Issuu on Google+

AUSTIN ARONSSON PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO


CONTENTS CONTENTS page

project

date

1-2 3-4 5-7 8-9 10-17 18-19 20-22 23-26 27-30

Spring Creek Canyon Logo Design Anacostia River Waterfront Museo Adriano Urban Agriculture Love Canal Buffalo Infill BAM Cultural District Navy Yard

2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 2011 2011


SPRING CREEK CANYON This project was part of a regional analysis studio to study a parcel of land called Spring Creek Canyon. Over part of the semester, an extensive amount of research went into analyzing the history, geomorphology and hydrology of the land. After compiling over twenty pages of information and suitability maps using GIS, a masterplan was created to indicate where activities, circulation and access points would be ideal. The vision of this project was to conserve as much land as possible while allowing various uses for stakeholders and the community. With this focus in mind, the main goal will be focused on reforesting most of the land. This is similar to the strategy that the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) proposed.

GIS Regional Data Map

1

Spring Creek Canyon Centre County, PA

Dr. Timothy Murtha Associate Professor

Fall 2008


Suitability Maps & Master Plan Spring Creek Canyon Centre County, PA

Dr. Timothy Murtha Associate Professor

Fall 2008

2


AG COMMONS The goal of this project was to create a design using primarily plants to offer the business and forestry students of Penn State a place for passive and active recreation. The design is organized around key circulation patterns that connect the space to the rest of campus. Within the space are numerous paths that meander through a range vegetation. A less dense, open area of grasses and turf lawn offer views to future development of the campus. Dense organization of plant and tree species border this open area to mimic a hardwood forest. An axial path that points toward a new arboretum on campus is bordered by forbe planting beds that add seasonal color to the space. Adding a grid of Trident Maples in between the two buildings will create a shaded place to occupy. It will also allow for a better transition that decreases the scale of the large buildings and walkway that exist there now.

Planting Plan

3

AG Commons State College, PA

Ken Tamminga Assistant Professor

Spring 2009


Plant List

Circulation and Plant Community Diagram AG Commons State College, PA

Ken Tamminga Assistant Professor

Spring 2009

4


ANACOSTIA WATERFRONT The Anacostia River Waterfront project provided the first opportunity to explore design solutions for a mixed-use community. It was also the first time designing for a brownfield site. The most fundamental problems for the design were the lack of connections to existing communities and river degradation. In order to restore river health, a natural riparian edge was proposed to become a buffer between the development and the river. This is something that doesn’t exist along much of the river today. The edge would provide a new habitat and also help filter harmful elements found in the soil of the site before they made it to the river. At the terminus of the main corridor would be a boardwalk overlooking the river and the new natural habitat. Bringing people closer to this positive change would be important for the community to learn the benefits of the riparian edge. Another important aspect of the design was the pedestrian bridge. This connection to an existing community would be beneficial to the economy of both new and old developments. The connection is located at the opposite end of the corridor from the boardwalk to create a strong axial thoroughfare. Pier Detail Plan

5

Anacostia River Waterfront Anacostia, DC

Stuart Echols Associate Professor

Spring 2009


O RIPARIAN

CO2 SEA GULL

FO

HAWK

O

D

POLLEN SEED

SPARROW

RABBIT

HERON

CHAIN

DRAGONFLY

BUTTERFLY

SPIDER

FISH

H A B I T A T S O

CO2

Riparian Edge Diagram

View Of Lookout

Master Plan Anacostia River Waterfront Anacostia, DC

Stuart Echols Associate Professor

Spring 2009

6


View On Bridge

Pedestrian Bridge Plan

Site Section

7

Anacostia River Waterfront Anacostia, DC

Stuart Echols Associate Professor

Spring 2009


MUSEO ADRIANO This was a collaborative effort among three architects and three landscape architects while studying in Rome. It was a submission for the Premio Piranesi Design Competition. The competition is held annually between several European Universities in commemoration of the late Giovanni Battista Piranesi. A number of design elements were proposed to link the influential places that were created under the rule of Emperor Hadrian and essentially create a museum identity. The main focus was on creating physical museum spaces for Villa Adriana in Tivoli, temporary exhibits for spaces in Rome, and branding for the museum to be recognized worldwide. Layers of historical design accretion along with Emperor Hadrian’s desire to have the most modern designs is what gave the project direction. Contemporary designs that merged into the historic fabric of Tivoli and Rome was a way for the team to make the character of Emperor Hadrian prevalent. The following graphics were done on my behalf as part of a collective submission.

Logo & Context Museo Adriano Rome, Italy

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor

Fall 2009

8


Master Plan

9

Museo Adriano Rome, Italy

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor

Fall 2009


URBAN AGRICULTURE Over the past few years Philadelphia has been working to create more environmentally sustainable places in the city. This research has led to a $2.5 million grant for the Fairmont Parks Authority to increase tree canopy cover to 30% by 2015. The studio was directly related to this issue. Our goal was to create transient urban nurseries that would foster tree production on vacant lots found in Philadelphia. The studio was broken down into two parts. One part concentrated on designing a working hybrid of tree production that integrates with public park space. The other was a quick, mid-semester charrette to showcase the final design that one of these urban nurseries could behold once tree production had ended. The concentration project consists of designed schemes for harvesting, planting and propagation. A garden was also designed where mature trees existed on site. In addition to planting, stormwater retention was also designed to be a key aspect, because the concentration site is located a block from a Delaware River tributary. This proximity also led to riparian species nursery production so the habitat along essential waterways could be replenished. Charrette Framework Plans Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010

10


Programmatic Plan

SECTION C.1 1/8”=1’0”

Charrette Site Plan

11

Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

0 1/4

1

1/8 1/2

Charrette Sections Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010

2


View Of Meadow Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010

12


Concentration Site Plan

13

Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010


TREES

[2’x4’ spacing on center - 6’ every 4 rows]

SPRING PLANTING .5” seedling (3gal)

1” caliper (7 gal) & new .5” seedling

1.5” caliper (15 gal) & new 1” caliper

= 5,000 TREES

2 growing season

SHRUBS/HERBACEOUS

3 growing seasons

[1x1 - 2’ every 4]

SPRING PLANTING bare root

= 44,000 PLANTS

Nursery Planting Schematic

1 growing season

Propagation Tower Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010

14


View Of Path

15

Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010


sept.

oct.

april

july

2 yrs.

Perennial Garden Planting Schematic

View Of Garden Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010

16


Detail Plan

17

Bench & Boardwalk Details Urban Agriculture Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Spring 2010


LOVE CANAL The Love Canal Superfund site offered opportunity for a unique design solution. This three acre site was once a hazardous waste dumping location that is now capped. The program called for a reflective design that would also be interpretive to future visitors. The team consisted of three Penn State Landscape Architecture students and two University at Buffalo Graduate Architecture students. The over arching theme that directed the design was the perception of absence and the uncanny through masses and voids. Proposing that the site be divided into three distinct zones responds to the existing conditions and what existed before. This enabled a sequencing of designed landscapes that could be observed from a pedestrian bridge crossing the barren capped canal. The bridge starts at a visitor center next to the zone on the left. In this zone we proposed adding raised walkways through the existing open meadow and growing tortured trees on the leftover concrete parking lots to signify that a problem once existed beneath the surface. Opposite this zone are more densely planted mature trees with brush in between. Grass patches litter this zone that signify property lines where people once had homes. This was emphasized by proposing to plant an even more dense grid of trees and maintaining the grass properties.

Site Plan

Walkway Section Love Canal Buffalo, NY

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

Fall 2010

18


Tree Manipulation

Neighborhood Section

19

Love Canal Buffalo, NY

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

Fall 2010


BUFFALO INFILL This project deals with multiple sites in Buffalo that have been under analysis by Groundwork Buffalo. The goal of this organization is to reclaim under utilized and neglected open space throughout the city. Most of the spaces studied were in low density residential communities. The designs were created as unique responses to existing conditions of each site. Separation is a design that responds to the end of a neighborhood block. It’s position called for a radial pattern of separated planting beds that would be observable by any home that has a view of this lot. The planting beds are separated based on height, stepping up from the street to the home that it is adjacent to. This gives a buffer for the home and also provides a design that can be appreciated from near and far. Spectacle responds to the existing canopy trees left over after the homes on the lot were removed. They were once thought of as leftover space and separated each property. Now they become the highlight of the space as a spectacle with poles that point upward to the trees when viewed from the street. String lights attached to the central poles would light the tree canopy at night and provide a safe thoroughfare for people to cut through the block.

Separation Site Plan Buffalo Infill Buffalo, NY

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

Fall 2010

20


View of Site Entrance

Site Section

21

Buffalo Infill Buffalo, NY

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

Fall 2010


View of Walkway

Spectacle Site Plan

Site Section

Buffalo Infill Buffalo, NY

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

Fall 2010

22


BAM CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown Brooklyn is home to worldclass institutions like the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) and Mark Morris Dance Group, which attract nearly 500,000 visitors and arts patrons every year. This effort involves the conversion of underutilized, city-owned properties into affordable performance and rehearsal space for a diverse array of non-profit visual, performing, and media arts groups. Already a destination for avant-garde arts and culture, the BAM Cultural District is proposed to be a dynamic commercial and residential center, featuring innovative architecture linked by a series of distinctive public open spaces. Amenities including restaurants, cafes, retail and parking will make the neighborhood a true 24/7 urban and cultural center.

Context

Located along Flatbush Avenue and within walking distance to the newly designed Atlantic Terminal and Atlantic Yards, the district is incapable of being missed. Key public spaces linking all of the unique amenities will be vital in keeping a dynamic community involvement.

Aerial

23

BAM Brooklyn, NY

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011


Section 1

Section 2

Site Plan BAM Brooklyn, NY

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011

24


Public Space

Phasing Diagrams

Building Use Diagrams

25

BAM Brooklyn, NY

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011


Roof Terrace Perspective BAM Brooklyn, NY

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011

26


NAVY YARD This proposal was a collaborative effort working to create a vision for future development of the 60 acre site along Langley Avenue of the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Of the 1,200 acre Navy Yard, the Langley Avenue site presented a unique opportunity to take advantage of regional and immediate context. ENTERTAINMENT

FDR park and the sports stadium complex are two of the important immediate connections that called for a land bridge and entertainment district. The greater Philadelphia connections included greenway/ waterways along the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. Important road networks that intersect at the eastern portion of the site called for a distinctive gateway into the Navy Yard. After meeting with leaders of Liberty Property Trust, our team decided that flex industrial was important to take advantage of existing rail lines through the site and create jobs.

Y INDUSTR

INDUSTRY

LIVE

Land Uses

To create an economically sustainable development, the team proposed a higher density masterplan that included a mix of commercial, industrial and residential.

Site Relationships

27

Navy Yard Philadelphia, PA

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011

LIVE


Entertainment Aerial

Dredge Diagram

Master Plan Navy Yard Philadelphia, PA

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011

28


Land Bridge Perspective

Land Bridge Plan

Land Bridge Diagram

29

Navy Yard Philadelphia, PA

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011


Entertainment District Perspective

Navy Yard Philadelphia, PA

Dan Jones Professor Emeritus

Spring 2011

30


Austin Aronsson 329 Cedar Avenue Manasquan, NJ 08736 732.299.7103 aba5046@gmail.com



Undergraduate Portfolio