one golf, beanbags, firemen’s water fight, a medallion hunt, and several food stands.

538 Hwy 218 South, Blooming Prairie, MN 55917

The Black Sox Kickball Tournament will again be a big part of this year’s Fun Days in Rose Creek. Herald file photo

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


Please join in and participate in Mower County’s Recycling program. As a Mower County resident all you have to do is stop at the Recycling Center at 1111 8th Ave. NE, Austin and pick up a set of three recycling bins. Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs., & Fri., 1-5pm FEEL FREE TO CALL IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT RECYCLING.

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

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1855

3714 4th St. NW, Austin 507-433-3454

1868

1912

1886

1913

Lawnboy, Toro, STIHL, Hustler Turf Equipment

PARTS, SALES & SERVICE

507-433-8245

1920

“Always providing quality service to the construction industry.”

1110 First Avenue SW • Austin, MN

507-433-3489

34

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

1936

1940

Originated by Dr. Swift

WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS!

WWW.ULLAND.COM

Providing Insurance and Financial Services

www.cobrown.com

Serving our members financial needs for over 80 years.

433-1819

Insurance

Your policy comes with an agent!

1930

DOZING • GRADING • FREE ESTIMATES COMMERCIAL SITE GRADING

Greg L. Meyer

Agents: Joshua Torgerson Celeste Krause

1923

Austin

1946

C.O. Brown Insurance Agency

104 Main Street • Rose Creek, MN 55970

BITUMINOUS PAVING ROADS & DRIVEWAYS

373-1960

1917

Professional Insurance with Personal Service 329 N. Main St., Suite 103 • Austin • 433-4998

Sand & Gravel • Fill Sand • Limestone Washed Sand • Mason Sand Pea Rock • Hot Mix • Topsoil Decorative Stone Albert Lea

1891

1948

Preventive Family Dentistry, Cosmetic Dentistry, Teeth Whitening, Dental Implants, Sedation Dentistry, 6 Month Smiles, STOP SNORING • Sleep Enhancement

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910 4th St. NW • Austin

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800 First Avenue SW • Austin 507-437-8208 www.eghdds.com AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


1946

1960

1961

1962

TI NY’S B ODY S HOP

66 years of service in Southern Minnesota

Serving the people of Mower County in areas of Employment and Contracted Services by building buisness partnerships for 52 years.

50 Years of Service • Free Estimates • Free Loaner Car State of the Art Shop • Lifetime Written Warranty

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1969

Since 1961

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1970

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1966

1966        

Energy Assistance Weatherization Housing Rehab Loans Head Start Homeless Prevention & Assistance Outreach Information & Referral Senior Nutrition RSVP

111 N. Main Street, Suite 201 • Austin, MN 507-433-5889 www.semcac.org Semcac has programs in 11 Southeast Minnesota Counties An Equal Opportunity Employer

1970

& ASSOCIATES, INC.

Architects & Civil Engineers Austin • 507-437-8141

907 Sykes Street • Albert Lea • 507-373-0689

1970 promotional products • decorated apparel www.robsp.com

1308 10th Drive SE - Austin, MN 507-433-8492

1971

1971

1974

Locally Owned & Operated

Free Estimates

Eric J. Connett

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1981

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1976

1978

www.hormelnaturecenter.org

CPA

The CPA. Never Underestimate the Value.

433-2264

Certified Public Accountants

326 North Main Street, Austin www.hlwb-cpa.com

1980

Main Street Dental Clinic Open Monday-Saturday and 2 Evenings We welcome new patients!

405 East Main Street • Blooming Prairie • (507) 583-2141 1170 East Frontage Road • Owatonna • (507) 455-1000 3110 Wellner Drive NE • Rochester • 507-536-7700 132 North Broadway • New Richland • 507-463-0502

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1981

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AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

The Exhaust Specialists

507-437-7519

HILL, LARSON, WALTH & BENDA, P.A.

1975

www.StevesPizzaMN.com ONLINE ORDERING

1982

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House of

VOTED BEST PIZZA 8 YEARS IN A ROW

Total Hair Care

421 North Main Street

Celebrating 30 Years! Cathy Murphy • Deb Morgan • Marv Streiff

507-433-5122 301 1st Avenue NW • Austin, MN

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

35


1982

Lincoln Webster Apartments 1 & 2 Bedrooms Available

A CLEAN, QUIET, SAFE AND SECURE PLACE TO LIVE

437-4264

1983 Heating & Cooling LLC SALES & SERVICE

43 3- 5 65 2

1984

1986

Austin Convention & Visitors Bureau CALL OUR STAFF TODAY!

(507) 437-4563 or (800) 444-5713 E-mail: visitor@austinmn.com

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1988

1988

1994

AUSTIN BUILDERS SUPPLY, INC.

South

Quality Lumber • Pole Buildings • Estimating Garages • Decks • Windows • Doors Plumbing • Electrical • Hardware • Power Tools Valspar paint • Cabot Stain • Rental Eq.

1996

1996

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1998

2000

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2003

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2000

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1995

1988

2005

507-434-2409 100 4th Street SE • Austin, MN 36

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


SPORTS: GOLF

Local courses to host club championships By Rocky Hulne While hitting the greens is a good way to relax on a nice summer day, there are those who like to see how they stack up with the rest of the field at their local golf course. That’s when club championships come to play and there are a few of those going on in the Mower County area this summer.

Austin Country Club will host its men’s club championship July 21, its women’s club championship July 18 and its junior club championship Aug. 7. Meadow Greens Golf Course in Austin will host its club championships in August and Cedar River Golf Course in Adams will host its men’s and women’s club championship Aug. 5 and its senior club championship Aug. 3.

Whether golfing for leisure or competition, there are plenty of golf courses to swing and putt your way through an afternoon. Many local courses will also host club championships. Herald file photos

AREA GOLF COURSES River Oaks, Austin 54384 244th St., Austin, MN 55912 (507) 433-9098 rivergolf1.com —18 holes —Par 71 —5,987 yards —$15 for nine holes or $25 for 18 The River Oaks, which lies along the edge of the Cedar River, winds its way through moderately wooded area and contains a mix of open and narrow fairways with several long and challenging par 5s. ............ Meadow Greens, Austin 25238 540 Avenue Austin, MN 55912 (507) 433-4878 meadowgreensgc.com —18 holes —Par 69 —5,950 yards —$14 for nine holes or $20 for $18 Meadow Greens, which lies directly adjacent to the River Oaks, plays shorter in the front than in the back with a creek, ponds and

gentle slope. ............ Cedar River Golf Course 14927 Minnesota 56 Adams, MN 55909 (507) 582-3595 cedarrivercountryclub.co m —18 holes —Par 72 —6,288 yards —$16 for nine holes or $25 for 18 The Cedar River Golf Course meanders through fairways lined with evergreens and plenty of deciduous trees to contend with. The Little Cedar River runs through the course. ............ Wedgewood Cove 2200 West Ninth St., Albert Lea, MN 56007 (507) 373-2007 wedgewoodcove.com —18 holes —Par 72 —6,594 yards (black tees 6,993 yards) —$25 for nine Mon. thru Thurs., $30 on Fri. thru Sun.; $45 and $55 for 18.

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER

Get some variety in that golf game this summer by trying different courses. After all, who can hone his or her game without testing the challenges new terrain, sandtraps and tricky greens? Here is a guide to a few area courses in, near and within an hour drive of Austin. — By Matt Peterson Wedgewood is a marshy course with plenty of wetlands, ponds and plays as a high-class, links-style setup. ............ Green Lea Golf Course 101 W Richway Dr., Albert Lea, MN 56007 (507) 373-1061 greenlea.com —18 holes —Par 72 —6,213 yards —green fees: $15 for nine or $25, $28 on weekends Green Lea hosts a menagerie of mature trees, well-defined fairways and plenty of obstacles such as sandtraps, water hazards and challenges golfers with risk/reward holes. ............

The Oaks 73671 170th Avenue Hayfield, MN 55940 477-3233 oaksinhayfield.com — 18 holes —Par 72 — 6,410 yards —$19.50 for nine holes or $27.50 for 18 The Oaks in Hayfield lives up to its name. Located in the country, the course is thick with Oak trees, carved fairways and several, nice rock-lined water bodies near challenging greens. ............ Maple Valley 8600 Maple Valley Road SE, Rochester, MN 55904 (507) 285-9100 maplevalleygolf.com —18 jooles —Par 71

—5,916 yards —$14 for nine holes and $18 for 18. Maple Valley is stowed away, well off the highway and dives its way down into bluff country. The terrain varies from flat to very hilly, is dotted with trees and hugs a river for most of the course. ............ Oak Summit 2751 County Road 16 SW, Rochester, MN 55902 (507) 252-1808 oaksummitgolf.com —18 holes —Par 70 —6,434 yards —$17 for holes and $26 for 18 Oak Summit is loaded with hills, fast, challenging greens and mostly open fairways throughout. The course hosts several tricky green placements and slopes, as well. ............ Riverview Greens 1800 Clubhouse Drive NE Stewartville, MN 55976 (507) 533-9393

riverviewgreens.com —18 holes —Par 70 —5,108 yards —$14 for nine holes or $18 for 18 Riverview greens, which lengthened its course several years ago, has a combination of open and tight fairways, ponds, and contends with the Root River for part of the course. ............ Root River Country Club 13029 County 3 Spring Valley, MN 55975 (507) 346-2501 rootrivercountryclub.com —9 holes —Par 36 —2,959 yards —$15 for nine holes or $20 for 18 Root River Country Club offers a gentle slope, two chances to cross the Root River, plenty of dog-legging and challenging shots around trees in just nine holes. ............ All yardages designated FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

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FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

AUSTIN DAILY HERALD - DISCOVER SUMMER


Discover Summer  

A guide to the biggest events in Austin and Mower County this summer!

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