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COURSE SYLLABUS Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

Course Description This studio, discussion, and critique course introduces students to visual and verbal design methods by emphasizing the fundamentals of composition, abstract visual thinking, and preliminary study of visual sequences, color, and graphic design principles. Students are required to design in class (with some homework), and to engage in personal research, active discussion, and group critique. Hand crafting techniques will be emphasized.

Attendance and Preparedness This studio course meets on Wednesdays from 9am–4pm during the Spring semester. Attendance is mandatory. Students will not receive course credit if they have more than two unexcused absences. Excused absences may include illness if accompanied by a doctor’s note, religious holidays, and unforeseen tragedies. Students who know in advance that they will be absent from class, must email the instructor or TA in advance otherwise the absence may be considered unexcused. It is the student’s responsibility to complete all assignments on time and to the best of their ability, even if they miss a class. Students must arrive to each class at 9am prepared with required art supplies and completed weekly assignments. Every 15-minute lateness and every instance of unpreparedness, will count as half an absence. Excessive unpreparedness or latenesses may lead to a grade of no credit.

Studio Conduct • Our classroom is your studio for the semester. Most assignments can and should be completed during class time. When there are no classes scheduled in the room you may use the facilities and supplies to complete your assignments and projects. • Class handouts and helpful information will be available to you on the course portal. • Outside of class our primary mode of communication will be SAIC email. Make a habit of checking this account weekly. • Cell phones, instant messaging and the equivalent must be turned off during class.

Grading and the VCD Curriculum All assignments must be completed in full and to the best of your ability in order to receive credit for this course. Craft, concept, risk-taking, consistent progress/revisions, and sustained effort will be factored into assessment of your work. Actively participating in discussions and critiques, and asking questions will benefit both you and your classmates. Insufficient participation will be reflected in your final review. The School adheres to a credit/no credit grading system. In addition to a CR, NCR, or INC grade, the department will maintain a written record of your performance. This report will influence your portfolio review should you choose to continue on to upper-level VCD courses. The department’s portfolio review usually takes place after a student has completed Beginning Graphic Design and Beginning Typography. Please review the attached VCD undergraduate curriculum and Portfolio Review grading sheet for details.

VCD Department Contacts John Bowers, Department Chair, jbowers@saic.edu Deborah Fell, Administrative Director, dfell@saic.edu Alysia Kaplan, Academic Advisor, akaplan@saic.edu Mary-Jo Krysinsky, Faculty Advisor, AIGA Student Chapter (SAIC AIGA on Facebook)


COURSE SYLLABUS Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Any student in need of academic adjustments or accommodations because of a disability should contact SAIC’s Disability and Learning Resource Center (DLRC) at 312-499-4278, or email dlrc@saic.edu. DLRC staff will review the student’s disability documentation and will work with the student to determine reasonable accommodations. The DLRC will then provide the student with a letter outlining approved accommodations. This letter must be presented to the instructor, as early in the semester as possible, so that accommodations can be implemented. Students, please contact the DLRC as early as possible.

Plagiarism Statement The School of the Art Institute of Chicago prohibits academic misconduct, which includes “both plagiarism and cheating, and may consist of the submission of the work of another as one’s own; unauthorized assistance on a test or assignment; submission of the same work for more than one class without the knowledge and consent of all instructors; or the failure to properly cite texts or ideas from other sources.” (Excerpted from Students’ Rights and Responsibilities, Student Handbook).

Supply List * indicates bring this to every class • Pencil and eraser * • Metal ruler * (at least 18 inches long, non-slip backing) • Glue stick * (3M permanent recommended) • Exacto knife #1 * (with spare #1 blades*) • Sketchpad or tracing paper roll * (for in-class sketching) • Single hole punch * (standard 0.25-inch hole) • Cutting mat (12x18-inches recommended) • Black paper (Artagain black Strathmore 60lb., 9 x12-inch, 24-sheet pad) • White bristol board (smooth, 1- or 2-ply, Strathmore, 9 x12-inch, 20-sheet pad) • Black mounting/museum board (large sheets to cut to size, at least 12x12-inches) • Double-stick tape or StudioTac for mounting (NO spray mount/adhesive) • Discarded magazines and newspapers (approx. 10 for collages and color studies) • An inexpensive folder or portfolio case to store and transport class assignments and handouts (recommended 13x19-inch size) • PVA adhesive (You will not need this until after the mid-term)

Resources Printing and Computing The Service Bureau at 37 S. Wabash, Room 1122 Viscom Department computers, scanners and printers at Sharp Building 11th Floor General Access Computer Lab at 112 S. Michigan Ave., Room 901 SAIC Media Centers at Sharp 307, MacLean 805, or Columbus Drive 233 Supplies Dick Blick at 36 S. State St. Utrecht at 332 S. Michigan Ave. Paper Source at 232 W. Chicago Ave.


COURSE SYLLABUS

Schedule and Assignments

Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214

FEB 3

Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

FEB 10

FEB 17

FEB 24

MAR 3

MAR 10

MAR 17

MAR 24

MAR 31

APR 7

APR 14

APR 21

APR 28

Dot, Line and Shape Compositions Assignments: A1, HW1, A2, HW2 Review A1, HW1, A2, HW2 Assignments: A3, HW3, A4 Abstract Symbols and Patterns Review A3, HW3, A4 Copier and tiling demo, Introduce P1 Assignments: HW4, A5, HW5 Review HW4, A5, HW5 Assignments: A6, P1 sketches Color and Texture Review: A6, P1 sketches Assignments: HW6, A7, A8, P1 draft Review HW6, A7, A8, P1 draft Assignments: A9, HW7, finish P1 Spring Break, Class cancelled Revise work; Prepare to turn in all work for midterm review. Midterm Reviews Bring all work to date to your individual review appointment. P1 Critique Review A9, HW7 Introduce P2 Assignments: Concepts and Thumbnails for P2 Sequence Bookbinding and materials demo, Watch Powers of Ten Assignments: Sample spreads for P2 Visit to Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection Review Storyboards and spreads for P2 Assignments: Print-quality images for P2 Review refinements to P2 and images Assignments: Simple prototypes for P2, Sample materials for P2

Studio work session with individual check-ins Assignments: Near-final prototypes for P2

MAY 5 

Crit Week, Class cancelled

MAY 12 

P2 Critique Hand in all assignments and projects for grading.

MAY 19

Grades due


DOT, LINE, & SHAPE COMPOSITIONS Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

Objectives Create abstract compositions that animate a page, that convey intention or meaning, and that engage a viewer. Challenge your notions of placement, relationship, and grouping. Learn to utilize an entire surface, and understand how the center, axes, grid lines, margins, and surface edges can be leveraged as elements of composition. Avoid literal forms of representation. Practice iterative sketching techniques. Hone the crafts of precise cutting, pasting, measuring, and mounting artwork for presentation.

Vocabulary point /dot The simplest, minimum unit of visual communication. line A directional path composed of dots. May be straight or curved, regular or irregular. shape /plane An area or form bound by lines. Shapes may be independent or modular. grid a system of organizing space; may result in the creation of axes that ground and regulate a composition; may be based upon a shape that is fundamental to a design, or through mathematic calculation. The trim edge and the margins of a page are part of the grid system. balance A state of equilibrium between elements in a composition. symmetry Describes the equal division of a picture plane; its dividing axes can be diagonal, vertical, or horizontal. Symmetry generally results in balance or harmony. asymmetry Describes the unequal division of a picture plane. Assymmetry generally results in visual tension and activity. figure/ground (or positive/negative) Describes spatial interaction. Figure refers to an element on the picture plane and ground refers to the area surrounding it. Negative space (or white space) may seem empty but is an active area of composition. By interacting with compositional elements the negative space can appear to come forward or to recede. scale/proportion Describes the size relationship between units in a composition. Consistent proportions generally lend harmony to a composition. Scale changes generally lend activity and contrast to a composition. repetition The uninterrupted visual relations among elements; characterized by continuity, and measured steps from one point to another; used to achieve rhythm or pattern. (e.g. uniform patterns, syncopated rhythm). direction/movement When elements are arranged in a specific order (horizontally, vertically, diagonally, etc. ) the eye is led in a direction. Motion can be fast or slow, orderly or chaotic. contrast The differences among elements defined by their degree of conflict or discord. May be observed in size (big v. small), value (light v. dark), shape (angular v. curvilinear), color temperature (warm v. cool), texture (smooth v. rough), etc. interaction of form by cropping, touching, intersecting, overlapping, layering (depth) hierarchy the rank of importance of the elements in a composition


DOT, LINE, & SHAPE COMPOSITIONS Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

Assignments A1 Dot Compositions Choose five adjectives from the list below. For each of the five words, create an 8x8-inch composition that expresses its meaning. You may use multiple or single 1/4” dots adhered to 8x8-inch paper. You may use either black or white paper for the dots or for the background paper. Explosive Magnetic Isolated Confident Speedy Heavy Tranquil Aggressive Nervous Joyful A2 Line Compositions Create five 8x8-inch compositions that visually communicate the same five adjectives from A1. You may use multiple 1/8”, 1/4”, 1/2”, or 1” thick straight lines adhered to 8x8-inch paper. You may use either black or white paper for the lines or for the background paper. All lines must have square ends. No angled ends. No curved lines. A3 Figure-Ground Shape Compositions Create five 8x8-inch compositions that visually communicate the same adjectives from A1 and A2, and that express a challenging figure-ground relationship. You may use multiple geometric shapes of various sizes adhered to 8x8-inch paper. You may use either black or white paper for the lines or for the background paper. All shapes must have cleanly-cut edges. A4 Irregular Shape Compositions Create five 8x8-inch compositions that visually communicate the same adjectives from A1, A2, and A3. You may use textured and intuitive forms in addition to geometric dots, lines, and shapes. You may use either black or white paper for the forms or for the background paper. You may use curved lines, torn paper, and rough shapes.

Homeworks HW1 Using a digital camera capture images of real-life dot compositions from the world around you. Print and crop at least one expressive photograph for each of the five adjectives that you are working with in A1. You will pin up five 4x4-inch photos alongside your A1 compositions. HW2 Photograph, print and crop five photographs of line compositions from the world that express the adjectives you are working with in A2. You will pin up five 4x4-inch photos alongside your A2 compositions. HW3 Photograph, print and crop five photographs of shape compositions from the world that express the adjectives you are working with in A3. You will pin up five 4x4-inch photos alongside your A3 compositions.


ABSTRACT SYMBOLS & PATTERNS Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

Objectives You have been assigned a simple object. Observe it closely: its form, its qualities, its essential characteristics. This object will be the starting point for you as you create an abstracted symbol to represent it, and then a visual system or pattern that further expands on its abstract qualities. In addition to composition, you will demonstrate techniques of visual variety, rhythm, repetition and juxtaposition. Your aim is to articulate the dynamics between a complex whole and its simple parts.

Vocabulary

repetition can be literal and exact, or can be based upon perception or similarity enlarge /reduce (zoom/shrink) crop to frame a portion of an image, usually to achieve a stronger image composition bleed to trim a page so that the image runs all the way to the edge without any margins rhythm (regular or irregular, harmonious or chaotic) reflection to mirror (across an axis) rotation to turn (around various points) juxtaposition to place side by side texture a visual or tactile surface (i.e. smooth, rough, reflective) pattern a clear and consistent system based upon the relationships between component parts which may be regular or irregular, mechanical or organic


ABSTRACT SYMBOLS & PATTERNS Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

Assignments A5 Symbolic object drawings Sketch your object from various perspectives (from above, the side, below, inside, etc.) to try to represent it in the clearest, most essential way. Bold, simple drawings with articulate contours are best. Choose your three strongest drawings to refine and present. These three drawings must be rendered either as black paper-cut silhouettes or as vectors drawn using Adobe Illustrator. Final size is 8x8-inches. Your drawings may be cropped within this frame. A6 Object Assemblages Crop, enlarge, reduce, rotate, repeat, and reflect your object drawings to create 4x4-inch square compositions or “tiles.” Join these tiles into intriguing pairs; Observe how their figure and ground start to flow into one another to create new shapes. Save your pairs in your sketchbook. Now, create three different 12x12-inch assemblages by combining your tiles in dynamic combinations. You may include completely white or completely black tiles in the assemblages to achieve the best overall effect.

Homeworks HW4 Brainstorm and list ten abstract qualities of your object. As a starting point, consider the appearance, materials, function, and manufacture of your object. For example, if your object is a safety pin, you may choose words such as tightly wound, tense, secured, puncture, industrial, pointy, linkable, smooth, curved, etc. HW5 Visit the Art Institute of Chicago’s Modern Wing to observe abstract, modular works. In your sketchbook, draw and diagram how the techniques of scale, rotation, reflection, repetition, and joinery are used by one of the artists or works below: • Sol LeWitt, Lines of One Inch, Four Directions, Four Colors, October 1970-March 1971 • Architecture Fragments Gallery (various works in the hall, choose one) • Sixteen Isomorphs (Negative), 1967 by Mel Bochner Consider how these artists and designers compose tiles to create modular patterns and design systems.


ABSTRACT SYMBOLS & PATTERNS

P1 Poster Apply the compositonal strategies you have been practicing to a large-scale composition: a 16x24-inch poster. Choose one of the adjectives you have been working with this semester as a theme for your poster (e.g. speedy, explosive, etc.).

Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214

Your poster design must incorporate ALL of the following:

Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

• One or more of your object drawings from A5 and A6 • Visual contrast (i.e. scale, figure/ground, form, texture) • A system of proportion (e.g. 1:2, or 1:3, or small:medium:large) • Incorporation of texture (i.e. handmade, photographic, material choice) • Use of figure transitioning to ground and vice versa Throughout the progression of this project you are expected to make approximately 2-3 revisions to your design. This is the suggested process to follow: • Start by exploring composition ideas in your sketchbook • Either work by hand (with the aid of the copier) or on the computer (with the aid of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator), or some combination of both • Produce drafts and test prints of your iterations at the full size by “tiling” (refer to the class demo) • Print the final poster at The Service Bureau (give them at least 24 hours advance notice); or on the color plotter in the hallway of Sharp 11th floor; or in the Computer Lab on the 9th floor of MacLean. Plan ahead! Do not leave printing to the last minute. • If you produced your poster by hand, make a black and white oversized copy of the poster at FedEx Kinko’s. The finished poster must be trimmed to size (16” x 24”), and may be oriented either vertically or horizontally. The poster may be either black/white, grayscale, or in color.


COLOR & TEXTURE Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214

Objectives In the following weeks you will create studies and compositions using color. You will learn the fundamentals of color relationships, harmonies, and the perceptual effects that can be achieved with applied color. Essentially color is a subjective study, however, you will learn how to build and predict color relationships which will energize and deepen your compositions.

Vocabulary Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

hue the location of the color on the light spectrum (ex. red, green, blue) value the amounts of lightness or darkness in a color, (also known as luminance, brightness, lightness, tone) intensity the brightness or dullness of a color shade variation of a hue by the addition of black tint variation of a hue by the addition of white saturation (or chroma) the purity or mutedness of a color; desaturated color neutralizes to gray luminosity the quality of emitting light color temperature white light that is warmed (red-yellow) or cooled (green-blue) RGB the additive light color spectrum, (ex. for computer screens) CMYK the subtractive light color spectrum, opaque (ex. for commercial printing) pigments used to create custom color blends from natural and chemical sources (ex. for painters) color wheel a system of rationalizing color; used by artists primary colors red, blue, yellow secondary colors orange, violet, green tertiary colors red-orange, yellow-orange, blue-green, yellow-green, blue-violet, and red-violet complimentary colors opposite one another on the color wheel (ex. red and green) analogous colors colors that are similar in chroma and which are next to each other on the color wheel (ex. red and orange)


COLOR & TEXTURE Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214

In-class demonstration Clip multiple swatches of a single hue from magazines and newspapers. All swatches must be 1” wide x 2” high. The best swatches are clipped from flat areas of color (avoid photos that have changes in depth of field, or with shifts in texture). Notice that the paper on which the colors are printed will affect your perception of the color. Mount the swatches for your studies onto black 9x12-inch Artagain paper or museum board.

Assignments Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

A7 Grayscale Spectrum Create a study of nine grayscale value intervals on a 9x12-inch shet of black Artagain paper or museum board. Start by choosing a white and a black swatch. Next, find middle gray, the value that is visually in-between black and white. Proceed to find each in-between value until you have a set of nine equal grayscale value steps. A8 Hue Spectrum Create a study of five hues on a 9x12-inch sheet of black Artagain paper or museum board. Choose one warm hue and one cool hue to begin. Next, find a swatch that is visually in-between these two, taking into consideration hue, value, tint, temperature and luminosity. Swatches must be arranged with the cool sample on the right and the warm sample on the left. A9 Color Perception Studies Create four studies of perceptual color effects, and mount each study on a 9x12-inch sheet of black Artagain paper. Start by choosing one color sample from the ColorAid set. Sparingly, cut five 1x1-inch swatches from this color sample. (Hold on to the rest of the sheet. You will need it). Now, choose and cut out four 2.5x2.5-inch color samples that demonstrate the following effects, and that maintain the general appearance of the one color sample that you started with: (1) Subtraction of color; (2) Vibration; (3) Analogous color; (4) Complimentary color As you overlay the 1-inch swatch on to the 2.5-inch swatch you will see how the colors affect your perception of hue, value, and temperature. Retain one of the 1-inch swatches as a reference point.

Homeworks HW6 Make two 8x8-inch relief collages using cardboard boxes. Tear, cut, crop and layer the material in different ways to create two dynamic and contrasting compositions (ex. flat vs deep; smooth vs. rough; geometric vs. organic). Explore the many textures you can get from simple cardboard. HW7 Recreate three of your dot, line, or shape compositions using colored paper. Your choice of colors should enhance the adjective that you intended to describe (ex. speedy, explosive, etc.). You may use ColorAid paper, or other solid colored papers such as Canson. You will pin up three 8x8-inch compositions.


COLOR & TEXTURE Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214

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Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl. Chicago, IL 60603

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Example of nine swatch gayscale study (top) and five swatch hue study (bottom).

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Excerpt from Graphic Design The New Basics by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Philips


Excerpt from Graphic Design The New Basics by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Philips


Excerpt from Graphic Design The New Basics by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Philips


SEQUENCE Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu

Objectives Sequences are narratives that consist of multiple frames or moments that change over time. They often exhibit key characteristics of rhythm and pacing, juxtaposition and intent. Since each frame is a composition unto itself you will learn to think of compositions at various levels of comprehension, from a single frame, to single plus adjacent frames, to the piece as an entire gesture. Keep in mind that key components of compelling sequences include: a clear concept; good content editing; similarity/variety of forms; variations on a theme; a beginning, a middle, and an end; appropriate material choice;, and refined craft and construction.

Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu

We will be working with book structures, which are sequential narratives and also objects. You should consider their materiality and their 3-dimensional characteristics.

Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl.

Vocabulary narrative sequence a continuous series of text and/or imagery that tells a story; can be linear or non-linear (a series is built upon similarity, visual or otherwise) pacing the rate of progress of movement; may be fast or slow in tempo; involves the coordination of similarity and difference among elements, the juxtaposition of elements on a page or in a structure, the variations on a rhythm that keep it interesting, and the adherence to a deviation from the established system of organization. thumbnails small sketches of every frame of a sequence that provides an overview of the entire narrative; often used in film, animation, and book design prototype a model for a finished work; often used to test materials and troubleshoot ideas. Prototypes may be crude or complex, depending on what the artist is testing. book parts include cover, end sheet, title page, fore-edge, head, tail, spine, text block, gutter, colophon, spread page elements include header, footer, column, margin, hang line, image and text hierarchy, folios, gutter proportions the relationship between parts to each other and to the whole; a series of sizes, dimensions and measurements that lend harmony and balance to a composition grid lines of measurement that serve as visual guides for arranging compositions and page layouts; grids may be derived from units (such as type measurements), or by visual rhythms, or by mathematical criteria

Page

Spread


SEQUENCE Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214 Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl.

Storyboards Concept Articulate your concept clearly. Your concept should be clear enough that you can write it in a single sentence or two. Thumbnails Create a full set of reduced-size sketches for your book. Make sure every page is sketched, including the covers. Come up with 2-3 variations on the narrative concept. Sample Spreads Create 3-4 full-size sample spreads of your book. Consider the juxtaposition of the pages, the crops of the images, the margins of the pages, the size of the book gutter.

Content Print-Quality Images Based on your thumbnail sketches collect, photograph, make, or scan images to use in the final book. If the images are not high quality they will look bad! If you are scanning images or shooting digital photography, make sure that your final images are sized at 300dpi at 100%. In Photoshop’s top menu go to: Image > Image Size to change the resolution and dimensions of an image.

Prototypes Simple Prototypes To test out your initial ideas for sequences and structures make mock-ups of your book using simple white paper with pencil sketches. 3-dimensional models are helpful for figuring out how to treat the back side of the accordion structure and the book covers. Near-Final Prototypes Now test the size of your book and the qualities of the materials you have chosen. Create a full scale prototype of your book. All the pages should be populated with final content at full size. Test the binding method, adhesives, and all materials. Figure out how you will print the pages (either one at a time, or as a longer sequence).

W structure

Z structure


SEQUENCE Introduction to Visual Communication SAIC, Spring 2010 Wednesdays 9am–4pm Sharp Bldg., Rm. 1214

Project 2: Book as Narrative Sequence and Object Your final project is to design a linear visual sequence and to present it in the form of an accordion book. Your narrative must transition between 2 key images: an abstracted drawing of your object from A5, and a high quality photograph of your object. All the pages in-between are up to you. You may focus on just the formal elements of the images or you may bring in some cultural elements of your own.

Esther Chak Part-time Faculty, Instructor echak@saic.edu

Requirements:

Yao Xin Teaching Assistant xyao@saic.edu

• consider composition at 4 levels: page, spread, unfolded linear sequence, object

Viscom Department SAIC, Sharp Building 37 S. Wabash, 11th fl.

• transition between 2 key images • thoughtful compositions and pacing • page count for the book is a minimum of 10 pages plus a front and back cover • trim size of the book is a minimum of 4x4-inches Choose ONE of the following structures: • Conventional book (“W” structure; the front and back side must be treated) • Flip narrative (2 narratives; front and back covers are each beginnings; “Z” structure) • Continuous narrative (front and back cover continue the narrative; either “Z” or “W” structure) • Gate fold (two books side by side, open in the middle; essentially 2 “W’s”) • Series of smaller accordion pamphlets (perhaps bound by a belly band or case; “W”) Producing the book: • Where will you print? How long will it take? Plan ahead! • What materials will you use? How much will they cost? Buy extras in case of mistakes. • Gather supplies (adhesives, tools, etc.) • Where will you source imagery? Are your images high resolution? (300 dpi at trim size) • What kind of cover will your book have? If hard cover, it will require additional planning. Keep in mind that key components of compelling sequences include: similarity/variety, variations on a theme, a strong foundation of project values and visual elements, a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Make two good copies of your book Since this is a design course, your work must be reproducible. I will evaluate both copies of the book. Remember to include a slip of paper tucked into your book that contains the following information: Your name Your book title (if any) Any other details about your book (if any) SAIC Introduction to Visual Communication Design Spring 2010 Esther Chak, instructor TA’s name, teaching assistant


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