Page 1

FUTURE EDUCATION & TRAINING 2018

FEB/MAR

CONNECTING BUSINESSES ACROSS ASIA AND BEYOND anz.com/institutional

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 1


A MESSAGE FROM THE

PRESIDENT

Greetings Members!

BOARD MEMBERS

What a night it was! About 900 revellers upholding our traditional Australian curtain raiser to Singapore’s business - social calendar year. AustCham’s ANZ Australia Day Ball. Our Patron and High Commissioner, Bruce Gosper opened the celebrations and we were delighted to also welcome Israel’s Ambassador and the European Union’s Ambassador. The reputation of our Australia Day Ball continues to grow across Singapore’s international business and diplomatic community, so I suggest you mark it into your 2019 diaries now. If you missed our end of year Xmas party, probably just as well. We had to decline non-members as the date drew near and ended up with a full house. It’s a great position to find ourselves in. I’ve had a look at what Kate, Erica and Cecilia have planned for 2018, so if you rub shoulders with our regular non-member event guests, suggest they do themselves a favour and sign up.

Ian Cummin PRESIDENT BlueScope

Adam Lyle

VICE PRESIDENT Padang & Co.

John Dick

HONORARY SECRETARY Dentons Rodyk

Sean Straton Our reputation as a business events management organisation was also recognised during the visit of the Honourable Christopher Pyne, Minister for Defence Industry in January. About 120 guests enjoyed his presentation, candour, and warm meet and greet session.

HONORARY TREASURER UBS

Nigel Cummings

Sliding Doors Entertainment

On the subject of visits, representatives from your Chamber and AustCham Asean had the opportunity to meet Senator Penny Wong, Shadow Foreign Affairs Minister during her recent visit. Up to then, I could only gauge the Senator’s persona from rather combative media grabs. How wrong was I? A thoroughly engaging, relaxed and memorable conversation.

Philip Forrest

You have some new Board members. Scott Speedie (Managing Director & Country Head, Singapore for Commonwealth Bank of Australia), Teena Pisarev (CEO Icon for SOC Singapore), Ben Vella (Head of Growth Markets and Digital Customer Hub, Asia for Telstra) & Prerana Mehta (Senior Trade and Investment Comimissioner A/g Singapore for Australian Trade and Investment Commission Singapore) have been welcomed.

Derek MacKenzie

Your Board is considering a range of changes to reflect prevailing governance standards. AustCham has come a long way from its origins in the late ‘70’s to the professionally influential organisation of today. Questions of Board member tenure limits, terms of office, Board size and diversity are all on the table. I will up-date you on progress in the next issue of Access Asia.

Teena Pisarev

Honorary Life Member

Freya Hone

Commonwealth Bank of Australia

designphase dba

Prerana Mehta

Australian Trade and Investment Commission Singapore

Icon SOC Singapore

Guy Scott

Cumming Corporation

Scott Speedie

Commonwealth Bank of Australia

Ian Cummin President

Benjamin Tan Qantas Airways

Fraser Thompson AlphaBeta

Annette Tilbrook

PLATINUM SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS

BRONZE SPONSORS

AT Asia Advisory Pte Ltd

Ben Vella Telstra


A MESSAGE FROM THE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CONTENTS Welcome to the second edition of Access Asia for 2018, and my first since returning from maternity leave in January. What a great and exciting time it is to be back in the office. Our first event in January was a visit from Australia’s Defence Industry Minister, Christopher Pyne (who I remember from my days at ABC Radio where I had the sometimes tricky task of chasing down the Minister for interviews). It was a pleasure to welcome him to a lunch event with over 120 leaders of the Australian business community to hear him speak about the opportunities for business as part of the Government’s newly released Defence Export Strategy. The following week was our annual ANZ Australia Day Ball and what a fantastic night it was. Our hard working team, led by Cecilia and Ashlley, worked tirelessly day and night to deliver another spectacular event. Now we begin working on next year’s plans… This edition of Access Asia explores the broad issue of education, focusing on the trends and developments we are seeing emerge in this space. We have articles on a wide range of topics including: •

Preventing financial crime through education (pg 16)

Shifts in technological trends and workforce demographics (pg 14)

Digital training programs (pg 18)

The importance of risk management programs in schools (pg 20)

Thank you to each of our contributors who are all experts in their field. I am also pleased to introduce a new section to Access Asia: Foreign Policy Updates. In this section we will explore important foreign policy matters from both the Australian and Singapore governments to keep you, the Australian and Singapore business community, up to date on any major issues. Finally, I would like to thank Elissa Maloney who was Acting Executive Director during my time out of the office. Through her time at AustCham, Elissa showed professionalism and dedication to the Chamber and our members. Elissa has returned home to Australia but we hope to see her in Singapore again in the future.

Kate Baldock Executive Director

6

FOREIGN POLICY UPDATES

8

ASK THE EXPERT

12

SUCCESSFUL DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION

14

BEING FUTURE READY FOR THE BRAVE NEW WORLD

16

PREVENTING FINANCIAL CRIME THROUGH EDUCATION

18

SKILLS FOR SUCCESS

20

IMPORTANCE OF RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION

22

UPCOMING EVENTS

23

OUT & ABOUT

27

PLATINUM SPONSORS

28

GOLD CORPORATE MEMBERS

29

NEW MEMBERS

32

MEMBERSHIP CARD OFFERS

34

NEWSFLASH


FOREIGN POLICY UPDATES

THE NEXT GENERATION HAS A

FOREIGN POLICY UPDATES

NEW PLACE

TO LEARN

ASEAN-AUSTRALIA SPECIAL SUMMIT On 17-18 March 2018, Australian Prime Minister the Hon. Malcolm Turnbull MP will welcome Leaders of the Member States of ASEAN and the Secretary-General of ASEAN to the ASEAN-Australia Special Summit in Sydney.

AND GROW

This will be the first time that Australia has hosted a Summit in Australia with ASEAN Leaders. The summit is an historic and unprecedented opportunity to strengthen Australia’s strategic partnership with ASEAN, and deliver tangible economic and security benefits to Australia. As a group, ASEAN is Australia’s third largest trading partner. Business elements of the summit, including the SME Conference on 16 March will provide Australian businesses a unique opportunity to tap into expertise and obtain advice from regional specialists, business leaders, and successful exporters. REGISTRATION FOR THE SME CONFERENCE IS NOW OPEN – see https://aseanaustralia.pmc.gov.au/ for more information and to register.

AUSTRALIA DEFENCE EXPORT STRATEGY AustCham hosted a lunch on 18 January for Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP. At the lunch, Minister Pyne spoke to AustCham members and guests about the Australian Government’s defence industry, and also announced the release of a Defence Export Strategy. On 29 January, Minister Pyne launched the Defence Export Strategy which aims to make Australia one of the top ten global defence exporters within the next decade.

Stamford American International School's new Early Learning Village provides children with the best start in life.

The new strategy includes: •

A new Australian Defence Export Office. The Office will work hand-in-hand with Austrade and the Centre for Defence Industry Capability to coordinate a whole-of-government efforts, providing a focal point for defence exports.

A new Australian Defence Export Advocate to provide high-level advocacy for defence exports and work across industry and government to ensure efforts are coordinated.

A $3.8 billion Defence Export Facility administered by Efic, Australia’s export credit agency. This will help Australian companies get the finance they need to underpin the sales of their equipment overseas. It will provide confidence to Australian Defence industry to identify and pursue new export opportunities knowing Efic’s support is available when there is a market gap for defence finance.

The world is changing. Education is changing. Today, how children learn is as important as what they learn. And that’s the inspiration behind our extraordinary new Early Learning Village, which has been built entirely for curious little learners aged 18 months to 6 years. Architecturally designed with input from environmental psychologists and inspired by Reggio Emilia philosophy, every detail about the Early Learning Village has been designed to help the next generation thrive in an exciting new world. Come and see for yourself the difference this purpose-built environment can make to your child’s vital pre-school years. Our Village doors are always open for a private or group tour, by our friendly Admissions team. Simply register at sais.edu.sg.

$20 million per year to implement the Defence Export Strategy and support defence industry exports, including $6.35 million to develop and implement strategic multi-year export campaigns, an additional $3.2 million to enhance and expand the Global Supply Chain program, and an additional $4.1 million for grants to help build the capability of small and medium enterprises to compete internationally.

21/2/2016 – 20/2/2020

August 10, 2014 to August 9, 2018 6 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

Join Our Community +65 6653 7907


ASK AN EXPERT

AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

GEMS WORLD ACADEMY

ANDRE CASSON

RICHARD HENRY

Richard Henry Head of School Gems World Academy

You took up your role as Head of School at GEMS World Academy in 2017. What drew you to this role?

Can you name three skills that graduates from secondary school should look to build?

I was fortunate to be offered the position as Head of School at GEMS World Academy (Singapore) at a time of growth for the school and the foundation for excellence in education has been established. One of the key attractions to the role for me was the opportunity to lead the school in a way that facilitates the best quality teaching and learning. This will ensure our children are exposed to a wide variety of educational opportunities which are well grounded as best practice for today’s learners. Another drawcard for me to GEMS (Singapore) is the truly international nature of the school community. This combined with the fact that we are one of the few schools in Singapore to offer a continuum of IB programmes is something very special and rings true to my beliefs for education. Delivering a world-class curriculum in such a wonderful facility as GEMS in Singapore is a great privilege as it is to work with our outstanding teachers. There is also such a vibrant community of parents which makes working here a true pleasure. Having spent most of my 30-year career in Australia and Indonesia it is also a pleasure to be back in Asia once again after my time working in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and the USA.

Creativity, entrepreneurialism and innovative skills are the foundations of the taught curriculum at GEMS World Academy (Singapore). These skills are critical for our student’s future. When one hears estimations like 65% of all jobs in the future don’t currently exist, these three skills are going to be critical for future success as active, engaged members of the community and workforce.

Your experience in education spans more than three decades. Has the delivery of education evolved, and what do you predict for the future? There has been a significant shift in pedagogical practices. Focussing on content and setting exams so that students simply recall knowledge is not the best preparation for the future of our children. More and more educational systems and institutions are coming around to fixing this. Focussing on key 21st-century skills, communication, collaboration, creativity, innovation is of paramount importance. It was this fact that drew me to the International Baccalaureate with its emphasis on the whole child and development of life-long learning whilst focussing on skills and attitudes.

8 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

What is coming up at GEMS that we should keep an eye out for? We are about to embark on a new strategic plan, which is united by a focus on innovation. The design cycle is a key element of this initiative and will be the catalyst for much of the construction of our students’ creative thinking, practical problem solving and decision-making. To lead in this area of education, GEMS (Singapore) is embarking on a large development project. We have already started creating our plans for a design centre which will be equipped with the latest educational resources. Once completed, this centre will be a hub for the future “technopreneurs” and artists. The new design centre will be an inspirational space for students to stretch their thinking and create exciting but practical solutions for their future. Leading the way in this endeavour is the launch of the GEMS Young Technopreneurs Challenge 2018. The event aims to support students to take ownership of the world they live in and actively develop solutions to the UN Global Goals. By providing expert advice and mentorship, combined with skills development and training, we hope to empower students to become problem solvers, innovators and entrepreneurs. For more information visit http://innovationchallenge.sg/

Do you approach education differently in Asia than you do in Australia?

Andre Casson Head of School Australian International School

You joined the Australian International School in 2012, and have recently taken up a new role as Head of School. Can you tell us about your new role and your vision for AIS? The Head of School position is similar to the role occupied by a Headmaster or Headmistress in an independent school in Australia. The role encompasses the oversight for all aspects of the School – academic and operational. To that end it is largely strategic in nature but I cannot see myself moving too far from my involvement with the students and the staff. I am a teacher at heart so these interactions will always form an important part of any position I may occupy. It is my ambition that AIS is a school in which everyone in our community – students, parents and staff – will be the best version of themselves so that they are inspired to make a difference for good. We seek to do this through exceptional programs that support each aspect of an individual’s growth – mind, body and soul. The success of an AIS education has its foundation in the talented people with whom I work each day. It is my job to remove the barriers that impede them from providing a truly holistic education to all of our students.

Working in an international school provides an interesting paradox for an educator. While we reside here in Singapore, a country renowned for a high-quality education, we still take our educational philosophy from our country of origin – in the case of AIS, Australia. That is not to say that we do not learn from the wonderful work being done in the education sector here nor do we not seek to take advantage of the wonderful location that we have in Asia. What we strive to do is to take what is best from our location and add it to the tapestry of our community with the ambition of creating something greater than the sum of the parts. I believe the biggest difference to the approach in education when working out of Australia lies more in the nature of the students that come through our doors. As expatriates, they have a unique view of the world that differs from their colleagues in Australia. They are worldlier in their outlook and more open to new experiences and cultures. To cater for this different outlook the School seeks to develop a program that is outwardly looking that builds on the strengths of our community.

The new AIS Early Learning Village is a child sized campus that has been thoughtfully designed. Can you tell us some more about it? The AIS Early Learning Village (ELV) is a wonderful structure. It is a building created with the education of our youngest students in mind. Every design feature has been considered with students of six years of age and younger as their only focus – a unique perspective in many schools. Most significantly the design of the building enhances our Reggio Emilia inspired PYP Program. I am always in awe when I see the learning that is achieved in our ELV through the seamless link of structure, program and design. Not with standing this amazing building, as is always the case in education, it is the people that truly make the educational experience for the students

come to life. Our brilliant ELV staff have utilized this remarkable facility to create a learning environment that is beyond peer. They have developed innovative processes to link the unique nature of the structure to the programs we have developed which has greatly enhanced the education of our youngest students. It truly is a wondrous place.

What are skills that children should learn today to be able to perform jobs of the future? During the latter half of 2017 I was granted a sabbatical from AIS to attend the Harvard Business School where I completed the General Management Program. One of the key themes of this course was the importance of innovation and how we “future proof” ourselves in an ever-changing world. One of my lecturers, Professor Linda Hill, spoke about “The Future of Jobs Report” that was presented at the World Economic Forum at Davos in January 2016. The key aspects of this report, which were shared by Professor Hill, focused on those essential skills that employers will be looking for in their teams of the future. Absent from this list were the traditional job specific qualifications – these are seen as a “license to play” for future employees. The ability to be a complex problem solver, to think critically, to provide creative solutions and display cognitive flexibility all while exhibiting superior emotional intelligence and people management skills were seen as crucial for future career success. I was heartened by these findings. Teaching and Learning at AIS focuses on these “soft skills” while still maintaining appropriate academic rigour in order to effectively prepare our students for success in their future careers. Our programs of study afford our students with many opportunities to develop these skills in their daily interactions with their peers and their teachers. These are the competencies that allow our students to embark on an unknown tomorrow armed with the skills that can be called upon no matter what their context or potential career path.

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 9


JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY

DALE ANDERSON

Dale Anderson Deputy Vice Chancellor, Head of Singapore Campus James Cook University

Can you tell us about your career to date, and how you started working for James Cook University? I have worked in the education industry all my life, predominantly in the Queensland Public Service. My career spans across different sectors – from primary schools, to secondary schools, vocational colleges, special education institutions, senior regional administration positions and various roles in universities. I started as a primary teacher and actually taught seven grades in a rural one-teacher school for two years in the early part of my career. After returning to full time study, I worked as a school counsellor before moving into quality assurance and leadership positions. I spent a short time as a senior lecturer in education at James Cook University but returned to the Queensland Public Service where I became a member of the Senior Executive Service of the Queensland Government. I held the positions of Regional Director in the Department of Employment and Training, Project Director in the Department of State Development and Trade, and Institute Director at TAFE.

10 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

In 2006, I was the Institute Director of a large multi-campus TAFE college in Far North Queensland when I heard that JCU was looking for someone to lead its offshore campus in Singapore. Four weeks later, I was in Singapore. The most enjoyable part of my career was seeing James Cook University Singapore grow from a small school in a high rise building in Bukit Merah to what it is today, a leading education institution in Singapore. During that time, I have had the pleasure of working with a wonderful team of people at the Singapore Campus and interacting with a range of communities across ASEAN and beyond.

What are some of JCU’s key achievements since the Singapore campus opened in 2003? JCU in Singapore has established itself as a quality educational organisation. We have the highest accreditation available in EduTrust Star along with Singapore Quality Class Star. We have also established our campus as a premium provider of quality higher education in Asia. Our psychology program is one of the strongest in Asia and we have taught the Doctor of Psychology here for over ten years. The student experience at JCU is something of which I am very proud. Students are at the heart of everything we do. Our focus of putting students first has ensured that student outcomes have been very strong and compelling. Our greatest achievement is however, the human talent we have developed through our graduates. JCU Singapore graduates now hold high-level positions throughout the world and take their place as leaders in many industries. Indeed, many of our own graduates work at James Cook University and are an integral part of its success.

JCU has campuses in Australia and Singapore. How is Australian education regarded overseas? Australian education is highly regarded and is considered one of the big three along with the US and the UK. In Australia, we regulate education effectively and in Singapore, the Australian product benefits from the strong regulatory

framework that Australia maintains along with the standards set by the Singapore Government.

What could we expect to see from JCU in 2018? In 2018, we will dramatically increase our research capability. We now have a new Dean for Research and we are developing strong partnerships with research organisations in Singapore. James Cook University Singapore has recently constructed aquaculture laboratories and recruited a number of researchers to work in Singapore. The Singapore campus will now offer PhDs across the board. Previously we only offered PhDs in psychology. My greatest expectation is that James Cook University Singapore will continue to engage strongly with the Australian Community as well as all aspects of the Singapore Community, its businesses and industries. Our students will play a major role in the community as volunteers and our staff and students will benefit from being part of the vibrant economy of Singapore and the learning that integration of business and community can foster.


INSIGHT

SUCCESSFUL DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION JODIE COLLINS Managing Director Re.Digital

HOW TO DELIVER A SUCCESSFUL DIGITAL TRAINING PROGRAMME TO DRIVE YOUR DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION Technology adoption has changed the way people make decisions forever, and it’s the businesses making a shift to a digital approach to marketing who are going to be successful in future. Whether you’re a business selling direct to consumers or whether your ‘consumer’ is actually a business decision maker, they are now completely in control. With the advent of digital technology and a smartphone in every pocket, people are doing most of their research on their own terms before they’ll even engage with your business. At every stage of the decision cycle they’re going online to research, compare and review your product or service against others. Having an effective digital business and marketing strategy has become critical. But making this digital transformation can be difficult. How do you undergo a successful digital transformation in how you market to and engage with customers? Success digital transformation in a business requires a cultural shift as well as building the right digital skills in the team. It’s not just about inviting a trainer in to conduct a training programme on how to use Facebook for your marketing. Digital transformation requires rethinking business processes, how you connect with consumers and really understanding your customer deeply, what moves and motivates them so that you can create content that connects with them online. So any training and upskilling programme should be closely tied to your strategy.

5. Appoint champions in the business who can own different areas of digital

With the rapid pace of change in digital and technology it sometimes feels impossible to keep up with it all. Split up the massive task of knowing everything in digital and ask for people in your team to own different topic areas eg data-driven marketing vs social media and content marketing. Then ensure there are opportunities for people to share their knowledge.

6. Implement a reverse mentorship programme because the consumer has already changed how they’re using technology. It is possible for trainers to come in and deliver a programme of skills training for your teams, however the most successful trainings I’ve been involved with are those that are deeply linked to the business strategy and are ongoing programmes rather than one-off sessions. Shift to a complete focus on the customer at the heart of your marketing planning. Before you decide on the area you want to train, ensure you really understand how your customer is using technology, as well as what their key drivers are, so that you are focusing on how best to engage them.

2. Build training programmes with real-life practical

Pair up a senior executive with a more junior executive who is a digital native and can guide the senior person on how to use different types of digital marketing activities. The only way to truly understand changes in digital is to use the different platforms. The above suggestions apply to how you can make your training programme impactful now and after implementation. Marketing has been the focus here as it’s often one of the earlier areas for a business to start thinking about digital transformation, with the consumer demanding a different way of engaging with businesses. But these points apply across other areas of digital business transformation too. The final comment is to get on board now. While this digital transformation may seem daunting, the pace of change is going to continue to pick up, so what’s most important is just to get started.

application

Combine your training programme with an ongoing consulting or coaching programme. Real understanding in learning technology and digital skills only occurs when able to practice these skills – even better if it’s tied directly to a real-life scenario or small test project. Working with a partner who more closely understands your business needs and tailors the training content to your specific company’s objectives and include practical follow up projects for people to try out their new skills, makes for a far more impactful skills shift as well as a more engaging programme for learners.

3. Develop a willingness to test and learn in your

"Digital transformation requires rethinking business processes, how you connect with consumers and really understanding your customer deeply..." HOW DO YOU DELIVER A SUCCESSFUL DIGITAL MARKETING TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

1. Closely link the business’s digital transformation plans to the digital training outcomes

Ensure this is clearly determined up front. If unknown, it may need work to establish how open senior management is to driving a digital transformation in the business. Marketing is often one of the front-runner functions to drive transformation 12 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

business and be open to failure

Allow your teams to test their new skills using small projects. Implement testing programmes to focus on new ways of working and ensure that the feedback loop is closed, so that you’re collecting data about what’s working or not, not just throwing ideas out there.

4. Develop curiosity in the business as an ongoing programme

Digital marketing and technology are in a constant state of flux. You will never be able to train everyone on all the changes, you need to encourage people in the team to seek out some information on their own. Create a culture of curiosity by arranging time to discuss changes, learnings and new ways of working outside of the training programme.

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 13


BEING FUTURE-READY FOR THE BRAVE NEW WORLD

ALVIN LOW Industry Relations Manager National University of Singapore

DR ANN-MARIE LEW Associate Director National University of Singapore

The global economy has undergone much turmoil with major restructurings across multiple sectors such as banking and finance, energy and shipping to name a few. With the advent of big data analytics, artificial intelligence, robotics, 3D-printing, biotechnology, cloud and mobile computing accelerating the pace of change, companies are scrambling to re-orientate their strategic growth plans or face disruption to their business models. We are entering a brave new world. Millennials – those born between 1982 and 2000 - are facing an increasingly “VUCA” world of VOLATILITY, UNCERTAINTY, COMPLEXITY and AMBIGUITY. There are currently about 1.2 million millennials in Singapore comprising 22% of the resident population and forming the largest generation in the workforce today, estimates human resource firm Adecco. According to a Channel NewsAsia report dated February 2016, this segment is estimated to make up 75% of the workforce in the next decade. With a structural shift in technological trends and workforce demographics, what do companies in Asia look for in graduate hires? What do millennials in turn seek and expect in a career and employer? At the NUS Centre for Futureready Graduates (CFG), we delved deep into these issues to yield relevant strategic insights for all stakeholders – government, employers, students and parents alike.

CFG Future-ready Index Resilience Ability to bounce back from adversities or stress. Curiosity Desire to seek new experiences, and embracing of novelty, uncertainty, and unpredictability. Adaptability Ability to adjust thoughts and behaviors to changing circumstances. Insight Clear understanding of one’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviours. Empathy Ability to understand and share another’s perspective. Emotional Sensing Ability to read and manage emotions in self and others. Entrepreneurial Thinking An entrepreneurial mindset to spot and seize opportunities Pursuing Convictions Pursuing what you believe in, and overcoming obstacles. Vision: Seeking to contribute and to improve situations of self and

FUTURE-READY SKILLS: WHAT EMPLOYERS WANT According to the World Economic Forum’s “The Future of Jobs” report, “the Fourth Industrial Revolution … will cause widespread disruption not only to business models but also to labour markets over the next five years, with enormous change predicted in the skill sets needed to thrive in the new landscape.” In the face of increasing automation, soft skills are the key differentiator to cope with these seismic economic shifts. In order to discover first-hand what employers want, CFG embarked on a research journey in early-2016 by conducting focus groups comprising a mix of 35 C-suite leaders, human resource directors and business heads from diverse organisations across public and private sectors. We identified key mindsets and competencies which the industry valued in talents, and further surveyed 315 industry professionals who confirmed the importance of these soft skills to employers. We then combed the academic literature to compile an assessment tool aimed at evaluating these essential domains; and administered it to 4,250 NUS undergraduates in order to test its validity and to examine the profiles of our students. This research process culminated in the creation of our unique CFG Futureready Index, comprising nine domains of soft skills which employers find essential, as shown below. It serves as a benchmark for any organisation looking to assess and enhance the soft skills competencies of their employees.

WORKPLACE CULTURE FACTORS: WHAT MILLENNIALS WANT Millennials are looking for more than just pleasant working conditions and a good salary from their employers - these factors have become an expectation, rather than a motivator. According to a Deloitte report dated 2015, millennials are seeking organisations with “a strong sense of purpose that is also closely linked to positive organizational performance”. From our meta-analysis undertaken of existing research combined with student interviews, several factors were identified as being the most important factors for millennials in choosing a career and staying with an employer: Purpose Millennials want to be engaged in meaningful work that resonates with them personally Growth Millennials want to work for organisations that support their desire for continued life-long learning and personal development

Autonomy Non-hierarchical organisational structures facilitate a sense of freedom to choose the way millennials like to work and achieve outcomes. Collaboration Millennials value cooperative rather than competitive climates, enabling diverse people to work con¬structively together, and achieve more than individually possible. Well-being Millennials cherish work-life integration, where they have the flexibility to choose when or where to work, in order to achieve both personal and professional goals. Trust Millennials value a culture where leaders are transparent and consistent in their conduct, and authentic in their interactions. This enables psychological safety at the workplace where employees

WORKPLACE CULTURE FACTORS: WHAT MILLENNIALS WANT In our survey of students, we found that they most valued a workplace culture of “Trust” “Growth”, “Well-being”, and “Purpose”. NUS millennials want to do meaningful work that allows them to grow personally and professionally, within an organisational culture that they can trust, be engaged and feel valued. The key question for employers to ask themselves is, “Are we providing a culture and climate that will attract and retain top talent?” We seek to shed more light on this important theme through follow-up research by collaborating closely with industry partners and continuing our research with students. The Centre for Future-ready Graduates (CFG) is a first-of-its kind centre developing programmes that contribute to holistic education to equip students for successful future careers and enabling them to lead happy and meaningful lives. We collaborate closely with industry partners to develop future-ready global talent - to cultivate personal leadership, promote societal contribution and connect students to their future beyond NUS. At CFG, we serve to bridge the gap between what employers want and what our millennial talents seek; and vice versa. We facilitate the talent acquisition and employer branding needs of our industry partners; and welcome employers to register for an account on our NUS TalentConnect portal: https://nus-csm.symplicity.com to post internship (both local and overseas) and graduate job opportunities.

Challenge Millennials are not content with roles that are too comfortable. They look to be stretched, and to take on opportunities to innovate and be creative.

14 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 15


PREVENTING FINANCIAL CRIME THROUGH EDUCATION CHRIS DOUGLAS Director Malkara Consulting Singapore

During the past decade there has been a seismic shift in financial crime enforcement that is having a significant impact on many businesses throughout the world. And while enforcement action has primarily been initiated in North America and Europe, the Asia Pacific region has not been immune. And it is expected that this trend will increase worldwide as countries respond to international criticism about their responses to financial crime, and new global standards are adopted and implemented.

the machines. Organised crime saw an opportunity and pumped large sums of alleged drug money through them. CBA is now facing a potential fine of AUD1.1 billion.

Two major areas of financial crime receiving increasing attention from regulators and law enforcement agencies are corruption and money laundering. Often regarded by many in the financial crime compliance industry as being separate disciplines. A symbiotic relationship exists between them, they are linked.

Understanding criminal networks, capabilities and cultural change can be achieved through training. But the training must be effective. To ensure compliance with AML regulations, many institutions implemented computer based learning which is designed to protect the organisation by preventing staff from breaching those regulations. The training is not designed to counter money laundering techniques used by criminal groups or about the specialised crime groups that now exist to launder money on behalf of other crime groups. These money laundering facilitation groups are a significant emerging trend and they pose a serious threat to regional and global financial systems. They know the law, the AML compliance systems and their weaknesses. These sophisticated, networked and capable crime groups have been a fundamental shift in how financial crime operates which has been largely ignored by business.

Drivers of money laundering compliance has been the amended standards published by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) which call for countries and therefore companies operating within them, to implement anti-money laundering measures which are effective. Many companies are not working towards implementing AML procedures that are effective due to the absence of any push coming from changes to domestic AML laws. However, since HSBC was fined $1.92 billion in 2012 for failing to implement an effective anti-money laundering programme, large international companies have invested millions in implementing new compliance procedures and in recruiting and training new staff. Disappointingly, most countries and companies still treat money laundering prevention as a compliance issue. Something for the legal department and teams of AML compliance and monitoring personnel to address. But preventing financial crime is not entirely a compliance issue. To achieve effectiveness, company boards, managers and staff need to understand that preventing financial crime requires an understanding of how organised crime works. And that will not happen until there is a change of culture within many organisations. An example of how criminals outsmarted a large organisation is the recent action initiated against the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) by the Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC). CBA installed intelligent deposit machines and it is alleged by AUSTRAC that it failed to assess the risk of criminals using

The action by AUSTRAC and the firestorm it has caused in financial circles, has brought changes to the CBA board. And a separate investigation has been launched into the culture at the bank. And it appears it could have been prevented.

Criminals know that AML laws have been shaped by competing groups with financial institutions being opposed to any measure which they regard as an impost on business. And that those laws therefore have gaps which can be exploited. And if the culture of an organisation is more focused on making money than on preventing it being targeted and used by criminals, then the path for criminal groups involved in laundering money and committing other financial crimes, is a lot easier. And the culture of ignorance about organised crime is widespread. Countries that have low level street crime, for example Singapore, tend to view low crime as meaning no crime and organised crime, including those involved in money laundering, does not exist. Ignoring the obvious tentacles of organised criminal behaviour that exist, for example, are the numerous massage parlours that operate throughout Singapore which are mainly staffed by girls from China. Recently FATF advised Singapore that it needs to learn more about transnational money laundering networks and be proactive

in identifying and addressing foreign predicate money laundering offences. An obvious warning that the city state is ignoring the threat international organised crime poses to the country. Education would play a major role in enhancing Singapore’s response to international crime groups. And firms operating in countries like Singapore need to understand that the criminal money laws of some countries have extra territoriality. For example, Australia’s criminal money laundering laws which contain the harshest penalties in the world, up to 25 years imprisonment, apply to Australian citizens and companies anywhere in the world and to any person, no matter where they live, if they engage in money laundering activity which harms Australia. A person can be convicted of money laundering if they are reckless or negligent. The law is designed to attack professionals engaged in money laundering on behalf of criminal groups, including those who turn a blind eye to the activity.

Chris Douglas is a Director at Malkara Consulting Singapore. He is a former Australian police officer with the elite Australian Federal Police (AFP) for 31 years. Whilst there, he was involved in drug trafficking, people smuggling, human trafficking, corruption, organised crime and fraud investigations. His extensive experience in the investigation of money laundering and in the conduct of financial investigations including the tracing and recovery of funds laundered offshore has made him a soughtafter trainer in the field of money laundering and corruption around the world.

A head in the sand culture also exists in the prevention of bribery and corruption. Organisations are ignoring the threat to them of being a victim of corruption or becoming involved in a corruption scandal. Organisations are blind to the threat posed to their wealth and to their information. And in this age of data, the latter is becoming more important, to criminal groups and foreign intelligence agencies. The well published theft of data from LGT Group, HSBC Switzerland and Credit Suisse Switzerland has not shaken firms who were not victims out of their complacency. Being involved in a corruption scandal can be more damaging than being a victim. Not just to a firm’s reputation but also in monetary terms. It is not possible to prevent all corruption, but it can be substantially reduced. One measure that is effective in preventing an organisation being involved in corruption is to train board members, all managers and staff not only in anti-corruption policies but also in why they should not engage in corruption and how corruption is committed. Again, the training cannot be a tick and flick exercise designed to protect the organisation from being prosecuted. It must be thorough, practical and targeted towards the weakest links identified in a risk assessment. Implementing the International Standard ISO 37001 Anti-Bribery Management Systems would go a long way to target hardening an organisation from being a victim and a perpetrator of corruption. When it comes to preventing financial crime, training has an important role to perform. Unfortunately, it is often being done on the cheap and some organisations are now paying a substantially high price. If an organisation wants to be effective and demonstrate its commitment to human development goals and values, then there can be no skimping. No short cuts. Those that do not learn from the mistakes of the past are forced to repeat them. And unless cultures change in many organisations and effective practical training is implemented; then we can expect to hear of more organisations being prosecuted for breaches of financial crime regulations.

“TO ACHIEVE EFFECTIVENESS, COMPANY BOARDS, MANAGERS AND STAFF NEED TO UNDERSTAND THAT PREVENTING FINANCIAL CRIME REQUIRES AN UNDERSTANDING OF HOW ORGANISED CRIME WORKS. “

16 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 17


SKILLS FOR SUCCESS Investing in skills could be the key to attracting and retaining top talent.

JAMES CHOLES Academic Manager Professional Development Centre British Council

JOE TOFIELD Sales and marketing manager Professional Development Centre British Council

How happy are your staff? If you do business in Singapore then perhaps they aren’t as happy as you think. A 2018 report by JobStreet.com revealed that 45 per cent of Singaporeans are unhappy at work, and that a lack of career development opportunities and training are key factors in this. “When their career trajectories stagnate”, says JobStreet Country Manager Chew Siew Mee, “employees do not derive any form of satisfaction and may begin to resent their jobs.” She advises that “to retain outstanding performers, there is a need to give them new challenges…so that they can grow their skillsets.” But what do these new challenges look like? And how can you best help your staff to develop their skillsets?

CET AND SKILLSFUTURE

Fortunately for all businesses in Singapore, the government places a high premium on this investment in skills. The Ministry of Manpower’s Continuing Education and Training (CET) Masterplan, for example, aims to ‘ensure a competitive and resilient workforce’ by developing ‘an integrated, high-quality system of education and training that responds to constantly evolving industry needs.’ SkillsFuture, too, was created to promote ‘a culture…of lifelong learning through the pursuit of skills mastery.’ The government has also encouraged individuals to ‘take ownership’ of their professional development with a S$500 training grant.

THE ROLE OF BUSINESS

What role do companies have to play in all of this? In Singapore we’ve seen that employee expectations are only increasing. An example of this is the lack of enthusiasm for more traditional ‘business’ courses on the SkillsFuture portal, with Singaporeans instead opting for courses catering to their personal interests. There is still the expectation from many Singaporean workers that their employers should be providing training and development for ‘work’ skills. This puts added pressure on companies – and especially SMEs – who may struggle to fulfil this need with limited budgets and resources.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?

One of the implications of ‘responding to constantly evolving industry needs’ is that employees will now expect to work for an employer that invests in them, an employer that, to borrow Richard Branson’s old adage, trains people well enough so they can leave (while also treating them well enough so they don’t want to). This is especially true for Millennials who already account for over 35% of the global workforce. Millennials want what we all want – purpose, meaningful work and a feeling of progression. The challenge for businesses, especially in developed countries, is how to provide this when there may be fewer opportunities for promotion or moving to new roles.

One of these is that staff can assume a much larger role in the organisation and often end up doing 2 or 3 jobs at once. Supplementing this with structured training in these different areas will provide a sense of development and progression without having to promote or offer pay rises (which only offer short term benefits). As a result, employees are more likely to feel valued and may resist moving to a larger organisation in case they lose this level of development and support.

TRAINING FOR THE FUTURE

With businesses realising the need to invest in skills training for their staff (either internally or by using external providers) the question becomes how best to do this? As it happens there are a range of both ‘quick wins’ and longer-term investments:

James Choles has been a corporate trainer for over 10 years, in the UK, China, Sri Lanka and Singapore, and is Academic Manager at the British Council’s Professional Development Centre (PDC). He leads on major projects such as the implementation of the UK’s Chartered Management Institute (CMI) programmes in Singapore. Joe Tofield is the PDC’s Business Development Manager and the British Council’s Diversity and Inclusion Lead. He specialises in providing tailored solutions to organisations’ learning and development needs. To contact James or Joe: pdc-enquiry@britishcouncil.org.sg

Quick wins • Introducing a calendar of training events that staff can apply for • Making use of WSQ and other government grants • Measuring the effectiveness of training (and any gaps) through customer satisfaction surveys and 360° feedback • Arranging coaching for senior leaders • Holding managers to account for providing their teams with training and development throughout the year Long term investments • Creating leadership development programmes • Developing personalised learning plans for every member of staff • Using scoring matrices (with detailed breakdowns of where gains have been made) to measure the effectiveness of the training • Exploring customised programmes with a mix of delivery methods (e.g. blended learning and coaching/mentoring) • Investing in qualifications for staff such as the CMI and CIPD diplomas in Management and HR There are a range of factors that determine your ability to attract and retain employees. With at least 69% of millennials wanting new skills on a continual basis (Deloitte Millennial Survey 2017), investing in training has the triple benefit of a more skilled workforce, greater engagement and an increased likelihood that your employees will stay. How will you invest in your staff to help your business thrive?

For MNCs, the answer can lie in developing leadership programmes with yearly intakes as well as providing an extensive calendar of training. For a better return on investment, these can be integrated with the performance management process so that both employees and their managers are held accountable for the upfront investment. This kind of development culture can also ensure that the value of lifelong learning is instilled in the entire business which should in turn increase staff engagement and motivation. SMEs will find providing this level of extensive training out of reach, but there a lots of advantages to a smaller, more dynamic work environment for staff. 18 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 19


THE IMPORTANCE OF RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION ALISON HUGHES Senior Consultant & Commercial Director Pace First Pty Ltd

Education is the key element in risk management, and risk management is a key element in education. What the defined risk is and the level of duty of care determines the education and other actions that are required. When it comes to education institutions the duty of care requirement is very high, especially those responsible for minors. Traditionally, education institutions work very hard to ensure that their environments are safe and secure. Today education institutions must review existing procedures to address increasing and emerging risks that pose catastrophic threats to staff and students. High level site security and emergency response management to prepare for and manage aggressive security incidents is no longer “a nice to have”. Existing plans need to be constantly reviewed in attempt to ensure that the worst never happens and if it does, the impact is minimised. Even in Singapore which is still one of the safest countries in the world we are seeing a big escalation in the education of the public in risk management in hostile situations. Risk levels are increasing and an incident is almost certainly inevitable. There is another element of risk management however that schools are still developing and one that is of key importance and long-term benefit to their staff and their students. Mindset has always been that “adults manage risk and take care of the students” but what happens if they can’t. Take for example a school that takes a group of students on a field trip to another country. Note that many schools take their students on educational field trips to countries with medium risk ratings so there is acknowledged and documented existing risk. Serious and even catastrophic incidents have occurred in the past and will so again. Currently arrangements, often through a third party tour provider, are made and logistics are mapped out and bookings made. Parents sign disclaimers and insurance is taken out. These days most likely a card with a number to call if you get into trouble is given to the supervising adults. Some schools employ risk management companies to assess these risks and plans are made accordingly. Supervising adults are briefed and everyone is feeling secure in the knowledge they have done everything to meet their duty of care. The tour begins, the children are with their supervisors enjoying their field trip and an incident occurs. It’s not an event that has been predetermined through the risk assessment and all of the supervising adults along with some children are killed or badly

injured. This could be as simple as a rock slide knocking out a bus, and as complex as a terrorist attack or severe natural disaster where infrastructure is taken out.

5 DAYS IN SINGAPORE CAN

The unharmed surviving children now need to manage themselves in a crisis situation, in a foreign country without adult assistance. They don’t speak the language, have little or no money and no communications as mobile phones were banned on the tour and/ or they don’t have the password to the teachers’ phones or the network is down anyway.

MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE with the International Company Directors Course

They are on their own. Some of the children have minor injuries and all of them are unprepared to deal with the situation. There was a key step that was missed in the preparation for this tour and it is now putting those children at a much higher risk and that is lack of education in risk management. If, for example, the children had been educated in how to manage themselves, and how to risk manage and cope in a crisis situation, their outcomes would be vastly improved.

Working across countries, cultures and regulatory frameworks is exhilarating but challenging. Suitable for directors and senior executives working in an international context, our flagship International Company Directors Course will help you better understand and navigate the complexities of international governance, based on global principles.

Educating our most valuable resource in risk management is not only smart, it’s necessary. More and more it is becoming imperative that they have these skills which they will utilise their entire life giving them the freedom to experience life with courage and confidence. It will also ensure that when something does happen, and in everyone’s life it will, they are prepared.

Over five days the important areas of directors’ duties, the international legal environment, risk and strategy, financial literacy and board effectiveness are explored and discussed, providing you with a deeper understanding of the risks, challenges and opportunities faced when operating internationally.

It’s just one more step in building a strong, resilient and capable future.

Upcoming dates: 14 to 18 May 2018 13 to 17 August 2018 19 to 23 November 2018

Today more than ever having a strong partner in Risk Management like PACE First working with you on your business is key to addressing these and many other risks. It also protects your business by ensuring you are legally covered, students or workforces can travel and operate safely and effectively in any environment, this gives you the freedom to expand experiences and/or business anywhere in the world. With the right preparation, management and an effective response that minimise losses, downtime, damage to reputation and brand and ensure best outcomes for your people if an incident occurs, it gives you confidence and a significant competitive advantage.

Contact us t: +61 2 8248 6600 e: international@aicd.com.au w: companydirectors.com.au/icdc

PACE FIRST is an independent risk, security, crisis and international services company helping organisations and individuals through consulting and a vetted global network to ensure they have the best Preparation, Assistance, Communication and Emergency (PACE) support globally.

20 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

-1_17

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 21


OUT & ABOUT

UPCOMING EVENTS MARCH 2018 Thursday, 15 March

Special Workshop: Employment Act

Thursday, 22 March

In Conversation with Kristian Livolsi EVENT SPONSOR

APRIL 2018 Tuesday, 27 March

Emerging Markets Panel Discussion:

Focus on the Greater Mekong EVENT SPONSOR

Thursday, 5 April

Special Workshop: Risk Management & Resilience Building Future Proofing

DECEMBER 2017

OUT & ABOUT XMAS DRINKS Thursday 7 December 2017

Over 130 guests joined us for a sold-out Xmas Drinks at La Brasserie, Fullerton Bay Hotel. AustCham members and guests enjoyed an evening of networking, free flow beer, wine and festive canapes. With thanks to event sponsors Commonwealth Bank and James Cook University Singapore, as well as venue sponsor Fullerton Bay Hotel.

Wednesday, 11 April

EVENT SPONSOR

Excellence in Leaders with Shayne Elliott, CEO of ANZ EVENT SPONSOR

VENUE SPONSOR

VENUE SPONSOR

Thursday, 19 April

In Conversation with Annette Edmondson

1

2

EVENT SPONSOR

VENUE SPONSOR

3

4

5

1.

Ian Cummin, Dale Anderson, Susan Cummin, Rodney Gillett and H.E. Bruce Gosper

2.

Mark Laudi and Graeme Robertson

3. 4. 5. 6.

David Dutton, Fiona Argyle and Scott Speedie Andrew Chew, Pinky Sibal, Consuelo Cofre Soto and Rajaneesh R. Kurup Daniel Tyson-Jones, Ray Dhillon, Alex Chua and John Ooi Anna Hughes, Sheridan Ingram, Simon Lieshout and Prerana Mehta

6

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT AUSTCHAM SINGAPORE Visit austcham.org.sg or contact us at info@austcham.org.sg

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 23


OUT & ABOUT

JANUARY 2018

JANUARY 2018

LUNCH WITH THE

Hon Christopher Pyne MP, Minister for Defence

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon. Christopher Pyne MP spoke to more than 120 AustCham members and guests about Australia’s defence industry, and the recently upgraded Singapore-Australia Free Trade Agreement. Special thanks to our event sponsors Icon SOC Singapore and Surbana Jurong, and wine sponsor Penfolds.

ANZ AUSTRALIA DAY BALL 2018 Saturday 27 January 2018

The highly-anticipated AustCham ANZ Australia Day Ball went off with a bang at Swissotel the Stamford, with nearly 900 members and guests joining together for an evening of celebration, networking, entertainment, free flow wine and beer and fine dining. AustCham would like to thank our sponsors and partners, who made such an event possible.

Thursday 18 January 2018

EVENT SPONSOR

EVENT SPONSOR

BAND FLOWN BY

WINE SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSORS

1

2

2

PHOTOGRAPHY & LOGISTICS SPONSOR

WINE SPONSOR

GOURMET SPONSOR

BEER SPONSOR

AUCTION SPONSORS

3

4 OFFICIAL PRESS PARTNER

DIGITAL COMMUNITY PARTNER

OFFICIAL MEDIA PARTNER

5

1.

Ian Cummin and The Hon. Christopher Pyne MP

2.

Teena Pisarev Joy

3.

Hari Poologasundram

4.

Bruce Gosper, Ian Cummin, The Hon. Christopher Pyne MP and Kate Baldock

5.

The Hon. Christopher Pyne MP and Paul Seaton

6.

Sunny Sng, Michael Buchanan and Stephen Forshaw

24 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

6

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 25


OUT & ABOUT

THANK YOU PLATINUM SPONSORS

JANUARY 2017

AustCham Singapore would like to thank our Platinum Sponsors for their support.

PLATINUM SPONSORS

26 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 27


THANK YOU GOLD CORPORATE MEMBERS

AustCham Singapore would like to thank our Gold Corporate Members for their support.

GOLD CORPORATE MEMBERS

NEW MEMBERS GOLD CORPORATE MEMBERS

CORPORATE MEMBERS

LEONIE RUEGG Business Development & Marketing Manager www.servcorp.com

ACCENTURE CHRISTOPHER WARREN Managing Director www.accenture.com

FARMERS MARKET PTE LTD EMMA PIKE Owner www.thefarmersmarket.com.sg

28 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

VISY SINGAPORE HEAQUARTERS PTE LTD

SERVCORP

BHUMIT AMIN Financial Controller www.visy.com.au

CENTRE FOR FUTURE-READY GRADUATES (NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE) ALVIN LOW Industry Relations Manager www.nus.edu.sg/cfg/

KERRY CONSULTING PTE LTD

MAZARS LLP

REDMOND O’SHEA Associate Director www.kerryconsulting.com

CHRIS FUGGLE Partner www.mazars.com.sg

CITY DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED EIK SHENG KWEK Chief Strategy Officer www.cdl.com.sg

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 29


NEW MEMBERS CORPORATE MEMBERS

SHANGRI-LA HOTEL, SINGAPORE JOSEPHINE PNG Director of Sales and Marketing www.shangri-la.com

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

PACE FIRST

RC HOTELS (PTE) LTD

ALISON HUGHES Commercial Director www.pacefirst.com

MARCUS HANNA General Manager www.fairmont.com

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS

BIPAN KAPUR General Manager www.shangri-la.com

ING BANK

ORACLE

PRADA

DONALD KOCH Executive www.appointmentgroup.com

PETER OCHMAN Digital Transformation Director www.oracle.com

SAMANTHA THERON Visual Merchandising Manager www.prada.com

STELLAR ASIA PACIFIC PTE LTD

REPUBLIC CONSULTING

SEEING MACHINES

THE APPOINTMENT GROUP

RICHARD MANN Senior Vice President www.stellarbpo.com

DAVID MAIR CEO www.republic.net..au

STEVEN FLETCHER Business Development Manager - APAC www.seeingmachines.com

VICTORIA HARTLEY Event Director www.appointmentgroup.com

ARTISAN FOOD SELECTION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD RICHARD LEONG CEO www.artisanselections.com

30 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

SHANGRI-LA HOTEL, SINGAPORE

PITCHER PARTNER LEON MOK Managing Director www.pitcher.com.au

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS

UOB

UBS WEALTH MANAGEMENT

STEPHANUS FISCHER Senior Vice President

ADAM KEITH MARTIN Director

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 31


TRAVEL

MEMBERSHIP CARD OFFERS Present your AustCham membership card and enjoy these benefits.

QANTAS Complimentary business class check-in for you at the Qantas lounge in Singapore

BUSINESS SERVICES AIMS IMMIGRATION SPECIALIST 15% discount on professional fee at AIMS Immigration Specialist CITY DEVELOPMENT LIMITED 10% discount on facilities and services at City Serviced Offices CLIFTONS 25% discount on room bookings GEEK TEAM ASIA 20% discount on all your technology support needs HMD Up to 50% off restoration services ISENTIA Up to 30% discount of standard rate card LAW IN ORDER Enjoy 15% off a range of business administrative services LEVEL3 A complimentary month of 'Community Membership' RUNNINGSTREAM 50% discount for the first year proprietary Portfolio Program SERVCORP Enjoy one month complimentary ‘The Virtual Office’ package

EDUCATION & TRAINING

HOTELS ANGSANA LANG CÔ Complimentary choice of one unlimited inclusion (golf/spa/dining) per day

FRASERS HOSPITALITY 20% off Best Flexible Rate at participating properties

BANYAN TREE LANG CÔ Stay 3 pay 2 Nights and enjoy the 3rd night free

THE FULLERTON HOTELS SINGAPORE 10% off the Fullerton Family Package

COMO THE TREASURY PERTH 10% off Friday and Saturday public rate FAR EAST HOSPITALITY Enjoy discounts on best available rates at Far East Hospitality Hotels in Singapore and TFE Hotels in Australia

RESTAURANTS ARTISAN BOULANGERIE CO. 17.5% off total bill

MEAT SMITH Exclusive all day happy hour drinks and 25% off all meat platters

CARLTON HOTEL SINGAPORE 20% off total bill at Café Mosaic, Tuxedo and Gravity Bar 10% off total dinner bill at Wah Lok Cantonese Restaurant

MEZZA9 15% discount on snacks at martini bar and party room, and food during lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch

GATTOPARDO 15% off A La Carte dishes JAXS BISTRO 10% off total bill

20% off all corporate training workshops

JW MARRIOT HOTEL SINGAPORE SOUTH BEACH Exclusive discount on dining and wellness priviledges

COALFACE DIALOGUE Special members’ rates on selected professional development program

MARINA MANDARIN SINGAPORE 15% off best available room rates and hotel managed restaurants & lounge

BRITISH COUNCIL

THE FULLERTON BAY HOTEL 10% off the Indulgence Room Package

MIKUNI & PREGO 20% off total bill MONTREUX JAZZ CAFE 20% off total bill and 15 % off Merchandise NOVOTEL SINGAPORE CLARKE QUAY 15% off total buffet food bill only at The Square Restaurant PARK REGIS Enjoy special rate for Corporate Seminar Package WHITEGRASS 20% off total bill at The Bar

GEMS WORLD ACADEMY SINGAPORE Priority discounts & preferential discounts for enrolments in the 2016-2017 academic year PM-PARTNERS Enjoy 20% off standard price of any public or in-house training course

RETAIL

SINGAPORE MANAGEMENT UNIVERSITY Receive 5% discount on selected SMU Executive Development Programmes

THE BESPOKE CLUB 15% off storewide including Bespoke Orders

WHITE LODGE Free trial class for your child at any one of eight centres throughout Singapore

EASTERN CARPETS Receive 10% discount on all carpet cleaning services

FINANCIAL SERVICES

INDIGO WINE CO Futher 10% off already discounted wine packs

PAY2HOME Enjoy money transfers to Australia for a flat fee of $15 (save 25%) QBE SINGAPORE 20% discount on personal lines including Home, Motor and Travel coverage

HEALTH SERVICES

NATURAL SPRINGS AUSTRALIA Receive one free 5-gallon bottle with every five bottles purchased

SHIVA DESIGNS 15% discount on purchases over $99 UOMO GROUP Exclusive discounts at UOMO Group, Brioni and Stefano Ricci WINE EXCHANGE ASIA $69 per bottle for cases of six Billecart-Salmon NV Champagne YES 20% off best wellness products including Tasmanian Honey

POP UP WINE Complimentary bottle of award winning wine with purchase of any 12 wines

ALL IN THE FAMILY COUNSELLING Enjoy special rates for counselling sessions DENTAL ESSENCE Special members’ rates for consultations GLOBALIS INTERNATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE AustCham members, both individuals and groups, now receive discounted rates on their international health insurance

TRANSPORT & RELOCATION SERVICES ALLIED PICKFORDS Offering AustCham members a special insurance premium of 3%

LIFESTYLE & ENTERTAINMENT BOUNCE SINGAPORE 10% off General Access Tickets EATPLAYLIVE 50% off the purchase price for 12 months access to EatPlayLive, Asia’s premier lifestyle app THE BRITISH CLUB Enjoy a Five Year Term Membership for only $6500+ VIRTUAL ROOM 15% off for AustCham members booking online

VISIT WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG FOR FULL DETAILS & CONDITIONS ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 33


NEWS FLASH New Business District in Singapore Takes Shape as Lendlease Tops Out First Office Tower at Paya Lebar Quarter Lendlease marked a significant milestone on 15 January 2018 with the topping out of the first office tower at Paya Lebar Quarter (PLQ), at a ceremony graced by the Minister for National Development Lawrence Wong. Leveraging Lendlease’s expertise in urban regeneration, the S$ 3.2 billion mixed-used development is a key catalyst to transform Paya Lebar into a bustling, pedestrian-friendly new city precinct and a dynamic business hub. PLQ has garnered strong interest and demand for its office and retail components. Over 50% of the available office space and 40% of the retail mall has either been leased, under final offer or in advanced negotiations. Park Place Residences, PLQ’s residential offering, also recorded strong sales, selling out half of all available units within one day during its Phase One launch last year.

Lendlease officiating the topping out of PLQ’s first office tower From left to right: Richard Paine, PLQ Managing Director, Lendlease; Associate Professor Fatimah Lateef, Member of Parliament for Marine Parade GRC, Geylang Serai Ward; Lawrence Wong, Minister for National Development and Second Minister for Finance; Tony Lombardo, Chief Executive Officer, Asia, Lendlease and Ng Hsueh Ling, Managing Director, Singapore and Chief Investment Officer, Asia, .

Mr Tony Lombardo, CEO, Asia, Lendlease, commented: “The significant market demand Lendlease has received for PLQ signals a sustained market appetite in Singapore for quality integrated business and lifestyle precincts underpinned by excellent public realm, superb connectivity and designed with people foremost in mind. PLQ represents the best of inclusive urban spaces and workplace ecosystems for seamless and vibrant lifestyles, where people want to work, live, dine and shop.”

Registration is NOW OPEN for the SME Conference Friday 16 March 2018 | 10.00am - 4.30pm | International Convention Centre, Sydney The SME Conference is a unique opportunity for Australian small-and-medium sized enterprises to tap into expertise and obtain advice from regional specialists, business leaders and successful exporters brought together to share their knowledge and insights. Expert facilitator, Ms Tamerlaine Beasley, will be the event’s master of ceremonies, overseeing a high profile line up of experts from diverse industry, government and business backgrounds.

The Qantas A380 returns to Singapore Flying to Sydney, Melbourne and London from 25 March 2018*. Choose from First, Business, Premium Economy or Economy. Fares available now. Book now at qantas.com Subject to Government and Regulatory approval.

*

34 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG

ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG 35


AUSSIE-RULES Skills for life

Ambition

Amelia IBDP Graduate 2017

Gabriel HSC Graduate 2017

Top 1% of all Australian students. University offers from Stanford, US and Oxford, UK

Top 1% in Australia for Legal Studies. Plans to study Marketing at Macquarie University

Emily Vocational Studies Graduate 2017 Top in the class score for Hospitality. Plans to study Marketing at a University in Sydney.

There’s no one route to success, so keep your options open How do you help students with a wide range of abilities, interests and ambitions achieve beyond their dreams? You provide them with unique curriculum choices, exceptional teaching support and an individualised educational experience that supports their personal path to success. Speak to our friendly Admissions Team to learn how our dynamic and engaging curriculum programs lead to success.

www.ais.com.sg +65 6653 7906

36 ACCESSASIA | WWW.AUSTCHAM.ORG.SG Australian International School Pte Ltd is registered by the Committee for Private Education (CPE), part of SkillsFuture Singapore (SSG). CPE Registration Number 199204405H. Period of Registration 6 July 2015 to 5 July 2019

Access Asia FebMar - Digital Copy  
Access Asia FebMar - Digital Copy  
Advertisement