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AGRIBUSINESS EDITION The Australian Chamber of Commerce Hong Kong and Macau 香港及澳門澳洲商會

ISSUE 181, 2016

Data: the Fertiliser for Agribiz Growth P.10

Australia Focus: Farming in 2050: Storing Carbon Could Help Meet Australia’s Climate Goals

P.14

Industry Insights Innovation and trends in Agribusiness

Special Feature: Rugby Sevens Lunch 2016 www.austcham.com.hk

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Contents

austcham news issue 181 03 Chamber Chatter 05 Events Update 17 May - The 13th InterCham Connecting People Cocktail

06 Cover Story Data: the Fertiliser for Agribiz Growth 10 Australia Focus Farming in 2050: Storing Carbon Could Help Meet Australia’s Climate Goals

12 Industry Insights

14 Rugby Sevens Lunch 2016

18 Macau Focus

19 Committee Comment

Editorial Committee: Drew Waters Karen Wu Claire Reaburn Advertising: Karen Wu Email: karen.wu@austcham.com.hk

AustCham Member Wins Prestigious IT Leadership Award

20 Committee in Actions

21 Chamber's Voice

21 Membership eCard Benefit

22 Corporate News

23 AustCham ANZ Mentor Program

24 AustCham Westpac ACBA 2016

25 Corporate Profile 26 On The Scene

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CONNEC T • ENGAGE • REPRESENT The Australian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Macau has more than 1,500 members from some 500 companies doing business here. It’s the largest Australian business grouping outside the country and the second largest of 28 International Chambers of Commerce in Hong Kong. The AustCham mission is: To promote & represent Australian business & values while enabling members to connect, engage & grow bilateral relationships. Disclaimer:

MG HILLRUS GROUP

Published By: The Australian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Macau Room 301-302, 3/F, Lucky Building 39 Wellington Street, Central, Hong Kong Tel: +852 2522 5054 Email: austcham@austcham.com.hk

austcham news Online version

The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the Australian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Macau, its members or officers. The Australian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Macau takes no responsibility for the contents of any article or advertisement, makes no representation as to its accuracy or completeness, and expressly disclaims and liability for any loss however arising from or in reliance upon the whole or any part of this publication. Copyright © 2016 The Australian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Macau

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Chamber Chatter

Chairman's Column Agribusiness is the main focus of this month’s AustCham News. The China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) has created many opportunities in many sectors, and agribusiness is a major beneficiary of the Agreement. Already, Australia has seen massive investment in Australian agribusiness from China, and this is likely to continue. Looking ahead, 85 percent of the world population growth to 2025 will be in Asia, with demand for food expected to double by 2050. Australia is a clean, safe, reliable premium producer of food and natural fibres in close geographical proximity to Asia. Australia’s diverse food and fibre sector stands to benefit greatly from growth in Asian consumption, with consumers already preferentially buying Australian produce. Many AustCham members operate in the agribusiness space, and this increase in demand and investment in the sector is great news for them. On a completely different track, the 2016 Annual General Meeting of the Chamber was held on 23 March and I am pleased to notify all Members who were unable to attend the AGM that all proposed resolutions were passed. All board members presently serving the Chamber who were eligible for election were re-elected. In addition, Ms. Bina Gupta, Founder and Managing Director of BG Business Communications Ltd., and Mr. Clayton Hebbard, Chairman of ClasG HK Ltd., were newly elected. Finally, those who joined the AustCham Commonwealth Bank Rugby Sevens lunch at the Grand Hyatt will know it was a marvelous event. Rugby legend Matthew Burke was guest speaker, and did a fantastic job, as did the Australian team on the field. I hope that you will connect with the Chamber this month in some way, and that you will continue to share your views on how best the Chamber can serve you.

Richard Petty chairman@austcham.com.hk

issue 181 | austcham news

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Chamber Chatter

Across My Desk

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he Australia-China Business Awards is over for another year and I extend my heartiest congratulations to the winners across the categories. This year, as you may be aware, the awards were brought forward a little to coincide with the Australia Week in China Delegation, making the most of the exposure that generated, and allowing the senior business leaders who were in Shanghai to attend this prestigious event. Many thanks to all who participated in the nomination process, whether you were successful this year or not, for contributing to the extremely high standard of organisations involved in Sino-Australia business. I also extend my thanks to those who were heavily involved in the organisation, judging, and running of such a glittering event and to the principle sponsor Westpac. Australia Week in China once again cast the spotlight on the push into China for some of Australia’s most prominent companies, but also allowed smaller enterprises to experience the strong business opportunities in the greater China market. Attended by the Prime Minister Hon Malcolm Turnbull, Trade Envoy Andrew Robb, Minister for Trade and Investment Hon Stephen Ciobo, Minister for Resources, Energy, and Northern Territory Hon Josh Frybenberg, Ambassador Jan Adams, and senior trade officials, the event was always going to attract a great deal of attention. I had the pleasure of attending the inaugural Australia-Asia Chambers Forum in Darwin and, following the Australia week in China focus on northern Australia becoming the future Food Bowl to Asia, was amazed to see just how ready the Territory was to capitalise on that focus. Being the topic of this AustCham News, the push for agricultural products and technology from Australia will form a significant part of the ChAFTA focus for the next foreseeable period, and will cement the relationship the region already has with high quality, fresh Aussie products. Having access to the executives of the major Australian Chambers over the two days of the forum, gave me great insight as to how we can work together to promote

the abilities of Australian business across the region. Although we are widespread, we share this very common goal. I commemorated ANZAC Day out of Hong Kong this year, but the Chamber was well represented at events around Hong Kong and Macau. Indeed, we held the first observance in Macau at MGM, which was attended by our Macau members, representatives from the Australian and New Zealand Consulates-General, Major General Gerard Fogarty, and hosted by our Macau Business Network. A special thanks to the network members for their dedication in bringing this event to completion, especial to Martin Darveniza for hosting the morning. The Rugby 7’s luncheon! Well, what can I say which has not already been mentioned? Thanks to Matt Burke for an amusing and enlightening address, and for generously making himself available to you all for a chat and a couple of photographs afterwards. It was a pleasure to have Matt here, and he has expressed his thanks to the members for making him so welcome. Thanks to all who enjoyed another terrific long lunch. The AustCham Mentoring Programme, after the successful completion of its third year, kicks off again this month. We have escalated the contents a little having engaged external mentoring consultants, Speak, to support us in the design and delivery of a very professional and engaging programme. Enrolments are now open, so please don’t hesitate to register your interest in participating as either a Protégée or a Mentor in this very popular initiative. Take a look at the web-site for all of the information you will need. Our new Marketing and Media Network will soft launch at our Mix at Six on Thursday 19th May, before rolling out a number of events a little later into the year. Come along and find out more about this new addition to the AustCham Committee structure and exchange ideas with some of the best marketing and media minds in Hong Kong. I look forward to seeing you there. Drew Waters, Chief Executive

AustCham supporting The Ben Kende Foundation at Rugby Sevens Lunch 2016 Guests can receive a BKF T-shirt by donating HK$150 to the Foundation. www.bkf.com.hk

Community Corner AustCham is a non-profit organisation and provides this space free of charge to other, selected non-profits or charities.

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A Letter from Canberra

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ail paved the way for the first Industrial Revolution, and roads made possible the second. But the third Industrial Revolution will be digital, and it’ll be paved with fibre optics.

Both of Australia’s major political parties have committed to modernising our broadband infrastructure. We have very different opinions on how best to modernise it, but we’re a unity ticket on the objective - if not the strategy. But recognising our broadband needs modernising is about as difficult as sticking your hand out the window and recognising it’s raining. Compare us to Hong Kong. It is fifth in the world for average internet connection speed, and second in the world for average peak speed. Australia is 46th and 60th, respectively. High speed internet is an enabler of a range of other innovations. It’s a precursor, and a precondition. And considering Australia has the lowest level of industry-research collaboration in the OECD, it means Government must find a way to kick-start the engine. As to how, we look to you. Australia needs to be an island nation in geography, not mentality. We’ve got a lot to learn from our neighbours, including Hong Kong. A 2015 report by KPMG found the two of the most important factors for enabling technology innovation are talent and capital.

EVENTS UPDATE MAY AT A GLANCE… Wed, 11 May, 8:00am – 9:30am 13th CEO Breakfast Herbert Smith Freehills, 23rd Floor, Gloucester Tower, 15 Queen's Road Central, Hong Kong Fri, 13 May, 12:30pm -2:00pm Australian Property: How to build your own Effortless Empire AustCham Business Centre, 3/F, Lucky Building, 39 Wellington Street, Central

Yes, it’s true that many of our best and brightest are seeking greener pastures overseas. It’s also true that we don’t have the level of available seed funding we want or need. But these aren’t the problems; they’re the symptoms. The real problem is cultural.

We won’t develop a world-class tech culture by simply building a world-class broadband network. But we can’t develop one if we don’t. You can’t have an economy without trade, and you can’t have trade without trade routes. In the digital economy, our trade route is the internet, and speed is everything. Hong Kong’s already in the fast lane – we hope we’ll meet you there. Gai Brodtmann MP, Federal Member for Canberra and Co-Convenor of Parliamentary Hong Kong Friendship Group

Tue, 17 May, 6:30pm – 9:00pm The 13th InterCham Connecting People Cocktail OZONE, 118/F, The Ritz-Carlton, ICC, 1 Austin Road West, Kowloon Thu, 19 May, 6:00pm – 9:00pm Mix at Six insomnia, Shop A, LG/F, Ho Lee Comm Building, 38-44 DÁguilar Street, Central Tue, 24 May, 6:30pm – 8:30pm How to build a successful portfolio in Australia NAB, Hysan Place, 500 Hennessy Road, Causeway Bay

Pymble in Hong Kong Tuesday 10 May 2016 at 7.00pm The Principal, Mrs Vicki Waters will host a cocktail reception and will be available to answer your questions about Pymble Ladies’ College and enrolling your daughter at the College WHERE Hotel Icon, 17 Science Museum Road, Tsim Sha Tsui East, Kowloon, Hong Kong RSVP Monday 2 May 2016 on communityrelations@pymblelc.nsw.edu.au

To find out more about Pymble visit pymblelc.nsw.edu.au issue 181 | austcham news

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Cover Story

Data: the Fertiliser for Agribiz Growth - Michael Whitehead Sector Head of Food, Beverages and Agribusiness at ANZ

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We can use this data to uncover correlations and trends, then use these discoveries to enhance processes – essentially to do business better.

Around 4,000 years ago, the Mesopotamians used their own version of big data to monitor the impact of salt on diffeent crops, using the data to switch from growing wheat to far tougher and more productive barley crops.

Prime time For agriculture in Australia, the increasing focus on analytics comes at a time of great opportunity. A recent report from ANZ argues Australia could increase wheat production by 20 per cent, from 25 to 30 million tonnes by 2030, which would see the sector generate an additional $A1.3 billion in value to a total of $A7 billion.

ig data and analytics are big news. The opportunities data analytics present for the global agricultural sector are astonishing yet in many ways they are just the next step in a process which has been happening for centuries.

Today, the use of data analytics on a barley crop doesn't just track where every seed is planted and where different fertiliser is needed for every centimetre of a paddock, it builds in a multitude of realtime information to create a far more productive, profitable and sustainable crop.

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In late 2015, a separate report suggested a rise in annual milk production (8.4 to 15 billion litres per year) could net Australia's dairy industry another $A1.3 billion in annual export value by 2025. The resurgence of rural and regional Australia is real. We are seeing fresh evidence of renewed confidence almost every week.


million tonn

production caters to around 99 per cent of demand and it has increased over the past decade at a CAGR of 2.8 per cent, thus driving feed demand for domestic production.

(10.0) (20.0)

Corn is the largest feed grain ingredient used in China, with Big data has potential to followed an estimated share ofWILL 63 perhuge cent since 2005/06, WHAT ROLE CHINA PL AY? by wheat (6 per cent). Both barley sorghum form a relatively transform the wayand agricultural China is the largest consumer of food and beverages the small portion of around 0.6 per cent and 0.8 per cent in share business is done – from real-time world. China also one of theover largest grain producers and is of overall feedis consumption the same time period. Use financing of commodities to self-sufficient in a number of basic strategic crops and food of barley and sorghum as a part of feed mix has been volatile sources, providing food cross-border security and on ensuring social stability. seamless customs historically and is largely dependent other domestic prices

Net Imports (30.0) IS BECOMING A NET IMPORTER CHINA '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12

Barley

Wheat

Corn

Rice

'14

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China new trade Oilseeds 1.0 (15.0)

Net Exports

0.5 (35.0) (55.0) (0.5) (75.0) (1.0) (1.5) (95.0) (2.0)

Net Imports Net Imports '92 '94 '96 '92

'98

'94 '96 '98 Cottonseed

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'00Peanut '02 '04

Sunflowerseed Beef Pork

'06

'08

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Poultry

'12

'14

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'12 '14 '16 Soybean

Milk Powder

Sugar Grain

million tonnes million tonnes

1.0 20.0

Net Exports Exports Net

10.0 (1.0) (2.0) (10.0) (3.0) (4.0) (20.0) Net Imports (5.0) (30.0) Net Imports '92 '94 '96 (6.0) '92 '94 '96

Barley

'98

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Corn

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'98

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Wheat

Oilseeds

Source: USDA 5.0

million tonnes

historically and is largely dependent on other domestic prices for corn and wheat prices.

millionmillion tonnestonnes

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for corn and wheat prices. processing. With just 7 percent of the world’s fresh water, and 10 percent of agricultural land, but support nearly 20forpercent of theand world’s Thethe Chinese government’s corn, wheat rice population there areansome difficult be made about crops has provided incentive for decisions farmers totoswitch away maintaining self-sufficiency. For livestock and grain production, from barley and sorghum production. As a result, China’s corn self-sufficiency will be more difficult to maintain as which these is an production reached 216 million tonnes in 2014/15 sectors are usually relatively land-intensive and not increase of 21.7 per cent over 2010/11. This led to a produced significantas efficiently infocus China in comparison to other more(given land and waterIntense rise in the corn supplies in the domestic market the high abundant countries. As shown in the chart, China is becoming Globally the agricultural sector is increasingly intense focus. support prices) and over 100 million tonnes inunder ending stocks. a net importer of numerous agricultural The world seeks to feed a population setproducts. to grow by two billion Further, the support led–to costs for feed people in price less than 25 years as high well asinput a large growing middle class, The key driver for grainChina demand in China is the growing demand producers and forced to search for alternatives, resulting particularly in China – through new technology and investment. for meat. With over people barley per annum rising intoinChina's in an increased use 27m of imported and sorghum the past middle class, consumption was estimated to have reached 87mt twoThis years. impacts every layer of society – from farmers to consumers of beef, pork, sheep meat and poultry in 2014. Domestic meat globally, and across governments and the private sector. China recently announced “Structure Planiton Corn production caters to aroundits99 per centAdjustment of demand and has Planting Area” policy (2016–2020), under which the government increased over the past decade at a CAGR of 2.8 per cent, thus Agriculture has already seen its share of technological innovation, intends to reduce grain acreage to promote silage corn driving feed demand forcorn domestic production. from robotic dairies to satellite crop mapping. But the potential to ease the pressure on storage facilities (currently used to implications using its full potential could stretch right Corn is the largest feeddata grain ingredient usedconcerns in China, with store corn). Thisofshould alsotoreduce the cost for feed across the immense agricultural supply chain. an estimated share of 63this, persuch cent policies since 2005/06, manufacturers. Despite withoutfollowed appropriate by wheatincentives (6 per cent). barley sorghum form a relatively financial (toBoth move awayand from corn) may have minimal This would encompass not only farmers, processors, exporters, small portion of around 0.6 per cent and 0.8 per cent share impact on China’s corn production. retailersfeed and consumption consumers, butover also regulators, banksperiod. and other of overall the same time Usecapital providers. of barley and sorghum as a part of feed mix has been volatile

(15.0) (35.0) (55.0)

PAG E 1 0

Further, the price support led to high input costs for feed producers and forced China to search for alternatives, resulting in an increased use of imported barley and sorghum in the past two years. China recently announced its “Structure Adjustment Plan on Corn Planting Area” policy (2016–2020), under which the government intends to reduce grain corn acreage to promote silage corn to ease the pressure on storage facilities (currently used to store corn). This should also reduce the cost concerns for feed manufacturers. Despite this, such policies without appropriate financial incentives (to move away from corn) may have minimal impact on China’s corn production.

(75.0) Net Imports (95.0)

'92

'94

'96

Cottonseed Peanut Sunflowerseed

Rapeseed

Soybean

Sugar 1.0

Net Exports

-

million tonnes

The Chinese government’s support for corn, wheat and rice crops has provided an incentive for farmers to switch away from barley and sorghum production. As a result, China’s corn production reached 216 million tonnes in 2014/15 which is an increase of 21.7 per cent over 2010/11. This led to a significant rise in the corn supplies in the domestic market (given the high support prices) and over 100 million tonnes in ending stocks.

-

(1.0) (2.0) (3.0) (4.0) (5.0) (6.0)

Net Imports '92

Source: USDA

'94

'96

'98

'00

'02

'04

'06

'08

'10

'12

'14

issue 181 | austcham news

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million tonn

of beef, pork, sheep meat and poultry in 2014. Domestic meat production caters to around 99 per cent of demand and it has increased over the past decade at a CAGR of 2.8 per cent, thus driving feed demand for domestic production.

Cover Story

(10.0) (20.0)

Corn is the largest feed grain ingredient used in China, with an estimated share of 63 per cent since 2005/06, followed by wheat (6 per cent). Both barley and sorghum form a relatively small portion of around 0.6 per cent and 0.8 per cent share are connecting food producers with of Digital overalltechnologies feed consumption over the same time period. Use new ways.asThe world changing from one volatile driven of consumers barley andinsorghum a part of isfeed mix has been by businesses shaped by the consumer with data prices historically andto is one largely dependent on other– domestic powering the transformation. foranalytics corn and wheat prices.

Net Imports (30.0)

'92

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Barley

'98

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Wheat

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Corn

'08

'10

Rice

'12

'14

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Other

Oilseeds

million tonnes

5.0

The Chinese support for corn, wheat and rice This can be government’s seen in many ways, including how data management crops hasused provided anand categorise incentive for soil in farmers switch away is being to map theto hope it will lead from barley and sorghum production. As a result, China’s corn to greater food security, better soil health and long-term benefit production reached 216 sector. millionThe tonnes in 2014/15 which to the global agriculture specific composition of is an increase of 21.7 per cent over 2010/11. This led to a significant different soils, their growing qualities and productivities for risedifferent in the corn in theto domestic market (givenlevels the high cropssupplies are all aspects be mapped at varying of support prices) and over 100 million tonnes in ending stocks. complexity.

(15.0) (35.0) (55.0) (75.0) Net Imports (95.0)

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Cottonseed Peanut Sunflowerseed

'06

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Rapeseed

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Soybean

Sugar 1.0

Net Exports

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million tonnes

Further, the price support led to high input costs for feed An ambitious and impressive CSIRO-led global project essentially producers and forced China to search for alternatives, resulting is studying the big data of bees. Bees continue to die in record in an increased use of imported barley and sorghum in the past numbers, threatening the global honey industry – and we still two years. don't know why (although my guess is it's probably a bee cult). China recently announced its “Structure Adjustment Plan on Corn Big dataArea” has huge potential to transform way agricultural Planting policy (2016–2020), underthe which the government business done –grain from corn real-time financing of commodities to intends to isreduce acreage to promote silage corn and radically faster, to seamless ease thecross-border pressure oncustoms storageprocessing facilities (currently used to more-personalised delivery food goods to consumers. is store corn). This should alsoofreduce the cost concerns There for feed so much more Despite to come.this, such policies without appropriate manufacturers. financial incentives (to move away from corn) may have minimal impact on China’s corn production.

(1.0) (2.0) (3.0) (4.0) (5.0) (6.0)

Net Imports '92

Source: USDA

PAG E 1 0

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'94

'94

'96

'98

'00

'02

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'06

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'10

'12

'14

'16


Additional Reading

The Five meatiest grains Themes for 2016 - Mark Bennett, Head of Agribusiness, Australia at ANZ

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ustralia's grains industry is fundamental to the agribusiness new entrants seeking markets in Asia but this space is sector. Not only does it create value in its own right but complex and difficult. supports revenue growth in domestic and export markets across Australian agribusiness. • Infrastructure investment in this industry is necessary to improve efficiency. However this in itself is not the answer Existing high inventories have led to bearish forecasts in the to farmer profitability. market but it's worth looking beyond this in order to position the sector for future success. It remains problematic for farmers to attract investment interest. More work needs to be done in matching A new report from ANZ, “The Grains Muster", argues Australia operations and capital, as well as positioning the industry could increase wheat production by 20 per cent, from 25 to 30 as one worthy of investment. million tonnes by 2030, which would see the sector generate an additional $1.3 billion in value to a total of $7 billion. • Investment in grain-producing assets is likely to come from outside the industry and this can have a positive impact. Five key themes ANZ identified for the grain sector in 2016 • Rising global demand for animal protein around the world Investment in infrastructure will only come if the sector creates a major opportunity for the Australian grain sector can demonstrate the right levels of return or strategic because these animals must be fed. A growing demand for importance to a given investor. It is possible benefits of meat and dairy could directly and indirectly impact the big-scale investment will take time and might only produce feed complex and Australian grain use. incremental benefits to the average farmer. Australia currently produces around 25 million tonnes of wheat, 18 million tonnes of which is exported. • An increasing population and a growing middle class in Asia will support the future growth of Australian grains amid expanding food and beverage markets. A key driver of grain demand in China and South East Asia is wheat-based food production, namely noodles, breads and baked goods. Recent free trade agreements in key North Asia growth markets have improved Australian farmers' access to around 70,000 food consumers and 4.8 million livestock per farmer. There is room for mid-size grain traders and

Whether this comes from private or government or both is somewhat out of the hands of farmers. Focussing attention on what they can control and do in the meantime to improve production and business performance makes sense. • Increasing productivity rates remains important to the industry. A key feature to farmer success is to understand your business well enough to make informed and effective strategic management decisions. Volatility in commodity prices and seasons remains a key obstacle to farmer success. Farmers should consider not just where the largest annual financial return is but how to produce a balanced and sustainable enterprise that trades in a lower range of highs and lows over time.

Source: ANZ BlueNotes For full stories, please visit BlueNotes https://bluenotes.anz.com/posts/2016/04/data-the-fertiliser-for-agribiz-growth/ and https://bluenotes.anz.com/posts/2016/03/the-five-meatiest-grains-themes-for-2016/ To download full report of ‘The Grains Muster’, please go to http://goo.gl/gbGavj BlueNotes is ANZ's corporate newsroom, featuring insights, opinion, research and news about the economy business and finance. Visit www.bluenotes.anz.com for more information or to subscribe. issue 181 | austcham news

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Cover Story Australia Focus

Farming in 2050: Storing Carbon Could Help Meet Australia’s Climate Goals - Brett Anthony Bryan, Principal Research Scientist, Environmental-economic integration at CSIRO

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ustralia’s agricultural lands help to feed about 60 million people worldwide, and also support tens of thousands of farmers as well as rural communities and industries.

But a growing global population with a growing appetite is placing increasing demands on our agricultural land. At the same time, the climate is warming and in many places getting drier too. Agriculture, and particularly livestock, is currently a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. But new markets and incentives could make storing carbon or producing energy from land more profitable than farming, and turn our agricultural land into a carbon sink. How might these competing forces play out in changing Australian land use? Our research, published in Global Environmental Change, assesses a range of potential pathways for Australia’s agricultural land as part of CSIRO’s National Outlook.

Is the balance right? Opinion varies. Many would say no, and consider the status quo to be stacked strongly against the environment. Others see agriculture as entering a boom time, driven by growing population and rising food prices. Substantial interest from overseas investors in Australian agricultural land reflects this opportunity. Parts of Australia’s agricultural land continue to change fast. Lessons hard-learned by South Australia seem to have been forgotten. Rates of land clearance in Queensland are rising again since 2010 after a longterm trend of decline. In the 1990s, new financial incentives led to the planting of over 1 million hectares of forest in southern Australia. Now a failed business model, many of these plantations are being returned to agriculture.

Changing landscapes

Demand for more secure sources of energy has generated rapid expansion of coal seam gas and wind power generation, and the development of northern Australia remains a bipartisan priority.

The only constant in landscapes is change. Ecosystems are always changing in response to natural drivers such as fire and flood.

Worldwide, Australia is not alone — many international examples also exist of recent, massive, rapid and accelerating changes in how land is used.

Humans have complicated things. Indigenous Australians manipulated the Australian landscape and climate through burning for millennia, sustaining a population of around 750,000 and underpinning a culture.

Australia has historically taken a hands-off approach to managing land use change, instead focusing on increasing the productivity and competitiveness of agriculture. Apart from a handful of planning and environmental regulations, the use of land has been subject to minimal governance or strategic direction.

European colonisation brought a different and more pervasive change, clearing land, building cities, damming rivers and establishing an increasingly mechanised and industrialised agriculture.

Where to from here?

These iconic but changed landscapes inspired the romantic art of Arthur Streeton and poetry of Banjo Paterson among many others — and helped forge a young nation’s identity.

What is it that Australians really want from our land? We know what we don’t want: wall-to-wall crops, pasture, buildings, gas wells, mines, wind farms or trees.

Change can happen surprisingly quickly. Often before we know it we’ve gone too far and need to scramble for fixes that are so often costly, slow and ultimately inadequate.

We can expect healthy debate around the margins, but, in general, diversity, productivity and sustainability seem to be widely valued. Most of us want to leave the place in decent condition for future generations.

For example, in South Australia, researchers in the early 1960s raised the alarm that the feverish post-war period of soldier resettlement, land clearance and agricultural development threatened entire native plant and animal communities with extinction. The government’s response over the following 30 years was to expand greatly the conservation reserve network and eventually prohibit land clearing.

Europe has had this conversation and knows what it wants from its landscapes — and it’s not afraid to pay for it (for instance, through agricultural subsidies). A deep aesthetic and cultural heritage is the central objective, with a balance of recreation opportunities, tourism, a clean and healthy environment and high-quality produce all being high priorities.

History repeating?

Once we know what we want, we can work out how to get there.

Agricultural lands produce a range of goods and services. But in many places the focus on agricultural productivity has come at the expense of ecosystems. Biodiversity, soil and water are all on downward trends.

That’s where science can help. We now have the ability to project changes in land use in response to policy and global change, and the environmental and economic consequences.

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CSIRO’s recent National Outlook mapped Australia’s potential future pathways. A companion paper in Nature found that it is possible to achieve strong economic growth and reduce environmental pressure, if we put the right policies in place now. It provides a glimpse of how our rural lands might respond to coalescing future change pressures.

If we redouble our focus on productivity, by 2050 agriculture will produce more than today, even as farmland contracts. The least productive areas are less able to compete with reforestation and other new land uses, leaving the most efficient agricultural land in production. But trade-offs are likely. Trees use a lot more water than crops and pasture, so we will need to think carefully about managing water resources.

Farming carbon In our modelling, carbon sequestration in the land sector plays a key role of Australia’s future. Land systems can help with the heavy lifting required to hold global warming to 2°C as recently agreed in Paris.

Australians care about their land and are more aware than ever about what is happening to it. While we can have some control over the future of our land, and we do exercise this control in certain circumstances (such as urban planning), our long-term approach to rural land has been to let environmental and economic forces play out and let the invisible hand of economics determine what will be.

There are several factors that could drive this change, including climate, carbon pricing, global food demand and energy prices. We modelled the economic potential for land use change and its impacts in over 600 scenarios (full data available here), combining a suite of global outlooks and national policy options.

Given the pace at which change can happen, a smarter approach will be to start the conversation, work out what it is we want from our land, and put the policies and institutions in place to get us there.

A carbon price, which enables landholders to make money from storing carbon in trees and soils (often much more money than from farming), may increase pressure to shift farmland to restored forests. Who knows? A pay rise while watching trees grow could be an attractive proposition for our ageing farmers. Complementary biodiversity payments could also help arrest declines in wildlife and help it adapt to AustCham AD (204 x148mm) Layout JAN_2016 OP.pdf 1 8/1/16 5:20 climate change.

Melbourne

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Source: This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article at http://goo.gl/OSQ22C

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issue 181 | austcham news

• 11


Industry Insights

Innovation and trends in Agribusiness The report highlights some of the key insights shared during KPMG’s Agribusiness roundtable series, attended by agribusiness leaders, government officials and representatives from peak industry bodies.

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here is no doubting how vital agribusiness is to Australia’s future growth and prosperity, but it is an industry with immense challenges. The changing economy, environmental issues, international demand fluctuations and sector disruption among them. In recognition of this, KPMG hosted a series of roundtable events in each major capital city across Australia, attended by over 65 agribusiness leaders, senior government officials and representatives of peak industry bodies. Themed “The Impact of Global Trends and Innovation in Australian Agriculture Business”, countless issues and ideas were shared, with the goal to improve productivity and profitability in the industry. Discussion was led by KPMG’s Global Agribusiness Leader, Ian Proudfoot, with some of the most important insights shared in this paper.

Key insights: Accelerating into a disruptive future Disruption is occurring across countless sectors – with agriculture no exception. Ian Proudfoot said Silicon Valley entrepreneurs have discovered the immense potential to make changes in agribusiness, and “they love it”. Proudfoot said the ASDA and Jamie OIiver Food Revolution is a prime example of a shakeup. Oliver is backing a British program called Beautiful on the Inside, which takes to market secondgrade fruit and vegetables that would otherwise not be sold or consumed. The result is that the farmer who supplies the goods gets a new source of revenue, the supermarkets benefit from an increase in stock, and consumers who couldn’t afford fresh food now have greater choices due to the lower cost.

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“It’s not going to be the big ideas and big players that are going to change the world. It will be the smaller and mid-sized entities that will drive the disruption,” said Proudfoot. Innovation Coupled with disruption is innovation, and Proudfoot presented a number of examples to demonstrate how this looks in agribusiness. Here are some key ideas. Fairlife Dairy This company is taking the sugar and lactose out of milk to add protein, turning a staple daily product into a high protein sports beverage, Proudfoot explained. They can charge more than the price of standard milk. Coca Cola has purchased a stake in the company, and is to launch the product across the US. Philly Cow Share Drawing on a crowdsourcing model, this company pre-sells a percentage of a cow via an online store. The company then raises the cow, and once grown, slaughters the animal. The consumer then receives their pre-purchased portion of the cow. Proudfoot said the idea is to provide the farmers with an upfront cash flow opportunity, to cover grazing, slaughter and profit. It is a complete transformation of the traditional cattle business into a more innovative and engaged business. Nemo’s Garden Divers have developed technology to grow and produce plants under the sea, so the whole concept of a farm could change in the future.


This question was put to attendees at the roundtable events. Their responses are noted What will the top five challenges be to the agribusiness industry over the in the infographic below. next 3 years? This question was put to attendees at the roundtable events. Their responses are noted in the infographic below.

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More emerging food trends Insect protein will be increasingly used in foods in the next 10 years, Proudfoot said, with crickets being ground and used as a flour replacement. He expects the over 65 age bracket to increase their requirement for premium food, while genetically modified foods will boom. Food will be a driver of wellness, with a shift from sugar and fats, and more money will be invested in wellbeing for preventative measures.

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Safe Traces: This technology addresses integrity issues in foods through chemical tainting. Chemical tainting in foods is chemically detectable, has no odour and no taste, but is inherent in the product. This traceability means the product that reaches the consumer is the same product that leaves the factory.

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“Impossible” foods The future of food won’t be the same, with “impossible” foods made a reality, Proudfoot proposed. Thanks to new ways of thinking about and approaching food, items such as plant-based cheeseburgers, which have a smaller environmental impact than meat-based burgers, and plant-based eggs to address concerns about the welfare of hens, will prevail. Other initiatives include: Green Sense Farms: These vertical farms can be placed in New York buildings, to bring fresh produce right to local residents. WelIntel: This comprises sensors that go into water wells to help inform farmers when making irrigation decisions and to plan water use.

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The Australian Government The Australian Government has identified the strategic importance of agriculture where many countries have failed to do so, Proudfoot said. He said the Agriculture Competitiveness Whitepaper is a bold step, as strategy and vision is important to navigate the challenges of the sector. He said it is vital to be able to outline what the investment threshold will look like, and the expectations for new investment partners to ensure the right people are on board.

What will the top five challenges be to the agribusiness industry over the next 3 years?

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Planet Labs This technology can take continual satellite imagery of the world. The data collected can be used to determine how people can structure their agriculture business, make decisions and provide farmers with real time data rather than making plans by intuition.

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Innovation and trends in Agribusiness | 7 © 2016 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.

Source: KPMG. For more information, please visit https://goo.gl/f5njrC

issue 181 | austcham news

• 13


Rugby Sevens Lunch 2016 1

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This year, over 400 guests joined our Rugby Sevens Lunch to kick-off the Sevens weekend! 18 years as our full back – THANK YOU event title sponsor Commonwealth Bank of Australia. AustCham and CBA have been partnered to run this key event on the Australian business community calendar since 1999.

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1 Team Physiotherapist Katie Ryan with James Rickward of Commonwealth Bank and Andrew Penford of AIEF. 2 Paul Bell and Mark Yeung of Mizuho Securities. 3 Vincent Kelly of Aristocrat (Macau) Pty Ltd and Patrick Liu of KPMG. 4 Australian Qantas Men’s Rugby Sevens Team with event sponsors. 5 Ian Robinson of Robinson Management Ltd, Ross Smith of Shenton Ltd and Lee Henshaw of The University of Queensland. 6 Stephanie Dixon and Katherine Forbes of Flight Centre and Laura de Heer of Harneys. 7 Daniel Vovil of Swiss Asia Asset Management and Mark Williams of SchwartzWilliams. 8 Murray Sargant of Informatica and Chris Summerville of HSBC. 9 Stephen Berry and Matthew Reilly. 10 Tyrone Lynch and Mukesh Mahtani of NTT Data. 11 Guenther Rittner of Thyssenkrupp and Janssen Chan. 12 Celina Kwong of Robert Walters and Steven Tan of China Telecom. 13 Kym Fortescue with Elliot Shadforth of Ernest & Young. 14 George Vallas and Arnaud Teissier of Commonwealth Bank and Helen Su of China Telecom. 15 Russell Shields (left) and Thomas McAlister of Savills (HK) Ltd and Ged Rockliff (middle). 16 Joseph Yam and Peter Pin. 17 Callum Dunn and Simon Blyth. 18 Tom Lashan of ANS Logistics, Trish O’Neill of Australian Premium Wines and Nicolas Crowther of Fortune & Sons Wines Brokers. 19 Mike Zhuang and Michelle Mui of Arrow Asia Pacific. 20 Lee Baker of Commonwealth Bank and Peter Anderson of AerCap. 21 Barbara Wang of Capital Group, Callum Brown of Flight Centre and Stephen Holl of Emirates Airline. 22 AustCham Board Director Darren Bowdern and Lesley Hobbs of AdventBalance. 23 Marcy LaRont (left) and Barbara Mayer (right) of AWA and Mireya Garcia. The day begins with a warm-up cocktail sponsored by

issue 181 | austcham news

• 15


Rugby Sevens Lunch 2016 3

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1 & 2 Matt Burke presents the Men’s team with their jerseys ahead of the game. 3 AustCham Chief Executive Drew Waters thanks Matt Burke for his inspired sharing with guests. 4 AustCham representatives welcome VIP guest on the day, Queensland Premier and Minister for the Arts, Annastacia Palaszczuk, MP (middle). From left at the back: Board Director Clayton Hebbard, Advisory Council member Edward Kwok, AustCham Treasurer Andrew Macintosh, Chief Executive Drew Waters, Board Director Fiona Nott, From left at front: AustCham Chairman Professor Richard Petty, Advisory Council member Dr Joseph Lam. 5 Former ESPN Star Sports Rugby Commentator Justin Sampson leads a panel discussion with Coach Andy Friend and guest speaker Matt Burke. 6 James Rickward, Executive General Manager, Corporate and Institutional Banking, Asia, welcoming guests on behalf of Commonwealth Bank. 7 Guest speaker Matt Burke, one of Australian rugby’s most accomplished backs with an international career spanning a glittering 11 seasons with the Wallabies. 8 AustCham Chairman Richard Petty thanks event sponsor and partners for supporting the Chamber on the day.

More coverage can be found on our online photo album: www.flickr.com/photos/austchamhongkong

16 • austcham news | issue 181


Guests attended the post lunch cocktail at Champagne Bar.

Big thanks to our supporting partners:

issue 181 | austcham news

• 17


Macau Focus

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est We Forget. More than 60 guests gathered on 25 April for the Anzac Day Observance Service at MGM Macau, marking the 100th anniversary of the war on the Western Front during World War One. Major General Gerard Fogarty addressed the attendees at the breakfast session after the ceremony. The event was organised by AustCham and supported by the Australian Consulate-General in Hong Kong & Macau, New Zealand Consulate-General and New Zealand Chamber of Commerce.

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Special thanks to venue and F&B partner:


Committee Comment

AustCham Member Wins Prestigious IT Leadership Award - Peter Smith, Chair of AustCham Business Technology Committee

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long standing and active member of the AustCham Business Technology Committee, Andre Blumberg of CLP, has been awarded this years’ Hong Kong CIO of the year for Large Enterprises. This is a highly sought after and prestigious award that has been operating now for the past five years.

The feedback from the judges at the ceremony was that Andre was an outstanding nomination in the Large Enterprise CIO category. His overall performance in delivering solid business benefits, creative use of cost effective technology and a heavy emphasis on people development within his department were stand out achievements.

The CIO Awards recognise the highest performing Hong Kong-based IT leaders over the past 12 months that have demonstrated both outstanding vision and execution. It is jointly organised by Computerworld Hong Kong and the CIO advisory firm, CIO Connect. The winners were announced at the CIO Leadership Forum held on 16th March.

Andre commented after the awards ceremony. “It is a tremendous honour to receive this award. I appreciate the company's efforts in creating a positive environment for IT professionals seeking the opportunity of a challenging and rewarding career in an exciting industry undergoing digital transformation." Congratulations once again, Andre.

Developing your director career? If you want a board position, you need to be prepared. This practical course will deliver toolkits and strategies for the next steps on your director career path. International Foundations of Directorship Monday 13 to Wednesday 15 June 2016, Hong Kong Monday 18 to Wednesday 20 July 2016, Singapore

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To find out more and enrol +61 8 9320 1709 w: companydirectors.com.au/ifod

issue 181 | austcham news

• 19


Committee in Actions

AustCham People Forum: Enhancing productivity through Design

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ollowing the very first successful event on workplace flexibility in 2015, the Committee organised this panel discussion to provide participants with insights on workplace flexibility and focuses on office design and architecture. Panellists on the day included Lisa Cameron from CBRE, Lynne Barry from Telstra International, Jason Taper from Steelcase Asia Pacific and Paul Scroggie from Merx. The panel was moderated by Craig McGrory from Leighton Asia. Throughout the session, panellists discussed and showcased how companies have used different approach to maximise organisational effectiveness and employee engagement. They also shared their insightful and creative ideas about workplace design and solutions for higher productivity.

Young Executives: Professional Development Series

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ontinuing from the success of the CEO breakfast series and mentor programme, the Chamber recently launched the Professional Development Series for our Young Executives. The series began in March with initial topics on Presentation Skills and Conflict Management. Attendees followed through a

20 • austcham news | issue 181

first stage theory session, then a second stage practical session, which allow them to give constructive feedback and a significant take away from the sessions. With thanks to our partner, Prime Time Training, for assisting with the facilitation and the Young Executives for their enthusiastic support.


Chamber’s Voice

Private briefing with Queensland Premier

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ueensland Premier and Minister of Arts, Annastacia Palaszczuk MP recently visited Hong Kong and addressed AustCham members at a breakfast session. Over the breakfast, she shared her stories on Women in Leadership, her views towards Queensland’s relationship with Asia especially Hong Kong & China.

AustCham

Membership eC

In May

ard

Ovolo Hotels is offering AustCham members a 10% discount off their best website rate by entering discount code ‘AUSTCHAM10’.

Exclusive offers for AustCham members from Rhombus International Hotel Group in April.

For more information, please visit http://www.ovolohotels.com/en/ *Terms and conditions apply. AustCham AD (204 x148mm) Layout JAN_2016 OP.pdf

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Room Offer: members can enjoy special 10% discount off ‘Best Available Rate’ on hotel official website by entering discount code ‘AUSTCHAM’. *Terms and conditions apply. Valid until 31 December 2016. **Applicable hotels: www.hotelpanorama.com.hk www.hotel-LKF.com.hk www.hotelbonaparte.com.hk www.hotelpennington.com.hk Dining Offer: members can enjoy special discount at AVA Restaurant Slash Bar, Azure and Café Express. *Terms and conditions apply. Valid only in April 2016.

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issue 181 | austcham news

• 21


Corporate News

New Appointment for Greater China Business

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ustCham Platinum Patron National Australia Bank (NAB) has recently announced the appointment of Mr Ciqiang Lu ( ) as General Manager of Greater China. Mr Lu is now based in NAB’s Hong Kong branch. With over 20 years of banking and strategic leadership experience in Greater China, Mr Lu has the strong networks and insights necessary to deliver NAB’s business priorities in Asia and its vision of being Australia and New Zealand’s most respected bank in this region. Mr Lu joins NAB from Natixis where he was the Senior Country Manager, Greater China for the past 9 years, based in Shanghai. Prior to

Member Classifieds Australia Registered Tax Agent in Hong Kong

Holistic Business Consulting Pty Ltd. Chartered Accountant We specialise in tax planning for Australian Expatriates, tax returns preparations, private rulings for deductions. www.myoztax.com Call Tommy Ip on +852 69018136 or email: tommy@myoztax.com

To enquire about advertising, submit an article, comment or respond to austcham news, please contact Karen Wu at karen.wu@austcham.com.hk or call +852 2522 5054.

22 • austcham news | issue 181

Natixis, Mr Lu held senior roles with Société Générale where he served as Chief Operations Officer China, General Manager for Shanghai Branch and also Head of Credit and Marketing. He has a strong track record of growing sustainable businesses and a broad banking background with strong product capability, particularly in areas such as structured asset finance, commodities, transactional banking and derivatives. NAB Executive General Manager for International Branches, Peter Coad, said, “Relationships are vital to making in-roads into China and NAB has been in China building those relationships longer than any other Australian bank. As we continue to support our Australia and New Zealand clients looking to increasingly gain exposure to the biggest growth economy in the world, Ciqiang will be a welcome addition to our offering and will ensure we can meet the growing needs of our clients in the Greater China market.”


AustCham ANZ Mentor Program

End of the Year: Going After Your Vision Program sponsor: The third run of the AustCham ANZ Mentor Program is coming to a close. In the past 12 months, from the initial speed matching event to the panel discussion on effective communications and use of social media, the Mentor program team structured the year around lectures, workshops and evening socials; these elements were foundational for the work done by the mentors and protégés. Thank you to everyone that made the 2015 Mentor program possible, especially to our Program sponsor ANZ, and the support from AustCham Young Executives Committee.

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1. A big thank you to Mentor Program Manager MaryBarbara Hanna, for her great passion and effort in the past three years! 2. Eva Lu, Head of Human Resources Hong Kong from Program Sponsor ANZ congratulates the protégés and wishes them every success in their future career. 3. In the Graduation event, Jill Robinson, Founder and CEO of Animal Asia, shared with protégés her experience as a pioneer of animal welfare in Asia.

issue 181 | austcham news

• 23


AustCham Westpac ACBA 2016

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he AustCham Westpac Australia-China Business Awards Gala Dinner was held on 13 April, recognising Australian and Chinese businesses in Greater China across a broad spectrum, from small entrepreneurs through to large publicly listed companies.

Hosted by Beverley O’Connor, Presenter on The World, ABC News 24, the evening saw the presentation of 11 awards recognising businesses and individuals who have demonstrated strong commitment and leadership to Australia-China business. With a record 600 guests in attendance at the Pudong Shangri-La and keynote speaker CEO and Managing Director of Blackmores Christine Holgate delivering a stellar keynote address, the night was an unforgettable one. Other notable speakers and presenters included The Honourable Steven Ciobo MP, The Honourable Andrew Robb AO MP, Australian Ambassador to China Jan Adams, and Chief Executive of Westpac Lyn Cobley.

Winners of the AustCham Westpac Australia-China Business Awards 2016: The Business Excellence Award for Sustainability and Social Impact sponsored by CLP Holdings Limited: ANZ Global Services and Operations Chengdu Company Ltd Chengdu with Winifred Wong of CLP Holdings Ltd and Udo Doring, CEO AustCham Shanghai.

The Business Excellence Award for Services sponsored by Qantas: Argyle Hotel Management Group (Australia) Pty Ltd

The Award for the Advancement of Diversity in the Workplace sponsored by UQ Business School Executive Education: Ben Way, CEO Macquarie Asia Ben Way, CEO Macquarie, with Alice Tsou, UQ Business School Executive Education and Bina Gupta, ACBA Judge 2016.

The Business Excellence Award for Construction, Infrastructure, & Natural Resources sponsored by Westpac: Macquarie Group Ltd Ben Way, CEO Macquarie and Lyn Cobley of Westpac and AustCham Hong Kong and Macau Chairman Professor Richard Petty.

Judges Special Recognition Award: Craig Willis 24 • austcham news | issue 181


The Business Excellence Award for Education & Training sponsored by Australia Plus / ICS: University of Technology Sydney The Chairman’s Award for Significant Contribution to Australia-China Business: Stephen Fitzgerald AO, PhD

Lifetime Membership: The Honourable Andrew Robb AO, MP The Hon Andrew Robb (second from left) with AustCham Chairmen Peter Arkell (Shanghai), Tracy Colgan (Beijing) and Professor Richard Petty (Hong Kong and Macau).

The Business Excellence Award for Agriculture, Food & Beverage: Orisis Orisis with Peter Clarke, General Manager Pudong ShangriLa and Deborah Biber, ACBA Judge Chairman 2016.

The Business Excellence Award for Business Innovation sponsored by Huawei: SmartTrans SmartTrans with John Lord, Chairman of Huawei and Susan Heffernan, ACBA Judge.

The Business Excellence Award for Start-Up Enterprises sponsored by CPA Australia: Soapnut Republic Soapnut Republic with Jeff Hughes, COO CPA Australia and Tracy Colgan, Chairman of AustCham Beijing.

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

See ACBA highlights at www.austcham-acba.com issue 181 | austcham news

• 25


Corporate Profile

MG HILLRUS GROUP Room E, 23/F, MG Tower, 133 Hoi Bun Road, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Level 5, 45 William Street, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia MG HILLRUS is based both in Hong Kong and Australia. The company is licensed to provide services in relation to Unit Trusts, Mutual Funds and other forms of collective investment schemes, and is regulated by Securities and Futures Commission. They also licensed to provide services relating to life assurance policies, expatriate pension contracts and other insurance linked products and is a member of The Hong Kong Confederation of Insurance Brokers. In addition, they are approved by the Estate Agency Authority to act as an agent to carry on estate agency work. MG HILLRUS is responsible for the provision of investment advice, trade execution, settlement, dealing with all service providers, client servicing, fund subscriptions and redemptions and client reporting. They pride themselves in the delivery of beginning-to-end service for both the purchase and/or sale of luxury residential, commercial, industrial properties and retail shop to their clientele. What are the main skills of your job? I lead a team of professionals whose responsibilities include the co-ordination, strategy and performance of the Group’s property investment management platform. I am also responsible for the assessment of prinicipal investment opportunities, transcation execution and optimisation of investee companies. What’s the most unusual thing you have had to do as part of your job? One of my most memorable experiences was leading a group of high-net worth investors to Australia for site visit What does your company do really well? MG Hillrus's success is founded on the quality and integrity of our

Jacqueline Yau Founder of MG HILLRUS GROUP professionals whom are fully committed to our Group's mission and vision. Furthermore, most of our professionals are property investors which share a profound knowledge of the residential, commercial and retail property market in Australia and overseas. We also pride ourselves in the long-term relationship we have with our clients and local property developers. How would you describe your workplace and colleagues? As a founder of the company, the workplace encourages a free flow of ideas and no hierarchical corporate culture. We deliberately have an open office environment which allows our colleagues to have more personal interactions rather than electronic means of communication. What’s something most people don’t know about your company? We offer an integrated family office solution to a number of respected Asian families. What’s your company’s connection to Australia? We have a physical office in Australia which works closely with local property developers and government authorities. What’s your favourite place to go on the week-end? Hiking is my favourite sport. There's a beautifully rural world within a hiking boot's throw of Hong Kong's downtown. What’s your favourite place to eat lunch? MG CAFÉ. The chef with over 20 years of experience and who have served in Gala, will delight you with thin-crusted handmade pizza, pasta, baked potato, salas, sandwiches etc.

AustCham Platinum Patrons

26 • austcham news | issue 181


On The Scene

Graeme Harris of MKS Harris and Mark Reade of Mizuho Securities Asia Ltd.

Joshua Keefe of Move For Life, Victoria Akhurst, Brigitte McMamara of AISHK.

Jessica Yuen of Top Schools and Chris McCorkell of AISHK.

Virginia Rigoni of VR Consulting and Robin Sillars of Giles Publications.

AustCham Spring Mix at Six was held at Jimmy’s Kitchen last month.

Ross Smith of Shenton Pty Ltd, James Ellis of FCM Travel Solutions and AustCham Chief Executive Drew Waters.

Kelvin Wong with Jonas Tam of National Australia Bank.

Special thanks to event sponsor Australian International School (AISHK):

Kathy Stannard, Boe Campion, Angus Sexton of Ord Minnett and Michael Madigan of OBE Organic.

Mandy Mansbridge of AISHK and Ian Robinson of Robinson Management Ltd.

Hannah Gibson with Lynette Wong of AISHK.

Sarah Thomson and Maryann Vale of PVH Far East Ltd.

AISHK Head of School Bruce Simons and Adler Ho of Adler Ho Property Consultants.

More coverage can be found on our online photo album: www.flickr.com/photos/austchamhongkong

ns Cong ratulatio ners! in w w a r d y k to all the luc issue 181 | austcham news

• 27


Some things we haven’t changed in 50 years… Like making time for everyone

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In fifty years we’ve learned a lot about what makes relocations more successful for everyone. With experienced and knowledgable people on the ground in more than 60 countries we equip you well for your relocation: • We’ll help you get to know the destination well before you go • Show you how to make it easier and more exciting for children, and less stressful for pets • We’ll look after your belongings with expert packing and transport • And when you arrive, we can help you get settled quicker and enjoy the thrill of a new place or a different culture

Tel: +852 2636 8388 hongkong@crownrelo.com

www.crownrelo.com/hongkong 28 • austcham news | issue 181

austcham news Issue 181  

The Australian Chamber of Commerce Hong Kong and Macau monthly publication.

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