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Works & Projects

Austin Chatelain


Contents

Academic Projects 3

Wendell Berry school for community farming

9

Rome Italy: Historical ecologies

15

Travel Sketches: Italy and France

19

Dickson Street TOD

25

Shadowlands Library

Professional Works 35

L - Stack house

41

Blair garage + house addition

47

Blair courtbuilding

51

Staggs Residence

55

Art Gallery


Wendell Berry school for community farming

Professors

Coleman Coker Laura Terry Location

Fayetteville, AR Semester

Spring 2005 Project

pattern recognition

Fayetteville city grid

This project began by looking at pattern on a variety of scales, from the vascular system of a leaf to Arkansas’ river systems. We further explored the creation of pattern through using different mediums such as color, concrete, and figure-ground drawings. All of these journeys, including a physical journey of 2200 miles from Fayetteville to Marfa Texas and back, set the mood for a beautiful semester. “When we slow down and take hold of things we become ardent participants in the world. Active participating prods us to recognize underlying patterns and how they order the world that we’re expected to build in. This then is the aim of this studio: to more fully participate in a world suffused with presence; to learn how to better discern patterns and put them to use; to realize how those patterns make visible this greater interconnected whole.”

-Coleman Coker

Leaf 1

pen on mylar

Leaf 2

pen on mylar


White River System

Leaf 3

pen on mylar


5 Wendell Berry school for community farming

Color study

Nine units of gessoed and painted plywood 3’ x 3’ overall

Form proposal derived from pattern studies seven units of concrete approximately 3’ x 4’

photographs of patterns found on site

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3


Wendell Berry school for community farming

6

Painting of the patterns found on site Acrylic on Gessoed Luan 3’ x 4’

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7 Wendell Berry school for community farming

study model 3

study model 4

site plan

study model 5

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Northwest Elevation

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400


Wendell Berry school for community farming

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First Floor

Southwest elevation

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Second Floor

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Rome, Italy

Professor

Davide Vitali Location

Rome, Italy Semester

Fall 2004 Project

Intervention for improving the forum ecology

In the beginning, analysis of Rome’s urban landscape became the primary focus. The charge was to provide a large scale as well as a localized solution for improving the ancient forum’s ecology. So, I started picking apart the site (the entire area from Piazza Venezia to the Colosseum) to understand its history; Discovering the Roman forum, the imperial forum, the Mussolini layer, and the absence of the medieval housing quarter that existed before Mussolini. I discovered that there are literal layers of history that make up this area. Upon further investigation I realized that the walk from Piazza Venezia to the Colosseum and surroundings could be very exhausting for the common visitor and there were few places in which to rest. So, a way to integrate a rest area into my proposal became important, not only for the physical relief, but also as a way to draw the visitor into my project. Next, I proposed a series of paths, thresholds, entries and exits, viewing platforms, rest areas, and information points. This system of movement was

tied together by conditioned space to be located where a large retaining wall exists on the North side of the Via de fori imperiali and also where the current visitor’s center resides. My physical building proposal was a new visitor’s center, bookstore, and café. In revisiting the salient points of my large scale proposal I tied in a park like series of spaces that then culminated into my building. If one was to enter at street level, he would be coaxed into the space by three walls creating four voids. Each wall would provide an overall map of the area in a different language. This would provide the needed threshold of information as well as a connection with the rest of the site strategy. Since the site as a whole exists in fragments of space and fragments of material, this is carried through in the execution of the original site strategy; sculpted walls giving way to framed views. It becomes the means of exploring the site and providing the best views available.

Ruin on the Palatine hill


Large scale plan proposal for improving the ancient forum area between Piazza Venezia and the Colosseum. Constructed using pen, pencil, watercolor.


11 Rome, Italy

watercolor study of the Campigdolio


Rome, Italy

11

Palimpsest of the ancient forum area. Pen, pencil, watercolor.


13 Rome, Italy

visitor’s center


Rome, Italy 14

Pedestrian Relief


Travel sketches: Italy

Hadrian’s Villa

Tower at Piazza del Campo, Sienna


Duomo and piazza, Pienza

Duomo, Sienna

Caprarola


Travel sketches: France

Villa Savoye roof garden, Poissy

Villa Savoye, Poissy

Le Habitation roof garden, Marseilles


La Tourette monastery, Lyon


Dickson Street TOD

Professors

Bill Conway Greg Herman Location

Fayetteville, AR Semester

Spring 2006 Project

Transit oriented development

The Bentonville + Fayetteville corridor in Northwest Arkansas, like many U.S. cities, suffers from poor land use and dependence upon the vehicle. A light rail system when implemented would be part of a larger plan of action; one that uses specific rules (opportunities) for how this network can work mutually with the existing context. I propose implementing the placement of pedestrian friendly, almost park like environments within the existing fabric along the proposed light rail line. There are working examples of this in Fayetteville already; Gulley Park, Wilson Park, and Walker Park. All are imbedded within the urban + suburban contexts and serve as vehicles for pedestrian oriented environments. Implementations of a similar typology in and around pre-existing urban + suburban environs will help ratify the existing damage and promote smart growth through natural experience.

This type of large scale plan would work in conjunction with enhanced rail corridor density through mixed use development. The architecture of my proposal is characterized by organically based linear structures that reinforce the directionality of the rail corridor and provide a host of mixed use developments. These structures were derived from the Ozark mountain landscape, a gully found on the site itself and a formal language that complements the color of the flora and scale of buildings in the immediate area. Also, this layering is meant to make the projects much more approachable by providing moments where the plazas and exterior spaces push directly into and through the interior spaces. This action creates a more public gravity throughout the project. Furthermore, in this project the spaces between the buildings have equal value as the buildings themselves.

Study model of train station area


Eighth Street Bentonville

Downtown Rogers

NWA Regional Airport Highfill

Downtown Lowell

Downtown Springdale

Tyson Headquarters Springdale Johnson NWA Mall Fayetteville

Dickson Street Fayetteville

Drake Field Airport Fayetteville


Covered walkways + rest area

Maple Street Housing Arkansas Avenue West Avenue Old Main Lawn (Eastern edge of the University of Arkansas Campus) Covered walkways + rest area Lafayette Street

Train Station + Retail + Cafe’

Sky bar + Fine dining Housing + Offices + Retail + bus stop Parking Dickson Street (Entertainment District) Retail spaces + Cafe’

Public plaza + Performance venue + Seasonal market space + Museum Parking

Housing

Existing green space Housing + Offices + Retail

Retail spaces + Cafe’


Dickson Street TOD

Birds eye view of plaza Train Station + Retail + Cafe’ Train Platform + Crossways Sky bar + Fine dining Parking Garage Public Plaza Housing + Offices + Retail West Avenue

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22

Historic Train station

Dickson Street

George’s Majestic Lounge Retail Spaces + Cafe’

Pocket park Parking Garage

Public Plaza + Performance venue + Seasonal Market space + Museum


23 Dickson Street TOD

Restaurant

Sky Bar C

C

S

Retail

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view across the train station and platforms

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approach towards plaza and performance venue


Dickson Street TOD

image 1 looking Southeast

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2

image 2 looking Northeast

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image 3 looking South

image 4 looking South

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Plaza with outdoor performance venue

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Site model: Scale = 1:100

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section 1

Shadowlands Library

Professors

Tahar Messadi Marlon Blackwell Location

Marfa, TX Semester

Fall 2005 Project

Comprehensive Studio

This mostly private library is for a childless couple who over the years, through their love of literature and the arts, have surrounded themselves with books and now reside in Marfa, Texas. Daylighting is important, to allow for reading by natural light and to deepen the sense of this library as an almost sacred place. Books not being read may only be touched by reflected light, to help to ensure their preservation. Acoustical qualities are nearly as important as those of natural light. This is a place for solitude, and for the deep reading of texts.

section 2

The Yucca glauca, a plant native to the Southwest, becomes the impetus from which the spatial edge of this library will come into being. It’s unique biology, morphology, tectonics, and transformative nature is intensely studied so that it may be used to inform the architecture. “It should not be so hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places in which... you may find really marvelous ideas.”

section 3

-Leonardo da Vinci

section 4

The Yucca Pod

Watercolor 12” x 12” section 5


27 Shadowlands Library

Field condition derived from combining multiple units

Individual unit derived from yucca pod geometry bristol paper laser cut, hand cut, scored, and folded

Extention of field condition in the Z axis

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2


Shadowlands Library

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perspective study using the field extention

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4


29 Shadowlands Library

West Elevation. Study model.

site plan

North Elevation. Study model.

Section A

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Shadowlands Library

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First Floor A

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Second Floor

West Elevation

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31 Shadowlands Library


Shadowlands Library

steel framework for roof structure

steel beams to support roof structure

Brise soleil second level floor plate

primary structural grid

first level floor slab

foundation + stem walls

Section B

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33 Shadowlands Library

Interior Perspective. model shot.

Interior Perspective. model shot.


Shadowlands Library

Interior Perspective. color pencil on mylar

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40

Southeast Elevation

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L - Stack House

Client

Marlon + Ati Blackwell Architect

Marlon Blackwell Construction

2005 - 2006 Contractor

Benchmark Framing, Inc. Interior trim work + Rain screen sealor

Austin Chatelain Lance Mallette

The Blackwell House responds to a site anomaly set within a dense inner-city neighborhood near a city park. The 10,000 SF trapezoid-shaped lot is traversed diagonally by a dry-bed creek. The urban grid and the modest scale of existing houses in the neighborhood is enhanced through a strategy of bridging and stacking of forms. In effect a new order is superimposed upon a in-fill tract of land that has been undeveloped since the 19th century origins of the city of Fayetteville. The resulting scheme is an ‘L’ configuration that subdivides the interior program and the site into private and public entities. A carefully positioned glass-enclosed stairway hinges together the two 18 -foot wide boxes that form the house structure. At the interior, the ground floor is organized as a linear open plan with connecting terraces along and adjacent to the creek. Throughout the house, windows and skylights are arranged to provide controlled views, illumination, a sense of privacy, and opportunities to observe the dynamic nature of the creek.

The stairway penetrates the underbelly of the second floor. Here private spaces are more discreet and cellular, however, all spaces open onto a hall that serves as a common family space for reading, office work, or watching television. Primary materials at the interior include teak floors, wenge, walnut, and white oak millwork, and painted wood plank accent walls. Large steel box windows provide spaces for sitting or sleeping. The exterior cladding is a unique rain screen system articulated with rot resistant Brazilian redwood. The wood screen is disengaged from a rubber-clad substrate and is stacked and screwed on the flat creating a horizontal louvered effect at the long walls. The cladding system provides for 50% transparency and perceptually provides the walls with a phenomenal translucency. End walls are either black metal clad or glass storefronts. The house as bridge provides an intensification of place, a cultured place revealing the evolving relations between home, nature, and city.

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View looking East of the first level spanning the creek

Site Plan

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Poplar 1x2 installed over partition wall in master bedroom. Next the poplar will be painted white to create a subtle texture.

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1. Foyer 2. Library + guest bed 3. Living 4. Kitchen 5. Breakfast 6. Dining 7. Deck 8. Coat closet 9. Bathroom 10. Patio 11. Outdoor kitchen

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12. Hallway 13. Master Bedroom 14. Marlon’s Desk 15. Master Closet 16. Master Bathroom 17. Mud Room 18. Bathroom 19. Bedroom 20. Bedroom 21. Media center

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First Floor

Second Floor


37 L - Stack House

STAINLESS STEEL SCREWS, PAINTED TO MATCH NOTCHED 2 X 4

Applying sealer on Brazilian redwood rain screen


L - Stack House 38

STAIN

SCREWS

Credits: -base drawings and text provided by Marlon Blackwell Architect -construction photographs taken by Lance Mallette and Austin Chatelain -other photographs taken by Timothy Hursley


Second story volume over outdoor kitchen space

View across dining table, through the kitchen to the living room

Blackwell family at glass and metal stair element

Blackwell family in living room

View through multi-use hallway on the second floor


L - Stack House

Oblique view of the Northern and Eastern fascades at the transition between day and night

40


Blair Garage + House Addition These two primarily concrete structures although on the same piece of property represent two seperate contruction projects. The house addition was began in August of ‘07 and was followed by the garage which was finished in April of ‘08.

Client

Jim + Nancy Blair Architect

Marlon Blackwell Construction

2007 - 2008 Contractor

Benchmark Framing, Inc. Project manager for contractor

Austin Chatelain

Framing with temporary bracing in house additon

The garage, located at the southwest corner of the existing house, uses a continuous concrete wall to retain the hillside and carve out a simple geometry that negotiates setbacks and utility easements while allowing the existing narrow driveway to be widened and replaced with a stamped concrete surface. The retaining walls also serve to correct major water runoff + flooding conditions that have affected the existing home since it was built. An infill condition of pre-finished metal panels, steel, and translucent glass define the operable and accessible conditions of the garage. The ‘lantern’ window box above the garage doors provides a glow of light at night to define the new garage and amply light the space of the driveway. A skylight allows the sun to rake across the boardformed texture of the back wall of the garage.

The house addition, an exercise room, is defined as a discrete concrete form set against the existing house on a steeply sloped hillside. A glass wall and deck cantilevers to the north, extending the exercise room and providing a direct view to the wooded site beyond and the creek below. The flat roof of the addition has a Green-Grid roof system that grows succulents which are adapted for our climate zone and do not require irrigation. This roof garden is viewed directly from the upper story bedrooms of the house.

Installation day of the Green-Grid roof system

Concrete formwork over cantilever portion of house addition


Garage Addition

Existing Residence

House Addition

East Elevation of house addition and garage addition 0

5

15

40

Credits: -base drawings and text provided by Marlon Blackwell Architect -construction photographs taken by Chris Baribeau and Austin Chatelain


43 Blair Garage + House Addition

board formed concrete using cedar 1x2

South elevation of house addition

North - South section through house addition

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Blair Garage + House Addition 44

interior shot looking North out of house addition

Porch on the North side of house addition

Photo credits: Timothy Hursley Ron Hudnall


45 Blair Garage + House Addition

view of garage and house addition from the street

view through garage to skylit back wall

section through garage

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Painter checking his craft


Blair Garage + House Addition

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light raking down boardformed concrete wall from skylight in the rear of garage

Photo credits: Timothy Hursley Ron Hudnall Austin Chatelain


Blair Courtbuilding

Client

Jim + Nancy Blair Architect

Marlon Blackwell Construction

2008 Contractor

Benchmark Framing, Inc. Project manager for contractor

Austin Chatelain

The Courtbuilding is to serve as a storage facility for the clients as they transition out of their office to being semi-retired and working from home. It is essentially a bar building approximately 150’ long by 18’ wide with a breezeway in the center and a single sloped roof pitch of 1 to 12. The building is clad in a 24 gauge box rib metal panel as the exterior shell, flat seamed metal on the North and Soluth ends, concrete fiberboard in the breezeway, and drywall on the interior. The only exception to the drywall is a cedar lined closet for seasonal storage of clothing. This closet also houses a clothing carousel to aide in compacting the storage capacity. Also, the building is conditioned and was insulated using a spray foam. The only incisions in the skin of the building are two strip windows which allow natural light in as well as allowing views up and out into the surrounding tree canopy. In order to gain vehicular access to the building a driveway between two concrete retaining walls was built. The tallest of the two retaining walls reaches a height of fifteen feet with a spread footing that reaches a width of seven feet.

Installation of large I-beams for soil shoring system

space between the steel shoring and the formwork for the radius wall

Pouring of the footing for the radius wall

Concrete being pumped into the formwork for the radius wall


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West Elevation 0

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Credits: -base drawings provided by Marlon Blackwell Architect -all photographs taken by Austin Chatelain


49 Blair Courtbuilding

view of the Western elevation and steel box window transitioning into the breezeway.

East West Section

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detail of steel box window meeting the metal box rib cladding

detail of box window at corner

detail of metal box rib cladding meeting the boardformed concrete retaining wall


Staggs Residence This house was designed for a couple who are moving to Fayetteville for retirement to be closer to the Ozark Landscape. Programmatically the house will also serve as a place for their three grown children to stay when they come to visit for Razorback games and holidays. Client

June + Gene Staggs Location

Fayetteville, AR Designer

Austin Chatelain Construction

unbuilt

The Staggs residence utilizes a concrete retaining wall on two sides to tame the slope and water runoff, but also as an organizational device that carves out a courtyard space providing a light well and privacy from the near by neighbors. The first story volume houses the main body of public spaces, the master bedroom suite, and a screen porch which provides a cool summer retreat and frames the landscape to the North. One may enter the residence formally by slipping underneath the second story volume and behind the mostly monolithic North wall to discover a sky lit chamber that draws you into the house and through to the living area. One may also enter the residence informally by slipping between the garage and shop, underneath the second story volume, and into the courtyard on the South side of the residence.

North Elevation 0

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The second story volume is accessed via a stairway perpendicular to the entry chamber and as one moves vertically he emerges into a light filled glass box with views out and across the green roof which sits atop the first story. This green roof is a way of reclaiming the ground plane lost through placement of the building but also as a way of mitigating storm water run-off, adding insulative value, and expressing the natural beauty of the plants. The second story volume houses the three additional bedrooms for their children as well as an office, an informal living room, and an exterior porch space which both frames the Southern landscape and provides a connection down to the courtyard space. Because this is to be the Staggs’ final residence, it was designed for them to be able to dwell primarily on the first level while the additional spaces for guests and their kids were placed on the second level. Native stone, concrete, and wood are utilized for the first level to anchor the project to the landscape and standing seam copper cladding is used for the second story volume for its longevity, inherent beauty, and its ability to be virtually maintenance free.


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1. Porch 2. Entry chamber 3. Garage 4. Utility room 5. Bathroom 6. Kitchen 7. Dining 8. Living 9. Screen Porch 10. Master Bathroom 11. Master Bedroom 12. Private Courtyard 13. Public Courtyard 14. Shop + Storage 15. Hallway + living room 16. Bathroom 17. Bedroom 18. Bedroom 19. Bathroom 20. Bedroom 21. Porch 22. Office + Library 23. Green Roof

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Second Floor

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53 Staggs Residence

birds eye model shot

Northwest elevation model shot

Section B

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Staggs Residence

roof plan model shot

Section A + South Elevation

West Elevation

level 2 model shot

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level 1 model shot


Art Gallery The ideas for this investigation have grown out of a knowledge gained from my experiences with Professor + Artist Laura Terry and Artist George Dombek. Professor Terry introduced me to landscape painting with the use of watercolor in a course taken during the Spring of 2003. I developed a fascination with color and how it reacts to the confinements of the paper when producing a work of art. There was a life that I didn’t know was missing in the graphite renderings I had produced previously.

retreat, a vent, a stabilizer, and eventually as an essential part of who I am.

That summer I worked for George Dombek at his residence performing a multitude of tasks. While there I began to notice his method of working and how it could apply to what I had been exposed to in architecture school.

The following summer, I again worked for George Dombek where my juxtaposition with the art was much closer. I framed paintings for much of the time that I worked which required some hands on involvement with the pieces. By my request, George gave a few lessons on how one might construct a work in the manner that he does.

The following Fall I spent the semester in Rome, Italy where I experienced art as something completely integral with the culture. The works of Michelangelo, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Piranesi were especially moving. Also, much of the early Christian art that I experienced put an unforeseen twist on how I view composition and the power of subject matter. During this period I used painting as a

My next Semester, the Spring of 2004, I was in a studio taught by Coleman Coker and Laura Terry. I was further introduced to color, painting, and figure ground studies in a way that suggested the interchangeable nature of art and architecture. The art that was produced as a result of that studio flowed seamlessly into the resulting architecture. It was an awakening.

It is through this chain of events that I am forever changed. Everything around me is far more beautiful than originally anticipated. The more I see the more there is to see. Consequently, this is just the beginning....


“Come Back” 2005 Watercolor 15” x 16”


57 Art Gallery

“Oppression” 2005 Watercolor actual size


Art Gallery

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Color and light are things that we can define in a dictionary but how well do we actually know them? Until you spend time with them you cannot know them. By going through a critical process of seeing, I understand my subjects in relation to the light. A minute moment in time is captured and studied to enhance its secrets. My artwork, among many things, seeks to enhance the viewer’s sense of being. There are infinite moments that encapsulate each day which rise and fall as we choose to distinguish them. I’ve managed to isolate a few in a way that creates pause and reflection. We are joined together for as long as you choose to experience the work. You are here now...

“Touch” 2005

Watercolor 8” x 20”


59 Art Gallery

“Dance” 2006

Watercolor 20” x 20”


61 Art Gallery

“The Lady Bug” 2005 Watercolor actual size


Art Gallery

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“The Banana” 2005

Watercolor actual size


63 Art Gallery

“Maple” 2005

Watercolor actual size


Art Gallery

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“Sycamore” 2005 Watercolor 20” x 20”


67 Art Gallery

“The War Clock” 2006 Watercolor 22” x 30”


Art Gallery

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“Lost Love” 2007 Watercolor 22” x 22”


71 Art Gallery

“Shy” 2008

Watercolor 12” x 12”


73 Art Gallery

“Tulip Louise” 2008 Watercolor 22” x 22”


Designed and Produced by Austin Chatelain 2009

Austin Chatelain architecture + art  

Austin Chatelain is seeking employment as an Architecture Intern with a progressive architecture firm.More info: http://www.austinchatelain...

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