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THE BLUE BERET OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE

AIRFIELD DEFENCE ASSOCIATION AUSTRALIA INC. PATRON: AIR MARSHAL S.D. EVANS AC DSO AFC RAAF RET’D

REGISTERED ADDRESS: 5 JEFFREY STREET CAPALABA QLD 4157

REGISTERED OFFICE: 5 JEFFREY STREET CAPALABA QUEENSLAND 4157 AUSTRALIA

adgies@adgblueberet.org

PHONE/FAX: 07 3245 7174

www.adgblueberet.org

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013: ISSUE 55

The Ground Defence Memorial: Nearly there. The Air Force Ground Combat Badge: Finally here. Photo courtesy Royal Australian Air Force

NATIONAL PRESIDENT ..……………….…….………...…..

MERV REID

NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT………………….…..….…….

HENRY CICHOWSKI

NATIONAL SECRETARY/TREASURER …….……...….......

JIM GABLE

EXECUTIVE ADVISOR …..………………….………......…..

GLEN HOMBSCH

COMMITTEE MEMBERS .………………………….……...….

SPIKE DAINER BOB HOLT MICK SHEEAN Vic smith

BLUE BERET EDITOR .…………………….……….......….

JIM GABLE

ASSOCIATION wEBMASTER ……………………………….

TONY PAHL

NEwSLETTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO: ……….….………....

adgies@adgblueberet.org

COPYRIGHT NOTICE This work is copyright and is published solely for the information of members of the Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process, nor may any other exclusive right be exercised, without the express permission of the Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc, 5 Jeffrey Street Capalaba 4157 Queensland Australia, 4157. DISCLAIMER Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc  takes no responsibility for any errors omissions or inaccuracies contained in this journal.  does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered directly or indirectly from the use of information contained in this journal.  Does not warrant that articles or opinions published in this journal are necessarily the opinions held by the Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc.


FROM THE PRESIDENT Since my last report I have been on an emotional and grateful journey, with the finale being the presentation to myself and Jim by the Chief of Air Force of my own designed, Patron and Air Force Approved Air Force Ground Combat Badge, in the presence of our Patron Air Marshal Dave Evans. This special event took place after the recent Parade for SECFOR1 to celebrate their safe return from Afghanistan. The very first ever Ground Combat Badges were jointly presented by CAF and Air Marshal Evans to that group of Young and Brave during the Parade, which was held at Amberley on 9th August. To then have Air Marshal Evans present badges to the Committee, fellow Association members and some eligible serving members in a ceremony organised by WGCDR John (JD) Leo, who was the ideal host for our Patron, was more than icing on the cake. Thanks JD. It was the end of a long, hard and sometimes frustrating road since 1986, but as our patron, who, on our behalf and with us fought long and hard for this to happen said on the day “better to be late than dead on time”. To say it was an overwhelming and proud day would be an understatement. From the 1990s it became a team effort and I must make special mention of Stewart Kerr, who actively wrote to politicians at all levels with our history in the combat role, to reinforce our claim to recognise those who deserved it. It would be greatly remiss of me not to mention the help which we received from Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Geoff Brown AO and his predecessor Air Marshal Mark Binskin AO, who both provided their total support and assistance throughout the course of the project. The Chief of Air Force Directive 19, with Application Forms, is reproduced elsewhere in this issue. Please read it carefully before applying as per the instructions. (Most eligible former ADGs and GRDEFOs will need to complete the application form marked “Annex B”). Air Force Office has a nominal roll provided by the Association which lists all Ground/Airfield Defence personnel who served the required time on eligible service in Vietnam, so apply for it and once you have it, wear it with pride and guard what you have earned. It will be the Committee’s privilege to advise and assist any of our Association family who would like to apply for the badge on behalf of departed or incapacitated loved ones, or you can contact me direct on 07 3394 7235 at the Advocacy office. As a final note on the AFGCB, our enterprising Vice President Henry Cichowski will have a surprise for us at the reunion in Adelaide next March. Enjoy and well done Ski! Now to back-track: Friday 2nd August saw the graduation of the latest ADG Basic Course at Amberley, followed by the unveiling of our Ground Defence Memorial. An excellent turn-out of our membership family and other serving members, who witnessed a great parade as 13 of our finest and our future graduated. We were told at the informal Barbecue breakfast before the parade “After Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 1


today, deploy us somewhere!” As always, the ladies of our Association family provided that touch of class that makes us look and behave a lot better. Good to see them on that special day of honouring not only the newest members of the family but also those who came before them and who made the ultimate sacrifice. Our host, Group Captain Peter Davis made us most welcome, as did the staff of the RAAF Security and Fire School (RAAFSFS), the Commanding Officers of Nos. 1 and 2 SECFOR Squadrons, the MC WOFF Mike McDonnell and all the serving members who were involved. More people will be named at the final dedication ceremony for the monument, when the Honour Rolls naming those who gave their lives in the service of their country are finalised, costed and in place on the memorial stone. To all those who have donated and those who will donate funds to make this memorial a reality and to cover its maintenance and upkeep, my sincere thanks and I hope to see you all again at the Dedication ceremony. In company with Jim and Kathryn Gable, I had the pleasure of spending quality time with one of our oldest “Old and Bold”, Charles Cugley, who at the tender age of 92 years, flew all the way from Perth to be with us on the day. At the Barbecue breakfast before they graduated, he addressed the graduates about the “qualities, camaraderie, special skills and hard yards” required to be an ADG. All who know and meet Charles are inspired by his Service record, his outlook on life and his passion for his Association family. Thanks for being with us mate and thanks to Jim and Kathryn for being top hosts to Charles during his brief stay. Don’t forget the Adelaide reunion in March 2014 – it’s now looking good and we’ve secured what we think is a great accommodation deal with an inner city hotel. We still have some ‘tweaking’ to do on the program but the Committee is pretty sure you’re going to enjoy it. There will be somewhere in this issue an “Expression of Interest” form which we would like you to fill in and return so that we have a rough idea of numbers – you’re not committed to anything if you send it back, but it does help us to work out numbers and costs etc. To those of our young and brave who are still in harm’s way on overseas deployment, remember the old slogan: “Mission; Team; Self” and keep safe. Our thoughts are with you and your loved ones and we are ready give help and support whenever needed. To those who returned home in June, it was a pleasure to share your day on the 9th August and to mingle with you and your families, who as we are, are so very proud of you, our latest Veterans. To all of our members who are currently on the sick list, I hope your recovery is swift, and to those families who have recently lost a loved one, our thoughts are with you as always. Finally, my thanks to all of you who are a part of Helen’s and my life – without you, things could be much harder. Why? Because we support and care for each other. “IT’S AN ADGIE THING”. Yours proudly Merv Reid National President Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 2


ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NEW SECFOR ORGANISATION WITHIN AIR FORCE An address by Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Geoff Brown AO at the SECFOR Inauguration Parade, RAAF Amberley 4 July 2013 Officer Commanding 395 Expeditionary Combat Support Wing, GPCAPT Peter Davis, Commanding Officers Security Forces Squadrons, officers and airmen of the Security Forces, family members, invited guests, ladies and gentlemen. Today is indeed a historic day. One that I hope you will recall with pride and a sense of ownership. You are part of a new era for Air Force which will see evolutionary changes in the delivery of air power. Many of you have witnessed the introduction of the C-17A and have seen the arrival of the KC-30A, which further enhances our strategic lift, and delivers a level of air-to-air refuelling capability for our Air Force. You have heard the sound of Super Hornets above Amberley, our new premier strike platform. You are part of an enterprise that will be bringing into service capabilities such as the P-8 Poseidon, our next generation maritime surveillance and response platform, a new ISR Unmanned Air System and of course the Joint Strike Fighter. Each of these advanced weapon systems enhances the level of air power but one of these most significant changes they bring is our approach to security. Security can no longer be viewed as a collection of functions but a continuum that spans the spectrum of needs. These needs range from physical security of our bases in peace time through to the protection of our deployed capabilities during times of conflict. We need a security force whose activities are integrated and capable of meeting the full range of current security needs of the Air Force. We need a force able to respond to the challenges and complexity expected of the future. It is the requirement to be capable of delivering protection across the entire security continuum that has driven us to consider a new paradigm for our forces. And as I stand here today and look out across this parade I see the men and women who are the tip of the sword. You are the team who will secure our capabilities through both peace and conflict; at home and when deployed. I am proud to be here today to mark the formal establishment of three Security Forces Squadrons. These squadrons, composing personnel currently in the SECPOL, ADG, ABP and EOD musterings, represent the new age of security forces within Air Force. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 3


This new structure provides coherency, standardisation, flexibility and the responsiveness to deliver the required effect across the continuum of security tasks – from domestic security through to war fighting. The creation of these three new SECFOR Squadrons has been achieved by renaming the two Air Field Defence Squadrons, and re-raising the third. The historical links to these Squadrons and the role of the Airfield Defence Guard are important for Air Force History; however the change in role and function of these Squadrons is significant. The transition from our current organisation into the new SECFOR structure represents the most significant structural change within the Air Force security and ground defence families since Vietnam. The establishment of these Squadrons is only part of the development of new Security Forces organisation. Today also marks the disbandment of the Security Police Mustering, and subsequent creation of two new musterings, Air Force Security and Air Force Police. Each trade element in a SECFOR Squadron in its own way delivers flexible, adaptable and agile responses to the needs of Air Force. The SECFOR organisation combines all of these capabilities under a single Wing, 395 Expeditionary Combat Support Wing, enabling the organisation’s focus to be primarily on meeting all concurrent security requirements. The creation of the SECFOR Squadrons is the first step in developing a cohesive and focused Security organisation. Within the SECFOR SQN, each mustering will require additional training. The mature SECFOR organisation will require an officer category capable of operating effectively across the full continuum of security tasks. The GRDEF and SECPOLO categories will be merged into a single category – the Security Force Officer. I challenge you each of you here today to ensure that the efficiencies and synergies achieved by the creation of the SECFOR SQN are not compromised by traditional stove pipes. This will require you to respect the past and strive for continued excellence in your specialist fields. You will need the agility to think and act wisely in your response to the many challenges that will come your way. I have full confidence in you, your commanders and the SECFOR organisation to meet the new security challenges and support the delivery of air power as we navigate this new chapter of Air Force’s history. Thank you

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HIGH PRAISE FOR SECFOR1 This article courtesy Air Force Newspaper Sixty-five Air Force personnel from Security Force 1 (SECFOR1) returned to Australia on August 9 after a seven-month deployment to Afghanistan. CAF AIRMSHL Geoff Brown was at RAAF Base Amberley to formally welcome the detachment at a parade to recognise their deployment. During the parade, CAF conducted the first ever presentation of the Air Force Ground Combat Badge (AFGCB).

CAF Air Marshal Geoff Brown AO presents the first Ground Combat Badges

"You have done your country proud, your Air Force proud, your family proud and, most importantly, yourselves proud," AIRMSHL Brown said. SECFOR1 worked directly to the Australian Multinational Base Commander - Tarin Kot and was responsible for security of the base and its airfield. Responsibility for security at the base has now transferred to the SECFOR2 detachment. "SECFOR1 served with distinction for more than seven months, where 65 of our personnel undertook one of the biggest challenges of their careers," AIRMSHL Brown said. "No doubt our personnel have grown from the experience and come home with a greater understanding of their role in an operational environment and the importance of our mission in Afghanistan. Our personnel encountered the challenges only confronted by those who have deployed and dealt with the separation from families and friends. "I would like to thank the spouses, partners, children and families. Without your support and patience, SECFOR1 would not have been able to do its job." The AFGCB is a new award for personnel who regularly operate beyond the relative safety of the base, serving 'outside the wire' in a combat role. The purpose of the badge is to recognise service by Air Force members whose deployed role

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required them to operate within a combat or escalated threat environment beyond that routinely experienced within a deployed base. In exceptional circumstances, service in a nonwarlike area of operations may be recognised for the purpose of determining eligibility for the awarding of the badge. AIRMSHL Brown said the Airfield Defence Association had long advocated for a unique badge that publicly recognised this special service. "It is with great pleasure that I am able to announce the formal promulgation of the Air Force Ground Combat Badge," he said. The badge's design depicts a bayonet inside the airman's wreath with the Air Force eagle overlaid. "These symbols collectively represent the dedication and sacrifice required to knowingly forsake the safety of the base to ensure the safety of those within," AIRMSHL Brown said. "It is an honour to award the first of these badges to be formally issued to the fine young men of SECFOR1 who are on parade today. "You should wear the badges with pride, as they represent all the values inherent in the Air Force today. SECFOR1, you paved the way for your comrades currently deployed." CPL Greg Snader was among the badge's recipients and said receiving the badge was an honour. "I think it's great recognition for the airfield defence guards," CPL Snader said. LAC Henry Mooney agreed: "Airfield Defence Guards do a unique job that is quite different from a lot of the Air Force and it is good that our combat role is recognised in this badge," he said. Former and current Air Force personnel who have previously deployed on warlike operations and whose duties required them to undertake combat or combat related duties outside the airbase perimeter are encouraged to read CAF Directive 19/2013 to ascertain whether they are eligible to apply to be awarded the AFGCB. A copy of the full CAF speech and Directive 19/2013, including the Application Form, can be found elsewhere in this issue.

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WELCOME HOME PARADE AND FIRST PRESENTATION OF THE AIR FORCE GROUND COMBAT BADGE

State Member for Ipswich - Mr Ian Berry; State Member for Ipswich West - Mr Sean Choat; Representing the Mayor of the City of Ipswich — Councillor Andrew Antoniolli Patron of the Airfield Defence Association - Air Marshal Selwyn David Evans; Commander Combat Support Group, Air Commodore Tim Innes; Officer Commanding 395 Expeditionary Combat Support Wing, GPCAPT Peter Davis; Commanding Officers Security Forces Squadrons; Officers and airmen of the security families; Invited guests, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you very much for the invitation to review this parade today. Today marks two distinct yet aligned historical events for the Ground Defence Airman and Officer groups. The first is the welcome home of the first large formed body of ground defence specialists that the RAAF has deployed since Timor in 1999.The second is the inaugural awarding of the Air Force Ground Combat Badge to ground defence personnel. These events are both significant milestones in the history of Air Force ground defence. The ADG mustering was established in 1942 during the wake of the bombing of Darwin and attacks on allied airbases. After numerous organisational iterations, numbers 1 and 2 Airfield Defence Squadrons were ultimately established. Throughout the war, ADGs served in the Pacific Theatre, participating with distinction in many hard-fought battles. Following the end of hostilities in 1945 both squadrons were disbanded. However 1AFDS was re-established in 1951 to support National Service training, but again disbanded in 1952. In 1965 the ADG mustering was re-established to provide security on bases in Australia, as well as Malaysia, Thailand and South Vietnam. In Vietnam, ADGs served in ground defence, security and helicopter door gunner roles. 2AFDS was reformed in 1983 at Amberley. In 1999, 2AFDS deployed in its entirety to East Timor where its commitment and professional performance was recognised with the awarding of a Meritorious Unit Citation. From 2000 to present day ADGs have been called upon to support a wide variety of tasks. These range from humanitarian assistance to base defence across almost all theatres of operation in which the RAAF has been engaged. But it was in 2012 that our ground defence specialists were tasked with the protection of the Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 7


Multi-National Base Tarin Kot in Afghanistan. Over a period of 45 days a team of 70 airmen and 3 officers underwent extensive preparations to undertake one of the biggest challenges of their careers to date. And challenged you were. SECFOR 1, on many occasions your tasks no doubt seemed long and arduous. You encountered frustrations that only arise in an operational environment. You had to deal with the logistical problem of being thousands of miles from your traditional support base. You encountered the tensions that arise within teams that only those who have deployed have confronted. And, in no small part you had to deal the gut-wrenching separation from your families and friends. I would argue that this is the hardest burden because it is shared by both you and those closest to you. I would like to thank the spouses, partners, children and families of our returned personnel. Your letters, phone calls, care packages and stoicism from afar has kept our team strong. Without your support, your sacrifice and your patience, SECFOR 1 would not been able to do their job. I do not underestimate your sacrifice and I thank you wholeheartedly. SECFOR 1 served with distinction for eight months. Congratulations on a job well done! No doubt, you have grown from the experience, and come home with a greater understanding of your role in an operational environment. It is these operational experiences that are the focus of my second task here today. I am aware there are some personnel who are routinely exposed to a more perilous ground environment than the general airbase population. ADG's, Combat Controllers, EOD operators and others must regularly leave the relative safety of the base and ply their respective trades outside the wire. The Airfield Defence Association has long advocated for a unique badge that publicly recognises this special service. And the patronage of Air Marshal David Evans has been a major influence in seeing this recognition come to fruition. It is with great pleasure that, today, I am able to announce the formal promulgation of the Air Force Ground Combat Badge. The design of the badge depicts a bayonet inside the Airman's wreath with the Air Force eagle overlayed. These symbols collectively represent the dedication and sacrifice required to knowingly forsake the safety of the base to ensure the safety of those within. It is an honour to award the first of these badges to be formally issued to the fine young men of SECFOR1 who are on parade today. You should wear the badges with pride, as they represent all the values inherent in the Air Force today. SECFOR1, you paved the way for your comrades currently deployed. You have done your country proud; Your Air Force proud; You families proud; And most importantly, yourselves proud. History records that the old Air Field Defence Wing motto was to Protect the Force. In this you have excelled. Thank you.

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ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF AIR FORCE R1-6-C001, PO Box 7902, CANBERRA BC ACT 2610 CAF Directive 19/13 DGPERS/2013/AB1494405 8 OCAF/2013/AB14975303 DIRECTIVE BY THE CHIEF OF AIR FORCE AIR FORCE GROUND COMBAT BADGE INTRODUCTION 1. The Air Force Ground Combat Badge (AFGCB) recognises service by Air Force members (Permanent or Reserve) whose deployed role in a ‘warlike’ area of operations required them to operate within a combat or escalated threat environment beyond that routinely experienced within a deployed base. In exceptional circumstances, service in a nonwarlike area of operations may be recognised for the purpose of determining eligibility for the awarding of the AFGCB. PURPOSE 2. The purpose of this directive is to formalise the policy and processes associated with the awarding of the AFGCB. DEFINITIONS 3.

For the purpose of this directive, the following definitions apply: a.

Area of operations. An area, defined by specific boundaries, within which military units undertake military operations. Personnel undertaking duties in the area of operations are subject to specific conditions of service and entitlements directly related with the operation.

b.

Ground Defence Area (GDA). A GDA is a defined area surrounding an airbase perimeter in which the base commander has freedom of action to conduct those combat or combat-related activities which enable airbase security and thus air operations through increased depth in security posture. Specifically, the GDA allows threats to be identified and treated far from the base, as well as providing the means to mitigate indirect fire, small arms fire and man-portable threats. Depending upon the operation and when it took place, a GDA might also be known by another term such as a ‘Close Approach Area’ or a ‘Patrol and Surveillance Area’.

c.

Combat Duties. Combat duties are those requiring a person to commit, or participate directly in the commission of, an act of violence against an adversary in a declared GDA surrounding an airbase within a warlike AO. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 9


d.

Combat-Related Duties. Combat-related duties are duties (other than combat duties) requiring a person to work in support of, and in close proximity to (ie. whilst also in a GDA surrounding an airbase within a warlike AO), a person performing combat duties, in circumstances in which the person performing the work may be killed or injured through an act of violence by an adversary.

e.

Member. For the purpose of this instruction a member means any member of any specialisation or mustering in the Royal Australian Air Force (PAF or Reserve).

f.

Warlike operations. Operations conducted in an AO that has been declared warlike for the purposes of conditions of service including remuneration, allowances, and honours and awards (eg. awarding of the Australian Active Service Medal (AASM)).

g.

Non-warlike operations. Operations conducted in an AO that has been declared non-warlike for the purposes of conditions of service including remuneration, allowances, and honours and awards (eg. awarding of the Australian Service Medal (ASM)).

ELIGIBILITY 4. Any Air Force member, or former member, who meets, or who has previously met, all of the following criteria is eligible for the award of the AFGCB: a.

force assignment to a ‘warlike’ AO commencing with the Vietnam Conflict for a minimum period of 90 days (continuous or aggregate);

b.

satisfactory performance of duties – assumed unless a member is returned to Australia early or removed from combat or combat related duties for administrative or disciplinary reasons;

c.

prior awarding of, or concurrent eligibility for the: (1)

AASM;

(2)

Operational Service Medal (OSM) for ‘warlike’ operations; or

(3)

OSM or ASM for ‘non-warlike’ operations but only where considering eligibility pursuant to the exceptional circumstances detailed at subparagraph 6(b);

d.

was a member of the RAAF at the time of their eligible service; and

e.

they routinely undertook combat or combat-related duties during the relevant deployment/s.

5. Notwithstanding the requirement to be ‘force assigned’, subject to deploying in a manner equivalent to force assignment, and subject to meeting all other criteria at paragraph 4, the AFGCB will also be awarded to Air Force members on exchange/attachment duties for service with joint or coalition/allied units.

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6. Eligibility exceptions. Implicit in the criteria above is the expectation that eligible members will have been placed in a position where they were in greater peril than those operating within the confines of an airbase. Consequently, the AFGCB may also be approved in the following cases: a.

b.

Where the member deploys to a ‘warlike’ AO and meets all criteria other than the required duration of deployment to a ‘warlike’ AO and as a consequence of their deployed service they are: (1)

decorated for gallantry, or

(2)

killed in action, wounded in action or evacuated from the AO because of a disability attributed to that service that is not self inflicted.

Where the member legitimately engages an adversary in small arms fire or combat using edged weapons whilst on deployment to a warlike or non-warlike AO for a minimum of 90 days and provided they rendered satisfactory service in accordance with sub-paragraph 4b.

7. By exception, where an Air Force member clearly meets the intent, but does not meet all of the criteria specified at paragraph 4 and elaborated upon at paragraph 5 and is not covered by an exception detailed at paragraph 6, one or more of the eligibility criteria may be waived by an authorised delegate. Waivers of this nature are expected to be quite rare. 8.

The AFGCB can only be awarded once.

ADMINISTRATION Application process 9. Applications for the award of the AFGCB may be initiated by either the member (using the form at annex B) or their unit (using the form at annex C). It is anticipated that the majority of initial applications will be prompted by members and former members whose qualifying service pre-dates this directive and they are therefore no longer embedded in a deployed unit with direct knowledge of their deployed service. Approving authorities 10.

The following responsibilities apply in granting the authority to wear the badge: a.

All criteria have been satisfied or a recognised exception clause applies. Where the award of the badge clearly lies within the eligibility requirements articulated at paragraphs 13 to 16 of this directive, or an exception clause detailed at paragraph 17 of this directive applies, award of the AFGCB may be approved by: (1)

Director General Personnel – Air Force;

(2)

Chief of Staff to Director General Personnel – Air Force; or

(3)

Deputy Director Personnel Concepts and Policy.

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b. Exception circumstances not anticipated. Where a member applies to be awarded the AFCGB having regard to exceptional circumstances not contemplated by this directive, the authority to approve or not approve the request is delegated to: (1)

Director General Personnel – Air Force; or

(2)

Deputy Chief of Air Force.

Processing 11. On receipt of an application, Personnel Branch staff will assess the application against service records. Where an application is approved, the award will be recorded in PMKeyS (for those with a PMKeyS Employee ID Number). All approvals and non-approvals also will be recorded in a master spreadsheet to enable tracking of both current and retired members who have made applications. 12. Personnel Branch staff will write to all applicants advising them of the outcome of their application. Approval letters will be accompanied by the badge. Non-approval letters will advise the reasons for non-approval. Description and Entitlement 13. The badge, finished in antique pewter, is in the form of a bayonet overlayed on the Airman’s wreath with the Air Force eagle (annex A refers). 14. Each eligible applicant (current or former member) will be issued one full size AFGCB and one miniature. Replacement AFGCB may be provided at the expense of the applicant. Wearing the badge 15. The AFGCB is to be worn by eligible members of the RAAF whilst in uniform. The badge may also be worn by eligible ex-service members, who subsequently join other services or uniformed organisations whose dress regulations permit the wearing, in uniform, of military awards. 16. Eligible retired members may also wear the AFGCB, with the appropriate uniform, when attending military functions. On occasions when medals are worn on civilian clothes, the AFGCB may also be worn. 17. The badge is worn on the left breast, centrally one centimetre immediately above medals or ribbons with all orders of dress. On mess dress the miniature is worn in the same location. For personnel entitled to wear a brevet or other qualification badge the AFGCB is to be worn one centimetre above the brevet/badges. Forfeiture and Restoration 18. Should any person forfeit campaign medals (ie. AASM, ASM, or OSM) then an AFGCB predicated upon the award of those medals is also forfeited. The AFGCB may be restored on restoration of the campaign medals.

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Related Awards 19. The AFGCB does not replace any existing ADF similar award. Where a member of the RAAF has already been awarded the Infantry Combat Badge (ICB) or Army Combat Badge (ACB) they may continue to wear that award or forfeit that right by applying for and being approved to wear the AFGCB. Under no circumstance can a member wear both the AFGCB and either the ACB or ICB. 20. Members who would otherwise qualify for the ICB or ACB from date of authorisation of this directive will no longer be eligible to receive those awards. Instead, these members will be considered for the award of the AFGCB. IMPLEMENTATION 21.

This directive is effective immediately and will remain extant until replaced.

22.

The sponsor of this directive DGPERS-AF.

23.

Addressees are to ensure widest dissemination.

G.C. BROWN Air Marshal Chief of Air Force 07 Aug 13 Annexes: A. AFGCB Pictorial Representation B. AFGCB – Individual Application Template – Post Deployment C. AFGCB – Unit Generated Application Template – Individual

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ANNEX A TO CAF DIRECTIVE 19/13 DATED 07 Aug 13 AFGCB Pictorial Representation

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ANNEX B TO CAF DIRECTIVE 19/13 DATED 07 Aug 13 APPLICATION FOR AIR FORCE GROUND COMBAT BADGE (AFGCB) AWARD (This form to be used for all member/former member generated applications)

PMKeyS Number: _______

Service Number: _________

Must/Spec: ________________________

(Post-2001 service active/inactive)

(Pre-2002 service)

(Employment Category)

Rank:_____________ Given Names: _________________________ Surname: ______________________________ (Current or on Cessation of Service)

Operation Name/s: _________________________________________________________________________________ (Criterion 1 – Eligibility predicated on force assignment to a ‘Warlike’ Operation)

Dates Deployed: ___________________________________________________________________________________ (Criterion 2 – Eligibility predicated on 90 Days aggregate service on a ‘Warlike’ Operation other than in defined exceptional circumstances)

Deployed Unit/Task Group: _________________________________________________________________________ AASM Awarded

(Criterion 3):

Yes/No (Please Circle)

Deployed as Air Force Member (Criterion 4):

Yes /No (Pease Circle)

Justification to be issued with AFGCB other than Criterion (1) to (4) noted on this form. Include a brief description of combat or combat related duties (Criterion 5 – definitions below) routinely performed during deployment and/or exceptional circumstances requiring consideration where eligibility criteria not met. Supporting documentary evidence to be attached where necessary.

(Criteria 5)

Combat Duties. Those duties requiring a member to commit, or participate directly in the commission of, an act of violence against an adversary in a declared ground defence area surrounding an airbase within a warlike AO. Combat-Related Duties. Combat-related duties are duties (other than combat duties) requiring a member to work in support of, and in close proximity to (ie. whilst also in a declared ground defence area surrounding an airbase within a warlike AO) another member performing combat duties, in circumstances in which the member performing the work may be killed or injured through an act of violence by an adversary. Ground Defence Area (GDA). A GDA is a defined area surrounding an airbase perimeter in which the base commander has freedom of action to conduct those combat or combat-related activities which enable airbase security and thus air operations through increased depth in security posture. Specifically, The GDA allows threats to be identified and treated far from the base, as well as providing the means to mitigate indirect fire, small arms fire and manportable threats. Depending upon the operation and when it took place, a GDA might also be known by another term such as a ‘Close Approach Area’ or a ‘Patrol and Surveillance Area”.

Return Address: _______________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (Current Unit for serving members/Home Address or PO Box (including Suburb, Postcode and State) for former members)

Contact Details: _______________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (Telephone and/or Mobile Phone and/or Email address)

Applicant Certification: I, ……………………………………………………….……. (insert full name) declare that the information provided on this application form is true and correct. Signature: …………………………………………. Printed Name: …………………………………….. Date: ……………………………………………….

Forward Applications to: BP29-2-249 Director General Personnel – Air Force Brindabella Park – Building 29 29 Brindabella Circuit Majura ACT 2609

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ANNEX C TO CAF DIRECTIVE 19/13 DATED 07 Aug 13 APPLICATION FOR AIR FORCE GROUND COMBAT BADGE (AFGCB) AWARD (This form to be used for all unit generated applications)

PMKeyS Number: _______

Service Number: _________

Must/Spec: ________________________

(Post-2001 service active/inactive)

(Pre-2002 service)

(Employment Category)

Rank:_____________ Given Names: _________________________ Surname: ______________________________ (Current or on Cessation of Service)

Operation Name/s: _________________________________________________________________________________ (Criterion 1 – Eligibility predicated on force assignment to a ‘Warlike’ Operation)

Dates Deployed: ___________________________________________________________________________________ (Criterion 2 – Eligibility predicated on 90 Days aggregate service on a ‘Warlike’ Operation other than in defined exceptional circumstances)

Deployed Unit/Task Group: _________________________________________________________________________ AASM Awarded

(Criterion 3):

Yes/No (Please Circle)

Deployed as Air Force Member (Criterion 4):

Yes /No (Pease Circle)

Justification to be issued with AFGCB other than Criterion (1) to (4) noted on this form. Include a brief description of combat or combat related duties (Criterion 5) routinely performed during deployment and/or exceptional circumstances requiring consideration where eligibility criteria not met. Supporting documentary evidence to be attached where necessary.

(Criteria 5)

Combat Duties. Those duties requiring a member to commit, or participate directly in the commission of, an act of violence against an adversary in a declared ground defence area surrounding an airbase within a warlike AO. Combat-Related Duties. Combat-related duties are duties (other than combat duties) requiring a member to work in support of, and in close proximity to (ie. whilst also in a declared ground defence area surrounding an airbase within a warlike AO) another member performing combat duties, in circumstances in which the member performing the work may be killed or injured through an act of violence by an adversary. Ground Defence Area (GDA). A GDA is a defined area surrounding an airbase perimeter in which the base commander has freedom of action to conduct those combat or combat-related activities which enable airbase security and thus air operations through increased depth in security posture. Specifically, The GDA allows threats to be identified and treated far from the base, as well as providing the means to mitigate indirect fire, small arms fire and manportable threats. Depending upon the operation and when it took place, a GDA might also be known by another term such as a ‘Close Approach Area’ or a ‘Patrol and Surveillance Area”.

Return Address: _______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (Current Unit for serving members/Home Address or PO Box (including Suburb, Postcode and State) for former members)

Contact Details: _______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (Telephone and/or Mobile Phone and/or Email address)

Commanding Officer Recommendation: On the basis of the justification provided I, recommend that …………………………………….……. (insert full name), be awarded the AFGCB. Signature: …………………………………………. Printed Name: …………………………………….. Rank: ……………………………………………… Appointment: ……………………………………..

Date: ………………………………………...

Forward Applications to: BP29-2-249 Director General Personnel – Air Force Brindabella Park – Building 29 29 Brindabella Circuit Majura ACT 2609

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 16


Want to see more photos of the three parades described in this issue? A DVD of the Graduation Parade for 35 Basic Course, the unveiling of the Ground Defence Monument and the Welcome Home Parade for SECFOR1, including the presentation of the first Air Force Ground Combat Badges, is available to interested members. The DVD includes still and video footage of each of the events and is available to members at a cost of $10.00, including postage. All proceeds from the sale of the DVD will go to the Ground Defence Memorial Fund.

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 17


CHANGES TO INDEXATION OF MILITARY SUPERANNUATION PAYMENTS The Minister for Defence Science and Personnel Warren Snowdon and the Minister for Defence Materiel Mike Kelly have announced changes to the way in which military superannuation retirement pay will be indexed for the Defence Forces Retirement Benefits (DFRB) scheme and the Defence Force Retirement and Death Benefits (DFRDB) scheme. The schemes were closed in 1972 and 1991, respectively. From 1 July 2014, payments to military superannuants aged 65 and over, within the DFRB and DFRDB schemes, will be indexed to the higher of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) or the Pensioner and Beneficiary Living Cost Index (PBLCI). Currently, there are some 56,500 superannuants in the two schemes and approximately 26,700 are aged 65 and over who will benefit from this announcement. This measure strikes the right balance by assisting many of our older military retirees while being fiscally responsible in the current economic climate. PBLCI was first used as an indexation factor for the age pension in September 2009 and the Government has decided to include it in the indexation of military superannuation retirement pay for the two schemes. The Government acknowledges the advocacy of ex-service organisations on this issue and in particular the RSL and the Defence Force Welfare Association. This announcement builds on a comprehensive program of support and recognition by the Australian Government for our veteran community since 2007. The Government will continue its commitment to engage with service and ex-service organisations to consider the benefits and support available to our current and former service personnel. Editor’s Note: Too little, too late! Note the age restrictions and the date this new “benefit” comes into effect! Less than HALF of the members involved will receive any benefit at all!

NEW UNIFORM IN THE PIPELINE Article courtesy Air Force newspaper.

The Disruptive Pattern Camouflage Uniform (DPCU) Air Force shares with Army has led to confusion about the roles Air Force personnel undertake to serve the nation. As a result, a project team has been established to investigate the feasibility for an Air Force General Purpose Uniform (GPU). The team is considering patterns and colour variations which would easily distinguish Air Force personnel, while retaining the same garment template and fabric properties as the current DPCU. Four dyed pattern swatches have been developed and presented to CAF and the next stage is to manufacture fully sewn uniforms in final colour designs in order to assess the feasibility of committing to more detailed development. Understandably, some members have expressed concerns about the affordability of a new uniform for Air Force. The GPU will use the existing DPCU garment template and fabric properties so costs to Air Force will be minimal, funded through savings from recent reforms to the management of uniforms and personal equipment. The GPU will be phased in over a number of years after the current stock of DPCUs has been exhausted. Should the option be considered viable, it will replace DPCUs for the majority of Air Force members and provide a unique identity for Air Force personnel. Members who require DPCU for their primary duties will continue to have an entitlement and GPU will not impact on specific kitting for members deploying to overseas locations in operation-specific uniforms. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 18


PRESIDENT’S REPORT TO THE 2013 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Good morning and welcome to your 2013 AGM. I hope you are all as well as can be expected at our age. Your attendance and the distances some of you have travelled to be here are appreciated, as are all the proxy votes which have been provided to us by those who can’t be here today. The past week has been a huge one for our Association – firstly our Patron Dave Evans Notified me by phone on Monday That the Association’s design for the new and only Air Force Combat Badge was selected above all the other submissions. The official badge is to be made of pewter. This is a personal victory for me as I have been fighting since 1986 for this well-earned and deserved recognition of our specialist role on active service. Since then, against a lot of official resistance, I have received so much dogged support and encouragement from our Patron, our Committee, our wider general membership, politicians, Stewart Kerr and some serving members. Dave Evans, knowing that we had a legitimate and just claim, took it directly to the then Chief of Air Force who got it moving again after a series of meetings with Dave at various venues. We owe so much to David for his persistent approaches to Air Force Office in Canberra, through two Chiefs of Air Force, who it must be said have been cordial, supportive and kept their word, as have their representatives, which is much appreciated. Full details on the new Award, especially the eligibility criteria, are yet to be promulgated. Thanks to Spike Dainer’s hard work and supervision, our Ground Defence Memorial was virtually completed last Tuesday, with the exception of the honour rolls which are still being verified through the Australian War Memorial and Air Force Office. Tex Bryson’s help in finding us an alternative to the original contractor has been not only valuable but vital in giving us a far superior but much less expensive result and our sincere thanks to him for his involvement. The unveiling of the monument is planned for Friday 2nd August 2013, immediately following the scheduled basic adg graduation parade at RAAFSFS. I hope that many ADGs and their families can attend on the day – full details will be published in a special bulletin to all members shortly. To all those who have donated money to the memorial fund, our deepest thanks. Ski is working on a further grant for equipment to be used in our Association office at Amberley, in the squadron headquarters area of what will soon be known as SECFOR HQ – full details of that change were in the last Blue Beret. Our congratulations to Glen Hombsch, who has worked long and hard to document the history of our Mustering in booklet form. An accompanying DVD is also being recorded, produced by Max Haling’s daughter Dannika, to whom we owe a huge debt of thanks. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 19


I would be failing in my duty if I didn’t record a huge vote of thanks to our brilliant web master Tony Pahl, otherwise known as miracle man. Tony’s assistance in setting up and maintaining our web site is incredible and his talent for making the impossible happen in just a short time is almost beyond belief. thanks so much Tony. Thanks to our Treasurer and the support of our members, our Association is financially sound, as will be confirmed by the Auditor’s Report which will be discussed shortly, and Jim is to be congratulated. Sixty of our young and brave returned from the “sand pit” earlier this month, while another eighty five were rotated on 6th May. Welcome home to the 60 and stay safe the 85. Our thoughts are with you and your families. Let’s turn now to some future events:     

On 4th July 2013 at 1030 an Inauguration Parade will be held on the RAAFSFS parade ground for the stand-up of the new SECFOR squadrons; Date and time to be advised, possibly August 2013, the Air Marshal S. D. Evans/Airfield Defence Association trophy for ADG section leaders will be presented at a special function at Amberley, in the squadron lines. On 2nd August 2013 at 1000 on the SFS parade ground, the latest basic ADG course will graduate. This will be followed by the unveiling of the Ground Defence Memorial at SECFOR squadron headquarters (timings to be advised); Between 13th -17th March 2014 the 2014 ADG Reunion is currently planned to take place in Adelaide. The program is still in the planning stages but details will be sent out as they are finalised.

Without membership support, team dedication, sheer effort and network rapport, the visions and aims of most Associations simply don’t succeed, so on your behalf as well as personally, I offer thanks and gratitude to our Patron, our past and serving Liaison Officers SQNLDR (Ret’d) Tom Nelson and WOFF Glenn Lyons, the Squadron COs, GPCAPT Guy Burton, WGCDR John Leo, the Airfield Defence Warrant Officer network, SFS staff, officers and OR’s, your dedicated, loyal and supportive Committee and Max Haling for his six years of proud service and future voluntary involvement, together with the lovely Dannika, who I mentioned earlier. As you know, this is a Committee election year. it’s your Association so have your say, ask questions and join in, but please stick to the published agenda. For those who haven’t yet done so, membership fees can be paid after this meeting and our new “It’s An Adgie Thing” polo shirts can also be purchased before you enjoy the refreshments. Thank you for just being you, especially all the ladies in our close family group. I request that this report be published in the next issue of the Blue Beret newsletter. Merv Reid, National President. 23 June 2013. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 20


THE ADG MONUMENT: WE STILL NEED YOUR HELP Most readers will hopefully know by now that the long-planned monument to fallen Airfield Defence members is slowly progressing towards completion. The stone has been unveiled, the first of the plaques has been mounted and all that is needed now is for the two honour roll plaques to be manufactured and mounted and the entire monument sealed against the weather. Grants will only go so far towards meeting the cost, which we have tried to keep as low as can), so we still need more cash to finish the job. With that in mind the Association is appealing to all former and serving members to help out where you can by donating as little or as much as you can to our Monument Fund. We are seeking “Not for Profit” status from the Australian Taxation Office so that your donations can be tax deductible. This memorial is dedicated to all ADGs and Ground Defence Officers who have lost their lives either on active service or during training and will hopefully be a lasting memorial to all of them. Because of that, we’re certain that all former members of the mustering/category will be happy to help, whether you are an Association member or not. We also ask current members to pass this information on to any non-members that you know, so that they too can have the opportunity to help us reach this goal. The response so far has been outstanding, but we need a lot more than we’ve been given so far if this is to be a goer, so if you can help us, perhaps in the next month or so, it would be a huge bonus and you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you have been part of a very worthwhile project. Every donation will be acknowledged unless specifically requested. Will you add your name to the list please? A copy of this form will be on our web site as well. We’re specifically asking those who haven’t yet made a donation to come forward now, because we really need your help to finish this project on behalf of all of us. Lots of small amounts are just as helpful as a few large ones, so will you help please?

 To: Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc. 5 Jeffrey Street Capalaba Qld 4157 Please find enclosed my cheque/money order for $ Ground Defence Memorial Fund.

as a donation to the Association’s

Name: ………………………………………………………..………..… Address:

……………………………………………………………..…… …………………………………………. Postcode ……………

PLEASE NOTE; WE ARE NOT YET ABLE TO ACCEPT CREDIT CARD PAYMENTS, BUT DIRECT DEPOSITS CAN BE MADE TO OUR BANK ACCOUNT: BANK: St George Bank Ltd ACCOUNT NAME: Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc. BSB: 114879 ACCOUNT NUMBER: 455299926. (Please let us know if you are making a direct deposit). ALL DONATIONS WILL BE ACKNOWLEDGED UNLESS OTHERWISE REQUESTED

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 21


Mates4Mates Mates4Mates evokes the Australian spirit, that a True Mate offers unwavering loyalty and friendship even in our darkest hour. It was in this spirit that Mates4Mates was born. Mates4Mates is a not for profit organisation set up by RSL (Queensland Branch) to provide support to wounded, injured or ill members of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and their families. Our focus is on current and ex-service personnel serving from 1990 onwards. Mates4Mates is designed to complement and enhance the capacity of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) to support their current and ex-serving personnel & families. We are independent, apolitical and non-religious. Our charity ensures that currently and ex-serving men & women are not without the trust, humility and strength of mateship in times of need. For more information, visit Mates4Mates.org

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 22


THE FUNNY PAGES Paddy took 2 stuffed dogs to the 'Antiques Road Show'. "Ooh !!" said the presenter, "This is a very rare set, produced by the celebrated Johns Brothers taxidermists who operated in London at the turn of last century. Do you have any idea what they would fetch if they were in good condition ?" "...Sticks " Paddy replied.

Wannabe Medals? A London lawyer runs a stop sign and gets pulled over by a Glasgow copper. He thinks that he is smarter than the cop because he is a lawyer from LONDON! and is certain that he has a better education then any Jock cop. He decides to prove this to himself and have some fun at the Glasgow cop's expense!! Glasgow cop says, " Licence and registration, please." London Lawyer says, "What for?" Glasgow cop says, "Ye didnae come to a complete stop at the stop sign." London Lawyer says, "I slowed down, and no one was coming." Glasgow cop says, "Ye still didnae come to a complete stop. Licence and registration, please" London Lawyer says, "What's the difference?" Glasgow cop says, "The difference is, ye huvte come to complete stop, that's the law, Licence and registration, please!" London Lawyer says, "If you can show me the legal difference between slow down and stop, I'll give you my licence and registration and you give me the ticket. If not, you let me go and don't give me the ticket. "Glasgow cop says, "Sounds fair. Exit your vehicle, sir." The London Lawyer exits his vehicle. The Glasgow cop takes out his baton and starts beating the lawyer and says, "Now then....Dae ye want me to stop, or just slow doon?" Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 23


THE TOP 5 IDIOTS IN THE COUNTRY. Idiot Number 1 I am a medical student currently doing a rotation in toxicology at the poison control centre. Today, this woman called in very upset because she caught her little daughter eating ants. I quickly reassured her that the ants are not harmful and there would be no need to bring her daughter into the hospital. She calmed down, and at the end of the conversation happened to mention that she gave her daughter some ant poison to eat in order to kill the ants. I told her that she better bring her daughter into the Emergency room right away. Idiot Number 2 Seems that a year ago, some Boeing employees on the airfield decided to steal a life raft from one of the 747s. They were successful in getting it out of the plane and home. When they took it for a float on the river, a Coast Guard helicopter coming towards them surprised them. It turned out that the chopper was homing in on the emergency locator beacon that activated when the raft was inflated. They are no longer employed at Boeing. Idiot Number 3 - A true story out of San Francisco: A man, wanting to rob a downtown Bank of America, walked into the branch and wrote "this iz a stikkup. Put all your muny in this bag." While standing in line, waiting to give his note to the teller, he began to worry that someone had seen him write the note and might call the police before he reached the teller's window. So he left the Bank of America and crossed the street to Wells Fargo. After waiting a few minutes in line, he handed his note to the Wells Fargo teller. She read it and, surmising from his spelling errors that he wasn't the brightest light in the harbor, told him that she could not accept his stickup note because it was written on a Bank of America deposit slip and that he would either have to fill out a Wells Fargo deposit slip or go back to Bank of America. Looking somewhat defeated, the man said, "OK" and left. He was arrested a few minutes later, as he was waiting in line back at Bank of America. Idiot Number 4 A motorist was unknowingly caught in an automated speed trap that measured his speed using radar and photographed his car. He later received in the mail a ticket for $40 and a photo of his car. Instead of payment, he sent the police department a photograph of $40. Several days later, he received a letter from the police that contained another picture, this time of handcuffs. He immediately mailed in his $40. Idiot Number 5 Guy walked into a little corner store with a shotgun and demanded all the cash from the cash drawer. After the cashier put the cash in a bag, the robber saw a bottle of scotch behind the counter on the shelf. He told the cashier to put it in the bag as well, but the cashier refused and said, "Because I don't believe you are over 21." The robber said he was, but the clerk still refused to give it to him because he didn't believe him. At this point the robber took his driver's license out of his wallet and gave it to the clerk. The clerk looked it over, agreed that the man was in fact over 21 and he put the scotch in the bag. The robber then ran from the store with his loot. The cashier promptly called the police and gave the name and address of the robber that he got off the license. They arrested the robber. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 24


DOUBLE HEADER AT RAAF BASE AMBERLEY BASIC COURSE 35 GRADUATION PARADE AND GROUND DEFENCE MEMORIAL UNVEILING Just like every other parade at Amberley in winter, the morning of 2nd August was pretty chilly, with a thick fog making driving difficult, but with more luck than judgement we found our way to the graduates’ barbecue breakfast, which started at 0640 outside their accommodation block. President Merv Reid, Jim and Kathryn Gable, our living legend Charles Cugley (who had arrived from Perth the previous night), together with Vice President Henry Cichowski, his wife Mary and Committee members Spike Dainer and Vic Smith all spent an enjoyable hour or so with the newest members of our Airfield Defence family before they were spirited away to get ready for their big moment. Merv presented each graduate with a Welcome Certificate from the Association and spoke briefly to the assembled course members about the values which made the ADG what he is, and the committee members spent some time speaking with small groups about what they could expect during their service careers, together with their own experiences as ADGs.

A large number of Association and serving members, family and friends of the graduates were gathered at the RAAFSFS Parade Ground to witness the parade, which started promptly at 1000. The 13 graduates marched on with the usual impeccable drill which ADGs have become known for and were addressed by the Reviewing Officer, GPCAPT Geoff Harland, OC No.82 Wing. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 25


Following the address, each graduate was presented with the coveted Blue Beret and trophies were presented to each of the prize winners: Dux of the course AC Sheldon Dawkins received the Terence Toole Memorial Trophy; AC Steven Gaudioso won the Thomas Irvine Trophy for Most Improved; The Dave Dubber PTI Award went to AC Neil Gaskell and the Livingston Field Award was presented to CPL Matthew Grey on behalf of No. 2 Section. The graduates of 35 Course are: ACs Jared Brand; Sheldon Dawkins; Jarred Dominello; James Fishlock; Neil Gaskell; Steven Gaudioso; Daniel Patching; James Pirie; Benjamin Reyer; Lachlan Stewart; Ashley Wacher; Shannon Woods and LAC Kc Palmer. Congratulations to you all and welcome to our extended family.

AC Sheldon Dawkins: Dux (Terrence Toole) Award

AC Steven Gaudioso: Most Improved

AC Neil Gaskell: PTI (Dave Dubber)Award

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 26


CPL Matthew Grey: The Livingston Field Award What do the Awards mean? Dux of the Course The AC Terence Toole Memorial Trophy is awarded to the Airfield Defence Guard who achieves the highest level of academic and practical skills during the course. Most Improved The LAC Irvine Trophy is in memory of LAC Thomas Irvine who was the first member of 2 Aerodrome Defence Squadron killed in action defending the airfield on Tarakan Island in May 1945. This trophy is awarded to the Most Improved student on course. PTI Award This award is presented to the student who has achieved the highest level of physical fitness during the course. The Livingston Field Award This award is named after Livingston Field in the Northern Territory where the first Airfield Defence Squadron was formed in 1944 to provide guards for Air Force Units. The award represents the coming together of a brotherhood of airmen whose role is to defend airfields. This award is presented to the Section that has consistently performed at a high standard during the 17 weeks of ADG Basic training, thus representing the modem version of a brotherhood of fighting men tasked with the defence of Air Force personnel and assets. The CPL Instructor of that Section accepts the award on behalf of the Section. This CPL has displayed the high level of professionalism and leadership that has inspired his men to achieve this award today.

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 27


…and the icing on the cake: THE UNVEILING OF THE GROUND DEFENCE MEMORIAL By now we’re pretty sure that everyone knows about the Association’s long term goals: The Ground Combat Badge (); a formal History of the Mustering (in progress) and the Ground Defence Memorial (almost finished). As described elsewhere in this issue, the Ground Defence Monument has been a continuing project for us for several years and it has only been through your generosity and the assistance of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs that we have got this far, so Friday 2 nd August was a major step forward for us. Immediately after the refreshments following the Graduation Parade for 35 Course, the assembled gathering was invited to move up to the Squadron Headquarters area, where our flag-draped monument was waiting. A surprising number of Association members and their partners, serving members and other guests accepted the invitation and by 1130, everything was ready. After an introduction by GPCAPT Peter Davis, Officer Commanding 395 Expeditionary Combat Support Wing (ECSW), followed by a brief address by Association President Merv Reid, the Memorial stone was officially unveiled by the Commanding Officers of 1 and 2 SECFOR Squadrons who formally accepted responsibility for the Monument. In his address, Merv Reid stressed that this was simply an unveiling, not a dedication – before the Monument can be formally dedicated, the two Honour Rolls, listing on one side the names of those ADGs and Ground Defence Officers who have died on Active Service, and on the other side the names of all who have died Whilst Serving, will need to be finalised and mounted, however this will take time and it was felt that all those who have donated to the Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 28


Memorial Fund and all those serving members who have been involved in the establishment of the monument deserved to see what has been achieved so far. Once the Honour Rolls are mounted, the Memorial will be officially dedicated, which will be a cause for even greater celebration. This has been a huge achievement for the Association and anyone who views the Monument in the future will agree that it has been worth every effort made so far.

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 29


AUSTRALIA COMMEMORATES ONE OF ITS GRAVEST TIMES On Battle for Australia Day, Wednesday 4th September 2013, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs Warren Snowdon asked Australians to remember the time when our shores were under threat during the Second World War. Mr Snowdon spent time on Battle for Australia Day visiting Taminmin College in the Northern Territory and presented the school with a copy of Australian War Memorial - Treasures from a Century of Collecting. “During 1942 and 1943 Australia faced a direct attack from Japanese forces, withstanding multiple bombings to Darwin and other northern towns including Port Hedland, Broome, Derby, Katherine and Townsville,” Mr Snowdon said. Battle for Australia Day was declared a day of national observance in 2008 and is marked on the first Wednesday of September. “Battle for Australia Day recognises a grave time in Australia’s wartime history and the contribution of the servicemen and women who defended Australia’s home front – both across the northern Australian coastline and throughout the south-west Pacific including Milne Bay and the Kokoda track,” he said. This year is especially significant as it marks 70 years since the Battle of Wau, a little known but important battle against Japanese forces in Papua New Guinea. The settlement of Wau was highly valued for its airstrip, a crucial supply line for the Australian ‘Kanga Force’ who defended the surrounding area. Facing Japanese troops advancing from Salamaua in early 1943, Australian forces attempted to deliver reinforcements to Wau by air but were prevented by bad weather. The situation came to a head on 28 January 1943. Far outnumbered, a single Australian company of less than 200 men held their position against the Japanese force in a hard fought and relentless battle. Reinforcements arrived the next day and the Japanese were driven back from the airstrip. “This outstanding Australian victory in the Battle of Wau helped pave the way for future advances in the region and illustrates the bravery and service that we honour today. “Today Australia gives its deepest thanks and gratitude to all those who have served in defence of our nation,” Mr Snowdon said. For more information on Australian involvement in the Second World War visit www.ww2australia.gov.au Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 30


BRONZE STAR FOR RISKY ROLE Deploying in a vastly different role, “embedded” in the US 3rd Infantry Division in Afghanistan as personal bodyguard and assistant to Deputy Commanding General of Force Development , BRIG Mark Brewer, has earned SGT Dean Cox from RAAF Base Amberley a Bronze Star. He conducted close personal protection (CPP), planned and carried out secure movements daily throughout regions in Regional Command South WGCDR Tony Houghton presents SGT Dean Cox with the citation which Afghanistan, co-ordinated with coalition and Afghan accompanied the Bronze Star forces in all aspects of CPP training and procedures and engaged with VIPs high-ranking Afghan Army officers and Afghan National Police. “It was a very different deployment, working directly with US and Afghan personnel, but also having access to such high-ranking officials” SGT Cox said. “It was mainly an individual deployment – I really only had myself and BRIG Brewer to worry about. Although we did often have other security personnel providing security for myself while I watched the Brigadier. It was great to be embedded in a regional HQ. It was a real eye-opener to see how the whole machine works and how they all work. They would start at 6 am and finish after midnight some nights for 12 months and we would be travelling every day – sometimes overnight.” He said it was a surprise to receive the medal on August 9th at the COs Parade at Amberley, where he is an Airfield Defence Guard Instructor with the SNCO Training Team at RAAFSFS. “I feel quite lucky because not many Air Force personnel are thrust into positions where they could be considered for a Bronze Star and it is a different sort of medal than many we would receive in Australia – awarded for valour or meritorious service.” His wife and children were very happy and proud of his achievements and recognition after a long period without seeing him – although he said it was something they were used to. “My wife is a FSGT Supplier with 15 years’ service. We have both been the ones deployed and the ones left at home while the other deploys, so we know what to expect. It is always much harder being the person sitting at home in an empty house though. She was more worried than usual as it was a risky role” he said. After previously deploying to Al-Minhad Air Base and Timor-Leste, this was a vastly more intense deployment than SGT Cox had previously experienced. He had to put BRIG Brewer’s safety before his own for seven months. The tempo of the work helped him not to worry about his own safety as much. “We were very busy because the Brigadier had to engage with many leaders and go to most of the forward operating bases, shuras, parades, presentations, Purple Heart ceremonies and, very sadly, ramp ceremonies as well. In the field you are a battlefield aide to make sure everything runs smoothly. You organise accommodation and ensure your boss is not left standing on the flight line waiting for an aircraft. You have to think on your feet and make a lot of last minute contingency plans. If the opportunity came up again I would jump at it”. Article and photo courtesy Air Force newspaper Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 31


SUICIDE AWARENESS SUPPORT FOR VETERANS NOW ONLINE A new website, Operation Life Online, has been launched to assist veterans, Australian Defence Force (ADF) members and their families in learning about suicide prevention. The website is the latest addition to Operation Life, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ (DVA) suicide prevention and mental health resource. Operation Life Online provides advice and resources for the veteran and defence communities, and is designed to raise awareness of suicide, from recognising warning signs and risk factors to learning ways to help in times of crisis. Operation Life Online will offer advice to people in need of immediate assistance, regardless of the time of day or their location. Operation Life workshops are also available for people who are concerned about family, friends, mates or others in the veteran community. Attendance is free and people can register through the Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS). Tragically, suicide is the leading cause of death in Australia for men under 44 years and women under 34, and current and former serving members of the ADF are not immune from this loss. However, support is available and awareness of suicide risk, could help save a life. The veteran community is reminded that free mental health treatment is available for eligible veterans without the need to lodge a DVA compensation claim, they just need to contact DVA on 133 254. Access to Operation Life Online is via DVA’s At Ease mental health portal http://www.at-ease.dva.gov.au/

SUPPORT LEGACY TO KEEP THE FLAME ALIGHT Minister for Veterans Affairs Warren Snowdon has called on Australians to help support the families of Australian servicemen and women by giving generously during Legacy Week, 1 to 7 September. The annual fundraising campaign has been running since 1942 and raises awareness of the support Legacy provides Australian Defence Force families coping with the loss of a loved one in the service to our nation. “Whether they served in the Navy, Army or Air Force, Australian current and ex-service personnel have always been able to count on the support of Legacy for their families if and when they need it. “By buying a badge, making a donation or becoming a volunteer during Legacy Week you can help ensure that support continues,” Mr Snowdon said. Founded in 1923 for veterans of the Great War and their families, today Legacy supports approximately 100,000 widows and widowers, 1,800 children, and dependants with a disability, whatever their needs, age or stage of life. Legacy supports war widows from both World Wars, Korea and Vietnam as well as families who have lost a parent or partner in more recent deployments like Iraq and Afghanistan. Legacy does this through tailored assistance such as counselling, special housing, medical, advocacy and social support. Legacy and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs share a common purpose to ensure the loved ones of Australians lost in conflict have access to the best care and support available. For more information on Legacy or to donate visit www.legacy.com.au or call 1800 534 229. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 32


BILL DELIVERS IMPROVED MILITARY COMPENSATION ARRANGEMENTS A Bill outlining improved military compensation arrangements passed through Federal Parliament at the end of June delivering increased support to the veteran and defence communities and their families. Minister for Veterans’ Affairs Warren Snowdon welcomed the passing of the Veterans’ Affairs Legislation Amendment (Military Compensation Review and Other Measures) Bill 2013 outlining changes to legislation flowing from the Review of Military Compensation Arrangements. “This Bill outlines increased compensation, expanded eligibility criteria and improvements to existing military compensation arrangements from 1 July 2013, benefiting many Australian Defence Force members and their families,” Mr Snowdon said. The recommendations implemented by this Bill will deliver: increased permanent impairment compensation; White Repatriation Health Care Cards to certain former members with conditions accepted under Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988; improvements to compensation for dependants; increased compensation for financial advice; expanded eligibility criteria for specific pensions, and a host of other improvements to the delivery of benefits and services. A full list of initiatives is attached. More than half of the recommendations will be implemented by 1 July 2013. Consultation is currently underway regarding two recommendations involving investigating an enhanced advocacy model and a single appeals pathway for MRCA claims. Discussion papers outlining options to address these matters are available for comment until 30 September 2013. Mr Snowdon said the Bill demonstrates the Government’s ongoing commitment to continually reviewing support and services to ensure they are meeting the evolving needs of the veteran and defence communities and their families. “I sincerely thank all those who contributed to the Review and in doing so, ensured that veterans, ADF members and their families receive the best support now and into the future,” he said. For more information on the Review of Military Compensation Arrangements, details of the Bill or to access the discussion papers visit the ‘MRCA Review’ tab on the DVA website www.dva.gov.au

SUMMARY OF IMPROVEMENTS TO MILITARY COMPENSATION ARRANGEMENTS Permanent Impairment  Improved provisions which will allow earlier payment of compensation for permanent impairment for some claimants with more than one accepted condition under the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA). 

DVA will make greater use of the payment of interim permanent impairment compensation and will include a payment for an imputed lifestyle effect when determining the level of interim MRCA compensation payable. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 33


A new method for calculating transitional permanent impairment compensation for clients under the MRCA who have been compensated previously under the Veterans’ Entitlements Act 1986 (VEA) and/or Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRCA). Additionally DVA will undertake a reassessment of transitional cases determined between 1 July 2004 and 30 June 2013. These reviews will be undertaken from 1 January 2014.

White Card for SRCA Veterans  Certain former ADF members with long term health conditions accepted under the SRCA will receive a White Repatriation Health Care Card from 10 December 2013 for specific conditions and a supplementary pharmaceuticals payment (if not already in receipt). Compensation for Dependants  Dependent children of deceased members will receive increased periodic compensation payments, aligning payments under the MRCA with similar payments made under the SRCA. 

Future wholly dependent partners (widows or widowers) will have greater flexibility in the way they receive compensation following the death of an ADF member or former member.

Financial advice  Eligible persons will be able to receive compensation for legal advice and increased compensation for financial advice from financial advisers and lawyers in relation to decisions on selected compensation options. Expanded eligibility criteria  Eligibility criteria for the Special Rate Disability Pension (SRDP) will be expanded. This will affect clients who have either redeemed small amounts of incapacity payments or who have had their incapacity payments fully offset by their Commonwealth funded superannuation payments. Clients who are SRDP eligible will be automatically accepted as permanently incapacitated for work for the purpose of Invalidity Service Pension. General improvements to the delivery of benefits and services  The claims process for a person with an accepted condition under the VEA, which has been aggravated by service on or after 1 July 2004, will be simplified. 

Current and former members, including reservists, will benefit from improved consistency and flexibility in accessing rehabilitation and transition services.

Education of rehabilitation providers, clients and their representatives will be increased to ensure that they are well informed about DVA entitlements in the event of injury or death. Information products on rehabilitation and transition from the ADF will also be improved.

A range of initiatives designed to improve the quality and timeliness of claims processing, including keeping clients informed of their claim’s progress, and improved reporting to assist the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission to fulfill its functions.

Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS) and Veterans Line can be reached 24 hours a day across Australia for crisis support and free and confidential counselling. Phone 1800 011 046. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 34


PROPOSED NAME BADGES FOR MEMBERS At the Annual General Meeting a couple of years ago it was pointed out that a lot of us never really served together and that some of us are reaching the age where the faces don’t look the same and are getting harder to recognise. A suggestion was made that to avoid embarrassment to anyone at future Association gatherings, we make Association name badges available to interested members at a nominal cost. After investigation, we have learned that we can provide a Name Badge for approximately eighteen dollars each – the badges are available to other family members if required. Interested members are asked to complete the Order Form below and return it to The National Secretary Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc 5 Jeffrey Street CAPALABA QLD 4157. Early orders will receive free postage. Please allow up to 21 days for delivery. AIRFIELD DEFENCE ASSOCIATION AUST. INC

Bill Bloggs  ORDER FORM – ASSOCIATION NAME BADGE Please supply me with Association Name Badge(s) in the following name(s) at a cost of $18.00 each:

______________________________________________________ PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY – what you write is what you get PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY– what you write is what you get

(Please Attach a separate sheet if additional badges are required.) Your Name: _______________________________________________________ Postal Address: ____________________________________________________ _________________________________ Postcode: __________ I enclose the sum of $ ___________ ( _____ badges @ $18.00) each). Signature: ____________________________________ Date: _______________ PLEASE NOTE: THIS OFFER IS AVAILABLE TO ASSOCIATION MEMBERS ONLY

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 35


EXPRESSION OF INTEREST: 2014 ADELAIDE REUNION THIS DOES NOT COMMIT YOU – WE JUST NEED AN IDEA OF WHO IS INTERESTED IN COMING, BECAUSE IT HELPS US WITH AN ESTIMATE OF NUMBERS AND COSTS Please fill in all the blanks, tick all the boxes and return this completed form to: The National Secretary Airfield Defence Association Australia Inc 5 Jeffrey Street CAPALABA QLD 4157 I/We are interested in going to the Association’s Reunion in Adelaide from 17th to 21st March 2014 Inclusive. I/We understand that the program has not yet been finalised and that this form does not commit me/us to attend. If I/We decide to make a firm booking: HOW MANY? 

there would be ……people in the group. ( ….. Adults: ….. Male, ….. Female), (……Children: ….. Male, ….. Female). TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS 

I/We would probably travel to and from Adelaide by Train

Bus

Car

Air

Other ACCOMMODATION I/We would prefer  To stay with the group  To make my own arrangements

[ [

] ]

ACTIVITIES I/We will PROBABLY / PROBABLY NOT(1) take part in any of the planned activities and acknowledge that there may be a cost involved, which I/We will need to pay in advance. YOUR DETAILS Your name: …………………………………………………………………………………… Contact Telephone: Daytime: (

) …………………… Evenings: (

) ………………....

Email: …………………………………………..

YOU DO NOT NEED TO BE AN ASSOCIATION MEMBER TO JOIN US (1)

Please delete whichever does NOT apply.

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 36


COMMUNITY NOTICE BOARD Welcome to our newest members Ron (Bomber) Bromley, Fred Holtmann, Terry Howe and Ken Willoughby. New members are always welcome and we encourage existing members to talk to their mates about membership. Welcome to you all. Welcome back!: SECFOR1 is now home from Afghanistan. A terrific Welcome Home parade was held at Amberley on 9th August to celebrate their safe return and present them with the first ever Air Force Ground Combat Badges. Sick Parade: Since the last issue, we’ve had reports that members of our family haven’t been travelling as well as they could. Ron Stuart is back in hospital, John White, Phil Armstrong, Eric Carpenter, Col Purdon and Jim Simons have all recently had surgery or been on the sick list. Most are on the way to recovery or have since recovered, but sadly, John White remains very ill, as does Ron Sloper and we again wish them and their families our very best. For the rest of you who are still not a hundred per cent, we send our best wishes that you get better soon. If we’ve missed anyone out, please let us know. Good Luck and safe trip back to the ADGs of SECFOR2, who are busy not only with their normal Airfield Defence duties but are also involved in dismantling Tarin Kot. Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.

Congratulations John and Janet Reale on the birth of first Great Granddaughter Ruby Anne Wicks, on 18th June 2013. Aren’t we getting old! Congratulations also to us (the Association), on finally seeing the Ground Combat Badge become a reality after years of hard work. Where the Heck is…? We’ve had returned mail marked “not at this address” from Terry (Tangles) Collis, Brian Taylor (ex 20 Course) and Martin (Blue) Campbell. If you can shed some light on their disappearance, please let us know. R.I.P.: It is with much sadness that we report the passing of some very special members of our Airfield Defence family over the past several months: Former FSGT Frank (Tug) Willson BEM left us on 3rd August in Adelaide and one of our Living Legends from World War 2, Clyde Jones, passed away a few days th later on 8 August. Lest we forget. FINALLY, another reminder: The AGM in June last year agreed that our next major reunion be held in or around March 2014, in Adelaide. With the assistance of Fred Holtman and Glen Hombsch we will hopefully soon have a draft program, accommodation details and other information available to you, however there is an “Expression of Interest” Form in this issue which we would like you to fill out and send back to us if you plan on coming. Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 37


THE LAST WORD The first thing I want to do is to thank all those people who came to Amberley for the unveiling of our Memorial – especially those who travelled huge distances to be there on the day, and what a great day it was: We welcomed thirteen new members to the ADG Community, the sun shone and our Memorial finally had its wrappings removed and is there for all to see. Now that I’ve done that, I want to thank all the Serving Members, especially Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Geoff Brown, GPCAPT Peter Davis, WGCDR Jonathon Durden, SQNLDR Mark Sartori, WOFFs Steve Bryson, “Chuck” Kearnan, Marty Lawrence, Glenn Lyons, Mike McDonnell and FSGT Steve Voll for their help and co-operation in making the unveiling ceremony a real event. Our Patron Air Marshal David Evans deserves more than our thanks, but I don’t know what or how to give it to him – he has been a tower of strength and help for the many years it has taken to achieve some of our goals and without him we wouldn’t have made it, so if a simple thank you is enough, then thank you sir. If I’ve left anyone out, please accept my apologies. Last, but by no means least, I want to thank Merv Reid, without whose dedication and sheer determination neither the Memorial nor the Ground Combat Badge would have been a reality. Spike Dainer has been a tower of strength with his knowledge of the system and the individuals who make things happen and it’s fair to say that without his get-up-and-go, things wouldn’t have. So thanks Spike. There is a DVD which is now available to members and contains photos and video of the three major events at Amberley last August. Not being one to blow my own trumpet too much, the video is pretty ordinary, but it gives a reasonable idea of the proceedings. See elsewhere in this issue for more details and check out the Merchandise Order form on the web site. We also have a new polo shirt available and some of you might recognise the little green man from many years ago. He has already proved popular with those who have seen him and I understand that many serving members have also shown an interest, so get in quick while stocks are available. Finally, we’ve managed to strike a major deal with a hotel in Adelaide for accommodation during the planned reunion next year. The rate is much lower than the normal room rate and includes a full breakfast every day and secure underground parking for those who are driving. All being well, I plan to make the trip from Brisbane via Birdsville and Oodnadatta to give the beast a bit of a run. An ‘Expression of Interest’ form is included in this issue and will also be available on the web site, so if you have any plans of joining us, and I hope that means every one, please fill it in and send it back so that we can work out the final program, catering and accommodation needs. Until next time, Stay well and happy! Jim Gable National Secretary/Treasurer Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 38


MERCHANDISE INFORMATION AND ORDER FORMS, TOGETHER WITH APPLICATION AND OTHER MEMBERSHIP FORMS, CAN NOW BE FOUND ON THE ASSOCIATION WEB SITE, www.adgblueberet.org IF YOU DON’T HAVE INTERNET ACCESS AND YOU NEED A PAPER COPY, PLEASE CONTACT US.

Blue Beret August/September 2013, Issue 55: Page 39

The Blue Beret  

The ADG Blue Beret Magazine: August/September 2013 - Issue 55