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The AUSB Odyssey The “Making A Difference” Edition

Winter 2012

Dee Dee Barrett

Juan Zaragoza

The Domino Effect

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Contributors Writers Brittany Gunther

Brittany is twenty-two years old and studying communications. This is her second quarter at Antioch and also her second year of living in Santa Barbara. She moved here from Chicago and the only thing she truly misses, besides the big city, is the deep dish pizza! Her plans for the future are to get involved in some organizations where she can give back. Living and studying in the paradise of Santa Barbara is a blessing that allows her to realize she needs to help out those who are less fortunate.

Jeffrey Lovelace

Former entrepreneur and photographic artist, Jeffrey is a now semi-retired perpetual student with an anomalous distinction; he started at Antioch University Santa Barbara in 1987, but has yet to graduate. His two wonderful, grown children love him anyway. His writings and photographs have been published in Santa Barbara Magazine, Sky & Telescope magazine, and the long defunct magazine Bliss. He is currently fifty-three years ancient, but that is certain to change.

Mallory Price

Mallory Price was born and raised in Santa Barbara. She comes from a family that has many ties to education, which inevitably led her in a similar direction. After graduating from the University of Washington with a BA in English, she began working in public schools. She recently obtained her multiple subject teaching credential from Antioch University Santa Barbara and is presently enrolled in the masters program. She is currently working at Summerland Elementary School.

Artists Cecily Barrie

Cecily is a BA student in her second to last quarter at AUSB. After graduation, she hopes to complete an MFA in creative writing.

Tessa Eckerman

Tessa understands that she is a spirit trying to be human, but in order to please her ego, she considers her characteristics as follows: She is a twenty-four year-old semi-environmental activist (more of the quiet, graceful type). She is an outdoor enthusiast, a security guard (believe it or not), and works in the wilderness with kids weekly. She is from California. Denise Thorpe-Eheler Denise is an MACP student. She loves her work She aspires to join the Peace Corps, then to become as an inclusion specialist for individuals who are a Waldorf teacher. developmentally disabled. Her passions are writing, dancing, traveling, and being a serious student of Buddhism. She and her husband have six children and two cats.

On the Cover

Julian J. Varela

Julian holds a master’s degree in exercise science and health promotion, is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist, and is currently enrolled in Antioch’s MACP-MFT program. Julian co-owns Equilibrium Fitness and Equilibrium Fitness for Women. Follow Julian’s blog at julianvarela.blogspot.com.

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Jennifer Baron

Jennifer first started taking photographs with her grandmother’s old Pentax camera at the mere age of eight. Since then, she has shot everything from fashion ads to pregnancy, with a concentration in documentary photography. She is a Santa Barbara native and the owner of Forty Weeks Photography.

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Staff Shonna Berk

Making a difference is something Shonna has become passionate about, whether that be with strangers or within her personal relationships. She dedicates a majority of her time to help those who are less fortunate, and hopes to study abroad in Africa this fall, to give back to those who have not had the opportunities she was blessed with growing up.

Jason Erwin

Jason is a BA Liberal Studies student at Antioch. He enjoys learning how business and sustainability can complement each other. He was born and raised in Santa Barbara, CA. He enjoys being outdoors and spending time with his friends and family.

Heather Laney

Heather, in her last quarter at Antioch University, is in the BA program studying liberal arts and taking control of her education. Hoping to become a novelist one day, she is always writing something somewhere, from her freelance writing business, to stories for her two children. Until the day comes where she can live off being a writer, Heather has started a dog rescue and training business, which currently runs out of her home. Along with training her service dog Dylan and her mother’s dog Star, she has recently started training a shelter rescue named Storm, who will become a therapy and companion dog for a disabled soldier. (Heather’s photo is of her two children, David and Hannah.)

Chelsea Bets Christenson

First and foremost, Chelsea considers herself a writer, and has since she was nine years old. She was first published when she was twelve, she won the Santa Barbara chapter of the United Nations National High School Essay Contest three consecutive years, and is currently one of five college finalists in the Santa Barbara International Film Festival’s 10-10-10 Student Scriptwriting Competition. A former Dramatic Writing student at NYU, Chelsea chose Antioch because of her ardent desire to change the world. She is twenty-five years old.

Editor and Layout Artist Chelsea Bets Christenson Staff Writer Shonna Berk Staff Writer Jason Erwin Staff Writer Heather Laney Founder/Contributor Megan Leigh Martello Faculty Advisor Hannah Holbrook

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Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t s Editorials 6 The Domino Effect Chelsea Bets Christenson

Features 19 Faces of Antioch Shonna Berk, Jason Erwin, & Heather Laney 25 Board of Trustees Profile: Dee Dee Barrett Shonna Berk 27 Faculty Close-Up: Juan Zaragoza Heather Laney 34 Sports: Fantasy Football Fail Megan Leigh Martello 36 Inspiration: A Guide to Your Personal Odyssey

Reviews 12 17 21 22 24 28 31 33

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Making Human Rights Our Compass for Globalization Tessa Eckerman How a Carpet Company Changed Business Forever Jason Erwin The Dog Works Shonna Berk Sustainable Business: MarBorg Jason Erwin Waiting for Superman Mallory Price United Way’s Day of Caring Brittany Gunther Transition House Shonna Berk Double Cheeseburgers and Global Warming Julian J. Varela

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Non-Fiction 8 10 18

Learning to Accept Yourself and Help from Others Megan Leigh Martello The Power of Addiction Shonna Berk Local, Organic, and Good to Eat Heather Laney

Fiction 15 32

No Small Thing Jeffery Lovelace Letting Go Heather Laney

Poetry 29

Making a Difference in the World Denise Thorpe-Eheler

Visual Art 11 Voice Cecily Barrie 26 Doorway to Change Tessa Eckerman 30 Inspiration Splash Tessa Eckerman

Events 37 38

Current Events: Staff Picks Calendar of Events

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The Domino Effect By Chelsea Bets Christenson

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It’s Wednesday night and it’s better than I expected. I’m playing dominos with good friends at Elsie’s in downtown SB. I’d never been, but I like it well, and I sip my cider to the repetitive sound of ivory kissing the tabletop. In spite of everything, life has treated me well. It’s in moments like these that I remember that. I play a domino and suddenly, I’m a kid all over again... I place the final domino and look up into my grandmother’s smiling face. I take a breath and initiate the chain reaction. An ivory waterfall surrounds us as it travels around the room. With a single action, I created lasting impact. I’m young, so I don’t realize; I’ve just learned the greatest lesson of my life. We’re in my grandma’s camper; I have no sense of the future or my age. All I know is that I’m happy. Happy to see her. Happy to be there. My world is still unexplored and I have no doubt that the journey will be terrific. I view life with childhood grace; I embrace each moment like it’s both the first and last. I’m not scared. I’ve never hated. I don’t know what it feels like to be ignored. Failure isn’t within my perception. I believe all dreams constitutionally come true. What happened to this little girl? When did she become me? How have things changed? How have I...? I know the first transformation occurred the year I lost my grandmother. Death will do that to you. I tasted tears, but rarely showed them. A part of me learned to hide. Afterwards, everyone was different. Her funeral was proof she’d made a difference in hundreds of lives. But now she was gone and we were still here, confused and left behind. Because of her, I strive for serenity. I have her to thank for my middle name. When she left, that little girl went with her. When she left, the world changed. Things changed again when I lived for a year in New York City. I learned to love, to lose, and to lie for my life; I learned about dignity, shame, and integrity. Life’s simplicity died; countless fears came alive. When I came home, that little girl would not have recognized me. Flash forward five years and I’m sitting, playing dominos at Elsie’s. As the night burns on, I realize, everyone has lost or will lose that

person whose death shatters their childhood perceptions. And in a way, everyone will take that trip to New York City, even if they travel only in their dreams. It isn’t about grandparents, or taking a bite of the Big Apple. It’s about those events in our lives that forever steal our inner child away. Why does it matter, you might ask. Who wants to stay a child forever anyway? Because children have great expectations. Because children believe the world can change. Because when you’re a child, you know anything is possible. And, when you truly believe in your dreams, they tend to come true. We need to remember this. We need to remember that it only takes a single domino to catalyze a cascading change. We all grew up and we’ve all forgotten; we stopped believing that the world can always change. At Elsie’s, we sit around the bar making art on matchbooks. Sure, we’re drinking, and no child would be allowed inside a bar, but there’s something oddly childlike about the way we all sit and draw, something simple, something pure. And maybe, all we’re doing is scribbling on matchbooks. But maybe, just maybe, we’re actually placing the final dominos. Perhaps, the next person who finds them will be the one to initiate the change. In my imagination, I can hear the sound of falling ivory: the domino effect. I smile, because I know, this is the way the world changes. I’m happy because I know that little girl is back. So, dust off your childhood dominos. Make an ivory waterfall around your world. Remember, change doesn’t always require a profound action; sometimes knocking down the first domino is enough to bring about change. It isn’t just about playing games, it’s about making a difference. It’s about making the world better before we’re gone. And maybe, the game of change requires a childlike perspective. Perhaps, relearning to be children will save our lives. That night at Elsie’s, nothing special really happened. Nothing profound occurred or was begun. But that night reminded me to keep playing with dominos; to line them up, to knock them down, to watch them fall, and know, within that chain reaction, lies the key to changing the world.

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Lao Tzu said, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” So, take that step. Knock over the first domino. Smile, and watch the world change.

Photographer’s credit: Jennifer Baron

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Learning to Accept Yourself and Help from Others By Megan Leigh (Marti) Martello

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Initially tasked with writing a reflective piece on my service learning experience, the events of life have taken both this piece and me down quite a different path. While many times I have gone in the direction of trying to provide a service for others, often finding it to be a humbling learning experience, it has never been quite so easy to accept help from others. I learned at an early age that life is not easy or free, which the selflessness of my hard-working adoptive mother instilled upon me. Experiences often beyond my maturity led me to love everyone but myself, and to see me as the only person who should be responsible for getting through whatever might come my way. Rarely able to say “no” to others, it always seemed easier to keep the spotlight on them, for I worried that if anyone saw how much help I actually needed, they would feel I could not be of any help to anyone else. With my military dreams quickly fading, a diagnosis of chondrosarcoma, a cancer which nestled itself in the cartilage of my sternum, before my 20th birthday put my self-reliance on shaky ground. I hated that when I returned home, I was unable to do all the things I felt I needed to do. I coped the only way I knew how, by turning the energy outward once more. I learned of camps for kids and teens with chronic and terminal illnesses, and decided to spend three months working at one in Florida shortly thereafter. I was signed up to work the adventure course for the summer, running the climbing tower and low ropes, as well as assisting in an assigned cabin. The first week was “cancer session,” and I was far from emotionally prepared. One of the first individuals I met was another staff member, Joey, who told me he was there because he had survived cancer when he was a child, showing me photos from the experience. The ease with which he shared this information was so different from the fear with which I withheld mine, yet our reasoning for being there was so similar. Bursting into tears, I then shared my diagnosis with someone I barely knew, who in that very moment, went from being nearly a stranger to a lifelong friend. The 7-8 year old girls in our cabin had all completed their treatment previously, most of them in remission, except for one. As she often tired

quicker than the others, I found myself walking her back early and singing lullabies to her at night, crying quietly into my pillow afterwards. Working the climbing tower was inspirational, as I watched the teenaged campers fight to reach the top, just as I knew they fought so often against their illnesses. There was a particular instance, at the top of the tower, when some of the oldest teenaged girls made their way to the top, and we sat together up there, hugging, laughing and crying. The whole experience was beautiful, and I was inspired to spend another summer there, as well as spend the time in-between working with atrisk youth in schools and a juvenile center. The way all of the kids approached the challenging things presented to them with courage, grace, and a sense of humor, all the while showing compassion and love to those around them, was nothing short of inspiring and amazing. I loved every one of these kids with all my heart, and yet, I do not feel I was as present as I should have been. I was trying to be there for them, take care of my mom, and all the while unable to admit that I needed to help myself. Moving to another state and enrolling in Ohio State University, I shifted my focus to children and adults with cognitive and physical disabilities. I continued to be amazed by those I worked with on a daily basis. During the summers, I traveled from camp to camp, often putting more physical stress on my body than even a healthy person could endure, while working multiple jobs and going to school the rest of the year. The phrase “burning the candle at both ends” would have been an understatement, as I still somehow managed to fit college partying into my life as well. My treatments were hodge-podge, with my body often only receiving my attention when it completely shut down, and even then, it was only as long as was necessary until I could get it up and running again. In the time since the initial diagnosis, I had told a limited number of people, including family members. It was difficult when, a few months before my 24th birthday, I found out that I had new metastasis in my skull base: it was becoming less and less of something I could hide. The day after my 24th birthday, having gone out

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the night before despite not feeling well, I awoke in the hospital, my friend, Leslie, by my side. I was informed that I had been brought home after bursting into tears and arguing with those around me because I insisted on going home, then eventually was taken to the ER by Leslie, where multiple seizures had ensued. Even after such a scare, I did not take treatment as seriously as I should have, and shortly before I left for camp that summer, a doctor told me something that would haunt me long after. He said: “If you keep this up, you WILL die.” I had previously been told I would not live to see my 21st birthday, and was afraid I would not defy the odds again if I did not make a change. With another move made partially on a whim, I ended up at Antioch, where I began to learn the importance of taking care of oneself in order to take care of others. It took the first couple years of repeating some of the same mistakes for the lessons to really sink in. I was dating a wonderful man, who was so kind and considerate of my needs that I initially pushed him away, worrying I would bring too much chaos into his gentle life. Outside a doctor’s office, he reminded me that he had the right to make that decision for himself. At Ohio State, I had struggled with the vast amount of students and impersonal nature of interactions, and yet, the cozy nature of Antioch made me worry that everyone would “know” all my secrets. I realized I feared vulnerability more than anything. The understanding and supportive nature of the professors was what first made me realize the need to communicate when I was going through treatment, especially if I ever planned to graduate. I also admired and respected my fellow classmates for being so open with their life experiences, just as my friend, Joey, had previously been. I began opening up more to other people in my life, which I hoped would give them permission to do the same. I realized that, by being vague in-order to appear stronger, I often confused those around me who did not fully understand. When I first started at Antioch, I could barely say the word, “cancer,” especially not in reference to myself. After the first couple years, I was much more comfortable being honest and open about my limits--both with myself and those around me. This summer put all these lessons to the test. Between the end of July and beginning of September, I experienced two deaths, my mother’s worsening health, and my sister’s near-fatal car

accident. The stress of these events, along with school and work, greatly affected my immune system. I soon found myself spending multiple nights in the ER again, and the day after Labor Day, I was given a new diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma, a stubborn uterine cancer. Treatment was to start the following week. My sanity was brought to its knees, and I was unsure that I had enough emotional space left. I vowed to do things differently as I headed into a new round of treatment, because there was no way I could do this on my own anymore. I told my boyfriend first, agreeing when he said he wanted to come here for a few days, when I previously would have said no. I informed my bosses and coworkers, adjusting my work schedules to accommodate my treatment, which I previously would have seen as unprofessional. I shared more with family and friends and continue to willingly answer any questions asked. I have learned to say “no” more often and feel less guilty about doing so, along with giving myself more credit for all that I accomplish. I still sometimes have trouble accepting offers of support, but I am working on this. For example, if I have not eaten all day because I am too weak to make food, and someone offers to bring soup, it might be necessary to take them up on this offer, rather than not eating out of foolish pride. Saying “no” to doing things does not make me selfish, and saying “yes” to receiving help does not make me weak. Cancer remains recurrent in my life, and I have not yet been in complete remission since the initial diagnosis. From the cancer and its treatments, I have acquired and experienced a number of resulting medical issues, which provide challenges of their own. Acknowledging that I live with cancer is not always easy, but in many ways, the cancer itself has served me, by making me stronger and more appreciative. This latest battle has been much harder on my body in many ways, but going easier on myself, along with accepting and appreciating the support of others, allows me to trust that I can get through this and anything else. It is not always easy to open yourself up to others. The reality of the situation has been too great for some, and they have not stayed in my life. Also, I am less willing to tolerate those who put me down or take advantage of me. In both scenarios, the letting go can be painful, but it is all a part of accepting the joy and pain of opening yourself up to others. The kindness of the people in my life continues to bring me daily tears

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of joy, as I feel incredibly blessed. My mom and siblings may be far away, but through conversation with those who know us best, we are reminded to remain true to ourselves, and in this way and through their love, they help more than they know. I am lucky to have a love in my life that is generously reciprocal and warms my heart. I cannot imagine what I would do without him, his family, and their support. The friends I am blessed with continue to go out of their way to help, and I am grateful for all of them. Even those who simply make me smile on a day I am not feeling well (or any day, for that matter) help more than they realize. It remains my passion to live a life of service for others, but Antioch and life’s lessons have taught me two things about service toward others: 1. Show yourself the same kindness you show others, and 2. You must be willing to ask for and accept help before you are able to be present enough to help someone else.

The Power of Addiction By Shonna Berk Being raised in a household of chaos and confusion was my reality growing up.  My mother would escape in any way she could, whether it be in the barn with the horses, or picking weeds to save her vegetable garden.  Sometimes, I would peer out the window just to catch a glimpse of her smile.  She was the rock holding my family together.  It wasn’t until I was twelve years old that I realized the reasons why she needed to escape.   My father is an addict, and has been since before I was born.  At a young age, I knew that drugs were something I wanted to keep away from through organizations such as DARE.  Later, I saw how destructive drugs can be because I saw what they did to my father and my family.  Four years ago, I realized I would have a career path because of his choices.   I began my journey in addiction studies, attending Pierce College in the San Fernando Valley.  Surrounded by recovering people in these classes, I came to the realization that the addict was not who I wanted to work with, but rather their families.  While the addicted person has multiple rehabilitation centers in which to recover, the families rarely get the help they need.  I want to be that help. Drugs have always been a fascination of mine.  I am intrigued by their effects.  The way one choice can lead into a full blown addiction and dependence is terrifying to me.  This is the reason I want to help families understand that no matter

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what, they are not alone.  In order to keep some sanity in their lives, the family often enables the addict to continue their drug use.  Drugs are everywhere, surrounding us in many forms.  From prescription medication, to crack cocaine, every single person in this world has a friend, family member, or acquaintance who suffers because of addiction.   Growing up, I always had anger towards my father.  My anger has now transformed into passion.  I strive to help those around me, whether it be volunteering for an organization, or simply smiling at a homeless individual, regardless of whether they are homeless due to drug abuse, mental illness, or life tragedy.   Every single person has the potential to make a difference, it just takes courage, strength, and the discipline to give yourself without reward. I could easily look back on my teenage years and be angry. Instead, I am grateful.  I am not grateful nor proud of my father’s decisions, but I am beyond thankful for my mother’s love, strength, and compassion.  She has taught me to pave my own path, and has let me make mistakes in the hope that I will succeed.  I am looking forward to my future, and am excited to see where my path is headed.  

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Voice By Cecily Barrie activism |ˈaktəˌvizəm| noun 1. the policy or action of using vigorous campaigning to bring about political or social change.

As members of the Antioch community, we are urged to impact social change at every turn, with each assignment or course study preparing us for activism as a life perspective. In many ways, this may be what led us to choose Antioch, and while that is certainly the first step, we must venture further. It is not enough that we banter with each other, insulated by our educations. We are tasked with much greater responsibility, for knowing and staying silent is perhaps the greatest crime against our humanity. We must take our knowledge and passions out into the world, educating those who do not yet know, those who have not yet heard. We must be the voice.

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Making Human Rights Our Compass for Globalization: What I Learned from Mary Robinson By Tessa Eckerman She walked out. Her stance professional, her voice soft and subtle with a skewed Irish accent. It was then that the topics “climate change” and “human rights” hit my being like a tidal wave. I felt chills and tears welling up in my ducts. “This is collective consciousness at work. Leaders are finally stepping up. It’s time to get moving,” I thought. Mary Robinson’s lecture on globalization, rights, and climate change revealed truths, offered facts, and catalyzed mind-blowing realizations. Her efforts and activism thus far are out of this world. The two hours of her lecture sent me on an emotional ride. The lecture affected me because Mary Robinson shed insight she gained from being physically involved and active around the globe. She is a credible and reliable source of information regarding the topics of human rights and climate change. Her lecture highlighted reasons why I live the life I do. It put into focus my life goals. I gained an informed perception of how millions of people in developing countries are affected by climate change and have almost no rights at all. Richard Appelbaum introduced the list of organizations that Mary Robinson leads.“This is a rather exhausting list and makes me look like a couch potato,” he said. Among leading the Mary Robinson Foundation, Oxfam, Women World Leaders, and The Elders, she was the UN High Commissioner For Human Rights from 1990 to 1997, and she is the Chair of International Institute for Environment and Development and received the Amnesty International’s Ambassador ofConscience Award. The list goes on. Robinson began by emphasizing that we need to work on solutions for seemingly unsolvable problems and that we need a world without borders. “How could I not be interested in human rights? I was wedged between four brothers, two older, two younger!” she said. She had an epiphany that human rights policies were too narrow. They focused on one point: the freedoms (i.e. freedom of press, no torture, civil liberties, etc.) “Basic rights are important too,” she says. But Robinson didn’t quite know

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how to turn this thought into action yet. Robinson felt like a “lonely voice during 9/11.” She went to ground zero to bring the perpetrators to justice because they committed a “crime against humanity.” “We said that we have been attacked and there’s a war on terrorism. [In essence], this sidelines human rights.” This event catalyzed Robinson’s formation of the Millennium Declaration. It’s premise is that globalization must work for all people. Robinson’s panel created eight goals: End poverty and hunger, create universal education, gender equality, child health, maternal health, combat HIV/Aids, environmental sustainability, and global partnership. Robinson has done extensive work in Africa and she has noticed a recurring “ah but things have changed, things are worse because of climate change” conversation. The horn of Africa experienced its eight hottest years on record; the past eight consecutive ones. “This hugely damages and undermines human rights, says Robinson. “Why do the poorest nations have to suffer from world’s efforts?” Robinson desired to “put the obtuse phenomenon of this suffering into immediate focus!” Her foundation is the climate justice nexus of climate change and human rights. She has no skepticism of climate change because she claims, “I’ve seen it!” She follows with a sigh and perhaps a tear. Robinson told us a story of meeting five African farmers with Arch Bishop TuTu. They all claimed that they have not had seasons for years. She said, “All farmers would complain of weather.” They replied, “We know. But this is way out of our experience!” Robinson mentions, “Water stress will displace masses of people.” She then briefly describes the famine, water shortages, and the lives of “climate refugees.” Robinson places urgency on the need to act now. She was a fountain of facts and useful information. I could go on for days explaining Robinson’s deep conclusions of the world’s current

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state. From topics covered in overlapping courses I’ve taken, I’ve learned that we are in distress, and if people don’t feel it now, they soon will. This lecture affected me by filling my gaps in knowledge of climate effects and rights. It informed me about our current state. I feel saddened that we’ve allowed this to happen, that prior generations haven’t made swifter, more positive moves. However, I feel that as a whole, humans are intelligent and, at times, brilliant. I am hopeful and resultantly excited for what I’ll see in my lifetime with regards to solutions and growth. Robinson’s news affected me because I have been thinking about such topics since I was a young woman. I am emotional, an Indigo Child of the Aquarian Age, and I love humanity. I sometimes feel depressed because I feel I can’t change the world. The insight I gained is that it is in my, and the world’s, best interest to think about how our actions affect others on a grand scale. We are taught

to admit, “Johnny hit sally and it hurt,” instead of getting to the root of the issue. I realized the best move is to continue living my lifestyle, with hopes of moving even farther off the grid. I live on a sailboat, rarely use water, shop only for food grown a maximum of fifty miles away (with the exception of a couple of meals). I don’t own a car, a computer, or i-phone by choice. We mine rare earth metals for phones and computers. I ride my bike everywhere, use a reusable bottle and biodegradable soaps, I reuse paper, recycle, pick up trash every day (five foot radius rule) and raise my voice about the need to reduce waste and change our way of living. I feel the urgency that Robinson feels. Thank God for women like her. I had the thought in a dream that night, “she is my hero.” I feel compelled to write her a letter. Robinson solidified my fouryear long dream to join the Peace Corps. and to start an organization, perhaps one like SOIL (composting toilets in Haiti). She revved my help engine.

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Do you have jeans you don’t wear anymore?

Teens for Jeans is an organization sponsored by the clothing store Aeoropostale which collects used, unwanted jeans and donates them to homeless individuals across the US and Canada. FROM NOW UNTIL FEBRUARY 1ST THERE WILL BE A DONATION BIN AVAILABLE AT THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF ANTIOCH UNIVERSITY. THESE DONATIONS WILL BE COLLECTED AND BROUGHT TO AEROPOSTALE.

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Please contact Sberk@antioch.edu with any questions

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It’s No Small Thing By Jeffrey Lovelace I am 53 years old. How the hell did that happen? It seems like I’ve spent my life trying to figure out what I want to be when I grow up. And then one day I looked up and saw that, not only had I overshot grownup altogether, but I held in my hand an AARP card with my bleepin name on it! My baby boomer generation was the first stained with that Santa Clause-ish lie that we can be whatever we want when we grow up. Unlike the Santa Clause myth, however, this one stays with you, adding a taint of failure to everything you do that falls short of spectacular. I have a stack of grandiose dreams that never came true. I never became an astronaut. I never played basketball for the Lakers. None of my bands ever got a record deal. I have yet to have a book published; and so on. So, what is my purpose in life? I still don’t know, but I better decide soon. I figure I have twentyfive to thirty-five good years ahead of me, and I want to make the most of them. But I now face the grim reality that, at my age, I could die tomorrow. So instead of asking what the purpose of my life will be, I think I will turn the question around and ask what the purpose of my life has been. Back in the early nineties, it became a cliché that the best way to find direction was to picture what you want people to say about you at your funeral, and then live in a way that would make that happen. Should I die tomorrow, what will they say at my funeral? How exactly have I contributed to the human enterprise? How have I left the world a better place for my having lived? The way it stands now, the handful of people who would bother to attend my memorial service will talk about how I was a good dad, taking my kids on educational trips, helping them with their homework, and volunteering for school functions and team events. I am proud of that, but in this world, that just never seems to be enough. They might also give a brief professional bio, telling how I worked at a variety of inconsequential jobs and even started several little companies, all of which no longer exist. Okay, that should take up about five minutes. Then, when somebody asks if

anyone wants to add anything, only the sounds of passing traffic will fill the awkward silence. If my disembodied spirit is there sitting on one of the many empty folding chairs, I will turn to the cherubic little guardian angel sitting next to me and say, in words that no one else can hear, “Wow, aside from being a good dad, I kind of sucked, didn’t I?” The angel will look at me with a shrug and raised eyebrows as if to say, “I don’t know, you tell me.” “Wait, hold on here just a minute, I know I contributed something more. I mean, sure, I had my dark and my dim moments, but I was a nice guy, nicer than most. Doesn’t that count for anything? Didn’t I make anyone else’s life just a tiny bit better?” I hope the angel will smile, nod, pull out his little harp and pluck a few strings, just as the tiny congregation begins to rise, poised to lunge toward the folding table with the chocolate chip cookies. At that moment, the doors will bang open at the back of the chapel, or the rest home meeting room, or the kid’s party room at Rusty’s Pizza, or wherever they hold this little shindig. The people will freeze, then turn to see a man in business attire with a blue striped tie stride confidently into the room saying, “Not so fast people. I would like to say a thing or two about this hero, this saint, this great American.” He will stride up to the microphone at the podium and tell the world how I courteously held the door open for him at Starbucks since his hands were full of piping hot beverages, and how, by averting a possible scalding spill, I singlehandedly helped make the guy’s day a tiny bit better. As he finishes he will turn the microphone over to a woman in greasy gray cotton sweat clothes. She will turn to look at my face in the open casket, then turn back, lean a little too close to the microphone, and say through welling tears in a slightly slurred smoker’s voice, “Yep that’s the guy. Thank you, thank you kind sir whatever your name is for urging me to go ahead of you in the checkout line ‘cause I only had a frozen pizza and a bottle of

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Hawkeye.” A line will begin forming behind her comprised of people in various attire and uniforms, but before the next person can speak, a brown uniformed delivery man will burst in through the door pushing a hand truck loaded with boxes overflowing with loose sheets of paper, “Hey where do you want me to put these receipts?” “What receipts?” will answer the lady in the sweat clothes, squinting as she tries to focus. These are all of the decades’ worth of charitable contributions made by this great man. Let’s see, I got one here for $25 from the Yosemite Fund, and another from 1997 for $15 to Habitat for Humanity. There’s a whole stack of Goodwill donations but they don’t have a dollar amount; first one’s for a lamp. I got another box here from the…” A parade of people will push past the delivery man, the woman in front will announce, “We are most of the people who worked with Jeff either as his boss, or coworker, or employee. We’re on our break right now, so I’ll make it quick. We all shared a lot of laughs with Jeff, that’s what we all remember most about him, how he always tried to lighten the mood a little. Heh like this one time, when I informed Jeff that the reason the single gal in shipping was pregnant was because the married inventory manager had put her in the family way; but Jeff’s jaw really hit the floor when I told him that they did the deed on Jeff’s very own desk, don’t ya know. But did that prince of a man get mad? No ma’am. He says to me, he says, ‘Well I guess one of them was bucking for a desk job,’ wahaha. And then there’s this time…” A gray 1989 Honda Accord will burst through the wall behind the podium and stop in the only unoccupied part of the room amid a shower of bricks and red dust. A twenty-ish woman will push the driver’s door open with a screech of bent metal. She will climb out coughing, walk up to the microphone and announce, “I am here on behalf of the thousands of drivers throughout North America who want to thank this kind man for using his superpowers of courtesy, consideration, and controlled breaking in allowing all of us to merge safely into traffic, change lanes in front of him, or cut across his lane and into the strip mall entrance that we almost missed ‘cause we were texting.” She will give a shy apologetic wave. “In fact, we grateful drivers have lined up a

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O d y s s e y procession of thousands of cars, trucks, and motorcycles behind the hearse for the drive to the cemetery. So I say let’s go everybody!” With that, everyone in the room will release a mighty cheer and fling fistfuls of confetti high into the air as they march out of the room singing “for he’s a jolly good fellow,” leaving behind a table full of untouched confetti covered chocolate chip cookies, and my coffin, which they will have forgotten in their glee and haste. Obviously that’s not going to happen, because there’s no way they would ever allow an open casket in the kids’ party room at Rusty’s Pizza. Okay, I’ve never trekked where no man has gone before. I never made a scientific or medical breakthrough. I never pulled a child or even a puppy from a burning building. But I would like to think that I have made things a tiny bit better for a lot of people over the years; and I am proud of that. In the absence of saving the world from a super villain, I hope it’s no small thing.

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How a Carpet Company Changed Business Forever By Jason Erwin Large multinational corporations have the capital to go green; however, this trend appears to manifest itself in small business disproportionally. Thinking about this question led me on a search to find multinationals that were going green. While watching a TED video, entitled “Ray Anderson on the Business Logic of Sustainability,” from February 2009, recorded in Long Beach, CA, I realized I had found such a company. Mr. Anderson was also featured in the 2004 documentary, The Corporation, and Leonardo DiCaprio’s 2007 film, The 11th Hour. Mr. Anderson was the founder and CEO of Interface Inc., an American pre-made carpet tile company, until his death on August 8, 2011. Mr. Anderson credits Paul Hawken’s 1993 book, The Ecology of Commerce, for his environmental awakening. He described reading it as a “spear in the chest experience,” after which Anderson started crisscrossing the country with near-evangelical fervor, telling fellow executives about the need to reduce waste and carbon emissions (New York Times, 2011). Mr. Anderson argues that the radical decline in the biosphere has been caused in large by business and industry. Ironically, the businesses within this industry are the only ones with the power, capital, and pervasiveness to right the wrongs of the last century (TED 2009). Mr. Anderson’s goal was to turn his petroleum intensive company into one which did not use a single input which the earth could not naturally regenerate by 2020. He stated, “There must be a leader, unless someone leads no one will, and thanks to the people at Interface, I have become a recovering plunderer” (TED 2009). Industry must replace fossil fuel with renewable, bicyclical fuel sources. Mr. Anderson realized this could reduce Interface’s impact on the climate and biosphere to zero. In the 12 years since implementation of this program, Interface has reduced their net carbon emissions by 82% in absolute tonnage and their water usage by over 40%. Renewable materials now compose 25% of their products; 27% of the energy used to make them is renewable, and 74,000 tons of used carpet has been diverted from landfills, closing the loop through reverse logistics and post-

consumer recycling (TED 2009). Over the same time frame, sales have increased two-thirds and profits have doubled. According to climatologists, this is the level all industry must reach by 2050 in order to save our planet (Time 2007). Interface has dispelled the myth that you have to choose between profits and the environment. The improvements are said to pay for themselves. Mr. Anderson claims their products are the best they have ever been because of the unexpected rise in employee innovation due to a holistic commitment to the environment. It has also helped them attract the best and brightest minds in the industry with an unbelievable employee retention rate. In order for our planet and species to prosper, all of us must be on board with Mr. Anderson’s plan. This proposition requires a restructuring of our social world in order to create a world in which we are all happier, while at the same time, requiring less “stuff.” If we can all pull together to accomplish this goal, the future of our planet and unborn children will be saved from the peril my generation is currently facing. Works Cited “COOL CARPET—CARPET MADE COOL.” Interface Global. Interface, 2003. Web. 5 Nov. 2011. Vitello, Paul. “Ray Anderson, Businessman Turned Environmentalist, Dies at 77.” Business Day. New York Times. Web. Wednesday, William Mcdonough. “Ray Anderson - Heroes of the Environment - TIME.” Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews TIME.com. Time Magazine, 17 Oct. 2007. Web. 7 Nov. 2011.

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Local, Organic, and Good to Eat A Journey to Eating Locally By Heather Laney Since I started my year at Antioch, I’ve learned a lot about my life that I never knew I wasn’t paying attention to. Like what am I eating! The city of Santa Barbara is more orientated toward locally grown and purchased food than any other city I’ve ever lived in. There are eight farmers markets six days a week, rain or shine, summer light or winter dark. I’ve never purchased so locally before, but I really do like heading out to whichever farmers market happens to be going on that day and finding what I’m going to make for dinner that night. That’s now. A few months ago, changing my eating habits was an idea I really wanted to try. Antioch scared me with the summer quarter’s food seminars. After watching King Corn and Big River, I removed all high fructose corn syrup foods from my pantry. Food, Inc. encouraged me to buy organic milk upon finding out how all the chemicals fed to cows pass into their milk, which could one day affect my children’s growth and puberty. I already suspected that drinking milk with rBst was how I ended up having twins. I switched to Costco’s Kirkland brand of organic milk. It tasted funny at first, but now I like it. It’s a bit more expensive than I would have wanted, but the local milk is even more expensive, which my budget didn’t allow. We drink a lot of milk. By the end of reading In Defense of Food by Michael Pollen, I was ready to make a bigger difference. My action plan was to completely get off big company processed foods, antibiotic and hormone induced milk and eggs from horribly treated animals, and eat only what was produced here, locally. I liked my plan so much, I decided to make it into an independent study experiment all about eating locally and organic, meanwhile forcing my children and my mom to come along with me. When I first started my plan, it was all about the farmers markets and finding everything I needed for the week at two or three of the markets, only buying organic milk at Costco. I had a bunch of vegetables and a few selections of local meats, but they didn’t really go well together. I tried making

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them all fit, but I think I was the only one who liked my tomato, beef, and pasta mush with green peppers and onions. I’m also sure I added organic milk. A bit of a mess. We didn’t save it for leftovers. One day, I poked around Costco more than I usually do, and I found they also carry other organic products. Over the next week, we tried organic buffalo hotdogs. Hotdogs are a kid staple food that my children were not willing to give up; we compromised with buffalo hotdogs. We also tried organic buffalo sausage, which I really like, though it’s a bit spicy for my little ones, and Coastal Range Organic’s free range chicken breasts. After grilling up some of that chicken, I realized that not everything tastes like chicken, but rather everything mass produced, chemically processed, and full of additives tastes the same. After weeks of trial and some disastrous errors, I’ve worked out my method of farmers market foods, consisting mostly of fresh, pickedthat-day vegetables and fruits, and certified organic Costco foods. Changing the way we eat has made a difference in our lives. My little family has never been so healthy, which makes me happy. Life does not revolve around fast food restaurants or processed sugar foods, and I think more people would be happier and healthier if they also made the change to locally produced, organic food.

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Faces of AUSB Alma Valenciano By Heather Laney

Born at Cottage Hospital, raised on Olive Street, growing up running around the downtown area, Alma Valenciano is a Santa Barbara native. Alma finished high school after two years of home schooling, and then continued her education at SBCC receiving an AA in graphic communication. She’s now completing her undergraduate degree at Antioch in business management, which is far from her childhood career plan of becoming a professional ice skater. A slightly shy, quiet in class person, Alma has a huge heart and is a very caring and understanding individual who is always offering her knowledge to help her fellow classmates and friends. One friend described her as “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious,” meaning that with a little work you can find an extraordinary person in Alma. For the last 15 years, she’s wanted to be a missionary, with the goal to help others learn how valuable they are to God. On top of that, Alma is also an animal lover with a soft spot for cats. She’s taken injured birds home, nursed them back to health before releasing them, always careful to keep her frisky, curious cats away. Always up for a laugh, when asked if she could be anything for a day, she answered, “A butterfly. Because no one suspects the butterfly,” quoting Bart Simpson. Currently, she’s working on an online comic strip called Bipolar Bear, a funny comic about the realities of life. Soon to graduate, she leaves her fellow Antioch students with a proverb: “En la multitude de consejeros hay logro,” translated as “Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with many advisers they succeed.” Alma explains this to mean “that by having people to bounce your opinions off of, others will show you there are doors of opportunity where you never thought to look. With the help of others, goals that once seemed unattainable can be reached.”

Benjamin Murphy By Shonna Berk

Originating from Phoenix, Arizona, Benjamin Murphy felt Santa Barbara was the ideal place to further his education. Murphy moved to Santa Barbara to attend SBCC, and achieved his certificate for alcohol and drug counseling. Following this, he continued his studies at Antioch University. Now, having a BA in liberal arts, Murphy is in his fifth quarter in the midst of a masters degree in clinical psychology. Meditating daily, expanding his knowledge of the brain, and keeping in shape are very important to his daily routine. Murphy’s mission in life is to continuously challenge himself, making time spent with loved ones his number one priority, while obtaining a career in a field that helps those surrounding him. “I think genuine laughter is one of the best feelings in life,” Murphy states.

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Faces of AUSB continued... Melissa Cervantes By Jason Erwin

Melissa Cervantes is a PsyD student at Antioch University Santa Barbara. She was born and raised in Palmdale, CA. and moved to Santa Barbara at age eighteen to attend college. She first received her BA in psychology in 2004 from the University of California, Santa Barbara, followed by her MA in psychology in 2010 from AUSB. Her goal right now is to make it through grad school alive! After that, she plans on building a successful career as a psychologist, while always continuing to grow, learn, and evolve as a person and clinician. The ultimate mission of Melissa’s education is to use the knowledge she has gained through her graduate experience, along with everything she will continue to learn, in a meaningful manner that contributes to the world in a positive and purposeful fashion. Melissa’s favorite U.S. city is New York, she loves to cook (Indian and Thai foods being her favorites), and her preferred music genre is country. She enjoys hiking and rock climbing. She has worked as a bartender through undergrad and grad school. If Melissa could be anything for a day, she would be sunshine because it makes people happy while being able to touch and affect everything and everyone. Melissa also loves talking to her mother because her mom makes her smile regardless of how bad a day is. One word to describe Melissa is “Diverse.” As an AUSB graduate, she would like current AUSB students to challenge themselves... All of the hard work will be worth it one day!

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The Dog Works By Shonna Berk

Noticing a man on State Street with an adorable companion by his side sporting a “guide dog in training” vest, I was intrigued. This man’s name is Doug Weil. Though he is currently retired, he is a licensed guide dog instructor in the state of California. With passion and enthusiasm in his eyes, he described to me the type of help he provides for the community, and for whom these dogs are trained. The Dog Works is an organization which began in 1982, using customized obedience and protection training as their main goal. Later, they added agility, tracking, herding, problem solving and behavior modification to expand their resources. Recently, they incorporated Balance Support dogs for the physically handicapped, as well as PTSD dogs for the Veterans returning from Iraq. Weil does this because he feels it is a labor of love. He enjoys training the dogs and working with handicapped clients. The way the clients and dogs grow together and become “one” with each other is something Weil feels strongly about. “When you can step back and watch the dog you have trained and the consumer you have trained, go places they have never been before, you get a warm fuzzy feeling inside that cannot compare to anything else. That’s better than any paycheck you could ever receive,” Weil states. Weil feels as though society benefits from his organization because it helps someone less fortunate achieve greater mobility, freedom, and the ability to be less dependent on others. He loves training dogs and working with different types of people. One thing in the world that Weil would like

to change is the attitudes and perspectives society portrays about handicapped individuals. A quote that was said to Weil by a blind man was, “We are not blind, you are light dependent.” Weil would like society to have more of an open mind and heart when it comes to handicapped individuals. Weil mentioned to me that there are ways for others to get involved. He stated that they occasionally need “puppy raisers” who volunteer their time to keep the puppy in their home for up to 18 months. If this is not practical, he also stated that there is a need for weekend puppy sitters. This organization is not a non-profit; however, everything comes out of pocket, donations, or sponsorship. Weil’s goal is to break even. Though sometimes this organization might make a small profit, it is put back into training another dog to help another individual. Organizations such as The Dog Works are not only helpful for the community, but also easy to get involved with if patience and time is something you possess. If you’d like to get involved, Doug Weil provided his email address and phone number: email: Doug@thedogworks.org telephone: (715) 937-2051.

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Sustainable Business: Marborg Industries By Jason Erwin

In the search to find an exemplary sustainable business in Santa Barbara, I stumbled upon an unlikely source. On a warm Monday afternoon, I saw a garbage truck pass by with a green symbol which read CNG. This sparked my curiosity, and the research soon began. The truck was from local trash hauler MarBorg Industries. I stopped by their headquarters and made an appointment with their environmental manager, Miss Dena Philips. She graciously accepted my request and after multiple communications back and forth, I realized I had discovered a diamond in the rough. When I asked Miss Philips what running a sustainable business means to the company she responded, “To MarBorg, running a sustainable business means operating in such a way to do as little damage and as much good for the environment as possible, while still providing a valuable service to the community.” I couldn’t have thought of a better definition myself. The green CNG symbol displayed on the side of the particular truck that sparked my interest stands for Compressed Natural Gas, a safer alternative to traditional fossil fuels. Although its combustion does produce greenhouse gases, it is an environmentally friendly alternative to those fuels, and it is much safer than other fuels in the event of a spill, as natural gas is lighter than air, and disperses quickly when released. Whenever possible, MarBorg

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purchases equipment that runs on alternative fuels. As diesel vehicles are retired, they are replaced with collection vehicles that run on CNG. It is fortunate for MarBorg that the local city and county governments in Santa Barbara place a high value on sustainable business practices. Operating as sustainable leaders in the community has helped them to secure long-term contracts for franchise solid waste services, and allowed them to invest in new sustainable technologies. One major example of this is the new CNG fuel station that MarBorg constructed in 2010, which allowed them to expand their fleet of CNG vehicles by providing a practical way to fuel this fleet. Their commitment to the environment does not end there. Within MarBorg’s office, they are committed to using recycled paper, and reusable dishes and silverware instead of paper or plastic. They also use Green Seal cleaning chemicals, rechargeable batteries, and low mercury lamps to light buildings. MarBorg recently joined The Climate Registry, the leading voluntary greenhouse gas registry in North America. They have reported and third-party verified their GHG emissions for both 2007 and 2010, and plan to continue reporting and verifying emissions in future years. This allows them to track their progress and understand exactly where emissions are coming from, while identifying areas for improvement. MarBorg also became a certified Santa Barbara Green Business in 2010. They are currently pursuing a LEED

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certification for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance, which benchmarks building performance (such as, but not limited to, water, energy and gas use, purchasing and custodial care, landscape maintenance and transportation methods). To date, MarBorg is scoring 84 out of 100 in energy star, reduced overall indoor water usage by 40%, and purchase over 90% green seal certified cleaning products. MarBorg’s buildings hold a large solarpanel installation, which offsets approximately 30% of the electricity used at each meter. Each of these programs help to identify and adjust operations and behaviors to reduce MarBorg’s environmental impact. MarBorg’s primary business is the collection of waste in the Santa Barbara area. It is their mission to encourage recycling over landfilling, and to divert as much of this material from the landfill as they can. They encourage customers to recycle their personal waste by offering free recycling and greenwaste services, and use their recycling facility to sort through a variety of materials to retrieve recyclables.

Sustainability is not just a gimmick at MarBorg, it is a way of life. Whenever possible, MarBorg prefers to lead the industry in sustainable business practices. Because they are a small, locally owned business, they have the opportunity to act quickly when the opportunity arises and to initiate new sustainable practices. MarBorg’s employees understand the importance of sustainable business practices. Within the office, all employees participate in recycling and composting office and food wastes, and employees carpool to work whenever possible. Their customer service department also assists customers in understanding the proper way to sort material using their waste containers. Sustainability affects everything MarBorg does. I hold this company in high esteem, as they are doing what many said could not be done. The myth that a company can either be green or profitable--not both--is clearly debunked by this textbook example of a pioneering enterprise. I am proud to live in a community where companies such as MarBorg exist.

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Waiting for Superman:

Can Hollywood Make a Difference? By Mallory Price

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After seeing the movie Waiting for Superman, a documentary that depicts the failures of American public schools, it took a while to settle in. I continued to reflect on the movie for the rest of the night, unable to decide how I felt about it. Was the purpose of the film to raise awareness regarding these issues? Was it intended to promote charter schools? What was the ultimate objective in creating this controversial and captivating film? One thing that particularly resonated with me was the part that discussed tenure. I have always believed that the idea is somewhat ridiculous, as I have personally known teachers who were ineffective, incompetent and who put their students in danger, who could not be fired due to tenure. If it were any other profession, these teachers would have been fired years ago. It is even more upsetting that there are incredibly competent and passionate teachers out there who can’t get jobs because of these tenured teachers. Furthermore, research has shown the highly detrimental effects that these ineffective teachers have on all students, especially those who are already struggling. Too many students are being deprived of a solid education due to a system that is failing them. While tenure was originally intended for good, Waiting for Superman brings to light many of the truths regarding tenure, including the failed efforts to move away from its potentially damaging modern realities. Another thing I considered and questioned was the intended audience of the film. It seemed that

it was made for teachers and other staff in the schools, but what about the parents? I considered what all of the students portrayed in the film had in common. Some of them were male, some female, from various places all over the country, with varying socioeconomic levels. The one unifying element among them was that they all had parents who cared deeply about their education. Unfortunately, not all parents are as involved in or seem to care as deeply about their children’s education, so I felt this movie should have been directed at them. While teachers and other staff working in public schools undoubtedly have an incomparable effect on student success, there must be an equally powerful contribution from the home in order to raise student achievement. Viewers of this film who are working in public schools already have some degree of understanding of the issues portrayed. It is the parents that need to become aware of these issues in order to bridge the gap between school and home and ultimately increase student performance. Despite the problems we face, I am hopeful for education in our country, and especially during a time when Hollywood is starting to shine a brighter light on all of these issues. It saddens me that Hollywood has such a strong influence on our country, but they might as well use this influence for something good. I have seen the great influence that recent films have had on the food industry and food in our country (Food Inc., Super Size Me etc.). Likewise, I hope that new mainstream films with a focus on education, such as Waiting for Superman, will have such a positive effect on education in our country. It’s sad to say, but if anyone can make a difference in our country, that industry has a chance to do so.

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Board of Trustees Profile: Dee Dee Barrett By Shonna Berk

Although Dee Dee Barrett dropped out of high school to take care of an ailing grandmother, she returned later to school, attending college first in London, then at Santa Barbara City College, and finally at Antioch University, where she earned a BA degree in liberal arts with an emphasis in communication studies. Barrett has lived in London, Paris, the Caribbean, Florida, New York, and now Santa Barbara. Barrett is a philanthropist, fully devoted to non-profit organizations such as Hospice and the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse. She plays a major role in annual fundraising events such as The Amethyst Ball for CADA and the Go Red for Women and Heart Ball Gala event for the Heart Association. She is a self-made business woman, and has even travelled to Antigua to distribute food to the less fortunate. In 2007, Barrett received Antioch’s Horace Mann Award for her involvement in the student community and her community service. She is recognized for her hard work, dedication and leadership skills, and now serves as the President of the Heart Association Board and the Vice President of CADA. Her devotion to better the community and give without reward is something to be admired. She has made a major impact on those surrounding her.

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Doorway to Change By Tessa Eckerman This is a photo of a run down building in San Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua, which I took this summer. I embarked on the journey, saw trashed streets and the highest poverty rate in Central America, yet the locals are said to be the happiest in their geographic region. It shifted my thoughts: We need little. Needing little will lessen our footprint here on Earth. Let’s make it happen. Let’s change. Let’s make a difference.

“A new human species is being born that looks at the external world of things, interactions, and experiences as a mirror that reflects an internal world of intentions, emotions, and thought.” -Gary Zukav

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Faculty Close-Up: Juan Zaragoza By Heather Laney

A cultural music researcher at heart, Juan Zaragoza always wanted to be a music scholar. He claims he came to scholarly life “a little backwards,” receiving his BA in music with an ethnomusicology focus in 2005 from UCSB. Family always first, his love of music, preforming, and culture encouraged him to complete his degree. Growing up, Zaragoza started to notice social injustices toward minorities and the Latino community while still in elementary school. As he moved on in life, and later in college, he realized that social injustice was all over the world. To encourage cultural diversity and interaction, Zaragoza started writing grants for community projects. He codeveloped Guitar Works, a program sponsored by St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Isla Vista and the Trinity Episcopal Church Justice Fund Grant of Santa Barbara. The program teaches guitar to youth from the Isla Vista and Goleta area and provides free instruments to participants involved after one year. In 2004, Zaragoza created the community ensemble Mariachi Integral at UCSB, and in 2006,

founded SONando. In 2007, he was awarded the status of hero by the Santa Barbara Independent for his musical work in the community. While working as a teacher’s aid at SBCC, Zaragoza heard from a local harpist and college friend, Leah Young, that Antioch was interested in expanding their liberal arts program. After doing so much research and learning so much about music, Zaragoza was ready to stretch himself by teaching others about different cultures and their music. The musical interests of students delighted him and he wanted to encourage students to explore their musical backgrounds as well as expand their knowledge of other cultures’ music. For those students who were so focused on their end goal, he wanted to inspire them to revisit their musical interests. Antioch gave him this opportunity. One day, Zaragoza would like to go back to school to receive his PhD in musicology and to continue his research on music. Before that, he has plans to develop Latin American programs at UCSB and Antioch, and encourage people to focus on their connections with others. He plans to “expose cultures to other cultures” so that each might be aware of their similarities as well as differences. During Antioch’s summer quarter, he did just that in his “Exploration of World Music” class. By integrating an Irish student into the music of Mexico and his Latin students into the music of Ireland, both cultures learned about each other as well as themselves. At the end of the day, Zaragoza hopes that his students will leave with an open mind, a desire to learn about other cultures and their music, and a sense of pride in their own culture. For more information about Mariachi Integral: http://www.performingartslive.com/Events For more information on SONando: http://sonandosb.com/about.html

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United Way’s Day of Caring By Brittany Gunther

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Reflecting on the last three years I have spent residing in Santa Barbara, I find myself cherishing the deep culture of community and awareness I have been immersed in. Weekly farmers markets, fundraisers, lectures, plays, and film screenings help keep Santa Barbara’s culture unlike any I have seen before. I have attended a variety of these events and never left disappointed. One new tradition I have is volunteering for United Way’s Day of Caring, the biggest day of volunteer work in Santa Barbara each year. The first time I heard about United Way’s Day of Caring was in my Communications 101 class at Santa Barbara City College. My teacher offered volunteering at this event as an extra credit assignment worth ten points. Without any information, I quickly signed up; extra credit is hard to come by. After some investigation on Google, I found that this Day of Caring consisted of over 1600 volunteers who go and work on projects around all of Santa Barbra for four hours. The previous outcome of this event resulted in hundreds of thousands of dollars in pledges, town improvements, and renovations. Beyond the financial benefits of United Way’s Day of Caring, there is a formed sense of community between the volunteers. The profound feeling of accomplishing something, as well as helping and giving back, is what keeps me going back each year. The first Day of Caring I attended was for my extra credit assignment. At 8AM my roommate and I parked in the lot of the Ben Page Youth Center and walked into the building, unaware of what to expect. We found a gymnasium filled to the brim with people all in matching green shirts;,talking, eating, and smiling. SBCC had its own table where I checked in, received my t-shirt, and ate my breakfast. The kickoff breakfast had over a thousand volunteers who all came together, sharing their time to improve the community. There was a positive energy vibrating amongst the gymnasium walls, filling me with excitement and curiosity. Around 8:45AM, we were dismissed.

After a quick coffee trip, we drove to SBCC and found our worksite. Our task was to help out in the garden, which grows fruits and vegetables as well as providing important data for the horticulture department of the school. There were about 10 other individuals present, a diverse crowd of all ages and occupations, all working together voluntarily. From 9AM to 1PM, we moved branches, pulled weeds, filled wheelbarrows, sweat, and took many water breaks. By the end of the day, I found that I, along with the other volunteers, had created a system; we were working together, getting along, and having a good time. We moved at least three brush piles that towered twice my height, loaded them into pick-up trucks, and raked up the leftovers. For a certified couch potato (which I was, at the time), this was a lot of work! After my first Day of Caring, I decided that I enjoyed volunteering and wanted to look into doing more. I began donating food to the food bank; I am especially fond of the Thanksgiving Turkey Drive. I am disappointed that it took an incentive such as extra credit to get me to volunteer, but I am more than happy to have had the life changing experience. Now, I can be an advocate of volunteering for others. Donating my extra turkey Albertsons gives me with their BOGO deal, or spending 4 hours on a Saturday once a year helping the community, are small and simple ways that I like to make a difference. I know that a single person can’t solve all the world’s problems; however, they can make a little bit of a difference or set an example...like the many volunteers for United Way.

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How to help out in Santa Barbara: The United Way of Santa Barbara County offers many opportunities to volunteer.  “UWSBC has the unique and positive vision that ‘in our community, everyone has a hopeful future.’  UWSBC has served the local community since its local founding in 1923, and through our  Power of Partnership™, we improve the lives of children, families and seniors by connecting and empowering resources.  UWSBC is not merely a fundraising agent, but rather acts as a unifying and multiplying force.” – United Way’s mission statement. You can register as a volunteer and find out about upcoming events: http://volunteer.truist.com/uwsbc/volunteer/ Santa Barbara Day of Caring, Saturday September 15th, 2012: http://www.unitedwaysb.org/dayofcaring.html

Making a Difference in the World By Denise Thorpe-Eheler To truly make a difference in the world We should “want to” and never have the feeling, “I have to” We should develop the seeds of this “genuine helping,” this “making a difference,” in our hearts And water our “pure” intention every day by expressing kindness, compassion, and love toward others we meet Our desire set in motion, our “pure intention” will now blossom into a reality which will transform others in small or huge ways Through our smiles, hugs, some physical act, active listening and reflecting back; the gift so often lost is the ability to be fully present for another human being Our mindful awareness, our intuition, is always our best guide, our “helping compass” to tell us where we are needed most The more we are genuine and sincere, this “doing,” this action response of “helping” will automatically become a part of us Transforming our heart seeds to blossom in their highest form We no longer have to think about helping others, “we just do it” naturally In making a difference in others, we realize, we’ve also made a difference in who we are We feel lighter, more joyous, more connected to our true spirit form We also realize this “human connectedness” to others makes us all united in the human realm Our higher selves now know that we are linking our true spiritual selves together and there is no divide, we are as one

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Inspiration Splash By Tessa Eckerman

The painting is done in watercolor on a thin white paper sheet. Some sketching with black tip pen is included. For the lower half, I used two pieces of cardboard and collaged an old acrylic abstract painting I did by cutting it into pieces. I found various up-cycled art in the garage and around the house (smashed bits of linoleum and ribbon). The meshing together of the mediums signifies quirkiness. Sometimes, looking in odd places without a plan, gives us the best result. We can use intellect, motivation, creativity, and our senses to make something out of nothing. Feeling that we cannot make a change is a lie. Life is a blank canvas. Take your dreams, look in odd places, and be an activist in whichever arena you imagine.

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Transition House By Shonna Berk one thing she would change about the world, she expresses her anger towards individuals who are prejudiced against those experiencing poverty: “It is a huge misconception that drives many of the choices government and private citizens make. Instead of using their energy to find solutions to the problem, they use it to deny people basic rights, including respect.” Her one wish is to change this way of thinking. What Kathleen Boushke does greatly benefits society. The selfless work she puts into helping those in need is something to be admired. She makes a difference in many individual’s lives without expecting praise or reward.

As many are aware, the number of homeless people in Santa Barbara is astonishing. According to the Santa Barbara View, “There are 1,040 homeless people living in the City of Santa Barbara.” In the year 1984, a group of twelve faith communities came together, calling themselves the Interfaith Task Force. They took it upon themselves to form Transition House, an organization which provides homeless individuals and families the opportunity to become independent, gain self esteem, family stability, and a greater chance towards a successful future for the youth. Kathleen Baushke, the executive director of Transition House, has always felt it was her personal obligation to contribute to society, with the homeless capturing her interest ever since college. She feels that every person has a basic right to shelter. Baushke expresses how privileged she feels to have the opportunity to work for a social service organization such as Transition House. She states that her colleagues are caring people, who do what they do for better reasons than simply to receive a paycheck. Many individuals in society make assumptions about the homeless, believing that they are abusing drugs or that they “choose” this lifestyle. This might be true for some, but for others, this is a life far from choice. When asking Baushke what

Transition House depends on the generosity of people like you to help local homeless Santa Barbara families get back on their feet. 70% of Transition House’s operating resources come from the kindness and concern of the Santa Barbara community. Make a donation at: http://transitionhouse.com

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Letting Go By Heather Laney Jared sits silently, looking down at his leaden feet. He doesn’t know how he got there and he doesn’t know how to get away. He can’t get away. There is no escape. He looks around, but he can’t see much. Fear keeps his head from turning like he wants it to. But really, he doesn’t want to look around. The lighting isn’t very good, and the faces of the people around him are obscured by masks. Except in the back, where a light shines brightly on a short, meanly muscled man wearing dark glasses. Jared stares at the man from the corners of his eyes, so intently, so afraid, his head starts to hurt. What am I doing here? he thinks. How did I get here? There’s a loud buzzing in his ears. It’s a mixture of engine, wind, metal scraping and fearful murmurs he can’t understand. The buzzing makes him more anxious. He feels a drop of hot sweat make its way from his temple, past his ear, down under his shirt collar. Only then does he realize he’s shaking, and the realization makes the trembling worse. I’ve got to get out of here! his mind shrieks. But his body won’t listen. I can’t be here! But all his body wants to do is to stay seated. His palms are so sweaty he wouldn’t be able to hold on if they forced him to get up. Who are they? Dark Glasses Squatty is joined by a much taller, much thinner man, who looks around at the group of people held captive like they were stinking cattle. Squatty whispers something to Thinman, something Jared would never want to hear even if he could, but their menacing laughter did reach him, and he cowers in his chair. They’re gonna come for me. There’s a hot, metallic taste pooling in his mouth as he watches the brutish, squat man approach. Jared pushes his body back into the safety of the padded chair trying to melt with it, hoping it isn’t him the man is after. Please, please, please, he prays to whomever will hear him, but no one is listening.

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Defeat stops his heart as Squatty grabs his arms and pushes him towards the door. Panic rushes through Jared’s body, the butterflies inside his stomach threatening to burst through and escape. Wobbly knees barely keeping him erect, Jared realizes that, other than shaking, he can’t move. I’m gonna die. I’m gonna die! Squatty decides to take matters into his own hands. His clear baritone voice shouts, “One, two, three,” as if Jared is a child needing a time out. And then he shoves. Seconds later there’s only silence as Jared’s brain stops functioning. He holds his breath, waiting for disaster to strike. His heart is beating so fast he can no longer hear the individual beats, and he’s sure any moment the blood being pumped will come spewing out of his head. But something unexpected happens. Adrenaline rushes through his petrified falling form, relaxing his muscles. Breath returns to his lungs and he realizes there’s no blood escaping his body. Jared laughs. He’s enjoying himself. Whoever said skydiving is terrifying, got it wrong. The anticipation is the real killer. * * * Life is full of scary things we don’t think we can do, like skydiving, changing our eating habits, or taking on an irresponsible company that is polluting our environment. Making a difference starts with you. Never let your fears of doing something stop you from doing it.

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Double Cheeseburgers and Global Warming By Julian J. Varela Who would have known that your last late night cheeseburger binge may have contributed to glacial melting? How are we supposed to know? Many fast food restaurant chains have just begun listing the caloric content of each menu item and that is shocking enough. But now, are we supposed to believe that eating cheeseburgers is contributing to global warming? It’s not like CO2 emissions are listed along with the calorie content, grams of protein and carbohydrates. When we purchase beef, we don’t find “warning” labels listing crimes against the environment made on the way to our dinner table. And really, the last time I saw a California Cheese commercial, the cows looked so happy; how could something so adorable be harmful to the environment? Over the last few years, we’ve heard more and more about the importance of eating locally and organically. Now, it’s time to hear about something called the low-carbon diet: an eating plan that seeks to limit high-impact foods like beef and cheeses in an effort to lower overall carbon emissions. The truth of the matter is that our nation eats an unhealthy amount of beef. According to the USDA, in 2010 the U.S. population consumed 26.4 billion pounds of beef. Wow. Keep in mind that cows need to eat too, and according to a newsletter published via the USDA (Lipton 2008), it takes 4-7 pounds of corn to produce one pound of beef, on average, which seems wasteful to me. Let’s not forget that cows also produce massive amounts of polluting gasses, including lots of methane. Some reports have shown that the average dairy cow produces daily pollutants in amounts that are comparable to what a car produces in a day (Owens 2005). Bon appétit! Speaking of bon appétit, it seems that Bon Appétit Management Company (2011), a national food service contractor that serves 80 million meals a year, is taking the lead on reducing carbon emissions. Bon Appétit has reduced its carbon emissions by 25% through an effort to narrow its purchase of food to within 150 miles of each kitchen, and has since spent $55 million in local regions.

This is just another example of the power of buying locally and its far-reaching implications. Through this endeavor, Bon Appétit has cut beef and cheese purchases by 25% and committed to purchasing meats raised in North America. They have also stopped purchasing air freighted seafood and now buy local or frozen-at-sea fish. Bon Appétit also pushes for composting and less food waste; they have stopped using imported water. Seriously, does it really make sense to import water from France to drink it here? Perhaps it’s time to say “Au revoir, Perrier.” I’m not certain that your next cheeseburger will lead to glacial melting, but nevertheless, it’s not the best for your arteries, so if you do go for it, at least balance it out by having a salad for your next meal (no, not the Cobb salad). Listen, I’m not suggesting that you forever give up meat, become a reformed vegan and purchase your own farm. If I’m honest, I thoroughly enjoy a nice steak now and then and have been know to wash it down with a bottle of imported water and perhaps a glass or two of imported cabernet. Everything can be enjoyed in moderation, but too much of any one thing can be harmful to ourselves as well as the environment. If all of us practice a little more balance, we’ll find that not only will our communities become healthier, but our waistlines just may as well. Works Cited Lipton, K. (2008). The economics of food, farming, natural resources, and rural America. Amber Waves. Retrieved September 6, 2011 from http://www.ers.usda.gov Owen, J. (2005). California cows fail latest emissions test. National Geographic News. Retrieved September 6, 2011 from http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news Bon Appétit Management Company, (2011). Retrieved on September 6, 2011 from http://www.cafebonappetit.com

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Sports: Fantasy Football Fail By Megan Leigh (Marti) Martello Ah, football season. Anyone who knows me knows how much I love football season, perhaps even more than many holidays. This season has been made even sweeter by my beloved Green Bay Packers enjoying so many victories, led by the sexy Aaron Rodgers. This year, I decided to see what all the fuss was about and joined in a fantasy football league. Perhaps I had felt left out too many years when my male friends talked about their “leagues,” but this somehow managed to be more exciting in theory than in actuality. For starters, as the league’s draft date drew closer, I realized that I had no idea as to what I was in for. Upon reading a few web pages of “Fantasy Football for Dummies,” I felt that I at least had the basic level of knowledge needed in order to go through with the drafting process. Boy, was I mistaken. The first problem is that I was not able to draft only Packers players, although I somehow managed to draft multiple Green Bay team members and their defense anyway. I was told that I would not score as many points if all my players were from one team. Nearly everyone in our league knew better than to choose Aaron Rodgers for their quarterback, except for one, who happened to have the draft selection slot just before mine, in the first round. He took him. Bastard. Within seconds of his selection, three people appeared on-screen with various comments as, “Ooooh, that’s not going to go over well,” and “Do you realize what you just did?” and other comments of similar nature. I’m from Wisconsin, and my team is the only existing fan-owned franchise in the NFL. This means that likeability is important. This made the selection of the non-QB players for my team difficult as well. First of all, if I cannot have all Packers players, I definitely cannot have anyone from Minnesota or Chicago. If I am going to be somewhat cheering this player on, they cannot play for a team that holds a fierce rivalry with my team, or I will have no desire to root for them in the first place. I will begrudgingly admit that this eliminated a few choices that other players in my league gladly picked up. They also

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could not play for Dallas or Oakland, because I just do not care much for either of those teams. Then I had to look at the statistically not-great teams, like the Browns, and figure it was probably best to not pick from those teams either. Following the team, I had to take into consideration whether or not I thought the player seems like a nice human being or not. Regardless of their football ability, if it is not someone who seems like a good person, I have no desire to cheer them on. Vick is not an option for me, as I am an animal lover, and Roethlisberger is not a choice, as I am also a lover of my fellow woman. Romo and Brady just seem too pleased with themselves as well. Poor Peyton would have been a possibility, were it not for his injury (as demonstrated by the Colts “awesome” record this year… not). I supposed the only quarterback I would like to have next was Drew Brees, both because he is an excellent player and also because he seems like a nice guy. Luckily, I got him. I’m down with the Saints, so one or two more of their players also joined my roster. Following that, I perused through their stats, projected rankings, and previously listed requirements for being on my team, and somehow managed to complete the draft. Since the draft, the steam has worn off the initial excitement and motivation. The first problem is that Santa Barbara is located between cities with teams, creating somewhat of a black hole for sports, and I am not always around other football fans who will share in my excitement. All the people I play against in the league live out of town, and the competition itself is not for money, which are two things that take some of the competitiveness out of the process and make it much less interesting. If you have invested money and could potentially get money, you will pay closer attention. Also, if your competition is nearby you on a regular basis, you have smack-talking to contend with, which also keeps you paying closer attention. I have not followed much of any team but the Packers, which makes it hard to keep up with any of my players who might not be able to play during a week, due

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to bye week, injury, or felony (likely). For about a month in the middle of it, I mostly forgot about it, and recently signed on to find three of my players were injured, and I now have only won four times. I just updated my team with some new picks so that I might embarrass myself slightly less for the rest of the season. However, I would trade a fantasy football league win for another super bowl trip for the Packers any day… but since we’ll be definitely making the trip, it’d be nice to have at least an average end to my first fantasy football record as well. (To my credit, for the weeks I paid the closest attention, I either won or only lost by a small margin. I am proud to be a woman who knows something about sports.) I have to say, I would try to play fantasy football again, making a few changes along the way. First, I need more than just the satisfaction of winning to go by. I either need an obnoxious friend’s face to rub it in, some monetary winnings, or both, in order to fuel my competitive spirit. Second, I need to research a bit more ahead of time, so that I might be able to have a list of people I would like to pick who meet the high football and human being

standards I set for my team. And, finally, I need to pay attention -- to my fantasy team and to the games they play in, perhaps expanding my viewing to more than mostly just Packers games (but not as far as Bears or Vikings games, unless we are playing each other). There are also survivor leagues, where you pick the winners and losers of each weekly game and/or an overall winning team for the season. I think I might enjoy this as well. By this time next year, I will be cohabitating with my significant other, who loves football as much as I do. Perhaps we can make it interesting by competing against each other in a league we actually care about… although, this could potentially lead to no longer cohabitating, so this might be a point to ponder further. In the meantime, I will continue putting half an effort into this fantasy football team, “RodgerThat,” while cheering on my Green Bay team, as they head to their second super bowl in a row.

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Inspiration: A Guide to Your Personal Odyssey “The purpose of life is not to be happy - but to matter, to be productive, to be useful, to have it make some difference that you have lived at all.” -Leo Rosten

“Love the earth and sun and animals, Despise riches, give alms to everyone that asks, Stand up for the stupid and crazy, Devote your income and labor to others... And your very flesh shall be a great poem.” -Walt Whitman

“Our existence is a series of behaviors.  All we are is what we do, so do what you love and love what you do.”

“We all have ability. The difference is how we use it.”

-Shonna Berk, BA student

-Stevie Wonder

“If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.” -Mother Teresa “Now is the pinnacle. It’s a poignant time where awareness meets hands, hearts, souls. The three are meant to inspire, share, and to show thy neighbor that we are indeed the same.” -Anonymous (contributed by Tessa Eckerman, BA student)

“Never let someone tell you that you cannot make a difference. Change begins with the individual. No goal is too distant, no dream is too big. Don’t give up hope. Together, we can save the world.” -Chelsea Bets Christenson, BA student “Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.” -Buddha

“Service to others is the rent you pay for your room here on earth.”

“As human beings, our greatness lies not so much in being able to remake the world - that is the myth of the atomic age - as in being able to remake ourselves.”

-Mohammed Ali

-Mohandas Gandhi

“The great use of life is to spend it for something that “You give but little when you give of your possessions. outlasts it.” It is when you give of yourself that you truly give.” -William James -Kahlil Gibran “I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catchers mitt on both hands. You need to be able to throw something back.”

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I... I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.” - Robert Frost

-Maya Angelou “Sometimes doing the best you can is enough.”

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-Heather Laney, BA student

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” -Dr. Seuss

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Current Events: Staff Picks Music

Art

by Shonna Berk

by Jason Erwin

Sandbar College Night Every Thursday 514 State St, Santa Barbara (805) 966-1388 *Students get 3 for the price of 1 drinks

1st Thursday Recurring monthly on the 1st Thursday Downtown Santa Barbara 5:00 - 8:00 PM (805) 962-2098

Sandbar Big Wednesdays Every Wednesday, 9PM 514 State St, Santa Barbara (805) 966-1388 *Live reggae, nominal cover charge Wilco Friday, Feb. 10, 8:00PM Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. (805) 963-8862 $45

Food

by Heather Laney Dargan’s Irish Pub 18 E. Ortega St., Santa Barbara (805) 568-0702 *Live music Thursday nights Ming Dynasty 290-G Storke Rd., Goleta (805) 968-1308 *Mongolian Barbecue Silvergreens 791 Chapala St., Santa Barbara (805) 962-8500 900 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista (805) 961-1700 *Fresh, natural and local ingredients The Barbecue Company 3807 Santa Claus Lane, Carpinteria (805) 684-2209 *“The World’s Best Barbecue & Homemade Sauces”

27th Annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival January 26 - February 5, 2012 Various Downtown Locations and Theaters Passes available for purchase via SBIFF.org (805) 963-0023 SBIFF 10-10-10 Student Filmmaking and Screenwriting Competition February 5, 1:00PM Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. (805) 963-0023

Social Justice

by Megan Leigh Martello

Arroyo Burro Beach Clean-Up Sunday, Feb. 12, noon Watershed Resource Ctr., 2981 Cliff Dr. (805) 884-0459 x16 Another Side of Peace film screening Wednesday, Feb. 29, 6:00PM MultiCultural Ctr. Channel Islands Rd., UCSB (805) 893-8411 Go Red for Women Luncheon Friday, Mar. 9, 10:00AM-1:30PM Fess Parker’s DoubleTree Resort 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Santa Barbara *$100 for individual tickets (805) 963-8862

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Calendar of Events Unnamed Table Date:

Event: Time: Admission: Location: Contact Info: Market Forays Fisherman’s $145 Cooking Demo & Market/ Every Saturday 8AM-3:30PM (805) 259-7229 RSVP Seminar Farmers required Market Star Parties at the Santa Barbara 2nd Saturday of Natural History 7:00-10:00PM Museum of Free (805) 682-4711 every month Museum Natural History 27th Annual Santa Passes Various Barbara January 26 Various times available at downtown (805) 963-0023 February 5, 2012 International Film SBIFF.org locations Festival SBIFF 10-10-10 Student Passes Filmmaking and Feb 5, 2012 1:00 PM available at Lobero Theatre (805) 963-0023 Screenwriting SBIFF.org Competition SB Symphony Call box 8PM Sat, Granada Presents: office for Feb 11-12, 2012 (805) 899-2222 Theatre 3PM Sun Rhapsody in Blue pricing info Granada Feb 17, 2012 The Chieftians 8PM $38-$58 (805) 893-3535 Theatre State Street Ballet 7:30PM Sat, Granada Presents: The Feb 25, 2012 $28-$53 (805) 899-2222 Theatre 2PM Sun Secret Garden George UCSB, Bldg Mar 8, 2012 8PM $35 (805) 893-3535 Kahumoku Jr. 402 Santa Barbara 10AM-4PM Earl Warren Mar 16-18, 2012 International $12 (805) 403-1533 Showgrounds daily Orchid Show SB Symphony Call box 8PM Sat, Granada office for Mar 17-18, 2012 Presents: Latin (805) 899-2222 Theatre 3PM Sun Passion pricing info Mar 21, 2012 Ani DiFranco 8PM $39-$45 Lobero Theatre (805) 963-0761

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Photographer’s credit: Jennifer Baron

We would love to hear from you. . . The AUSB Odyssey provides a unique opportunity for students, faculty, staff, and alumni of AUSB to share their written work. We are always accepting submissions for current and future issues. Submissions can include: current news, literary works, editorials, photography, artwork, reviews, or pieces on social justice, business, health, or human interest. Whether you are a student in one of our various programs, faculty, staff member, or alumni, we would love to hear from you. Please email Odyssey.ausb@antioch.edu with comments, questions, submissions, and/or suggestions. We appreciate your continued support of our humble publication.

Mmere Dane An Adinkra symbol of change The AUSB Odyssey is a student driven production, designed to provide an opportunity to share the AUSB community’s critical and creative voices. The views represented are those of the authors and not necessarily Antioch University Santa Barbara’s.

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AUSB Odyssey -Winter 2012