Issuu on Google+

Brave Chests

Ribbons worn or eligible for Canadian Victoria Cross winners and those associated to Canada By Jim MacMillan-Murphy Š 2010

1


THE CANADIAN VC RECIPIENTS By Billy Willbond, MSM, CD. Who were these courageous young men who won the VC? They joined up to serve their King and keep the world free. Many of us knew the wet canteen stories and myths. About brave guys like our own, BC’s Smokey Smith. The stories weren’t stretched, were not embellished or twisted. Because, right now here in this book the citations are listed. They have a place of honour in our Canadian War Museum. Their photos and medals groups by the public should be seen. Listed herein are their pictures and citations of glory. They tell our military history, the Canadian true story. As you turn the pages perhaps you should give a thought. To these brave Canadians who gave all as they fought. WILLIAM WILLBOND CANADIAN SOLDIER POET SAANICHTON BC 1841 HRS 15 SEPTEMBER 2010

Military ribbons denote awards and decorations won by the individual in the armed services which recognize service and personal accomplishments while a member of the armed forces. Together with military badges, such as wings or hazard badge are a means to outwardly display the highlights of a service member's career. Interesting enough Billy Bishop would point to his roll of ribbons which included the VC, DSO, MC and DFC and refer to it as his “fighting row” to illustrate his bravery. Within this volume the author shares his virtual collection of ribbons and badges of all those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. You are exposed to recipient’s most important items, their faces, and cap badge at time of award, their rank and their ribbons, which demonstrates not only their service but, their sacrifice. The military ribbons below represent wars and campaigns from the Victorian times to the end of world war two. As was stated above, on their left chest they wear their history, from orders of chivalry to medals of long service, from one war to another, Not only commonwealth decorations and medals but foreign decorations.

2


I’ve listed not only commonly accepted Canadian recipients, but those born in Canada, died in Canada or served in the Canadian forces. I’ve also included the only recipient awarded the VC in Canada. The portraits allow you to look into the recipients faces and see, they are not supermen, but ordinary Canadians, doing extraordinary acts. Don’t forget to refer to the ribbon chart at the back of the book to see what ribbons were awarded.

Jim MacMillan-Murphy Esquimalt, BC.

Billy Bishop showing off his “fighting row”

Data Guide Photo of recipient

Cap badge at time of award

Name of recipient RANK: at time of award DECORATIONS: other decorations (see ribbon chart UNIT: at time of award BORN: place born ACTION: where was VC action DIED: date and place of death FOREIGN DECORATIONS: awarded REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads:

3

Rank at time of award


Wallace Lloyd ALGIE RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 20th Battalion, 1st Central Ontario Regiment, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Alton, Ontario - June 10, 1891 ACTION: North east of Cambrai, France– October 11, 1918 DIED: Cambrai, France – October 11, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action

Digest of Citation reads: On 11th October 1918 north east of Cambrai, France, Lieutenant Algie was with attacking troops which came under heavy enfilade machine-gun fire from a neighbouring village. Rushing forward with nine volunteers he shot the crew of an enemy machine-gun and then turned the gun on the enemy, enabling his party to reach the village. He rushed another machine-gun, killing the crew and capturing an officer and 10 men, thereby clearing the end of the village. He then went back for reinforcements but was killed while leading them forward.

4


William George BARKER RANK: Major (later Wing Commander) DECORATIONS: DSO & Bar, MC & 2 Bars UNIT: 201 Squadron, Royal Air Force (later Canadian Air Force) BORN: Dauphin, Manitoba - November 3, 1894 ACTION: France – October 27, 1918 DIED: Near Ottawa, Ontario – March 1, 1930 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre (France), 2 Italian silver medals for Military Valour REMARKS: Killed in a flying accident. Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One

Digest of Citation reads: On 27 October 1918 over the Foret de Mormal, France, Major Barker attacked a two-seater enemy aircraft causing it to break up in the air. He was afterwards attacked by a formation of Fokker fighters and was wounded in both thighs and his elbow was shattered. He lost consciousness twice but each time, on recovering, went back to the attack and sent three of his opponents down in flames. Finally he brought his crippled aircraft back to our lines where he crashed on landing.

5


Colin Fraser BARRON RANK: Corporal (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 3rd (Toronto) Battalion., Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Baldavie, Byndie, Baniff, Alberta - September 20, 1893 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium, November 6, 1917 DIED: Toronto, Ontario - August 15, 1958 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: served in World War Two

Digest of Citation reads: On 6th November 1917 at Passchendaele, Belgium, when his unit was held up by three machine-guns, Corporal Barren opened fire on them at point-blank range, rushed the guns, killed four of the crew and captured the remainder. He then turned one of the captured guns on the retiring enemy, causing severe casualties. This action produced far-reaching results and enabled the advance to continue

6


Ian Willoughby BAZALGETTE RANK: Squadron Leader DECORATIONS: DFC UNIT: 635 Squadron RAF No. 8 (Pathfinder Force) Group, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve BORN: Calgary, Alberta - October 19, 1918 ACTION: Trossy St. Maximin, France - August 4, 1944 DIED: Senantes, France - August 4, 1944 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action

Digest of Citation reads: On 4th August 1944 at Trossy St. Maximin, north-west Europe, Squadron Leader Bazalgette was one of the marking formation spearhead on a daylight raid. When near his target his Lancaster came under heavy anti-aircraft fire, both starboard engines were put out of action and serious fires broke out. In spite of this the squadron leader pressed on to the target, marking and bombing it accurately. He then attempted to bring the burning aircraft safety, having ordered those of the crew who were able to do so to bail out. He managed to land the Lancaster, but it immediately exploded, killing him and his two wounded crew members.

7


Harry Churchill BEET RANK: Corporal (later Captain) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1st Battalion, Derbyshire Regiment BORN: Bingham, Nottinghamshire, England - April 1, 1873 ACTION: Wakkerstroom, South Africa - April 22, 1900 DIED: Vancouver, British Columbia - January 10, 1946 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: He later immigrated to Saskatchewan, Canada, where he fought with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in WW1. In 1936 he settled in Vancouver where he remained until his death Citation read: On 22nd April 1900 at Wakkerstroom, South Africa, an infantry company and two squadrons of the Imperial Yeomanry had to retire f rom near a farm under a ridge held by the Boers. A corporal was lying on the ground wounded and Corporal Beet, seeing him, remained behind and put him under cover, bound up his wounds and, by firing, prevented the enemy from coming down to the farm until dark when a medical officer came to the wounded man's assistance. Corporal Beet was exposed to very heavy fire during the whole afternoon.

8


Edward Donald BELLEW RANK: Captain DECORATIONS: UNIT: 7th (1st British Columbia) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Bombay, India - October 28, 1882 ACTION: Kerselaere, Belgium - April 24, 1915 DIED: Kamloops, British Columbia - February 1, 1961 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: P.O.W. (Prisoner of war) until 1919

Digest of Citation reads: On 24th April 1915 near Kerselaere, Belgium, the advance of the enemy was temporarily stayed by Lieutenant Bellew, the battalion machine-gun officer, who had two guns in action on high ground when the enemy's attack broke in full force. Reinforcements which were sent forward having been destroyed, and with the enemy less than 100 yards away and no further assistance in sight, Lieutenant Bellew and a sergeant decided to fight it out. The sergeant was killed and Lieutenant Bellew wounded, nevertheless, he maintained his fire until his ammunition failed, when he seized a rifle smashed his machine gun and fighting to the last, was taken prisoner.

9


Philip Eric BENT RANK: Lieutenant Colonel DECORATIONS: DSO UNIT: 9th Bn., The Leicestershire Regiment BORN: Halifax, Nova Scotia - January 3, 1891 ACTION: East of Polygon Wood, Belgium - October 1, 1917 DIED: Polygon Wood, Belgium - October 1, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One

Digest of Citation reads: On 1st October 1917 east of Polygon Wood, Zonnebeke, Belgium, when the situation was critical owing to the confusion caused by a heavy enemy attack and the intense artillery fire, Lieutenant Colonel Bent collected a platoon that was in reserve and together with men from other companies and various regimental details, he organised and led them forward to the counter-attack, which was successful and the enemy were checked. The coolness and magnificent example of the Colonel resulted in the securing of a portion of the line essential to a subsequent operation, but he was killed whilst leading a charge.

10


William Avery "Billy" BISHOP RANK: Captain (later Air Marshal) DECORATIONS: CB, DSO & Bar, MC, DFC, ED. UNIT: 60 Squadron Royal Flying Corps BORN: Owen Sound, Ontario – February 8, 1894 ACTION: Near Cambrai, France – June 2, 1917 (flying services) DIED: Palm Beach, Florida, USA - September 11, 1956 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Knight, Legion of Honour (5th Class) (France), Croix de Guerre (France) REMARKS: Also served with Royal Air Force, Canadian Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force. Served in World War Two Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One

Digest of Citation reads: On 2nd June 1917 near Cambrai, France, Captain Bishop, patrolling independently, flew to an enemy aerodrome where several machines were standing with their engines running. One of the machines took off, but Captain Bishop fired at very close range and it crashed. He fired at and missed, the second, but his fire made the pilot swerve and hit a tree. Two more aircraft then took off– He emptied his Lewis -gun into the forward fuselage of the first and it crashed. He then emptied a whole drum into the fourth machine which had come up behind him and it dived away. Captain Bishop then flew back to his station.

11


Roland Richard Louis BOURKE RANK: Lieutenant (later Lieutenant Commander) DECORATIONS: DSO UNIT: Motor Launch 276, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve BORN: London, England – November 28, 1885 ACTION: Ostend, Belgium - 9 and May 10, 1918 DIED: Esquimalt, BC – August 29, 1958 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Chevalier, Legion of Honour (France), Croix de Guerre (France) REMARKS: also served in Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve served in World War Two Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One

Digest of Citation reads: On 9th and 10th May, 1918 at Ostend, Belgium, after HMS Vindictive's crew had been taken off, Lieutenant Bourke, Commanding Motor Launch 276 went into the harbour to check that everybody had got away. After searching and finding no one, he withdrew, but hearing cries from the water he turned back, found an officer and two seamen clinging to an upturned boat, and rescued them. During this time the motor launch was under very heavy fire and was hit 55 times, once by a six-inch shell which killed two of her crew and did considerable damage. Lieutenant Bourke, however, managed to take her into the open sea, and was taken in tow.

12


Alexander Picton BRERETON RANK: Corporal (later Company Quartermaster Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 8th (Winnipeg Rifles) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Oak River, Manitoba - November 13, 1892 ACTION: East of Amiens, France - August 9, 1918 DIED: Calgary, Alberta - June 11, 1976 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: served in World War Two

Digest of Citation reads: On 9th August 1918 east of Amiens, France during an attack when a line a hostile machine guns opened fire suddenly on his platoon which was in an exposed position with no cover, Corporal Brereton realised that unless something was done, his platoon would be annihilated. On his own initiative he at once sprang forward alone and, reaching one of the enemy machine-gun posts, shot the operator of the gun and bayoneted the next one who attempted to operate it, whereupon nine others surrendered. His action inspired the platoon to charge and capture the five remaining posts.

13


Jean BRILLANT RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: 22e Battalion (Canadien Francais), Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Assametquashan, QuÊbec - March 15, 1890 ACTION: East of Meharicourt, France - August 8/9 1918 DIED: Near Amiens, France – August 10, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Died of wounds from this action

Digest of Citation reads: On 8th/9th August, 1918 east of Maharicourt, France, Lieutenant Brillant, while capturing a machine gun which was holding up his company, was wounded but refused to leave his command. Later his company was again held up by heavy machine-gun fire and Lieutenant Brillant, with two platoons, rushed to the machine-gun post, capturing 150 prisoners and 15 guns. He was wounded a second time, had his wounds dressed immediately and again refused to leave his command. Subsequently he led a 'rushing party' towards a field gun and was again seriously wounded, but continued to advance until he fell unconscious. He died on the next day.

14


Harry BROWN RANK: Private DECORATIONS: UNIT: 10th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Ganonoque, Ontario- May 10, 1898 ACTION: Hill 70 near Loos, France – August 16, 1917 DIED: near Loos, France -August 17, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Died of wounds from this action

Digest of Citation reads: On 16th August 1917 at Hill 70, near Loos, France, after the capture of a position, the enemy massed in force and counter-attacked and the situation became critical. All signal wires were cut and Private Brown and another soldier were given an important message to be delivered at all costs up. The other messenger was killed and Private Brown's arm was shattered, but he struggled through to complete his mission before collapsing. He died on of his wounds.

15


Hugh CAIRNS RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: DCM UNIT: 46th (South Saskatchewan) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Ashington, Northumberland, England - December 4, 1896 ACTION: Valenciennes, France - November 1, 1918 DIED: Valenciennes, France - November 2, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Chevalier, Legion of Honour ( France ) REMARKS: Died of wounds from this action

Digest of Citation reads: On 1st November 1918 at Valenciennes, France, when a machine gun opened fire on his platoon, Sergeant Cairns seized a Lewis gun and single-handed and, in the face of direct fire, rushed the post, killed the crew of five and captured the gun. Later, after killing 12 of the enemy and capturing 18 and two guns, he went with a small party and, although wounded, outflanked more field and machine guns, killing many and capturing all the guns. After consolidation he went with a battle patrol to exploit Marly and forced 60 to surrender, but was severely wounded. He later collapsed and Died on next day.

16


Frederick William CAMPBELL RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1st (Western Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Mount Forest, Ontario - June 15, 1867 ACTION: Givenchy, France - June 15, 1915 DIED: near Givenchy, France - June 19, 1915 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Died of wounds from this action served during the Boer War

Digest of Citation reads: On 15th June 1915 at Givenchy, France, Lieutenant Campbell took two machine gun detachments forward and in face of heavy fire reached the German front line trench with one gun which he kept in action after nearly all his detachment had been killed or wounded. When a German counter-attack came, Lieutenant Campbell advanced his Gun still further and by firing about 1,000 rounds succeeded in holding the enemy back, but he was mortally wounded and Died on four days later

17


Leo CLARKE RANK: Lance Sergeant (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 2nd (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Hamilton, Ontario - December 1, 1892 ACTION: Near Pozieres, France - September 9, 1916 DIED: Etretat, France - October 19, 1916 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed later in the war

Digest of Citation reads: On 9th September 1916, near Pozieres, France, Corporal Clarke was detailed with the section of bombers, to cover the construction of a " block " in a newly captured trench. Most of his party had become casualties when about 20 of the enemy, with two officers, counter-attacked. The corporal advanced, emptying his revolver into them; then he picked up two enemy rifles and fired those too. One of the officers attacked with a bayonet, wounding Corporal Clarke in the leg, but he shot him dead, and pursuing the rest of the Germans, shooting four more and capturing a fifth.

18


William Hew CLARK-KENNEDY RANK: Lieutenant Colonel DECORATIONS: CMG, DSO & Bar. ED. UNIT: 24th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Dunskey, Wigtownshire, Scotland -March 3, 1879 ACTION: Fresnes-Rouvroy line, France - August 27/28, 1918 DIED: Montreal, Quebec - October 25, 1961 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre ( France ) REMARKS: served in the Boer war

Digest of Citation reads: On 27th/28th August, 1918 on the line at Fresnes-Rouvroy , France, the Brigade, of which Lieutenant Colonel Clark-Kennedy's Battalion was a central unit, suffered heavy casualties. At this point, the colonel encouraged his men and led them forward, then by controlling the direction of neighbouring units and collecting stragglers he enabled the whole Brigade front to advance. The following day he was severely wounded, but despite intense pain and loss of blood, he refused to be evacuated until he had gained a position from which the advance could be resumed.

19


Hampden Zane Churchill COCKBURN RANK: Lieutenant (later Major) DECORATIONS: UNIT: The Royal Canadian Dragoons BORN: Toronto, Ontario - November 19, 1867 ACTION: Komati River, South Africa - November 7, 1900 DIED: Toronto, Ontario - July 13, 1913 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Royal Humane Society Medal ( Silver )

Digest of Citation reads: On the 7th November 1900 during the action at Kumati River, South Africa, Lieutenant Cockburn with a handful of men , at a most critical moment, held off the enemy to enable the guns to get away. To do so he had to sacrifice himself and his party, all of whom were killed, wounded, or taken prisoner. He himself weas slightly wounded.

20


Robert Grierson COMBE RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 27th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Aberdeen, Scotland - August 5, 1880 ACTION: South of Acheville, France - May 3, 1917 DIED: Acheville, France - May 3, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action

Digest of Citation reads: On 3rd May 1917 South of Acheville, France, Lieutenant Combe steadied his company under intense fire and leading them through the enemy barrage reached the objective with only five men. He proceeded to bomb the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties and then, collecting small groups of men, succeed in capturing the objective, together with 80 prisoners. He repeatedly charged the enemy, driving them before him, but while personally leading his bombers he was killed by a sniper.

21


Frederick George COPPINS RANK: Corporal (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 8th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: London, England - October 25, 1889 ACTION: Hackett Woods, France - August 9, 1918 DIED: Livermore, California, USA- March 30, 1963 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS:

Digest of Citation reads: On 9th August, 1918 at Hackett Woods, near Amiens, France, Corporal Coppins' platoon came unexpectedly under fire of numerous machine guns. It was not possible to advance or retire and there was no cover. Corporal Coppins, calling on four men to follow him, leapt forward in the face of intense machine-gun fire and rushed straight for the guns. The four men with him were killed and he was wounded, but going on alone, he killed the operator of the first gun and three of the crew and took four prisoners. Despite his wound, he then continued with his platoon to the final objective.

22


Aubrey COSENS RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: UNIT: The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada BORN: Latchford, Ontario -May 21, 1921 ACTION: Mooshof, Holland - February 25/26, 1945 DIED: Mooshof, Holland - February 26, 1945 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action

Digest of Citation reads: On the night of 25th/26th February, 1945 at Mooshof, Holland, Sergeant Cosens assumed command of the four survivors of his platoon whom he placed in position to give him covering fire and then, running forward alone to a tank, took up an exposed position in front of the turret and directed its fire. When a further counter-attack had been repulsed and, on his orders, the tank had rammed some farm buildings, he went in alone, killing several of the defenders and taking the rest prisoners. He then dealt similarly with the occupants of two more buildings, but soon afterwards was killed by a sniper.

23


John Bernard CROAK RANK: Private DECORATIONS: UNIT: 13th (Royal Highlanders of Canada) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Little Bay, Newfoundland, May 18, 1892 ACTION: Amiens, France - August 8, 1918 DIED: Amiens, France - August 8, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action

Digest of Citation reads: On 8th August, 1918 at Amiens, France, Private Croak, having become separated from his section, encountered a machine-gun which he bombed and silenced, taking the gun and crew prisoners. Shortly afterwards he was severely wounded but refusing to give in, rejoined his platoon. When several more machine guns at a strong point were encountered, the private, seeing an opportunity, dashed forward, followed almost immediately by the rest of the platoon in a brilliant charge. He was the first to arrive at the trench line into which he led his men, bayoneting or capturing the entire garrison. He was again wounded and died almost at once.

24


Robert Edward CRUICKSHANK RANK: Private (later Major) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 2/14th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (London Scottish) BORN: Winnipeg, Manitoba - June 17, 1888 ACTION: East of Jordan River, Palestine - May 1, 1918 DIED: Blaby, Leicestershire, United Kingdom – September 1, 1961 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS:

Digest of Citation reads: On 1st May 1918 east of Jordan, Palestine, Private Cruikshank volunteered to take a message to company headquarters from his platoon which was in the bottom of a Wadi, with its officer and most of the men casualties. He rushed up the slopes but was hit, tried again and was again wounded. After his wounds had been dressed, he tried yet again, but was so badly wounded that he could make no further attempt. He lay all day in a dangerous position, being sniped at and wounded where he lay, but displayed great endurance and was cheerful and uncomplaining throughout.

25


David Vivian CURRIE RANK: Major (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: UNIT: The South Alberta Regiment BORN: Sutherland, Saskatchewan - July 8. 1912 ACTION: Battle of Falaise, France - August 18 – 20, 1944 DIED: Owen Sound, Ontario. - June 20, 1986 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: He was the vice chairman of the VC and GC Association from 1968-86 (Overseas) he also served as Sergeant at Arms of the House of Commons in Ottawa until 1979.

Digest of Citation reads: During the period 18th/20th August, 1944 at the Battle of Falaise, Normandy, Major Currie was in command of a small mixed force of tanks, self-propelled anti-tank guns and infantry which had been ordered to cut one of the main escape routes. Having attacked the village of St. Lambert-sur-Dives and consolidated a position halfway inside it, for 36 hours he repulsed repeated enemy attacks. Despite heavy casualties Major Currie never considered the possibility of failure and in the final assault seven enemy tanks 12, 88 mm guns and 40 vehicles were destroyed, 300 Germans were killed, 500 wounded and 1,100 captured. The remnants of two German armies were thus denied this escape route

26


The Hon. Raymond Harvey Lodge Joseph De MONTMORENCY RANK: Lieutenant (later Captain) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 21st Lancers ( Empress of India's ) BORN: Montreal, Quebec - February 5, 1867 ACTION: Battle of Omdurman, Sudan -September 2, 1898 DIED: Dordrecht, Cape Colony, South Africa, - February 23, 1900. FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: He was killed in action during the Boer War

Digest of Citation reads: On 2nd September, 1898 at the Battle of Khartoum, Sudan top after the charge, Lieutenant De Montmorency returned to help a second Lieutenant who was lying surrounded by a great many Dervishes. The Lieutenant drove the Dervishes off and, finding that the officer was dead, put the body on his horse which then broke away. Another Lieutenant and a corporal then came to his assistance and he was able to rejoin the Regiment which are begun to open fire on the enemy.

27


Edmund De WIND RANK: Second Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 15th Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles BORN: Comber, County Down, Ireland - December 11, 1883 ACTION: Racecourse Redoubt, near Groagie, France - March 21, 1918 DIED: near Groagie, France - March 21, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: On 21st March, 1918, at the Racecourse Redoubt, near Groagie, France, for seven-hour Second Lieutenant De Wind held this important post and though twice wounded and practically single-handed, he maintained his position until another section could be sent to his help. On two occasions, with two NCOs only, he got out on top under heavy machine-gun and rifle fire and cleared the enemy out of the trench, killing many of them. He continued to repel attack after attack until he was mortally wounded and collapsed.

28


Thomas Fasti DINESEN RANK: Private (later Lieutenant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 42nd (Royal Highlanders of Canada) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Rungsted, Denmark - August 9, 1892 ACTION: Parvillers, France - August 12, 1918 DIED: Hørsholm, Frederiksborg, Denmark - March 10, 1970 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre ( France ), Knight, Order of Dannebrog (Denmark) REMARKS:

Digest of Citation reads: On 12th August 1918 at Parvilles, France, Private Dinesen displayed conspicuous bravery during 10 hours of hand-to-hand fighting which resulted in the capture of over a mile of strongly defended enemy trenches. Five times in succession he rushed forward alone and put hostile guns out of action, accounting for 12 of the enemy. With bomb and bayonet. He sustained valour inspired his comrades at a very critical stage of the action.

29


Campbell Mellis DOUGLAS RANK: Assistant Surgeon (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 2nd Battalion, 24th Regiment of Foot BORN: Quebec City - August 5, 1840 ACTION: island of Little Andaman, eastern India, in the Bay of Bengal - May 7, 1867 DIED: Hollington (near Wells), Somerset, United Kingdom - December 31, 1909 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Lieutenant Colonel Douglas' Victoria Cross was unusual in the fact that it was awarded for saving life its sea in a storm off the Andaman Islands, and not for bravery in battle. He also holds the Bronze Medal of the Royal Humane Society.

Digest of Citation reads: On 7th May, 1867 at the Island of Little Andaman, Bay of Bengal, Assistant Surgeon Douglas and four privates of the 2nd/24th Regiment risked their lives in manning a boat and proceeding through dangerous surf to rescue some of their comrades who had been sent to the island to find out the fate of the Commander and seven of the crew, who were landed from the ship Assam Valley and were feared murdered by the cannibalistic islanders.

30


Alexander Roberts DUNN RANK: Lieutenant (later Colonel) DECORATIONS: KStJ UNIT: 11th Hussars (Prince Albert's Own) BORN: York (later Toronto) -September 15, 1833 ACTION: Battle of Balaclava on October 25, 1854 DIED: Eritrea, Africa – January 25, 1868 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: killed in unusual circumstances during in a hunting accident at Senafe and first Canadian awarded the Victoria Cross

Digest of Citation reads: On 20th October 1854 Balaclava, Crimea,(The Light Cavalry during the Charge of the Light Brigade), Lieutenant Dunn saved the life of a sergeant of his regiment, by cutting down two or three Russian Lancers who were attacking from the rear. He later killed a Russian Hussar who was attacking a private

31


Frederick FISHER RANK: Lance Corporal DECORATIONS: UNIT: 13th (Royal Highlanders of Canada) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: St. Catherine's, Ontario - August 3, 1894 ACTION: St. Julien, Belgium - April 23, 1915 DIED: St. Julien, Belgium - April 23, 1915 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: He was the first Canadian-born man to win VC while serving in the Canadian Army. Killed in action the next day.

Digest of Citation reads: On 23rd April, 1915 in the neighbourhood of St Julien, Belgium, Lance-Corporal Fisher went forward with the machine gun of which he was in charge, under heavy fire, and covered the retreat of a battery, losing four of his gun team. Later, when he had obtained four more men, he went forward again to the firing line and was killed while bringing his machine-gun into action under very heavy fire.

32


Gordon Muriel FLOWERDEW RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) BORN: Billingford, Norfolk – January 2, 1885 ACTION: Bois de Moreuil, France - March 30, 1918 DIED: Bois de Moreuil, France - March 31, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS:

Digest of Citation reads: On 30th March 1918 north-east of Bois De Moreuil, France, Lieutenant Flowerdew commanding a squadron detail for special services, reached the first objective and saw two lines of the enemy, each about 60 strong, armed with machine-guns. He ordered one Troop to dismount and engage the enemy while he led the remaining three troops to the charge, passing over the lines, killing many of the enemy then wheeling about and galloping at them again. Although the squadron had about 70 per cent casualties, including Lieutenant Flowerdew who was dangerously wounded, the enemy broke and fled, and the position was captured.

33


John Weir FOOTE RANK: Honorary Captain (later Honorary Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: CD UNIT: Canadian Corps of Chaplains attd The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Wentworth Regiment) BORN: Madoc, Ontario - May 5, 1904 ACTION: Dieppe, France – August 19, 1942 DIED: Cobourg, Ontario - May 2, 1988 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Lieutenant Colonel Foote was from 1958-57 the Minister of Reform Institutions Ontario

Digest of Citation reads: On 19th August, 1942 at Dieppe, France, Captain Foote coolly and calmly during the eight hours of the battle walked about collecting the wounded, saving many lives by his gallant efforts and inspiring those around him by his example. At the end of the gruelling time he climbed from the landing craft that was to have taken him to safety and deliberately walked into the German position in order to be taken prisoner so that he could be a help to those men who would be in captivity until the end of the war.

34


Benjamin Handley GEARY RANK: Second Lieutenant (later Major) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 4th Battalion, The East Surrey Regiment BORN: Marylebone, London, England – June 29, 1891 ACTION: Hill 60 near Ypres, Belgium - April 20/21, 1915 DIED: Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario – May 26, 1976 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Ordained into Holy Orders after the war, he was at one time Chaplain to the Forces, but resigned to go to Canada where he became Sergeant-at-Arms in the Canadian Legislature. In 1939 he joined the Canadian Army as a Major. He died on 28th May 1976, at Niagara-on-Lake.

Digest of Citation reads: On 20th and 21st April 1915 on Hill 60 near Ypres, Belgium, Second Lieutenant Geary led his men across exposed open ground swept by fierce enemy fire to join survivors of the Bedfordshire Regiment in a crater at the top of the hill, which she held against artillery and bomb attacks during the evening and night. Each attack was repulsed mainly owing to the fine example and personal gallantry of Second Lieutenant Geary. He deliberately exposed himself to enemy fire in order to see by the light of flares the whereabouts of the enemy. He was severely wounded early on 21st April.

35


Herman James GOOD RANK: Corporal. DECORATIONS: UNIT: 13th Battalion, Quebec Regiment (Royal Highlanders of Canada). Canadian Expeditionary Force ACTION: Hangard Wood, France – August 8, 1918 BORN: South Bathurst, New Brunswick, November, 29, 1887 DIED: Bathurst. New Brunswick, - 18th April 18, 1969

Digest of Citation reads: On 8th August, 1918 at Hangard Wood, France, when his company was held up by heavy fire from three machine guns, Corporal Good dashed forward alone, killing several of the garrison and capturing the remainder. Later on, the corporal, while alone, encountered a battery of 5.9 inch guns which were in action at the time. Collecting three men of his section he charged the battery under point-blank fire and captured the entire crew of three guns.

36


Robert Hampton GRAY RANK: Lieutenant (N) DECORATIONS: DSC UNIT: 1841 Squadron, Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve BORN: Trail, British Columbia - November 2, 1917 ACTION: Honsh큰, Japan - August 9, 1945 DIED: Honsh큰, Japan - August 9, 1945 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War Two

Digest of Citation reads: On 9th August 1945 at Onagawa Wan, Japan, Lieutenant Gray led an attack on a Japanese destroyer. In the face of fire from shore batteries and heavy concentration of fire from some five warships, he pressed home his attack, flying very low in order to ensure success. Although he was wounded and his aircraft in flames he obtained at least one direct hit, sinking the destroyer. His aircraft crashed into the bay.

37


Milton Fowler GREGG RANK: Lieutenant (later Brigadier) DECORATIONS: OC, CBE, MC, VD, ED, CD UNIT: The Royal Canadian Regiment. BORN: Mountain Dale, Kings County, New Brunswick -April 10, 1892 ACTION: Cambrai, France - September 27 to October 1, 1918 DIED: Fredericton, New Brunswick 13 Mar 1978 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Entering politics, from 1947-48 he was the Canadian Minister of Fisheries, following this then in 1948-50 he became Minister of Veterans Affairs. He was Minister of Labour from 1950-57 and in 1958-59 he was in Iraq with the United Nations Technical Assistance Team. He represented United Nations Children's Fund in Indonesia from 1960-63. He was the Canadian Commissioner to Guyana 1964-67

Digest of Citation reads: During the period 27th September to 1st October 1918 near Canbrai, France, Lieutenant Gregg showed most conspicuous bravery and initiative. Although wounded twice, he led his men against enemy trenches in which he personally killed or wounded 11 Germans, took 25 prisoners and captured 12 machine guns. In spite of his wounds he stayed with his company and a few days later again led his men in attack until severely wounded for the third time.

38


Frederick William HALL RANK: Company Sergeant-Major DECORATIONS: UNIT: 8th (Winnipeg Rifles) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Kilkenny, County Kilkenny, Ireland - February 21, 1885 ACTION: Ypres, Belgium - April 24, 1915 DIED: Gravenstafel, Belgium - April 25, 1915 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Died of wounds from this action. C S M Frederick William Hall was one of three Victoria Cross winners who all came from the same street, Pine Street, Winnipeg, Canada which was renamed Valour Road in their honour. The other two men were Corporal Leo Clarke and Lieutenant Robert Shankland

Digest of Citation reads: On 24th April 1915, near Ypres, Belgium, when a wounded man, who was lying some 15 yards from the trench, called for help, Company Sergeant-Major Hall endeavoured to reach him in the face of very heavy enfilade fire by the enemy. He then made a second most gallant attempt, and was in the act of lifting up the wounded man to bring him in when he fell mortally wounded in the head.

39


William HALL RANK: Able Seaman (later Petty Officer) DECORATIONS: UNIT: HMS Shannon, Royal Naval Brigade BORN: Horton's Bluff, Nova Scotia - April 28, 1827 ACTION: Lucknow, India - November 16, 1857 DIED: Hantsport, Nova Scotia - August 25, 1904 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Petty Officer Hall was the first coloured man to win the Victoria Cross

Digest of Citation reads: On 16th November, 1857 at Lucknow, India, naval guns were brought up close to the Shah Nujeff Mosque, and the gun crews kept up a steady fire in an attempt to breach the walls, while a hail of musket balls and grenades from the mutineers inside the mosque caused heavy casualties. Able Seaman Hall and the Lieutenant in command of the gun crews were , after a time, the only survivors, all the rest having been killed or wounded, and between them they loaded and served the last gun.

40


Robert Hill HANNA RANK: Company Sergeant-Major (later Lieutenant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 29th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Kilkeel, County Down, Ireland - August 6, 1887 ACTION: Lens, France - August 21, 1917, DIED: Mount Lehman British Columbia - June 15, 1967 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS:

Digest of Citation reads: On 21st September, 1917, at Lens, France, Company Sergeant-Major Hanna's company met with most severe enemy resistance at a heavily protected strong point, which had beaten off three assaults and all the officers of the company had become casualties. This warrant officer, under heavy machine-gun and rifle fire, coolly collected and led a party against the strong point, rushed through the wire and personally killed four of the enemy, capturing the position and silencing the machine-gun. This courageous action was responsible for the capture of a most important tactical point.

41


Frederick Maurice Watson HARVEY RANK: lieutenant (later Brigadier) DECORATIONS: MC, CD & 2 bars UNIT: Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) BORN: Athboy, County Meath, Ireland - September 1, 1888 ACTION: Guyencourt, France - March 27, 1917 DIED: Fort Macleod, Alberta - August 24, 1980 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre with star ( France ) REMARKS:

Digest of Citation reads: On 27 March 1917 at Guyencourt, France, during an attack by the regiment, the leading troop, commanded by Lieutenant Harvey, had suffered heavy casualties from rapid fire at close range. He was riding in front of his men when he came upon a wired trench containing a machine-gun and a strong garrison. He at once swung from his saddle and ran straight for the trench, jumped the wire, and shot the gunner and captured the gun.

42


Frederick HOBSON RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 20th Battalion, 1st Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Brigg, Lincolnshire, England - September 23, 1873 ACTION: Lens, France - August 15, 1917 DIED: New Lens, France - August 15, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action Served in the Boer War Digest of Citation reads: On 18th August, 1917 North-West of Lens, France during a strong enemy counter attack the Lewis gun in a forward position was buried by a shell and the crew, with the exception of a one man, killed. Sergeant Hobson, although not a Gunner, grasping the great importance of the post, rushed from his trench, dug out the gun and got it into action. The gun then jammed and so Sergeant Hobson rushed forward at the advancing enemy with bayonet and clubbed rifle, holding them back until he himself was killed by a rifle shot.

43


Charles Ferguson HOEY RANK: Major DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: 1st Battalion, The Lincolnshire Regiment BORN: Duncan, Vancouver Island, British Columbia - March 29, 1914 ACTION: Ngakyedauk Pass, Arakan, Burma (now Myanmar) - February 16, 1944 DIED: Ngakyedauk Pass, Arakan, Burma (now Myanmar) - February 17, 1944 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Died of wounds in this action Digest of Citation reads: On 16th February, 1944 near the Ngakyedauk Pass, Arakan, Burma, Major Hoey's company came under devastating machine-gun fire, but Major Hoey did not waver in his advance on the objective. Although wounded in the head and leg he went forward alone and tackled a troublesome enemy strong point, destroying it and killing all the occupants, but he was mortally wounded.

44


Edward James Gibson HOLLAND RANK: Sergeant (later Major) DECORATIONS: UNIT: The Royal Canadian Dragoons BORN: Ottawa, Ontario - February 2, 1878 ACTION: Komati River, South Africa - November 7, 1900 DIED: Cobalt, Ontario - June 18, 1948 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Served in World War I Digest of Citation reads:. On 7th November 1900 in South Africa, Sergeant Holland kept the Boers away from two 12 pounder guns with his Colt gun. When he saw that the enemy were too near for him to escape with the carriage, as the horse was blown, he calmly lifted the gun off and galloped away with it under his arm.

45


Thomas William HOLMES RANK: Private (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Montreal, Quebec - October 4, 1898 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium - October 26, 1917 DIED: Toronto, Ontario - January 4, 1950 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads:. On 26th October, 1917 near Passchenaele, Belgium, when the right flank of our attack was held up by heavy machine-gun fire from a pill-box strong point and heavy casualties were producing a critical situation, Private Holmes, on his own initiative and single-handed, ran forward and threw two bombs, killing and wounding the crews of two machine-guns. He then fetched another bomb and threw this into the entrance of the pill-box, causing the 19 occupants to surrender.

46


Samuel Lewis HONEY RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: DCM, MM. UNIT: 78th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Conn, Ontario - February 9, 1894 ACTION: Bourlon Wood, France - September 27/30, 1918 DIED: Bourlon Wood, France - September 30, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: killed in this action Digest of Citation reads:. On 27th September, 1918 at Bourlon Wood, France, when his company Commander and all the other officers of his company became casualties, Lieutenant Honey took command, continuing the advance and gaining the objective. Then, finding his company suffering casualties from enfilade machine-gun fire he made a personal reconnaissance and locating the machine-gun nest, rushed it single-handed, capturing the guns and 10 prisoners. Later, after repelling four enemy counter-attacks, he captured another machine-gun post. He continued to lead his company with great initiative and daring, but died of his wounds on the last day of the attack by his battalion.

47


David Ernest HORNELL RANK: Flight Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: No. 162 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force BORN: Mimico, Ontario - January 26, 1910 ACTION: Faroes, North Atlantic - June 24, 1944 DIED: Faroes, North Atlantic - June 24, 1944 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: On 24th June, 1944 on sea patrol in the North Atlantic, Flight Lieutenant Hornell's twin engined amphibian aircraft was attacked and badly damaged by an enemy submarine, nevertheless he succeeded in sinking it and then with superhuman effort managed to bring his aircraft down on the heavy swell, blazing furiously. There was only one serviceable dingy which could not hold all the crew so they took it in turns in the water. By the time the survivors were rescued after 21 hours, Flight Lieutenant Hornell was blinded and weak from exposure and cold. He died shortly after being picked up.

48


Bellenden Seymour HUTCHESON RANK: Captain DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: Canadian Army Medical Corps, Canadian Expeditionary Force, attached to 75th (Mississauga) Battalion, C.E.F. BORN: Mount Carmel, Illinois, USA - December 16, 1883 ACTION: Arras, France - September 2, 1918 DIED: Cairo, Illinois - April 9, 1954 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: On 2 September 1918 in France, Captain Hutcheson went through the Queant-Drocourt Support Line with his battalion, remaining on the field until every wounded man had been attended to. He dressed the wounds of a seriously hurt officer under terrific machine-gun and shell fire, and with the help of prisoners and his own men succeeded in evacuating the officer to safety. Immediately afterwards he rushed forward in full view of the enemy to attend a wounded sergeant and having placed him in a shell hole, dressed his wounds

49


Joseph KAEBLE RANK: Corporal DECORATIONS: MM UNIT: 22e Battalion (Canadien Francais), Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Saint-MoĂŻse QuĂŠbec - May 5, 1893 ACTION: Neuville-Vitasse, France - June 8, 1918 DIED: Neuville-Vitasse, France - June 9, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Died of wounds from this action Digest of Citation reads: On 8th/9th June 1918 at Neuville-Vitesse, France, Corporal Kaeble was in charge of a Lewis gun section during a strong enemy attack, when all of his section but one became casualties. As soon as the barrage lifted and about 50 of the enemy advanced, Corporal Kaeble jumped over the parapet with his Lewis gun, emptying several magazines into the advancing enemy. Although hit several times, he continued to fire blocking the enemy advance, until he fell mortally wounded. Even while lying on his back in the trench, he fired his last cartridge over the parapet at the retreating enemy.

50


George Fraser KERR RANK: Lieutenant (later Captain) DECORATIONS: MC & Bar, MM. UNIT: 3rd (Toronto) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Deseronto, Ontario – June 8, 1894 ACTION: Bourlon Wood, France – September 27, 1918 DIED: Toronto, Ontario – December 8, 1929 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: On 27th September 1918 at Bourlon Wood, France, Lieutenant Kerr acted with conspicuous bravery and leadership during operations, giving timely support by outflanking a machine-gun which was impeding the advance. Later, when the advance was held up again by a strong point and being well in advance of his company, he rushed the enemy strong point single-handed and captured four machine-guns and 31 prisoners.

51


John Chipman KERR RANK: Private (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 49th (Edmonton) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Fox River, Nova Scotia - January 11, 1887 ACTION: Courcelette, France - September 16, 1916 DIED: Port Moody, British Columbia - February 19, 1963 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS served in world war two Digest of Citation reads: During a bombing attack on the 16th September 1916 at Courcelette, France, Private Kerr, acting as a bayonet man, noticed that they were running short of bombs. He ran along the parados under heavy fire until he was close to the enemy. He opened fire at point blank range inflicting heavy losses. Assuming that they were surrounded, 62 of the enemy surrendered as well as 250 yards of the enemy trench being captured. Earlier in the action, Private Kerr's fingers had been blown off, but didn't stop to have his wounds dressed until he and two others had escorted the prisoners back, still under heavy fire, before reporting for duty.

52


Cecil John KINROSS RANK: Private DECORATIONS: UNIT: 49th (Edmonton) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Hillend, Clackmannanshire, Scotland - July 13, 1897 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium – October 28 - November 1, 1917 DIED: Lougheed, Alberta - June 21, 1957 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: On third in October 1917 at Passchendaele, Belgian, shortly after an attack was launched, Private Kinross' company came under very heavy fire, any chance of further advance being held up by an enemy machine-gun. Private Kinross carefully surveying the situation, removed all of his equipment except for his rifle and bandolier and then advanced alone over open ground in broad daylight. He charged the machine-gun killing the crew of six, seizing and destroying the gun. His superb example and courage allowed an extremely important position to be established

53


Arthur George KNIGHT RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 10th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Lewes, Sussex, England - June 26, 1886 ACTION: Villers-les-Cagnicourt, France - September 2, 1918 DIED: Villers-les-Cagnicourt, France - September 3, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre ( Belgium ) REMARKS Died of his wounds Digest of Citation reads: On 2nd September, 1918 at Villers-les-Cagnicourt, France, after an unsuccessful attack, the bombing section which she was leading was held up by the enemy. Sergeant Knight went forward alone, bayoneted several machine-gunners and trench mortar crews which caused the remainder to retire. He brought forward a Lewis gun and directed the fire on the retreating enemy. Whilst his platoon went off in pursuit, he saw about 30 of the enemy going into a tunnel leading off the trench. Again, alone, he went forward, killing one officer and two NCOs and taking 20 twenty. Following this, yet again single-handed, he routed another hostile party. On each occasion he displayed the greatest Valour under extreme conditions of fire. His example of courage of the gallantry and initiative was an inspiration to all. A short while later he was fatally wounded.

54


Filip KONOWAL RANK: Corporal (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 47th (British Columbia) Battalion , Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Kutkivtsi, Ukraine - September 15, 1888 ACTION: Lens, France - August 22–24, 1917 DIED: Hull, Quebec - June 3, 1959 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Cross, Order of St George ( Russia ) REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: In the period 22nd to 24th August 1917 at Lens, France, Corporal Konowal was in command of a section that had the difficult task of mopping up cellars, craters and machine-gun emplacements. Under his competent direction any resistance was overcome successfully and heavy casualties were inflicted on the enemy. In one cellar, he personally bayoneted three enemy and single-handed attacked seven others in a crater, killing them all. On reaching the objective, a machine gun was holding up the right flank causing heavy casualties. He rushed forward and entered the emplacement, killing all the crew, then bringing back the gun to our lines. The following day, single-handed, he again attacked a machine gun post, killed three of the crew, destroying the gun and emplacement with explosives. He killed at least 16 of the enemy and during the two days of fighting managed to keep up the excellent work until he was wounded.

55


Okill Massey LEARMONTH RANK: Major DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: 2nd (Eastern Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Quebec, City - February 20, 1894 ACTION: Near Loos, France - August 18, 1917 DIED: Loos, France - August 19, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Died of wounds next day Digest of Citation reads: East of Loos, on 18th August 1917, during a determined counter-attack on our new position, this officer, Acting Major Learmonth MC, when his company was momentarily surprised, personally charged and disposed of the attackers. Later carrying on a tremendous fight against the advancing enemy. Under intense barrage and although mortally wounded, he continuously bombed the enemy, by standing on the parapet of the trench, and directing operations and by his actions inspiring his men with a spirit of utmost resistance. Several times he caught the enemy bombs and threw them back. When he was eventually unable to continue, because of his wounds, he refused to be carried out of the line. He continued to give instructions and invaluable advice to his junior officers. He was finally taken to a hospital where he died of his wounds the following day.

56


Graham Thomson LYALL RANK: Lieutenant (later Colonel) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 102nd (North British Columbians) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Manchester, England - March 8, 1892 ACTION: Cambrai, France - September 27-October 1, 1918 DIED: Mersa Matruh, Egypt – November 28, 1941 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Died on active service in Egypt in World War Two, with the British Army Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: On 27th September, 1918, north of Canbrai, France, Lieutenant Lyall led his platoon in the capture of an enemy strong point, including 13 prisoners, a field gun and four machine-guns. Later he led his men once more against another strong point, rushing forward alone and capturing the position single-handed, on this occasion taking 45 prisoners and five machine guns. Another 47 prisoners were captured in his final objective along with another five machine guns. Near Blecourt, France, on the 1st October 1918 the capture of a strongly defended position yielded 60 prisoners and 17 machine-guns. During all of these operations, once the objective had been attained, Lieutenant Lyle, still under heavy fire, tended to the wounded

57


Thain Wendell MacDOWELL RANK: Captain (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: DSO UNIT: 38th (Ottawa) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Lachute, Quebec, - September 16, 1890 ACTION: Vimy Ridge, France - April 9, 1917 DIED: Nassau, Bahamas - March 27, 1960 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: At Vimy Ridge, France on 9th April 1917, Captain MacDowell, aided by two runners, was able to capture two machine guns, under extreme difficulty, and also capturing two officers and 23 men. He continued to hold the new position for five days, even though wounded in the hand, and in spite of heavy shellfire, until the battalion ultimately came to their relief.

58


John MacGREGOR RANK: Captain (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: MC & Bar DCM ED UNIT: 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Cawdor, Nairn, Scotland - February 1, 1889 ACTION: Cambrai, France - September 29/October 3, 1918 DIED: Powell River, British Columbia - June 9, 1952 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS also served in world war two Digest of Citation reads: Between 29th September and the 3rd October 1918 near Cambrai in France, Captain MacGregor led his company under continuous heavy fire. Although he was wounded, he located and terminated the action of the enemy machine-guns which were preventing Allied progress. He killed four men and took eight prisoners. He reorganised his company and continued the advance under heavy fire and against stubborn resistance. Later, after personally making a daylight reconnaissance under extremely heavy fire, he consolidated his company in Neuville St. Remy thus assisting the advance forward and into Tilloy.

59


John Keefer MAHONY RANK: Major (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: CD. UNIT: The Westminster Regiment BORN: New Westminster, British Columbia - June 30, 1911 ACTION: River Melfa, Italy - May 24, 1944 DIED: London, Ontario - December 15, 1990 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: On 24th May 1944, Major MAHONEY and his company were ordered to establish the initial bridgehead over the River Melfa, Italy. After this was accomplished, the company, in the face of very heavy enemy fire and attacks, held the position for five hours until they were reinforced by the remaining companies and supporting weapons. Major Mahoney had continued to direct the defence of the bridgehead even though he had been wounded, in the head and twice in the leg, earlier in the action. He refused all medical attention until the situation was established. He became a target of the enemy when they noted that he was the keystone to the defence.

60


Robert Gordon McBEATH RANK: Lance Corporal DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1/5th Battalion, The Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, Duke of Albany's) BORN: Kinlochbervie, Sutherland, Scotland - December 22, 1898 ACTION: Cambrai, France - November 20, 1917 DIED: Vancouver, British Columbia - October 9, 1922 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: McBeath was murdered in the line of duty while working as a police officer in Vancouver, British Columbia Digest of Citation reads. To the west of Canbrai, France, on 20th November 1917, the advance was checked by a nest of machine guns resulting in heavy casualties. Lance-Corporal McBeath moved off alone, after volunteering to deal with this situation,: armed with a Lewis gun and a revolver. Discovering that several other machine guns were also in action, with the assistance of a tank he attacked them driving the Gunners to ground in a deep dug- out. Lance-Corporal McBeath rushed in after them shooting the first man he saw. He then forced the remainder out, capturing three officers and 30 men.

61


George Burdon McKEAN RANK: Lieutenant (later Captain) DECORATIONS: MC, MM. UNIT: 14th (The Royal Montreal Regiment) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Willington, County Durham, England - July 4, 1888 ACTION: Gavrelle Sector, France - April 27/28, 1918 DIED: Potters Bar, England - November 28, 1926 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: Lieutenant Mckean's party, operating on the right flank, was held up by grenades and intense machinegun fire from a Block in the communication trench. The block was well protected by barbed wire and a machine-gun, 30 yards to the rear. The Block should have been destroyed by a previous bombardment, but had been too close to our lines to have been engaged. Realising that the block must be destroyed if the operation was to be successful, Lieutenant McKean ran to the right flank of the Block, disregarding all danger, jumped over the Block, head first, right on top of the enemy. Whilst lying on top of one of the enemy, he was attacked by another, using a bayonet. Lieutenant McKean, shot his attacker, then shot the man lying beneath him who was struggling fiercely. He ran out of bombs and he sent back to the line for a new supply, during which time, he single-handedly engaged the enemy. With the fresh bombs, he attacked the second Block, killing two, capturing four and driving the remainder of the garrison, which included a machine gun, into a dug out. The dug-out, its occupants and the guns were destroyed. If this position hadn't been captured, the raiding party would have been exposed to a dangerous enfilade fire, thus due to his action, many lives had been saved.

62


Hugh McDonald McKENZI E RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: DCM. UNIT: 7th Company, Canadian Machine Gun Corps, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Liverpool, Lancashire, UK - December 5, 1885 ACTION: Meetscheele Spur, Belgium - October 30, 1917 DIED: Passchendaele, Belgium - October 30, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre with palm ( France ) REMARKS Killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: At Meetscheele, near Passchendaele, Belgium, Lieutenant McKenzie when in charge of four machine guns accompanying the Infantry in an attack, seeing that all the officers and most of the NCOs had become casualties and the men were hesitating before a nest of enemy machine guns which were inflicting severe casualties, from their position on commanding ground. Handing over his command to an NCO, he rallied the Infantry into attack, capturing the strong point. Discovering that the position, a pillbox, was sweeping the ground by machine-gun fire, and dominating everything before it, Lieutenant McKenzie reconnoitred and detailed a frontal and flanking attack and captured the pillbox. Whilst leading the frontal attack he was killed.

63


Alan Arnett McLEOD RANK: Second Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: No. 2 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps BORN: Stonewall, Winnipeg, Manitoba - April 20, 1899 ACTION: Albert, France - March 27, 1918 DIED: Winnipeg, Manitoba - November 6, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS died of the Spanish Influenza pandemic Digest of Citation reads: Whilst flying an FK8 over Albert, France, on the 27th March, 1918, along with his observer, Second Lieutenant McLeod attacked and destroyed an enemy triplane and was immediately engaged by eight more, two of which were taken on and destroyed. The petrol tank of their aircaft was hit and burst into flames severely wounding both pilot and observer. Second Lieutenant Macleod side-slipped the aircraft steeply, trying extremely hard to keep the flames away from his observer. The plane eventually crashed in No-Man's-Land and, without considering his own injuries, he rescued his observer from the wreckage. He then carried him, under heavy fire from the enemy, to a reasonable place safety: where he collapsed from exhaustion.

64


William MERRIFIELD RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: MM UNIT: 4th (Central Ontario) Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Brentwood, Essex – October 9, 1890 ACTION: Abancourt, France - October 1, 1918 DIED: Tronto, Ontario – August 8, 1943 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: Sergeant Merrifield, single-handedly attack two enemy machine gun emplacements on the 1st October 1918 at Abancourt, France, which were preventing his platoon's advance. Quickly making his way from one shell-hole to another he killed the crew of the first post, getting wounded in the process. In spite of his wounds he went on to attack the second machine-gun, killing the crew with a bomb. Until he was severely wounded, he continued to lead his platoon refusing to be evacuated.

65


Charles Cecil Ingersoll MERRITT RANK: Lieutenant Colonel DECORATIONS: ED UNIT: The South Saskatchewan Regiment BORN: Vancouver, British Columbia - November 10, 1908 ACTION: Dieppe raid - August 19, 1942 DIED: Vancouver, British Columbia - July 12, 2000 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS POW and later MP Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War two Digest of Citation reads: On 19th August 1942 at Dieppe, France, Lieutenant Colonel Merritt's unit had to advance across a bridge swept by heavy machine-gun, mortar and artillery fire. The first parties had mostly been destroyed but the Colonel rushed forward and personally led the survivors of at least four parties, in turn, across the bridge, then led them in successful attacks on German pill-boxes. Although twice wounded he continued to direct the unit's operations and having collected bren and tommy guns, prepared a defensive position to cover the withdrawal from the beach

66


William Henry METCALF RANK: Lance Corporal (later Corporal) DECORATIONS: MM & Bar UNIT: 16th (Canadian Scottish) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Waite, Maine, USA - January 29, 1894 ACTION: Arras, France - September 2, 1918 DIED: Eastport, Maine, USA - August 8, 1968 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: On 2 September 1918 at Arras, France, when the right flank of the battalion was held up, LanceCorporal Metcalf rushed forward under intense machine-gun fire to a passing tank and with his signal flag walked in front of the tank directing it along the trench in a perfect hail of bullets and bombs. The machine-gun strong-point was overcome, very heavy casualties were inflicted and a critical situation was relieved. Later, although wounded, Corporal Metcalf continued to advance until ordered to get into a shell hole and have his wounds dressed.

67


William Johnstone MILNE RANK: Private DECORATIONS: UNIT: 16th (Canadian Scottish) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire, Scotland - December 21, 1891 ACTION: Thelus, France - April 9, 1917 DIED: Thelus, France - April 9, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: Whilst in the process of an attack on Vimy Ridge, France, on reaching the first objective Private Milne spotted an enemy machine-gun firing on the advancing troops. He reached the gun by crawling on his hands and knees, bombing the crew and killing them, capturing the gun. On the reformation of the line he located another machine-gun. Again on hands and knees he stalked the second gun, putting the enemy crew out of action and capturing the gun.

68


Harry Garnet Bedford MINER RANK: Corporal DECORATIONS: UNIT: 58th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Cedar Springs, Ontario, - June 24, 1891 ACTION: Demuin, France - August 8, 1918 DIED: Demuin, France - August 8, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre ( France ) REMARKS Killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: During an attack on 8th August 1918 at Demuin, France, Corporal Miner, single-handed, rushed an enemy machine-gun post, killed all of the crew and then turned the gun on to the enemy. Along with two others, later on, he attacked another machine-gun post successfully putting the gun out of action. He then rushed, again single-handed, an enemy bombing post. Here he bayoneted two of the garrison and put the rest of the team to flight. In the performance of this act he was mortally wounded.

69


Coulson Norman MITCHELL RANK: Captain (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: 1st Tunnelling Company, 4th Canadian Engineers, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Winnipeg, Manitoba - Dec. 11, 1889 ACTION: Canal de L'Escaut, France - October 8/9, 1918 DIED: Mount Royal, Quebec -November 17, 1978 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: On the night of 8th/9th October 1918, Captain Mitchell led a party to examine bridges over the Canal de L'Escaut, north-east of Canbrai, France, ahead of the advancing infantry. The main bridge had been heavily charged. The object was to stop the bridges from being demolished on the line of approach. When he reached the canal he found the bridge already blown . Captain Mitchell managed to cut several of the lead wires on one of the following bridges, which was by then, in total darkness. He then dashed across the main bridge, not knowing the strength or position of the enemy. Whilst he and his NCO were cutting the wires, the enemy decided to attack the bridge. He went to the assistance of one of the sentries, who had been wounded. He captured 12 of the enemy after killing three others. He managed to maintain the bridgehead until reinforcements arrived. Still under heavy fire, he continued with his task of neutralising the charges, knowing full well that the bridges could have been fired at any moment.

70


George Harry MULLIN RANK: Sergeant (later Major) DECORATIONS: MM UNIT: Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, (Eastern Ontario Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Portland, Oregon, USA - August 15, 1892 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium - October 30, 1917 DIED: Regina, Saskatchewan - April 5, 1963 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS served in world war two, Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: On 30 Ocober 1917 at Passchendaele, Belgium, Sergeant Mullin single-handed captured a pill-box which had withstood heavy bombardment and was causing heavy casualties and holding up the attack. He rushed the sniper's post in front, destroyed the garrison with bombs, shot two gunners and then compelled the remaining 10 men to surrender. All the time rapid fire was directed on him and his clothes were riddled with bullets, but he never faltered in his purpose and he not only helped to save the situation but indirectly saved many lives.

71


Andrew Charles (Andy) MYNARSKI RANK: Pilot Officer DECORATIONS: UNIT: 419 "Moose" Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force BORN: Winnipeg, Manitoba - 14 October 1916 ACTION: Cambrai, France - June 12, 1944 DIED: Cambrai, France - June 13, 1944 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Died of wounds from this action. At the time of the raid, he was unaware that he'd been promoted to Pilot Officer with effect from 11th June 1944 Digest of Citation reads: Pilot Officer Mynarski was the mid- upper gummer of a Lancaster that had been attacked by enemy fighters causing a fire in the aircraft. The captain gave orders for the crew to bale out and as Pilot Officer made his way to the escape hatch, he spotted the rear-gunner who was trapped in his turret. He made his way through the flames to the gunners aid, but despite his efforts to save him, he couldn't release him. He was eventually persuaded that nothing more could be done to help the gunner and by this time his own clothing was on fire. He made his way once more to the escape hatch and baled out. He was so badly burned, when he was found by the French, that he died of his injuries the following day.

72


William Henry Snyder NICKERSON RANK: Lieutenant (later Major General) DECORATIONS: CB, CMG. UNIT: Royal Army Medical Corps, attached to the Mounted Infantry BORN: Dorchester, New Brunswick - March 27, 1875 ACTION: Wakkerstroom, South Africa - April 20, 1900 DIED: Cour, Kintyre, Scotland - May 20, 1954 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Hon. Surgeon to the King 1925-33, Colonel Commandant RAMC 1933-45 Home Guard Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads:. At Wakkerstroom, South Africa, Lieutenant Nickerson, during the infantry advance in support of the mountain troops, went under heavy shell and rifle fire and attended to a wounded soldier. After dressing his wounds, he remained with him until they were able to take him to a place of safety.

73


Claude Joseph Patrick NUNNEY RANK: Private (later Corporal) DECORATIONS: DCM, MM. UNIT: 38th (Ottawa) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Dublin, Ireland - December 24, 1892 ACTION: Drocourt-Queant Line, France - September 1/2, 1918 DIED: Vis-en-Artios, France - September 18, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Died of wounds from this action Digest of Citation reads: For most conspicuous bravery on the 1st and 2nd September 1918 during operations against the Drocourt-QuĂŠant line. When his battalion was in the vicinity of Vis-en-Artois, France, preparatory to the advance, the Germans laid down a barrage and counter-attacked. Private Nunney, at this point in time, was at company headquarters. On his own initiative he immediately proceeded through the barrage to the company's outpost lines. Making his way from post to post and giving encouragement to the men by his own fearless example the enemy were repulsed and a critical situation was saved. On the 2nd September, during the attack, his dash placed him continually well in advance of his comrades. His example of showing no fear was undoubtedly a great factor in helping the company on its way forwards to the objectives. Throughout the action he showed the highest degree of Valour. He was severely wounded and died of his wounds on 18th September 1918.

74


Timothy O'HEA Private. 1st Battalion. Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort's Own) London Gazetted on the 1st June 1867. Born in 1846 at Skull, Bantry, County Cork, Ireland. Disappeared in November 1876 in Sturt's Desert, Queensland, Australia. Remarks As this act by Private 0'Hea was not performed against an enemy, he could not be originally awarded the Victoria Cross under Rule 5 of the Royal Warrant. However, on August 10th, 1858 a new clause was added to the Warrant, under which Private O'Hea was able to receive the award. Because the service medal was not issued until 1899, it was awarded only if applied for and the recipient must have: a. been on active service in the field; b. served as guard at any point where an attack from the enemy was expected; or c. been detailed for some specific service or duty.

Digest of Citation reads: For conspicuous conduct, on the 19th June 1866, on the occasion of a fire on a railway car that contained 2000lbs of ammunition, between Quebec and Montreal. On the Grand trunk Railway, at Danville Station an alarm was given that a railway carriage was on fire. The sergeant, who had been holding the keys, had them taken from his hand by Private O'Hea, who then rushed to the car, and on opening it, called for water and a ladder. Due to his fin e example the fire was suppressed.

75


Christopher Patrick John O'KELLY RANK: Captain (later Major) DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: 52nd (96th Lake Superior Regiment)Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Winnipeg, Manitoba - November 18, 1895 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium - October 26, 1917 DIED: Lac Seul Ontario - November 15, 1922 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: At Passchendaele in Belgium, on 26th October 1917, Captain O'Kelly led his company with extraordinary skill and determination. After the failure of the original attack and two companies, that belonged to his unit, had launched an attack, Captain O'Kelly advanced over 1000 yards with his command under extremely heavy fire, not being covered by an artillery barrage and took the enemy posts situated at the crest of the hill by storm. Captain O'Kelly organised his men and led them in a series of attacks against enemy pillboxes. His company captured six pillboxes, 100 of the enemy and 10 machine-guns. Later, during the afternoon, Captain O'Kelly, again leading his company, repelled a fierce enemy counter attack, during which they took more prisoners. During the night he and his company captured a hostile raiding party consisting of one officer, 10 men and a machine-gun. The success of these actions was due mainly to the magnificent courage, daring and capability of Captain O'Kelly.

76


Michael John O'LEARY RANK: Lance Corporal (later Major) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1st Battalion, Irish Guards BORN: Inchigeela, County Cork - September 29, 1890 ACTION: Cuinchy, France - February 1, 1915 DIED: London, England - August 1, 1961 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Cross, Order of St George ( Russia ) REMARKS He had been in the Royal Navy before joining the Irish Guards. After serving seven years he left for Canada. Here he joined the Royal Canadian North-West Mounted Police at the outbreak of the European War (WW I) he rejoined the Irish Guards. Served in world war two Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One

Digest of Citation reads: When forming one of the storming parties at Cuinchy, France, on the 1st February 1915, which advanced against the enemy barricades, Lance-Corporal O'Leary crossed to the fore and alone killed five Germans who were holding the first barricade. He went on to attack a second barricade, 60 yards further along and after killing three of the enemy, captured it and took two prisoners. By his action, he practically captured the enemy positions by himself; he also prevented the rest of the attacking party from being fired upon by the enemy.

77


Michael James O'ROURKE RANK: Private DECORATIONS: MM UNIT: 7th (1st British Columbia) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Limerick, Ireland – March 19, 1879 ACTION: Hill 70, France - August 15/17, 1917 DIED: Vancouver, British Columbia - December 6, 1957 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: Private O'Rourke was a stretcher bearer, who during the period 15th/17th August, 1917, worked continuously for the three days and nights bringing in the wounded to safety, dressing their wounds and supplying them with food and drink. During the whole of this period at Hill 60, Lens, France, the area around where he worked was continuously shelled and swept by heavy machine gun and rifle fire. He was, on several occasions, knocked from his feet and even partially buried by enemy shells. Seeing a blinded comrade, who was being sniped at by the enemy, stumbling around ahead of their trench, Private O'Rourke immediately leapt out and went to his aid, bringing the man back, all the time under sniper fire. On a later occasion he went forward once more, a distance of 50 yards ahead of our barrage: all the time under heavy and accurate fire from enemy machine guns and snipers and brought in another wounded comrade. Once again, when the posts were retired to consolidate, he made his way out, again under extremely heavy fire, to bring in a wounded man who'd been left behind. He showed an absolute disregard for his own safety whilst going to the aid of the wounded in spite of his own exhaustion and being continuously under heavy fire from the enemy.

78


John Robert OSBORN RANK: Company Sergeant Major DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1st Battalion Winnipeg Grenadiers BORN: Norfolk England - January 2, 1899 ACTION: Mount Butler, Hong Kong - December 19, 1941 DIED: Mount Butler, Hong Kong - December 19, 1941 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Killed in this action served in world war one with the royal navy Digest of Citation reads: During the attack on Mount Butler, Hong Kong on the 19th December 1941 a section of the company led by Sergeant-Major Osborn captured and held a hill until the position became untenable. He helped the stragglers to the new company position and whilst covering their retirement he was exposed to the enemy. Later, when the enemy were hurling grenades at them, he picked up one and threw it back at the enemy. One grenade landed in a position where it was impossible to retrieve it and return it in time. SergeantMajor Osborn shouted a warning to his comrades, then threw himself to bodily cover the grenade, which exploded. He was killed instantly.

79


John George PATTISON RANK: Private DECORATIONS: UNIT: 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Woolwich, London, England - September 8, 1875 ACTION: Vimy Ridge, France - April 10, 1917 DIED: Lens, France, - June 3, 1917. FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Killed in action later in the war. Digest of Citation reads: When an enemy machine gun, which had been holding up the advance of our troops and inflicting severe casualties on 10th April 1917 at Vimy Ridge, in France, Private Pattison, without regard for his own safety, ran forward, and making his way by jumping from shell-hole to shell-hole, managed to reach cover only 30 yards from the enemy machine-gun. From this point, under extremely heavy fire, he hurled bombs which killed and wounded some of the gun's crew. Private Pattison then rushed forward, overcoming and bayoneting the surviving five gunners. His action made further advance to the objective possible.

80


The Hon George Randolph PEARKES RANK: Major (later Major General) DECORATIONS: CC, CB, DSO, MC, KStJ, CD & 3 Bars. UNIT: 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Watford, Hertfordshire, England - February 28, 1888 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium - October 30, 1917 DIED:Victoria, British Columbia - May 30, 1984 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre with star ( France ), Commander, Legion of Merit ( USA )REMARKS He was the General Officer Commanding the 1st Canadian Division in 1940 and in 1942-45 he was the GOC-in-C, Pacific Command, Canada. From 1957-60 he was the Minister of National Defence (Canada), the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia from 1960-68. He was the Overseas Vice-Chairman of the VC and GC Association of 1956-68. Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: Major Pearkes, although wounded in the left thigh, continued to lead his men with utmost gallantry, in spite of many obstacles. On the 30th/31st October 1917 at Passchendaele, Belgium, when at a particular stage of the attack further advancement was threatened by a strong point, an objective of the Battalion on his left, but they had failed in its capture. Major Pearkes, appreciating the situation, quickly captured and held this strong point. This enabled the advance to continue successfully forward. It was mainly due to his personality and determination that he was able to maintain his objective with the small number of men at his command, repeatedly beating back enemy counter attacks whilst both of his flanks were unprotected. His repeated reports to his commanding officer giving his appreciation of the situation made it possible for them to dispose their troops to advantage and hold the position captured.

81


John PEARSON RANK: Private (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 8th Hussars (The King's Royal Irish) BORN: Leeds, Yorkshire, England - January 19, 1825 ACTION: Gwalior, India - June 17, 1858 DIED: Lion's Head, Eastnor Twp., Bruce Co., Ontario - April 18, 1892 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: In a gallant charge made by a squadron of the Regiment at Gwalior, India on 17th June 1858, included Private Pearson, Captain Heneage, Sergeant Joseph Ward, and Farrier George Hollis. They were supported by the Division of the Bombay Horse Artillery and the 95th Regiment. They routed the enemy who were advancing upon a position held by Brigadier Smith. They charged through the rebel camp into two batteries, capturing and bringing back two of the enemy's guns, all the time under heavy converging fire from the fort and the town.

82


Cyrus Wesley PECK RANK: Lieutenant Colonel DECORATIONS: DSO, & Bar. UNIT: 16th (Canadian Scottish) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Hopewell Hill, New Brunswick - April 26, 1871 ACTION: Cagnicourt, France – September 2, 1918 DIED: Sidney, British Columbia - September 27, 1956 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS MP, represented Skeena in the Canadian parliament Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: For most conspicuous bravery and skill whilst leading his men, under intense enemy fire After quickly capturing the first objective progress, to a further objective, was hampered by enemy machine-gun fire from the right flank. Colonel Peck went forward and made a personal reconnaissance tour, all the time under heavy machine-gun fire and sniping across a stretch of ground which was being heavily swept by enemy fire. Returning to the Battalion, he reorganised, and then, acting on the knowledge he'd gained from his reconnaissance, pushed them forward, arranging to protect his flanks. Making his way out under the most intense artillery and machine-gun fire, he intercepted our tanks and gave them the necessary instructions to where they were to make for, thus making it possible for Canadian Infantry Battalion to push forward. He then gave this Battalion the required support. His magnificent display of courage and leadership allowed the advance to continue and contributed largely to the success of the brigade attacks.

83


Frederick Thornton PETERS RANK: Captain (N) DECORATIONS: DSO, DSC & Bar. UNIT: HMS Walney, Royal Navy BORN: Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island - September 17, 1889 ACTION: Oran, Algeria - November 8, 1942 DIED: At sea near Gibralter - November 13, 1942 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Distinguished Service Cross ( USA ) and Messina Earthquake Medal 1908 REMARKS killed when the Sunderland seaplane which was returning him to England crashed Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: For Valour in taking HMS Walney, into the harbour of Oran, North Africa, on 8th November 1942. This port was held by the Vichy French. Captain Peters led his force through the boom towards the jetty, all the time under fire at point-blank range from the enemy shore batteries as well as fire from a Vichy French Destroyer and a Cruiser. Although he was blinded in one eye, he was the only one of 17 officers on the bridge that survived. HMS Walney, badly disabled and on fire, managed to make it to the jetty. She sank with her Colours flying.

Messina Earthquake Medal 1908

84


Walter Leigh RAYFIELD RANK: Private (later Captain) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 7th (1st British Columbia) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Richmond-on-the-Thames, Surrey, UK – October 7, 1881 ACTION: Arras, France - September 2, 1918. DIED: Toronto, Ontario - February 19, 1949 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Silver Medal of the Royal Order of the Crown (Belgium) REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: East of Arras, France, from the 2nd to 4th September 1918, during operations, Private Rayfield rushed ahead of his company, to a trench occupied by a large number of the enemy, where he bayoneted two of them and took 10 prisoners. Later, on locating an enemy sniper, who was causing many casualties, Private Rayfield, with great skill, and under constant rifle fire, engaged the sniper. Then rushing the section of trench from where the sniper had operated, he so demoralised the enemy, by his daring and calm, that 30 more of them surrendered to him. Regardless of his own personal safety, he left , under cover of heavy machine-gun fire, to carry in a badly wounded comrade. "His indomitable courage, cool foresight and daring reconnaissance were invaluable to his Company Commander and an inspiration to all ranks."

85


Herbert Taylor READE RANK: Surgeon (later Surgeon General) DECORATIONS: CB UNIT: 61st Regiment of Foot BORN: Perth, Upper Canada - September 2, 1828 ACTION: Delhi, India - September 14, 1857 DIED: Bath, Somerset, England - June 23, 1897 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Digest of Citation reads: During the Siege of Delhi, India, on 14th September 1857, Surgeon Reade was attending to the wounded, at the end of one of the the city's streets, when a party of rebels advanced, from the direction of the Bank, towards where he was working. Having established a position, they started firing from the roofs of the nearby houses. This placed the wounded in extreme danger and susceptible to falling into enemy hands. Surgeon Reade called upon the few soldiers that were there, around 10 in all , and drawing his sword led them, under extremely heavy fire from the rebels, towards their positions and dislodged them. Two of his own men were killed and five or six wounded. Two days later, at the assault on Delhi, Surgeon Reade was amongst the first at the breach in the magazine, where he, and a sergeant, spiked one of the enemy's guns.

86


Arthur Herbert Lindsay RICHARDSON RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: UNIT: Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians). BORN: Southport, Lancashire - September 23, 1872 ACTION: Wolwespruit, South Africa - July 5, 1900 DIED: Liverpool, England - December 15, 1932 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS

Digest of Citation reads: At Wolwespruit, South Africa, 38 personnel of Lord Strathcona's Horse were engaged at close-quarters by an enemy force, around 80 in number. After the order had been given to retire, Sergeant Richardson, under very heavy crossfire, rode back and picked up a Trooper, who was wounded in two places, and whose horse had been shot from under him, and rode with him, under fire, to safety. Sergeant Richardson, himself, was at the time of this act of gallantry, within 300 yards of the enemy and his own horse had been wounded.

87


George RICHARDSON RANK: Private (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 34th Regiment of foot (later The Border Regiment) BORN: Derrylane, Killyshandra, County Cavan - August 1, 1831 ACTION: Kewane Trans-Gogra, India - April 27, 1859 DIED: London, Ontario - January 28, 1923 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: On 27th April 1859, Private Richardson showed determined courage when, although severely wounded, one arm actually disabled, closed with, and secured a mutineer who was armed with a broad revolver. This act took place at Keware Trans-Gogra, India.

88


James Cleland RICHARDSON RANK: Piper DECORATIONS: UNIT: 16th (Canadian Scottish) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Bellshill, Scotland - November 25, 1895 ACTION: Somme, France - October 8, 1916 DIED: near Courcelette, France- 8 or 9 October 8, 1916 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: On 8th October, 1916 at Regina trench, Somme, France, the company was held up by very strong wire and came under intense fire. Piper Richardson, who had obtained permission to play the company 'overthe-top' strode up and down outside the wire playing his pipes, which so inspired the company that the wire was rushed and the position captured. Later the piper was detailed to take back a wounded comrade and some prisoners, but after preceding some distance he insisted on turning back to recover its pipes which he had left behind. He was never seen again.

89


Thomas RICKETTS RANK: Private (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1st Bn, Royal Newfoundland Regiment BORN: Middle Arm, White Bay, Newfoundland - April 15, 1901 ACTION: Ledeghem, Belgium, - October 14, 1918 DIED: St. John's, Newfoundland - February 10, 1967 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Croix de Guerre ( France ) REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: On 14 October 1918 at Ledeghem, Belgium, Private Rickets volunteered to go with his section commander and a Lewis gun in an attempt to out-flank an enemy battery causing casualties at pointy blank range. Their ammunition was exhausted when still 300 yards from the battery and the enemy began to bring up their gun teams. Private Rickets doubled back 100 yards under the heaviest machine-gun fire, procured ammunition and dashed back again to the Lewis gun. They then drove the enemy and gun teams into a farm and the platoon was able to advance. They captured four field guns, four machine-guns and eight prisoners.

90


James Peter ROBERTSON RANK: Private DECORATIONS: UNIT: 27th (City of Winnipeg) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Albion Mines (now called Stellarton), Pictou County, Nova Scotia - October 26, 1883 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium - November 6, 1917 DIED: Passchendaele, Belgium - November 6, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: On 6th November 1917, at Passchendaele, Belgian, when his platoon was held up by uncut barbed-wire and an enemy machine-gun that was causing many casualties, Private Robertson rushed to an opening on the flank, attacked the machine-gun, he struggled with the crew, killed four of them, turned the gun on the fleeing remainder, who were terrified by his fierceness, as they ran for the safety of their own lines. His gallant work allowed his own platoon to advance. After inflicting sev eral casualties on the enemy, he carried the captured machine gun to his final position and opened fire on the demoralised, retreating enemy. His determined fire subdued the enemy snipers. His actions, of courage and calm, in the face of the enemy were an inspiration to his comrades, spurring them on to greater efforts. Later, under extremely heavy fire, he went out to rescue two of our snipers, from in front of the trench, badly wounded. He was killed just as he rescued the second man.

91


Henry Howey ROBSON RANK: Private DECORATIONS: UNIT: 2nd Battalion, The Royal Scots (The Lothian Regiment) BORN: South Shields -February 18, 1894 ACTION: Kemmel, Flanders/Belgium - December 14, 1914 DIED: Toronto, Ontario - March 4, 1964 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: he was the Sergeant-at-Arms for the Ontario Legislature Digest of Citation reads: Private Robson climbed from his trench, under extremely heavy fire and rescued a wounded noncommissioned officer, during an attack near Kemmel, France, on 14th December 1914. During another attack, later, he attempted to rescue another wounded man and bring him to cover again exposed to heavy fire. During this attempt he was wounded almost immediately, but persevered, with the attempt, until he was made helpless when he received his second wound. On 13th November 1916, he was seriously wounded again at Serres-on Ancre .

92


Charles Smith RUTHERFORD RANK: Lieutenant (later Captain) DECORATIONS: MC, MM. UNIT: 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Haldimand Town, Ontario - January 9, 1892 ACTION: Monchy, France - August 26, 1918 DIED: Colborne, Ontario - June 11, 1989 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS From 1934 to 1940, he was the Sergeant at Arms of the Ontario Legislature when Mitchell Hepburn was Premier. He was the first sergeant at Arms to eject a member of the Legislature Digest of Citation reads: Whilst in command of an assault party on 26th August 1918, at Monchy, France, Lieutenant Rutherford found that he was a considerable distance ahead of his men. Almost at the same moment, ahead of him, he sighted a fully armed strong enemy party outside a pillbox. With his revolver he beckoned them to come towards him. They, in turn, indicated that they wanted him to go to them. This he did and informed them that they were now his prisoners. The German officer disputed this and invited the lieutenant into the pillbox. Lieutenant Rutherford declined the offer. He managed, by bluffing, to convince the officer that they were surrounded and the whole party of the enemy, 45 in all, including two officers and three machine-guns, surrendered to him. He also convinced the enemy officer to halt the fire of an enemy machine gun close by, taking advantage of the situation to move his men up in support. The Lieutenant then noticed that the right assaulting party was being held up by fire from another pillbox. He attacked the pillbox with a Lewis gun, taking another 35 prisoners, along with their machine guns, enabling the assault party to continue their advance. He was an inspiration to all those who saw him.

93


Francis Alexander Caron SCRIMGER RANK: Captain (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: UNIT: Canadian Army Medical Corps, Canadian Expeditionary Force, attached to 14th Battalion, (Royal Montreal Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Montreal, Quebec - February 10, 1880 ACTION: St. Julien, Belgium - April 25, 1915 DIED: Montreal, Quebec - February 13, 1937 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: On 25 April 1915 at St.Julien, Belgium Captain Scrimger was in charge of an advanced dressing station. He directed the removal of the wounded under heavy fire and carried a wounded officer out of a stable in search of a place of greater safety. When he was unable to carry him any further, he remained with the wounded man until help could be obtained.

94


Robert SHANKLAND RANK: Lieutenant (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: DCM UNIT: 43rd (Cameron Highlanders of Canada) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Ayr, Scotland - October 10, 1887 ACTION: Passchendaele, Belgium - October 26, 1917 DIED: Vancouver, British Columbia - January 20, 1968 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: served in world war two Digest of Citation reads: Having gained a position at Passchendaele on 26th October 1917, Lieutenant Shankland organised the remnants of his own platoon and other men from various companies to command the foreground where they inflicted heavy casualties on the retreating Germans. He later dissipated a counter-attack, allowing for the arrival of support troops. He then communicated to his HQ a detailed evaluation of the brigade frontage. On its completion he rejoined his command, carrying on until relieved. His courage and his example undoubtedly saved a critical situation.

95


Ellis Welwood SIFTON RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 18th (Western Ontario) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Wallacetown, Ontario - October 12, 1891 ACTION: Neuville-St.-Vaast, France - April 9, 1917 DIED: Vimy Ridge, France - April 9, 1917 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: During an attack on enemy trenches at Neuville-St-Vaast, France, on 9th April 1917, Lance Sergeant Sifton's company received many casualties when they were held up by machine gun fire. There sergeant, having located the gun, single-handedly charged at it and killed all the crew. A small party of Germans moved down the trench towards him, these he held off using his bayonet and his rifle, as a club, until his comrades arrived. He was killed by a dying German, who rolled over, picked up and aimed a rifle at Lance Sergeant Sefton, during this action. His conspicuous Valour contributed greatly to the success of the operation and undoubtedly saved many lives.

96


John Alexander SINTON RANK: Captain (later Brigadier) DECORATIONS: OBE UNIT: Indian Medical Service BORN: Victoria, British Columbia - December 2, 1884 ACTION: Orah Ruins, Mesopotamia - January 21, 1916 DIED: Cookstown, Co. Tyrone, Ireland - March 25, 1956 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Cross, Order of St George ( Russia ), Egypt Gambia Medal REMARKS: Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One and two Digest of Citation reads: On 21 January 1916 at the Orah Ruins, Mesopotamia (Iraq),although Captain Alexander had been shot through both arms and had also been wounded in the side, he refused to be taken to hospital and continued to attend to the wounded, under extremely heavy fire, as long as the daylight lasted. He also displayed extreme gallantry on three previous occasions.

97


Ernest Alvia ("Smokey") SMITH RANK: Private (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: CM, OBC, CD. UNIT: Seaforth Highlanders of Canada BORN: New Westminster, British Columbia - 3 May 1914 ACTION: Savio River, Italy - October 21-22, 1944 DIED: Vancouver, British Columbia - August 3, 2005 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: last Canadian Victoria Cross winner Digest of Citation reads: Private Smith of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, was in the spearhead of the attack to establish a bridgehead over the River Savio, in Northern Italy on the night of the 21st and 22nd October 1944, which they did, inspite of strong enemy opposition At a range of 30 feet, and in full view of the enemy, Private Smith put a German tank out of action with a Projector, Infantry Anti-Tank gun. (PIAT). Again, he destroyed a second tank as well as two self-propelled guns, whilst protecting a wounded soldier. He also routed a body of enemy infantry with a Thomson machine-gun at point-blank range. He kept more enemy infantry engaged, using some abandoned Tommy gun magazines from a ditch, until they withdrew in disarray.

98


Robert SPALL RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: UNIT: Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, (Eastern Ontario Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Suffolk County, England - March 5, 1890 ACTION: Parvillers, France - August 13, 1918 DIED: Parvillers, France - August 13, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action Digest of Citation reads: Sergeant Spall's Platoon became isolated during an enemy counter attack on the 12th 13th August 1918 near Parvillers, France. Taking a Lewis gun, he stood on a Parapet and fired upon the advancing enemy causing them to suffer many casualties. He came down from the trench, directing his men into a Sap, 75 yards from the enemy. Taking up another Lewis gun, he again mounted the Parapet and held up the enemy with his fire. During this action he was killed but thanks to his courage and the giving of his life, the platoon was saved.

99


Harcus STRACHAN RANK: Lieutenant (later Lieutenant Colonel) DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: The Fort Garry Horse BORN: Borrowstounness, West Lothian, Scotland - November 7, 1884 ACTION: Masnieres, France - November 20, 1917 DIED: Vancouver, British Columbia - May 1, 1982 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: served in world war two Digest of Citation reads: Lieutenant Strachan took command of his squadron, on 20th November 1917 at Masnieres, France, when its leader was killed galloping at the enemy line. He led the squadron through a line of enemy machinegun posts and then, with the remains of his squadron, led a charge on the enemy battery. Using his sword, he killed seven gunners. Having killed all the Gunners and silenced the battery, once more the men rallied and at night-time they fought their way back through the enemy lines, bringing back all the unwounded to safety; along with 15 enemy prisoners. This outstanding and fearless officer had, with his squadron, silenced the battery; killed all battery personnel; killed many Infantry and had also cut telephone communications two miles to the rear of the enemy lines.

100


James Edward TAI T RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: MC UNIT: 78th (Winnipeg Grenadiers) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Dumfries, Scotland - May 27, 1886, ACTION: Amiens, France - August 8 – 11, 1918 DIED: Amiens, France - August 11, 1918 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS Killed in this action Digest citation reads: Lieutenant Tait rallied his company after the advance had been held up by intense machine-gun fire during the period 8th/11th August 1918, at Amiens, France. With considerable skill and flair, he led his company forward under a hail of bullets from the Machine-guns. One well concealed machine gun continued to harass and cause considerable casualties. Lieutenant Tait, acquired a rifle and bayonet, and dashing forward alone, killed the enemy machine-gunner. His men, inspired by his courage and example, rushed the position and captured 12 machine guns and 20 prisoners. This action made it possible for the battalion to advance. When the enemy counter-attacked the Allied lines under cover of an intense Artillery bombardment, Lieutenant Tait again gave an exhibition of outstanding courage and leadership. Although he was mortally wounded from shellfire, he continued, until his death, to direct and aid the men of his company.

101


Frederick Albert TILSTON RANK: Major (later Colonel) DECORATIONS: KStJ, CD. UNIT: The Essex Scottish Regiment BORN: Toronto, Ontario - June 11, 1906 ACTION: The Hochwald, Germany - March 1, 1945 DIED: Toronto, Ontario - September 23, 1992 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: At the Hochwald Forest, Germany, on the 1st March 1945, Major Tilston led his company in the attack, even though he was wounded, through a tangle of 10 ft of barbed-wire, towards the enemy trenches. He personally silenced a machine-gun and was the first to reach the enemy position. While pressing on to the second objective, he received a severe wound in the hip but carried on regardless. His unshakeable confidence and his own enthusiasm gave such inspiration, to the men of his company, that they determinedly held on against greater odds. Wounded for a third time, and hardly conscious, he refused any medical attention until he given complete instructions to his men for the holding of the position.

102


Joseph Harcourt TOMBS RANK: Lance Corporal (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1st Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment) BORN: Melbourne, Australia - March 23, 1888 ACTION: Rue du Bois, France - June 16, 1915 DIED: Toronto, Ontario - June 28, 1966 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Cross, Order of St George ( Russia ) REMARKS: Served in the RCAF in world war 2 Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: Lance-Corporal Tombs, on his own initiative, repeatedly made his way out under extremely heavy fire, from shell and machine-gun, in order to bring in some wounded men who were lying, approximately 100 yards, in front of our trenches. He managed to rescue f our men, one of whom was so badly wounded that had he not received Medical attention, he surely would have died. This man, Lance-Corporal Tombs dragged back by placing a rifle sling around the man's body and his own neck.

103


Frederick George TOPHAM RANK: Corporal DECORATIONS: UNIT: 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion BORN: Toronto, Ontario - August 10, 1917 ACTION: Rhine, Germany - March 24, 1945 DIED: Etobicoke, Ontario - May 31, 1974 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: Two medical orderlies had been killed whilst attending to a wounded man on the 24th March, 1945 at Diersfordter, North West Europe. On his own initiative, Corporal Topham went out to continue their work and was injured through the nose. Despite his wound, he attended to the casualty and then brought the man in under continuous and heavy fire, and further refusing any medical treatment himself until all the casualties were cleared. He rescued three men from a disabled carrier, later in the day, despite the fact that the ammunition on board the carrier was exploding.

104


Charles William TRAIN RANK: Corporal (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 2/14th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (London Scottish) BORN: London, England - September 21, 1890 ACTION: Ein Kerem, near Jerusalem - December 8, 1917 DIED: Vancouver,, British Columbia - March 28, 1965 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: When his company was unexpectedly engaged and brought to a halt, at close range, by the enemy with two machine guns, at Air Karim, near Jerusalem,Palestine. Corporal Train rushed forward and engaged the enemy with grenades, succeeding in putting some of the enemy team out of action by means of a direct hit. He did this on his own initiative, during which, he shot and wounded an enemy officer, killing or wounding, with grenades and rifle , most of the remainder of the team. Following this he went to the assistance of a comrade who was also bombing the enemy from the front, Corporal Train killed one of them who happened to be carrying his machine gun out of the action. He was no doubt responsible for saving his battalion from receiving heavy casualties, enabling them to advance at a seemingly critical time.

105


Paul TRIQUET RANK: Major (later Brigadier) DECORATIONS: KStJ, CD. UNIT: Royal 22e Régiment BORN: Cabano, Quebec, - April 2, 1910 ACTION: Casa Berardi, Italy – December 14, 1943 DIED: Québec City, Quebec - August 8, 1980 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Chevalier, Legion of Honour (France) REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: On 14th December at Casa Berardi, Italy, during the attack, and supported by a Canadian Armoured Regiment, Captain Triquet and his company came under very heavy fire from machine guns and mortars. When all of his company's officers and half its men had been either killed or wounded, Captain Triquet dashed forward accompanied by the remaining men and broke through the enemy's resistance. With his small body of men, who by this time were reduced to 15 men and two senior NCOs, they forced their way forward gaining a position on the objective's outskirts. During the action, four tanks were destroyed and several machine-gun nests put out of action. This small contingent, along with the remaining tanks, held out against attacks from superior numbers of the enemy until they were relieved the following day by the remainder of the Battalion. Captain Triquet showed an utter disregard for danger throughout the whole of the action and filled his men with inspiration by his cheerful encouragement.

106


Sir Richard Ernest William TURNER RANK: Lieutenant (later Lieutenant General) DECORATIONS: KCB, KCMG, DSO, VD, CD & Bar. UNIT: Royal Canadian Dragoons BORN: Quebec City, Quebec - July 25, 1871 ACTION: Komati River - November 7, 1900 DIED: Quebec City, Quebec - June 19, 1961 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: Order of the White Eagle with swords (Russia, Imperial), Commander, Legion of Honour ( 3rd Class ) ( France ), Croix de Guerre with palms ( France ) REMARKS: Lieutenant General Sir Richard Turner served in the European War (WW I), Commanding a Canadian Brigade of Infantry and the 2nd Canadian Division: he was also the General Officer Commanding Canadian forces in England from 1916-18 Awarded a mentioned in dispatches in World War One Digest of Citation reads: During an action at Komati River, South Africa, on 7th November 1900, the guns were in danger of being captured by the Boers. Lieutenant Turner, although twice wounded, dismounted and by deploying his men at close quarters was successful in driving off the enemy, thus saving the guns.

107


Thomas Orde Lawder WILKINSON RANK: Lieutenant DECORATIONS: UNIT: 7th Battalion, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment BORN: Bridgnorth, England - June 29, 1894 ACTION: La Boiselle, France - July 5, 1916 DIED: La Boiselle, France - July 5, 1916 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Killed in this action. Family moved to Canada prior to the war, and at the outbreak of the war in 1914 Wilkinson joined the 16th Battalion, Canadian Scottish. After the regiment arrived in England he transferred as a temporary Lieutenant to the 7th Battalion of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment as Gunnery Officer Digest of Citation reads: On 5 July 1916 at La Boiselle, France, during an attack when a party of men from another unit were retiring without their machine-gun, Lieutenant Wilkinson with two of his men, got the gun into action and held up the enemy until relieved. Later he forced his way forward during a bombing attack and found four or five men from different units stopped by a wall of earth over which the enemy was throwing bombs. He at once mounted the machine-gun on top of the parapet and dispersed the bombers. Subsequently. In trying to bring in a wounded man, he was killed

108


John Francis YOUNG RANK: Private (later Sergeant) DECORATIONS: UNIT: 87th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Kidderminster, England, January 14, 1893 ACTION: Dury-Arras Sector, France - September 2, 1918 DIED: Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, Quebec, - November 7, 1929 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: Digest of Citation reads: Throughout the operations on the 2nd 3rd and 4th September 1918, whilst acting as a stretcher bearer he showed the greatest Valour and devotion to duty. On the 2nd September 1918, in an attack at the Dury Arras Sector, France, whilst attached to D company, the company came under heavy shell and machinegun fire: causing them to suffer many casualties. Without hesitation, Private Young went out into the open, where there was a complete absence of cover and the area was being swept with enemy fire, and there worked ceaselessly to dress the wounds on the casualties. He returned to replenish his supplies of bandages and dressings, all of the time under extremely heavy enemy fire, on more than one occasion. For over an hour he continued this heroic work. When the enemy fire had died down, he personally led parties of stretcher-bearers to bring in the casualties that he had dressed earlier.

109


Raphael Louis ZENEL RANK: Sergeant DECORATIONS: MM UNIT: 5th (Western Cavalry) Battalion., Canadian Expeditionary Force BORN: Fairbault, Minnesota, USA - November 11, 1894 ACTION: Warvillers, France - August 9, 1918 DIED: Nanaimo, British Columbia – February 25, 1977 FOREIGN DECORATIONS: REMARKS: served in world war two Digest of Citation reads: On 9 August 1918 east of Warvillers, france, Sergeant Zengel was leading his platoon forward to the attack when he realised that an enemy machine-gun was firing into the advancing line.He rushed forward ahead of the platoon to the gun emplacement, killed the officer and the operator of the gun and dispersed the crew. Later in the day he was rendered temporarily unconscious by an enemy shell but on recovering continued to direct harassing fire on the enemy. His utter disregard for personal safety and the confidence he inspired in all ranks greatly assisted in the outcome of the attack.

110


RIBBON CHART

Victoria Cross

Companion of the order of Canada

Officer of the Order of Canada

Order of the Bath (KCB, CB)

Order of St.Michael & St.George (KCMG. CMG.)

Order of the British Empire (CBE, OBE)

Distinguished Service Order (DSO)

Distinguished Service Cross (DSC)

Military Cross (MC)

Distinguished Flying Cross

Member, Order of Canada

Order of British Columbia

Order of St.John

Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM)

Military Medal (MM)

Crimean War Medal 1854-6

India General Service Medal 1854-95

Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-8

Abyssinian War 1867-8

North West Canada 1885

Queen’s Sudan Medal 1896-7

Queens South Africa 1899-1902

King’s South Africa 19012

1914 Star

1914 – 15 Star

1914 – 18 British War Medal

Merchant Marine Medal

1914 – 18 Victory Medal with MiD

1918-64 General Service Medal

39-45 Star

Atlantic Star

Air Crew Europe Star & FG Clasp

Africa Stat

Paci fic Star

Burma Star

Italy Star

France & Germany Stat

1939 – 45 Defence Medal

Canadian Volunteer Service Medal & overseas clasp

1939 – 45 War Medal with MiD

Edward VII Coronation 1902

George V Coronation 1911

George V Jubilee 1935

George VI Coronation 1937

Elizabeth II Coronation 1952

1967 Centennial Medal

Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee 1977

Canada 125 medal

Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee

Army Long Service Medal

Volunteer Offi cers Decoration (VD)

Efficiency Decoration (ED)

Efficiency Medal

Canadian Forces Decoration (CD)

Canadian Corps of Commissionaires Long Service Medal

Silver Medal of the Royal Order of the Crown (Belgium)

Croix de Guerre (Belgium)

Knight, Order of Dannebrog (Denmark)

Khedives Sudan Medal 1896-1908

Commander, Legion of Honour (3rd Class) (France)

Legion of Honour (France)

Croix de Guerre (France)

Italian silver medals for Military Valour

Order of the White Eagle with swords (Russia, Imperial)

Order of St George (Russia)

111


Turkish Crimea Medal

Commander, Legion of Merit (USA)

Distinguished Service Cross (USA)

Denotes additional awards

New Canadian Victoria Cross

Bibliography The register of the Victoria Cross, this England – 1988 True Canadian Victoria Cross Heroes, Arthur Bishop – 2008 Photo credits All are Directorate Honours & Recognition – DND unless stated Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia – front-page, 7, 8, 12, 25, 27, 28, 35, 61, 73, 75, 82, 88, 92, 97, 103, 105. Authors collection pg 10, 40, 77, 86, 108 Legion Magazine 30, 31 Veteran Affairs Canada – 44, 112.

112


Brave Hearts: Ribbon Register of the Victoria Cross to Canadians