AUPresses 2022 Book, Jacket, and Journal Show Catalog

Page 1

Association of University Presses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show

2022



Association of University Presses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show




Purpose Since 1965, the Association of University Presses

The 2022 show includes books published by

(AUPresses) Book, Jacket, and Journal Show

AUPresses member presses in 2021 and jackets

has fulfilled its mission to “honor and instruct”:

and covers of books published that year. Books may

honoring the design and production teams whose

have been manufactured anywhere in the world, but

work furthers a long tradition of excellence in

imports and copublications from another publisher

book design and—through a traveling exhibit and

are not eligible.

acclaimed annual catalog of selected entries— visually teaching the tenets of good design.

The 2022 Book, Jacket, and Journal Show selections were first announced on April 20, 2022 on design.

The Book, Jacket, and Journal Show is a juried

up.hcommons.org. The traveling exhibition will

design competition, open only to AUPresses

premiere at the AUPresses Annual Meeting in

member publishers. Every autumn the call-for-

Washington, DC, in June 2022. Afterward, the show

entries is distributed, and each January, the jurors

will be exhibited at member presses around the

gather in AUPresses’ New York offices to examine

country from September 2022 through May 2023.

hundreds of submissions and select the very best examples of book, journal, and cover designs. Jurors are esteemed interior and cover designers appointed by the annual show committee. The show recognizes meritorious achievement in design, production, and manufacture of books, jackets, covers, and journals by members of the university press community. It also provides an evaluation of their work and serves as a focus of discussion and a source of ideas for intelligent, creative, and resourceful bookmaking.


2021–2022 Results

Charge to the Jurors

Judging for this year’s Book, Jacket, and Journal

To select approximately fifty publications

Show took place on January 27–28 at the

(representative of the book and journal categories

AUPresses Central Office in New York City.

on the entry form) and thirty book jackets, covers, and journal covers that exhibit excellence in design

Statistics

and manufacture

Member presses submitted 488 publications across

To consider the different types of materials

the following categories:

published by university presses and the problems

50 Scholarly Typographic

they pose for the designer

31 Scholarly Illustrated

To give special consideration to academic book

34 Trade Typographic

design and creative solutions to short-run

31 Trade Illustrated

publications

13 Poetry and Literature 3 Journals 7 Reference 322 Jackets and Covers The jurors selected 91 publications across the following categories: 9 Scholarly Typographic 13 Scholarly Illustrated 10 Trade Typographic 12 Trade Illustrated 3 Poetry and Literature 0 Journals 4 Reference 40 Jackets and Covers

To write general comments about the show for inclusion in the book show catalog To participate in the 2022 AUPresses Annual Meeting



Contents 8

Jurors

13

Scholarly Typographic

33

Scholarly Illustrated

61

Trade Typographic

83

Trade Illustrated

109

Poetry and Literature

117

Reference

127

Jackets and Covers

169

Index

175

Acknowledgments


Lisa Hamm Books and Journals Lisa Hamm is now an independent designer. After

Statement

twenty-two years and hundreds of books, she

pleasure for me. I didn’t realize how much I would enjoy sitting for two days,

recently retired from her job as senior designer

paging through the fine efforts of my partners in crime. Never have I had the

for Columbia University Press. Her work has

opportunity before to contemplate book design in this way. It was gratifying.

been acknowledged by the New York Book Show and AUPresses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show. Before CUP, Lisa worked at Adobe as a senior graphic artist, but her roots are in fine art. Her goal going forward is to meld all her skills in a more personal way.

Judging the Book, Jacket, and Journal show was an unexpected

Having worked as a book designer for twenty-two-plus years, I so appreciated the skill with which my fellow designers handled complex interiors, masterfully selected and combined type, and juggled the challenges—many completely out of their hands. Large workloads, paper shortages, unpredictable digital printing results—to name a few obstacles—yielded stunning innovative solutions in impressive numbers. More than 50! We welcomed new presses and new creative designers as well as several veterans who turned out beautiful designs with confident hands once again. Thank you AUPresses for shining a light on designers and their designs.

8


Stephen Coles Books and Journals Stephen Coles (he/him) was raised in Salt Lake City where he was drawn to publishing by his father, who ran a local magazine, and was hooked on fonts the moment his family got a Mac. In college, he learned about type (and life) as a designer at his university newspaper, The Daily Utah Chronicle. After a brief stint as a freelancer in Stockholm, Stephen moved to San Francisco in

Statement

As a university press outsider, I enjoyed discovering the diversity

2004 to serve as FontShop’s creative director and a

of design that academic publishing can offer. We saw dozens of books

member of FontFont’s TypeBoard which evaluated

representing the kind of competent and restrained approaches that I (perhaps

submissions and developed the pioneering library

unfairly) associate with the field. But we also saw many new ideas and bold

of digital type. He was also an independent

choices. I was especially pleased to discover designers who find ways to break

consultant, connecting font makers with font users

free from traditional typography—not just to call attention to themselves, but

and advocating for the interests of both groups.

to enlighten the content, or simply to delight the reader. Weeks after judging I

Stephen co-founded the websites Typographica

remember Jenny Chan’s atypical paper and typeface choices that subtly reflect

(an annual review of new typefaces) and Fonts

the subject matter of Conchophilia. And I still think about Jill Shimabukuro’s

In Use (a crowdsourced index of typographic

expert handling of Lines of Thought; in which she managed to make a complex

design) and wrote the book The Anatomy of Type.

topic both understandable and enjoyable. As an advocate for typographic

In 2017, he joined the nonprofit library and museum

diversity I welcomed those who broke free of the usual Renaissance classics

Letterform Archive as Associate Curator and

and Adobe/Linotype standbys and dipped into the deep well of new type made

Editorial Director. With his background in design

by new designers for new books. Thank you, Roy Brooks, for thinking beyond

and journalism, combined with an obsession for

Futura for mid-century modernism; Matt Avery for picking Arnhem, Atlas,

type history, Stephen is responsible for the online

and Graphik and setting them with such care; Matthew Tauch for putting the

face and voice of the Archive and helps to shape

underused Portrait and Canela to work on an important topic, and Erin Kirk for

the future of the collection.

seeing the whimsy in Windsor.

9


Statement

I don’t think I can convey what an honor it was to be asked to be

a judge for this year’s book jacket show without acknowledging the context of how challenging the past two years of the pandemic have been for most of us. As we shifted to working remotely, we had to become even more resourceful in how we go about the work of putting books out into the world, and the fact that university presses tend to have even more limited budgets and resources than commercial ones made it all the more satisfying to see the amazing variety and quality of work in the submissions this year. It felt almost surreal to me when I headed to midtown Manhattan in January to the AUPresses offices for the judging as well as meeting this year’s chair,

Lucy Kim Jackets and Covers

Barbara Bourgoyne, in addition to the other judges and staff in person. It had been so long since I’d interacted with professional peers face-to-face, and it turned out to be a wonderful two days of discussion and camaraderie.

Lucy Kim is an Art Director at Little, Brown

The experience reinforced how much I missed “talking shop” with my fellow

& Co, a division of Hachette Book Group

designers, and it made me excited for the day when we could all return to

North America. In her 20+ year career

offices and social gatherings again.

designing book covers she has also worked for the Penguin Group, Simon & Schuster, and the Macmillan Group. Her work has been recognized by the New York Book Show and featured in Lit Hub, Buzzfeed, and Spine Magazine. She currently resides in New York City where she was born and raised.

As Tim and I methodically went through all of the submissions over the course of the two days, we found ourselves in agreement for pretty much all of our evaluations, despite our different backgrounds and experiences—Tim, with his outstanding work in branding and at Faceout Studio, and me with my background solely in commercial book publishing. It’s always difficult to determine what constitutes “award-winning” work, but I believe all the covers we selected were the most successful at communicating their ideas to an audience in truly beautiful ways. I’m grateful to have been a part of this year’s competition and I want to thank everyone at AUPresses for making this process such an enjoyable one. But most importantly I’d like to thank all the university press designers who submitted entries, whether they were in the final selection or not. One of the best things about designing book covers, I believe, is that your hard work is always rewarded with the production of this magical object—a book.

10


Tim Green Jackets and Covers Tim Green is Creative Director at Faceout Studio. His work has been recognized by Graphis Design Annual, AIGA 50 Books 50 Covers, and the New York Book Show. When he is not at his desk designing, he is most likely to be found at home, with his lovely wife and 3 children. If he’s not with them, it’s a safe bet you’ll find him at a coffee shop, probably designing something.

Statement

When I told some of my non-designer

friends that I would be judging a book cover competition, no less than 5 of them made the same joke about not judging books by their covers. But I was undaunted by such comments and deeply honored and excited to have this opportunity. Then I found out that Lucy Kim would be a fellow jacket judge, and I immediately felt extremely cool by

Lucy and I entered a room full of books, with caffeine in our veins and design

association. My wife and I hopped on a plane and

on our brains. We quickly settled into a rhythm and began sorting books into

soon found ourselves in a hotel with a view of the

“yes,” “no,” and “maybe” piles. We were quite kind at first, with a pretty sizable

Empire State Building. So far so good.

“maybe” pile taking shape. We would make the tougher calls after first going

Everything in New York is famous. From Times Square to Shake Shack—everything is noteworthy. I

through all the books with a quick evaluation. The process was very smooth, and I was glad to find that Lucy and I agreed on most of the selections.

was especially surprised by the number of Canada

We returned the second day to go through the selections once more and sort

Goose jackets I saw on the subway. I was not

out the maybe pile into either “yes” or “no”. This was more difficult, but even

familiar with these jackets prior to the trip, and

with the tough calls we faced, we were largely in agreement. It was a lot of fun

when I searched them out online to see what the

to see the variety of excellent work on display, and to talk through our thoughts

big deal is, I did a double take at the price. Must be

openly. We ended the day with a strong set of books to honor for this year’s

a golden goose filling those down jackets.

show.

The first morning of judging, I was feeling a bit

My congratulations to the winners and to everybody who submitted work! And

nervous. I didn’t have a Canada Goose jacket and I

my sincere thanks to the AUPresses committee for the chance to be involved

wasn’t sure how the other judges would respond to

with this year’s competition. It was a great honor, as I have followed the jacket

my Oregonian ways and “dad core” style. But I was

and journal show for many years, and I continue to be impressed by the quality

pleased to discover that everybody was extremely

of design on display across the spectrum of university presses. To my fellow

cool—just a bunch of design nerds like me. Next,

judges, I still think we should get matching tattoos. Or at least some matching

we set about the task of judging.

Canada Goose jackets.

11



Scholarly Typographic


Aarhus University Press Fra fravær til fællesskab: Hvad kan skolen gøre? Gro Emmertsen Lund Designer Nethe Ellinge Nielsen

Designer Comments Empty chairs in the classroom are both a theme in the book

Production Coordinator Cecilie Harrits

and a framework for the design. The intent for this title was to create a book that was

Acquiring Editor Cecilie Harrits Project Editor Cecilie Harrits Trim Size 14 × 21 cm Number of Pages 204

simultaneously pleasant to hold and easy to read. Visually stimulating graphs and figures are used to make the subject of the book easy to understand and perceive. The choice of the fonts Sentinel and New Rail Alphabet in typography also contributes to this. Every larger paragraph in the book is indented, which creates a blank space, that is a reference to the empty seats on the cover of the book. The

Print Run 1,200

content of the book depicts the problem that an increasingly large number of children

Compositor Nethe Ellinge Nielsen

are absent from schools.

Text Type Sentinel (Hoefler&Co.), New Rail Alphabet (A2-TYPE) Display Type Sentinel, New Rail Alphabet Paper 100 g Munken Lynx

The cool green colour of the cover recurs in the body matter too and is used both in the graphic design of illustrations and graphs, as well as in the text itself. Likewise, the red colour appears in the empty chairs on the cover as well as in text passages throughout the book.

Inks LED-UV

SC An excellent use of color, both in typography and paper. And it’s nice to see a

Printer/Binder Narayana Press

rare use of a slab among all the oldstyle serifs in academic publishing. The designer

Method of Printing Offset

acheived their goal of a pleasant reading experience.

Method of Binding Burst binding Binding Materials Softcover book, 4 creases with page glue. Coating 4+4 colors with neutral overprint varnish. Jacket/Cover Designer Nethe Ellinge Nielsen Jacket/Cover Printer Narayana Press

14

Scholarly T ypographic

LH Thoughtful design.



Aarhus University Press Marsilius af Padua: Middelalderens revolutionære filosof Claus Bryld Designer Carl-H.K. Zakrisson Production Coordinator Ulrik Hvilshøj Acquiring Editor Ulrik Hvilshøj Project Editor Søren Hein Rasmussen Trim Size 12.2 × 20 cm Number of Pages 208 Print Run 600 Compositor Carl-H.K. Zakrisson Text Type Arno Pro (Adobe) Display Type Arno Pro (Adobe) Paper 120 g Munken Pure Inks LED-UV Printer/Binder Narayana Press Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Full binding 2 mm board with round spine and head/tailband dark red 589. Black text embossing on front and back and blind embossing with adhesive small posters, 150 g Silk, FSC. Separate endpapers 135 g Surbalin Linea ruby red 5080. Jacket/Cover Designer Carl-H.K. Zakrisson Jacket/Cover Printer Narayana Press Designer Comments With a format of just 12.2 ×

enjoyed at leisure (eg., in a pocket or saddlebag), the

20.0 cm, this is a small hardcover book about a big

format of this book is likewise kept small, compact,

subject. Set in Arno, a font designed after Renaissance

and durable. An intimate subject, Defensor Pacis, in an

typographic ideals and proportions; named after the

intimate format.

Tuscan river that cuts through Florence, it corresponds directly—both geographically and temporally—with the life of the author, Marsilius of Padua. Another contemporary influence, Aldus Manutius, Italian humanist, scholar, educator, and the founder of the Aldine Press also plays a part: The inventor of compact, portable printed volumes to be taken with you and

16

Scholarly T ypographic

SC The typography is spot on and the images are masterfully treated—whether full-bleed or silhouetted. The Aldine pocket book experience is marred only by the tight, hardcover binding. Perhaps a flexi or softcover would do more justice to the form.



Duke University Press African Ecomedia Cajetan Iheka Designer Aimee C. Harrison Production Coordinator Chris Granville Acquiring Editor Elizabeth Ault Project Editor Susan Albury Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 336 Print Run 550 pb / 40 litho Compositor Tseng Information Systems Text Type Portrait Text (Berton Hasbe/Commercial Type) Display Type Bluu Next (Jean-Baptiste Morizot/ Velvetyne Type Foundry) Paper 70 lb house white matte, 739 ppi Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Porter Print Group Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials 10pt C2S 4/4CP / printed litho for case Jacket/Cover Designer Aimee C. Harrison Jacket/Cover Printer Porter Print Group SC The idiosyncratic type in curved blocks is a great way to nudge the reader that we’re headed away from traditional, Eurocentric content.

18

Scholarly T ypographic


Scholarly T ypographic

19


Duke University Press Black Bodies, White Gold: Art, Cotton, and Commerce in the Atlantic World Anna Arabindan-Kesson Designer Matthew Tauch Production Coordinator Chris Granville Acquiring Editor Ken Wissoker Project Editor Lisa Lawley Trim Size 7 × 10 Number of Pages 320 Print Run 1,500 Compositor Copperline Book Services Text Type Portrait Text (Commercial Type) Display Type Canela Text (Commercial Type) Paper 70 lb Anthem Plus Satin Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Porter Print Group Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 12pt C1S Jacket/Cover Designer Matthew Tauch Jacket/Cover Printer Porter Print Group SC A light and solemn touch does justice to a heavy topic. LH Solid design. Would have preferred the captions weren’t center aligned and more attention to their line breaks, less or no hyphenation.

20

Scholarly T ypographic


Scholarly T ypographic

21


Duke University Press Nervous Systems: Art, Systems, and Politics since the 1960s Johanna Gosse and Timothy Stott Designer Courtney Leigh Richardson Production Coordinator Chris Critelli Acquiring Editor Elizabeth Ault Project Editor Lisl Hampton Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 304 Print Run 475 pb / 35 hb Compositor Westchester Text Type 10.2/13.8 Minion Pro (Adobe) × 25p9 Display Type Helvetica Paper 50 lb natural Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials 12pt C1S / printed litho for case Jacket/Cover Designer Courtney Leigh Richardson Jacket/Cover Printer John P. Pow Company Designer Comments Love a good sturdy Helvetica/ Minion combo! SC Solid, refined typography throughout, (with the odd exception of a few captions that are too tightly tracked). LH Nicely designed. Wish there was less paper see-through.

22

Scholarly T ypographic



Leuven University Press Congoville: Contemporary Artists Tracing Colonial Tracks Edited by Pieter Boons Designer La Villa Hermosa Production Coordinator Patricia Di Costanzo Acquiring Editor Veerle De Laet Project Editor Sandrine Colard Trim Size 195 × 295 mm Number of Pages 272 Print Run 1,000 Compositor La Villa Hermosa Text Type EB Garamond Display Type Numberplate Paper 90 gr Munken Lynx Rough / 115 gr Arctic Volume White / 80 gr Olin Regular Absolute White Inks LED-UV full color Printer/Binder Die Keure Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Hardback, linen with foil stamp on front and spine, printed back Jacket/Cover Designer La Villa Hermosa Jacket/Cover Printer Die Keure, Printing and Binding SC Sections are set apart in novel ways, such as varying page trim, adding a background frame, or going white type on black. Unfortunately, the type isn’t its best at the smallest sizes and presents readability issues in the reversed settings. Still, this is such an innovative package it deserves special mention. LH Overall, very nicely done. Solid typography. Interesting touch binding two page trims together. The smaller trim is carried through by carving out that size on the larger sheet using black margins to define the shape. Great paper.

24

Scholarly T ypographic



Charting the

Plantation Landscape from Natchez to New Orleans Edited by Laura Kilcer VanHuss

Louisiana State University Press Charting the Plantation Landscape from Natchez to New Orleans Edited by Laura Kilcer VanHuss Designer Barbara Neely Bourgoyne Production Coordinator Barbara Neely Bourgoyne Acquiring Editor Jenny Keegan Project Editor Catherine L. Kadair Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 256 Print Run 750 Compositor Barbara Neely Bourgoyne Text Type 10.4/14 Garamond Premier Pro (Adobe) × 25p Display Type Garamond Premier Pro (Adobe) Paper 55 lb Natures Natural, 360 ppi Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 80 lb Rainbow Graphite with Buckram embossing Jacket/Cover Designer Barbara Neely Bourgoyne Jacket/Cover Printer Sheridan Books LH Solid handling of type. Nicely designed.

26

Scholarly T ypographic


Charting the

Plantation Landscape from Natchez to New Orleans Edited by Laura Kilcer VanHuss

Contents

1 Introduction 14 Construction and Construct: Architecture of the Louisiana Plantation Laura Ewen Blokker 49 The Plantation Landscape: Spectres of an Unseen Imprint Suzanne Turner 79 Severed Heads to Statehouse: The Political Landscape of the Sugar Coast Charles D. Chamberlain III 97 Plantations as Landscapes of Medicine Christopher D. E. Willoughby 130 Landscapes of Emancipation: Plantations and African American Liberation William Horne 157 After Persac: Imagining the Plantation Landscape from the Civil War to the Great Depression Jochen Wierich

Louisiana State University Press Baton Rouge

Cane for the Mill, by George François Mugnier, Courtesy of the Collections of the Louisiana State Museum, 09813.0807.1.

191 The Rise and Fall of Uncle Sam Plantation Christopher Morris 223 Epilogue 229 Contributors 233 Index

Landscapes of Emancipation

Landscapes of Emancipation Plantations and African American Liberation

William Horne

On March 24, 1900, Raymond Breaux, editor of the St. Landry Clarion, reprinted an article from the East Feliciana Columbian. The Columbian article invited its readers, “us Democrats, the white people, to pause and glance backward at some of the scenes enacted under the Republican regime.” The essayist cautioned that “it is still within the memory of man when John Gair, a negro, was our state senator; when Bob Ray, a negro, was in the state legislature as member from East Feliciana . . . with Tony Clark, a negro clerk of court.” “Magistrates and constables were negroes,” the Columbian complained, and threatened to be so again if readers voted Republican. The writer celebrated the impossibility of this outcome. “No more will it be necessary for the white men to break up a court of justice,” he wrote, “and drive judge, sheriff and all from the land.” Even a quarter of a century later, the tenure of Gair, Ray, and Clark in office troubled the minds of white supremacists in East Feliciana. The memory of these Black officeholders, whose race was their primary shortcoming, apparently motivated white voters decades after they drove them from the parish under the threat of death.1 The experiences of John Gair, Robert Ray, and Tony Clark point to the need to understand the political landscape that emerged during and after Reconstruction, a landscape defined by its occupants’ common goal of freedom and shared strategy of active political mobilization.2 The Columbian’s discomfort with the men was not simply an expression of loyalty to their own race but a reaction to the fact that these men and hundreds of other local African American 130

officeholders challenged the superiority of their former enslavers. Tony Clark had almost certainly been owned by East Feliciana Parish planter Benjamin F. Clark, while local carpenter James Gair had probably enslaved John Gair. Their trajectory from enslaved workers to postwar politicians grew from a web of kinship alliances founded in slavery. The relationships they formed in slavery had provided support and, in the wake of emancipation, formed the basis of African American political organizations. As a result, postwar plantations were not simply sites of labor but also provided the backdrop for grassroots organizing and resistance. From this perspective, postwar plantations were highly contested spaces—at once fetishized by former slaveowners who hoped to regain their antebellum elite status and weaponized by their formerly enslaved workers to throw off the yoke of oppression. This essay examines the landscape of political activity through which African Americans articulated a radical rejection of the established political topography. Together, they transformed the postwar plantation landscape and destroyed the efforts of former enslavers to resurrect slavery.3 The Antebellum Plantation Landscape Louisiana’s antebellum plantation labor camps were sites of brutal exploitation. Many of those who worked Louisiana’s plantations were victims of the so-called Second Middle Passage—the domestic slave trade through which enslavers in long-established slave states, especially Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware, sold Black men, women, and children into the Deep South. Some were also descended from Africans who were in St. Domingue during the Haitian Revolution. These forced migrants were the backbone of Louisiana’s plantation landscape. They built its levees, cleared and tilled its fields, harvested its crops, and loaded its steamers. Their bodies were far and away the most valuable assets in the region and it was through them that plantation owners secured their wealth. The proximity of New Orleans—the vortex of the antebellum slave trade—also meant that slaves lived in constant fear of losing friends and family to sale, either as punishment or as a consequence of plantation mismanagement. Both were common enough to warrant concern. Even under “normal” circumstances, slavery was brutal and dehumanizing. Men, women, and children were forced to work in the planter’s home, blacksmith shops, cooperages, barns, and sugar and cotton fields. Field slaves primarily labored in gangs and 131

William Horne

Like his comrades, Gair left the parish in July 1875 and had been unable to return due to the threats on his life. In October, he was living in Baton Rouge with little prospect of returning to office. Based on contemporary newspaper accounts, it appears that the white elites whom Gair had governed hoped to use their newfound control of the sheriff ’s office and the courts to kidnap and kill him. They arrested his sister-in-law, Babe Matthews, on suspicion of attempting to poison local white supremacist physician Dr. J. W. Saunders. Saunders never showed any sign of illness. He claimed, however, that he suspected Matthews was trying to poison him, thus “uncovering” the supposed plot. Matthews allegedly confessed that Gair had conspired with her in the rumored poisoning— of which there was no contemporary evidence—and the local court issued a warrant for Gair’s arrest. We cannot know whether she actually confessed or not because Matthews would never have the opportunity to contradict their story. By the end of the night of October 13, masked white supremacists, in apparent league with local officials, lynched her from the oak tree on the front lawn of the courthouse (fig. 2). The Weekly Louisianan theorized that white supremacists had murdered Matthews to cover up the fraudulent basis of their assassination of Gair. Though the likely conspirators left no record in which they described their plot and confessed to the crime, the circumstantial evidence supports the Louisianan’s theory. Matthews was almost certainly killed because of her relationship with Gair.42 John Gair’s story ended the same night as that of his sister-in-law. He was arrested in Baton Rouge by Deputy Sheriff Woodard under the authority of the warrant based on Matthews’s alleged testimony. As the Republican put it, “Mr. Gair was arrested as an accessory before the fact to an alleged attempt to poison a man who now lives and moves as free as the freest.”43 He was shot to death on the way back to Clinton to stand trial for the trumped-up poisoning charge. He was still in the custody of the deputy sheriff, who claimed Gair was murdered by between sixty and seventy masked vigilantes. As with Matthews’s poisoning “confession,” we have only Woodard’s word that he acted in good faith. These were, however, the very same people that purged the parish of Black officeholders on the premise that, in the words of the local conservative press, “the black man has proved his incapability to hold office.”44 We may take them at their word, but we do so at our own peril. Indeed, the accounts of the white elites of East Feliciana are credible only if we view their actions in isolation and ignore both the interrelationship and context of their program 148

Landscapes of Emancipation

Figure 2. The East Feliciana Parish Court House, by Andrew David Lytle, 1899. This is the courthouse where white vigilantes lynched Babe Matthews. Andrew D. Lytle Collection, Mss. 893, 1254, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collection, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, LA.

of destruction in the summer and fall of 1875. They organized around the total destruction of Black democracy in the parish. This was precisely what they said in the press and exactly what they accomplished.45 Testifying years after the official end of Reconstruction, George Andrew Jackson Swazie, state senator from neighboring West Feliciana Parish, identified two key components of the coup that ousted Gair and so many other democratically elected politicians of color. The first was the rabid white supremacy of plantation elites and the second was their alliance with white northerners. Swazie observed that “the moment any of these United States soldiers came up there, he was taken to the house of white men like you, and his hair was plaited, and whatever the [white] people wanted to do he turned his back on it.” Because of their friendliness with former enslavers, Swazie theorized, “the negro stood no chance with them.” This understanding between white northerners and planters, though hardly universal, laid the groundwork for the wave of white vigilantism that “commenced when John G[ai]r was killed, and never ceased until the State was in the hands of the Democratic party.” “It 149


South Dakota Historical Society Press Pioneer Girl: The Revised Texts Laura Ingalls Wilder and Nancy Tystad Koupal Designer Rich Hendel Production Coordinator Jennifer McIntyre Acquiring Editor: Nancy Tystad Koupal Project Editor Nancy Tystad Koupal Trim Size 9 × 10 Number of Pages 520 Print Run 5,000 Compositor Tseng Information Systems Text Type 11.8/14 Bulmer (Monotype) × 21p3 (text); 12.5/16 Bulmer (Monotype) × 33p (essays) Display Type Bulmer (Monotype), LHF Ross Antique Paper 60 lb Rolland Opaque Natural Inks Black Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Arrestox 64550 Mixed Berry (spine), Rainbow Endleaf Cinnamon (sides) Jacket/Cover Designer Rich Hendel Jacket/Cover Printer Friesens SC This book was a hefty task and the designer did a fine job handling lots of different content types. Bulmer is period-appropriate but struggles at the smallest size.

28

Scholarly T ypographic



University of Georgia Press Stargazing in the Atomic Age: Essays Anne Goldman Designer Erin Kirk Production Coordinator Rebecca Norton Acquiring Editor Walter Biggins Project Editor Jon Davies Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 160 Print Run 1,000 Compositor Erin Kirk Text Type 10.15 Minion Pro (Adobe) × 26p9 Display Type Twentieth Century (Monotype) Paper 60 lb Natures Natural Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials Printed case over 3mm case boards, square back with reinforced spine, and 4-color printed endsheets Jacket/Cover Designer Erin Kirk Jacket/Cover Printer Sheridan Books Designer Comments I carried the Mandelbrot fractal imagery from the cover through to the text design to connect to the book’s focus on Jewish scientists and artists.

30

Scholarly T ypographic




Scholarly Illustrated


University of Chicago Press The City Creative: The Rise of Urban Placemaking in Contemporary America Michael H. Carriere and David Schalliol Designer Monograph / Matt Avery Production Coordinator Joan Davies Acquiring Editor Timothy Mennel Project Editor Michael Koplow Trim Size 8.5 × 9 Number of Pages 336 Print Run 810 Compositor Monograph / Matt Avery Text Type Atlas Grotesk (Commercial Type) Display Type Dala Floda (Commercial Type) Paper 128 gsm Chinese matte white coated

Designer Comments This book includes photo essays

Inks 4-color process

and sections of the book where the photos are on par with

Printer/Binder C&C Offset

the text in terms of importance. These aspects made this

Method of Printing Offset

book design an enjoyable challenge.

Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Faimei FM-P06 Gold; Endpapers: 1-color Pantone 639 uncoated blue; Spine foil: Foiland GB-730 Silver; Head/Footbands: GF131 red and gold checker Jacket/Cover Designer Monograph / Matt Avery Jacket/Cover Printer C&C Offset

34

Scholarly Illustrated

SC Beautifully produced all around, especially the generous treatment of the imagery. On type: Atlas is one of the few neo-grotesks that functions well in body text, and it’s easy to fall in love with Dala Floda, but the dazzling stencil typeface doesn’t quite resolve in the small heads. I would have tried for a typeface (like Ariata or Nocturno) that has both a stencil and standard version.


The Rise of Urban Placemaking in Contemporary America

Contents

The University of Chicago Press, Chicago 60637 The University of Chicago Press, Ltd., London © 2021 by The University of Chicago All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission, except in the case of brief quotations in critical articles and reviews. For more information, contact the University of Chicago Press, 1427 E. 60th St., Chicago, IL 60637. Published 2021 Printed in China 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21

1 2 3 4 5

ISBN-13: 978-0-226-72722-6 (cloth)

Introduction: A Brief History of the Recent Past 1

ISBN-13: 978-0-226-72736-3 (e-book)

The City

DOI: https://doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226727363.001.0001

1 The (Near) Death and Life of Postwar American

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Cities: The Roots of Contemporary Placemaking 29

Names: Carriere, Michael H., author. | Schalliol, David, author.

2 The Roaring ’90s 57

Title: The city creative : the rise of urban placemaking in contemporary America / Michael H. Carriere and David Schalliol.

Creative

3 Into the Twenty-First Century 83

Description: Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, 2021. | Includes bibliographical references and index. Identifiers: LCCN 2020013473 | ISBN 9780226727226 (cloth) | ISBN

4 Growing Place: Toward a Counterhistory of

9780226727363 (ebook)

Contemporary Placemaking 113

Subjects: LCSH: City planning—United States—History—21st century. | City planning—United States—History—20th century. | Community development,

5 Producing Place 155

Urban—United States. | City planning—Citizen participation. | Urban renewal— Citizen participation. | Public spaces—Social aspects—United States. Classification: LCC HT167 .C37 2021 | DDC 307.1/21609730905—dc23

6 Creating Place 197

LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2020013473

Conclusion: Placemaking Is for People 265

∞ This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (Permanence of Paper).

Acknowledgments 283 Notes 285 Index 305

The University of Chicago Press

Chicago and London

If I could do it, I’d do no writing at all here. It would

ing create and sustain public spaces that build strong

be photographs; the rest would be fragments of cloth,

communities.” The early twenty-first century found PPS

bits of cotton, lumps of earth, records of speech,

employing the concept of creative placemaking as per-

pieces of wood and iron, phials of odors, plates of

haps the best mechanism with which to rebuild America’s

food and of excrement.

urban centers. For PPS, placemaking was “a collabora-

James Agee (1941)

“more than just promoting better urban design.” Instead, it “facilitates creative patterns of use, paying particular atIn August 2010, Quicken Loans founder Dan Gilbert

define a place and support its ongoing evolution.” And Detroit proved an appealing laboratory for such ideas,

to the city’s troubled downtown. At the time, the move

with Gilbert a more-than-willing partner. In fact, he would

stunned many observers as Detroit was still reeling from

speak at PPS’s inaugural Placemaking Leadership Coun-

the effects of the Great Recession and the bankruptcies of

cil, held in Detroit in April 2013. Not surprisingly, his topic

Chrysler and General Motors. At the same time, Gilbert’s

was the ability of placemaking to transform his city.2 Kent would work with Gilbert and others on “Opportu-

gobbling up countless historic buildings, empty skyscrap-

nity Detroit: A Placemaking Vision for Downtown Detroit,”

ers, and myriad other properties throughout the city. In

a report issued in the spring of 2013. This report called for

December 2017, Crain’s Detroit Business forecasted that

a “culture change” in city planning, one based on the core

Bedrock would have over twenty-four million square feet

belief that an “intense focus on the public realm will trans-

under development by 2022, at an estimated value of ap-

form streets, sidewalks, promenades and buildings so

proximately $4 billion.1

that they relate to pedestrians on a human scale.” Rather

This level of investment in an American urban center

than focusing on economic activity, it stressed the need

was noteworthy in and of itself. Yet what was even more

to grow social activity—all sorts of development, includ-

stunning was the way Gilbert began to use such invest-

ing economic, would soon follow. “The downtown core,”

ment as a means of redefining what it meant to live and

it noted, “will become all about activity on the streets,

work in downtown Detroit. The real estate, in other words,

sidewalks, parks and plazas that draw more and more

was just the first step in a broader process of reinvent-

people.” The ultimate goal was to create spaces of “so-

ing urban living in a city still carving out its place in the

ciability.” “When people see friends, meet and greet their

twenty-first century. Still suffering from the aftershocks

neighbors, and feel comfortable interacting with strang-

of deindustrialization, white flight, and more, Detroit’s

ers,” the report concluded, “they tend to feel a stronger

rebranding would not come easy, particularly when—as

sense of place or attachment to their community—and

would come back to haunt Gilbert—many of the neighbor-

to the place that fosters these types of social activities.”3

hoods hit hardest would have to wait.

bankruptcy, July 18, 2013.

tention to the physical, cultural, and social identities that

moved the headquarters of his company—and its seventeen hundred employees—from the suburbs of Detroit

Bedrock Real Estate Services went on a buying spree,

(Previous spread) Detroit’s Belle Isle on the day the city declared

tive process by which we can shape our public realm in order to maximize shared value.” While paying attention to the traditional world of city planning, placemaking is

I ntroductIon

A Brief History of the Recent Past

Michael h. carriere & DaviD Schalliol

In the aftermath of this report, Gilbert became the city’s

But Gilbert had help. By early 2013, he was in close

chief placemaker-in-residence. He placed whimsical fur-

contact with Fred Kent, who in 1975 founded the New

niture in front of buildings and created a bike rental pro-

York–based Project for Public Spaces (PPS), a nonprofit

gram for his workers. He strung festive lights along Wood-

organization that declares itself to be “dedicated to help-

ward Avenue and gave food trucks and street performers

(Facing) Dmytro Szylak’s Hamtramck Disneyland.

1

(Above) Kingsessing Morris Men dance at the Philadelphia Magic Gardens.

Producing Place

the Great American Cheese Collection, Bike a Bee (which

hundred women—to bring the raw materials needed to

produces honey products), the ice cream–maker Sacred

create spices such as saffron from Afghanistan to the

Serve, the Whiner Beer Company, and Rumi Spice. There

The demolition of a former Back of the Yards brewery.

United States.14

is little doubt that such companies are evidence of the

What is perhaps most innovative about The Plant,

site’s commitment to cultivating a hyperlocal food econ-

however, is that it developed nearly in tandem with a

omy. Yet the example of Rumi Spice shows the potential

nonprofit organization called Plant Chicago. Plant Chi-

global reach of the site. Rumi was founded in 2011 by

cago was created in 2011 and came to serve as the stew-

the army veterans Emily Miller and Kimberly Jung, who,

ard of the building, whether internal or external relations

motivated by their tours of duty in Afghanistan, sought

were involved. And, while Edel initially wanted it to focus

to provide an economic opportunity for Afghan farm-

on research connected to The Plant’s vision of a circular

ers to grow something other than poppies. It now works

economy, current Plant Chicago education and outreach

with over thirty farms—which employ approximately four

manager Kassandra Hinrichsen notes that the nonprofit

Damiane Nickles of Closed Loop Farms describes the food raised at The Plant.

165


University of Chicago Press Iconoclasm David Freedberg Designer Monograph / Matt Avery Production Coordinator Joan Davies Acquiring Editor Susan Bielstein Project Editor Jenni Fry Trim Size 7 × 10 Number of Pages 360 Print Run 1,500 Compositor Monograph / Matt Avery Text Type Arnhem (Type By), Atlas Grotesk (Commercial Type) Display Type Graphik (Commercial Type) Paper 70 lb Opus white, 526 ppi Inks Black Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Brillianta 4070 (red); dusted foil; headbands: gray; endpapers: printed 1-side Pantone Warm Gray 8U Jacket/Cover Designer Monograph / Matt Avery Jacket/Cover Printer Friesens Designer Comments On the cover and title page “Iconoclasm” is broken to suggest the breakage/ defacement of images. Using a two-piece lithocase allowed us to do the foil stamping while staying within the budget. SC Beautifully typeset, with thoughtful image placement and caption treatment. I only wish there were more images given the subject matter, but I assume that wasn’t up to the designer. LH Well designed, strong display; love the handling of the chapter titles and the part opener numbers. Nice sized column width. Even color to the typeset page.

36

Scholarly Illustrated


David Freedberg

The University of Chicago Press Chicago and London

Contents

Antwerp, Mosul, and Palmyra Theology and The ProducTion of Violence*

Preface ix I Antwerp, Mosul, and Palmyra: Theology and the Production of Violence 1 II Iconoclasm: The Material and Virtual Body 17 III Art and Iconoclasm, 1525–1580: The Case of the Northern Netherlands 51 IV The Representation of Martyrdom during the Early Counter-Reformation in Antwerp 95 V The Structure of Byzantine and European Iconoclasm 113 VI Iconoclasts and Their Motives 133 VII Joseph Kosuth and the Play of the Unmentionable 151 VIII From Defamation to Mutilation: Reason of State and Gender Politics in South Africa 179 IX Charlottesville 203 X The Wag in the Tail: Image, Iconoclasm, Art 221 Appendix 1: Damnatio Memoriae: Why Mobs Pull Down Statues 239 Appendix 2: The Power of Wood and Stone 243 Notes 247 Bibliography 301 Index 321

1. Destruction of the Temple of Baalshamin at Palmyra by ISIL Forces in August 2015. Photograph: Dabiq. 2. Mass Executions by ISIL Forces at Palmyra in July 2015. Photograph: Dabiq.

Chapter three

94

work that shows the massive and clearly idolatrous image erected by the king of Babylon, while in the background, unmistakably, are the three holy children—Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego—who were prepared to die for their opposition to the idol that so offensively dominates the scene and is so grossly venerated there.213 It is hard to imagine how the topical significance of the scene could have gone unnoticed by anyone in the Netherlands in the years covered by this exhibition (and the same subject was also represented in print by Heemskerck).214 But we are still left with the puzzle of how exactly a work such as this would have been read and for whom it could have been painted. Perhaps it would be as well not to push the possibility of topical reference too far, since the same subject was painted by Aertsen’s son, Pieter Pietersz., for the Haarlem Guild of Bakers—for whom the subject was oddly, indeed perversely, appropriate—in 1575.215 But those were different times. We still know too little about Pieter Aertsen. His work seems to pose in acute form many of the questions suggested in this last section of my discussion. Even if the case of Aertsen fails to provide the answers, no one could deny the extraordinary pertinence of the kinds of issues generated in the great debates around him and the cataclysmic events from which he suffered. They are pertinent to our understanding of Dutch history, pertinent to our understanding of Dutch art, and pertinent to the very roots of the way in which we think about all art. In the period between 1525 and 1580 every doubt that had ever been raised about the artistic endeavor was aired and then subjected to the most critical scrutiny imaginable. Every aspect of the validity and the worth of art was raised and raised again; it was debated, discussed, and argued in countless treatises, sermons, and polemics. In the northern Netherlands, just as in the south, these momentous debates coincided with extraordinary social and political pressures to culminate in a brief but fierce assault on images. What resulted, astonishingly, was not resignation and defeat but rather a sustained and extraordinarily imaginative reevaluation of the Dutch artistic tradition. If ever there was a period that testifies most eloquently to commitment in the face of criticism it is this one. One might have thought that the controversies about images would wither the roots of art or that iconoclasm would remove the evidence of its growth—but that did not happen at all. Not only did art survive; it flourished. It built innovatively on the past and prepared the way for a magnificently inventive future. But it would be wrong to see the period between 1525 and 1580 solely in terms of transition: its achievements stand distinctively on their own.

If ever the iconoclastic impulse seemed to be out of control, it was in the course of ISIL’s campaign against images in Iraq and Syria between February and September 2015.1 Beginning with their destruction of the objects in the museum at Mosul and ending with the blowing up of the temples of Bel and Baalshamin in Palmyra (fig. 1), they laid waste to the art and architecture of the entire region. Using the very sites of violence against monuments as backdrops for violence against people, they held public hangings of the guardians of those monuments and staged executions such as that of twenty-five captives who were neatly lined up, bound, and ordered to their knees before being shot in front of an invited audience in the amphitheater at Palmyra (fig. 2). The next day ISIL blew up the proscenium itself. Though I had long argued the need to understand not only why people make images but also why they break them, I had not imagined the scale of the calamities that began in late 2014, when the self-proclaimed Islamic State started accompanying its murderous assaults on people with assaults on images. In the course of its conquests and attempted conquests, it conducted some of the most violent and extensive campaigns of image-breaking ever known. The list of ISIL’s destructions filled one with despair. I had spent most of my adult life studying iconoclasm, but the scale of what ISIL wrought was unparalleled—though not without precedent. The need to see if any lessons could be drawn from the past—as well as from current science—could not have been more urgent. I hope that the studies in these pages may illuminate some of the broader issues at stake in any study of image destruction—if only because now, in the age of digitization, when one might have thought that images had become more innocuous (as implied by the many claims that * Partly based on a lecture given at the Getty Research Institute on March 1, 2015, and subsequently at the Asia Society, London, on December 16, 2015.

The Representation of Martyrdom in Antwerp

IV

31. Ambrosius Francken, The Charity and Martyrdom of Saints Cosmas and Damian, two panels, each 237 × 89 cm. Antwerp, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten.

30. Ambrosius Francken, The Martyrdom of Saints Crispin and Crispinian, panel, 271 × 217 cm. Antwerp, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten.

Two important historical events should be mentioned first: the An­ twerp iconoclasm of 1566 and the so­called silent iconoclasm of 1584. The wave of iconoclasm that swept the Low Countries in 1566 (in Antwerp on August 21–22 of the same year), although long studied by historians,2 had been totally neglected by art historians until fairly recently.3 Much was destroyed, but some works of art were saved. Catholic services were soon restored. Artistic reputations—and in particular that of Maarten de Vos4—were made on the basis of altarpieces, or parts of altarpieces, commissioned to replace those that had been lost in the iconoclasm. Im­ mediately after the uprising a number of theological writers sprang to the defense of images, seeking to eliminate abuses in order to counter at least some of the Protestant criticism of image worship. The Council of Trent’s recommendation three years earlier of ecclesiastical supervision of images was used to the same end by these writers.5 The second event is the more peaceful iconoclasm (the “stille Beel­ destorm”) that took place in Antwerp in 1581, when the recently elected

99


AY E L ET E V E N - E Z R A

For information on books of related interest or for a catalog of new publications, please visit www.press.uchicago.edu.

“Even-Ezra roots the history of ideas in her probing analysis of habits of reading materialized in the horizontal tree diagrams that fill the margins of medieval university manuscripts. Lines of Thought places the relationship between spatialized patterns of visualization and scholastic thought, famously formulated by Erwin Panofsky, on an entirely new footing. Applying concepts from linguistics and cognitive science within a framework inspired by Extended Mind Theory, the author reconstructs coordinated habits of hand and mind that remain as critical today in literary criticism, cognitive studies, and computational linguistics as they were to medieval theology, philosophy, literature, logic, law, and medicine. A brilliant and utterly original book.” J e f f r e y F. H a m b u r g e r , author of Diagramming Devotion: Berthold of Nuremberg’s Transformation of Hrabanus Maurus’s Poems in Praise of the Cross

LINES OF THOUGHT

Israel Malovani

A Y E L E T E V E N - E Z R A is a senior lecturer in the History Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of Ecstasy in the Classroom: Trance, Self, and the Academic Profession in Medieval Paris and her articles have appeared in Harvard Theological Review, Traditio, and the Journal of Ecclesiastical History, among many other publications.

“Even-Ezra’s study is an excitingly original contribution to the histories of cognitive psychology and information design that explores the question of how people were thinking, not just what they thought. Focusing on the logical horizontal tree diagrams that are ubiquitous in the margins of European medieval university manuscripts and early printed books, she demonstrates with much detailed evidence how these diagrams—too often dismissed by historians as mere ‘doodling’ by bored beginners— functioned as a primary means for medieval scholars to visually comprehend their learning. A compelling example of the Extended Mind Theory now prominent in modern neuropsychology, this book will be of interest not only to medieval historians, art historians, and scholars of the book, but to anyone with an interest in information design and associative learning practices.” Mary Carruther s, New York University

LINES OF THOUGHT Branching Diagrams and the Medieval Mind Ay e l e t E v e n -E z r a

LINES OF THOUGHT Branching Diagrams and the Medieval Mind

We think with objects—we conduct our lives surrounded by external devices that help us recall information, calculate, plan, design, make decisions, articulate ideas, and organize the chaos that fills our heads. Medieval scholars learned to think with their pages in a peculiar way: drawing hundreds of tree diagrams. Lines of Thought is the first book to investigate this prevalent but poorly studied notational habit, analyzing the practice from linguistic and cognitive perspectives and studying its application across theology, philosophy, law, and medicine. These diagrams not only allow a glimpse into the thinking practices of the past but also constitute a chapter in the history of how people learned to rely on external devices—from stone to parchment to slide rules to smartphones—for recording, storing, and processing information. Beautifully illustrated throughout with previously unstudied and unedited diagrams, Lines of Thought is a historical overview of an important cognitive habit, providing a new window into the world of medieval scholars and their patterns of thinking.

The University of Chicago Press www.press.uchicago.edu

j a c k e t (front) Oxford, Balliol College 195, fol. 141v, detail: an inked revision of an erased, draft HT, courtesy of the Master and Fellows of Balliol College, Oxford; (back) detail from Basket and Pyramidals by Greg Dunn. B o o k a n d j a c k e t d e s i g n Jill Shimabukuro

AY E L ET E V E N - E Z R A

Printed in the USA I S B N -13: 978-0-226-74308-0 978-0-226-74308-0 ISBN-13: I S B N -10: 0-226-74308-X 0-226-74308-X ISBN-10:

9

7 8 0 2 2 6

9 0 0 0 0

CHICAGO

7 4 3 0 8 0

University of Chicago Press Lines of Thought: Branching Diagrams and the Medieval Mind Ayelet Even-Ezra Designer Jill Shimabukuro

Designer Comments A historical overview of

Production Coordinator Joan Davies

how medieval scholars learned to think with their

Acquiring Editor Karen Merikangas Darling

manuscripts, by drawing tree diagrams. The design

Project Editor Caterina Maclean Trim Size 8.5 × 11 Number of Pages 256 Print Run 1,100 jacketed cloth Compositor Jill Shimabukuro Text Type 11/13.5 Arno Pro SmText (Adobe) × 25p10 Display Type Din Paper 60 lb natural, 420 ppi (text); 80 lb white gloss coated, 566 ppi (insert)

challenge was to find a way to eliminate several gatefold inserts that had been planned; the final layout features a larger trim size with generous margins that accommodate the placement of diagrams in the margins and across spreads. A pleasure to work on. SC This is one of those you flip through and say, “My goodness, how many years did that take to produce?” I can’t imagine the effort required to typographically interpret these diagrams, in all their various forms,

Inks Black (text), 4-color process (insert)

presumably without an existing templating system to

Printer/Binder Sheridan Books

work with. And yet it is all done so deftly, quietly, clearly.

Method of Printing Offset

The chapter opening diagrams are a delightful break

Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Arrestox 15200 Vanilla Linen; Rainbow Wedgewood endpapers; Fimband #222 Wedgewood Blue Cotton head/foot bands; GRL S33 Copper Lustrofoilon spine Jacket/Cover Designer Jill Shimabukuro Jacket/Cover Printer John P. Pow Company

38

Scholarly Illustrated

from a dense topic, and the openness and feel of the book adds to its usability. Chef’s kiss! My favorite of the show. LH Thoughtfully designed with very well-handled variety of elements: charts, tables, branch diagrams— Careful thought paid to small details.


{3}

LINES OF THOUGHT

Contents

Structures of Concepts

Introduction, 3

Distinctions

PA RT I

The most popular and probably the earliest subject matter for horizontal tree diagrams (HTs) was distinctiones. Distinctiones were concise lists enumerating and distinguishing (hence their name) different senses of a concept or a word, different purposes of an action, different causes, and so on.1 They embodied, therefore, the cognitive procedure of distinction, an essential tool for clarification, articulations, and problem solving in scholastic theological discourse, as well as in philosophical, legal, and medical fields. A classic solution for a problem that involved conflicting authorities, for instance, could be offered by showing that one author intended the first, more general meaning of a certain term, while the other opted for a second. Difficulties and doubts benefited from clear distinction as well. According to a famous story about Thomas Aquinas, while he was still a young and shy student in Albert the Great’s school, he was assigned the role of respondent during a disputation on a difficult issue. He refused out of modesty but being forced to obey, he prepared himself well.

1 } The Form: Chronological, Linguistic, and Cognitive Perspectives, 15 1.1 Form: A Chronological Perspective, 16 1.2 Form: A Linguistic Perspective, 25 1.3 Form: A Cognitive Perspective, 36

Branching Diagrams and the Medieval Mind

2 } The Habit: On What, Where, Who, When, and How Often, 50 2.1 Diagramming as a Form of Marginal Annotation, 57 2.2 Parasitic, Embedded, and Tapestry Forms, 75 2.3 Beyond the Classroom, 79 2.4 Conclusion, 81

PA RT I I 3 } Structures of Concepts: Distinctions, 89 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5

Natural Philosophy, Metaphysics, Ethics, 91 Biblical Distinctions, 99 Canon and Civil Law, 109 Medicine, 114 Conclusion, 118

On the day of the disputation he responded to the question at stake with arguments and with a three-membered, most beautiful distinction, so brilliantly and clearly that one could make no other determination. Friar Albert therefore said: “My son, you should not take the place of respondent but that of the determiner.” Thomas most reverently replied: “Master, I cannot see how I could respond otherwise to the question.” “Well,” said Albert, “now solve the question with this distinction,” and presented him with four arguments which were so difficult that he believed Thomas would not be able to solve them. Thomas responded most sufficiently, to the amazement of Albert, who is said to have said, in a spirit of prophecy: “We used

4 } Structures of Language, 119 4.1 Verse and Rhyme, 119 4.2 Letter Writing (Ars Dictaminis), 129 4.3 Grammar , 135

AY E L ET E V E N- E Z R A

5 } Structure of Texts, 145 5.1 Orientation and Composition: Theological Questions, 146 5.2 Analysis: Argument, 156 5.3 Analysis: Biblical Narrative, 170 5.4 What HT Diagramming Tells Us about the Scholastic Perception of Texts: Authors as Architects, Texts as Wisely Made Constructions, 180

The Uni ver s i t y of Chicago Pr e ss Chicago and London

Note: 'Distinctio' may refer to

a textual unit, by which one may refer to a place in the text, e.g. 'book 1 distinction 3', as in Peter Lombard's Sentences or Gratian's Decretum. the cognitive procedure of distinguishing one thing or sense from another. the result of such a procedure, which may be expressed orally, written in regular lines, or as HT. short units of the type above, distinguishing diverse senses or causes of spiritual senses in biblical theology and preaching. This is a particular case of nr. 3.

stru ctur e s of concepts

Table 2.2. Distribution of Diagrams according to Texts within Middle-Range Manuscripts 261

1

4

11

8

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

10

0

0

1

6

170

2

0

0

238

0

0

0

5

0

0

3

0

9

3

3

6

3

13

9

0

0

5

2

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

35% 35

35

Actual Share Share Actual

30% 30

30

Expected Share Expected Share

25% 25

25

20% 20

20

15% 15

15

10% 10

10

5% 5

5 0

263

0% 0

SIX

IS

peri pred

pri

ele

post

top

SIX six

IS isa

peri pred pred

pri

ele ele

post post

2.15 Expected share of diagrams in texts versus actual share

top top

242

70

267

8

2

5

66

72

0

7

0

8

3

14

1

2

0

3

1

5

2

31

4

4

4

0

9

1

6

23

8

0

0

4

3

6

7

1

1

0

8

0

4

0

0

0

180

148

281

698

16

ARISTOTELES LATINUS NO.

Isagoge

5

Predicamenta Perihermeneias 13

11

Topica

10

17

An. priora

1

3

2

An. posteriora

0

12

12

Elenchi

14

1

Six Principles

(considering the lengths of the texts and the number of manuscripts they appear in). Results appear in figure 2.15. This graph shows that the type of text does indeed influence frequency, Actual Share but only slightly. The Isagoge, Categories, and Prior Analytics are annotated twoExpected or three Sharetimes more than expected; the Posterior Analytics, far less than expected. The Sophistici elenchi, Topics, Perihermeneias, and the Six Principles are annotated at around their expected share. This is too small a sample, of course, but together with the table, it strongly suggests that the amount of paradigmatic writing was influenced by the text in question, but to a small degree. Some texts mildly “invited” their annotators to visualize them more than others, whether because they contain more explicit divisions and subject matters more easily converted into such trees or simply because they were studied more than others. Note, however, that different texts within one manuscript differ, sometimes considerably, in the number of glosses, whether verbal or diagrammatic, in their margins—a datum I have not taken into account. Thus, it is possible that what we see here reflects differences in the general annotating activity.

be learned. Complete misunderstanding is rare, and the two examples I have found do not come from this survey. BAV Pal. Lat. 634 is a rare example of someone who tried to imitate the form of HTs but failed in understanding its principles. This codex of Gregory IX’s Decretales (canon law) contains multiple notes which look like HTs until one actually reads the nodes. These are simple sentences whose parts were divided arbitrarily between nodes according to no paradigm, and the division makes no sense as such. Assisi, BC 298 shows a similar mock HT. While such annotators show complete ignorance of the technique except for its appearance, Vienna, ÖNB 2370, folio 124v, betrays a more accidental mistake. It has four HTs in the lower margin of Sophistici elenchi 2, 165a38–b9, the third of which attempts to explain what distinguishes the four types of disputatio from each other (figure 2.16). to know a habit The aim of every disputation is either

72

ch a pte r { 2 }

then it is a tentative if it is to know a habit

or to generate a habit

disputation

While the first split makes sense, instead of dividing the upper category further, the author merged the lines and repeated the content of the upper category and then split it again into two branches that should in fact be one. These converge again to form what should have been the second category of the first split. It is easy to imagine here someone hearing the words “Omnis disputatio aut est ad habitum cognoscendum aut ad habitum generamdum. Si est ad habitum . . .” and continuing to write without understanding that the division of the upper branch is now introduced, rather than new content. The correct way to arborize this content must have been something like figure 2.17, which I found in the margins of another manuscript long after I produced a similar reconstruction.39

Those Who Don’t Know, Those Who Don’t Care: Levels of Execution The manuscripts sampled also differ greatly in level of execution of paradigmatic writing and thus demonstrate the deep reach of this practice beyond specialists of fine writing and decoration. The great majority of Porphyrian trees, as well as most squares or hexagons or octagons of oppositions in the surveyed manuscripts were executed by the principal scribe, mostly in a prearranged space inside the column, sometimes in the margins. Almost all the HTs, however, are written in scripts different from that of the original scribe and are marginal. Very few annotators seem to err in the act of arborizing itself, but the few errors betray the very fact that HT diagramming is a practice that had to

89

always true if it is to generate a habit, it or always false, for [...] generates a habit [that is] either or sometimes true and sometimes false

2.16 Vienna, ÖNB 2370, fol. 124v, translation

to know a habit, and this is a tentative disputation Every disputation is either

always true, and this is the demonstrative disputation or to generate a habit, and then it is a habit that is

or always false, and this is the sophistic disputation or sometimes true and sometimes false, and this produces faith or opinion, and this is the dialectic disputation

However, these are the exceptions. Most diagrammers were versed in the technique of graphical division. But this habit also had a technical aspect of design: knowing how to plan the space properly and to allocate adequate space for nodes by estimating their number and the length of the words. Elsewhere I have shown in detail that in browsing BAV Vat. Lat. 782, one can follow the scribe’s improvement from one page to the next.40 Yet fine executhe h a bi t

2.17 Paris, BnF Lat. 6576, fol. 1v, translation

73

Scholarly Illustrated

39


Fordham University Press Form and Feeling: The Making of Concretism in Brazil Antonio Sergio Bessa Designer Jonathan Lo Production Coordinator Mark Lerner Acquiring Editor Fredric Nachbaur Project Editor Eric Newman Trim Size 9 × 9 Number of Pages 264 + 8 pg color insert Print Run 1,200 Compositor Jonathan Lo Text Type 9.5/14 Univers 55 (Adobe) × 32p Display Type Univers Extra Black Paper 80 lb Accent opaque Inks Black (text), 4-color process (insert) Printer/Binder Integrated Books International Method of Printing Digital Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials Perfect bound paperback, matte lamination with spot gloss UV Jacket/Cover Designer Jonathan Lo Jacket/Cover Printer Integrated Books International SC The wide trim, extra heavy display type, and sansserif text all echo the bold brutalism of the artwork without distracting or making it tough to read

40

Scholarly Illustrated


Scholarly Illustrated

41


Getty Publications The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930: Cityscapes, Photographs, Debates Idurre Alonso and Maristella Casciato Designer Catherine Lorenz and Jim Drobka Production Coordinator Victoria Gallina Acquiring Editor Michele Ciaccio Project Editor Laura Santiago Trim Size 10.5 × 11 (landscape) Number of Pages 324 Print Run 1,200 Compositor Tina Henderson Text Type Hoefler Text regular Display Type Epilogue regular Paper 115 gsm Kasadaka white paper Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Artron Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Paper laminated case; 3mm boards Jacket/Cover Designer Catherine Lorenz and Jim Drobka Jacket/Cover Printer Artron SC Love the Art Deco display type for the title and the way it’s mirrored on cover and interior. The captions— centered with ornaments—are slightly overwrought for me, but at least they offer a break from the expected and further echo the period. LH Nicely done.

42

Scholarly Illustrated



Getty Publications Purity is a Myth: The Materiality of Concrete Art from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay Zanna Gilbert, Pia Gottschaller, Tom Learner, and Andrew Perchuk Designer Jim Drobka Production Coordinator Clare Davis Acquiring Editor Michele Ciaccio Project Editor Mary T. Christian Trim Size 7 × 9 inches Number of Pages 336 Print Run 800 Compositor Tina Henderson Text Type TT Jenevers Display Type Unit Slab OT Paper 130 gsm Garda Ultramatt Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Printer Trento s.r.l. Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Paperback; 330 gsm Symbol 1-sided artboard Jacket/Cover Designer Jim Drobka Jacket/Cover Printer Printer Trento s.r.l. SC The contemporary typefaces feel out of sync with the modernist subject matter, but this book is expertly set and easy to follow. LH Well-handled art and solid design.

44

Scholarly Illustrated



National Gallery of Art Aquatint: From Its Origins to Goya Rena M. Hoisington Designer Brad Ireland Production Coordinator Christina Wiginton Acquiring Editor Emily Zoss Project Editor Hilary Becker Trim Size 8.25 × 10.25 Number of Pages 288 Print Run 3,150 Compositor Brad Ireland Text Type 10/14.25 Ideal Sans (Hoefler & Frere-Jones) Display Type Ideal Sans Paper Munken Polar Inks 4-color process UV Printer/Binder Verona Libri, Italy Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Printed paper over board Jacket/Cover Designer Brad Ireland Jacket/Cover Printer Verona Libri, Italy Designer Comments A single column of text with a

SC A truly elegant experience from the cover to the

nice open measure was used to create a very readable

endpapers to the interior. The sepia tone is so consistent

experience of the narrative which is clearly organized

I only wish the color of the title page type was closer to

into 10 chapters. The history of the medium of Aquatint

the other elements. (One other niggle: the folios are also

is demonstrated with many illustrated examples

uncomfortably close to the bottom edge.) Otherwise,

interspersed with lots of close up details to help

this is a exemplar of how paper, typography, layout, and

demonstrate the unique characteristics of the process.

image can come together as a cohesive whole.

A vellum-finished paper was used to create a lush feel while reading and nods to the true nature of the works

LH The quality of the paper and the care in the printing

themselves. UV inks were used to achieve the best

enhance a well-designed book.

quality and detail in the printing on an uncoated paper.

46

Scholarly Illustrated



Penn State University Press The Prophetic Quest: The Stained Glass Windows of Jacob Landau, Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania David S. Herrstrom and Andrew D. Scrimgeour Designer Regina Starace

SC I particularly appreciated the handling of Hebrew

Production Coordinator Jennifer Norton

text in the index, using a typeface (uncredited) that

Acquiring Editor Kathryn Yahner Project Editor Beverly Michaels

pairs well with the Latin. It’s a small but important consideration.

Trim Size 8.25 × 11.25

LH Nicely designed. Beautiful saturated color

Number of Pages 144

throughout.

Print Run 1,500 Compositor Regina Starace Text Type 10/15 Sirba (TypeTogether) × 31p Display Type Scala Sans Pro (FontFont) Paper 157 gsm FSC Chen Ming matte Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Asia Pacific Offset Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials JHT Cloth Jacket/Cover Designer Regina Starace Jacket/Cover Printer Asia Pacific Offset


Scholarly Illustrated

49


Princeton University Press Conchophilia: Shells, Art, and Curiosity in Early Modern Europe Marisa Anne Bass, Anne Goldgar, Hanneke Grootenboer, and Claudia Swan Designer Jenny Chan / Jack Design Production Coordinator Steve Sears

Designer Comments “Conchophilia ought to be a word, but it isn’t,” is the first

Acquiring Editor Michelle Komie

sentence in the introduction. This idea of a unique and bespoke word that perfectly

Project Editor Lauren Lepow Trim Size 7.5 × 10 Number of Pages 224

describes the phenomena documented in this book provided an interesting conceptual focal point for our cover design, in which we offset the word “Conchophilia” on a different alignment from the rest of the elements on the cover to highlight its unusual quality. The ornate, high-contrast look of the display typeface, Mazius, has a

Print Run 2,000

calligraphic richness that, like the artwork throughout the book, is elaborate, delicate,

Compositor Jenny Chan / Jack Design

and lavish in its attention to detail. The section openers focus on the notion of close

Text Type Jenson Pro (Adobe)

examination, isolating a specific detail in an artwork whose context is revealed in

Display Type Adobe Jenson Pro Paper 130 gsm matte Inks 4-color process

full on the following pages. For the endpapers, we wanted a simple entry point into this remarkable world with the use of an iridescent image that conveys a sense of the dazzling tones of shells, whose beauty is the starting point for all the artworks discussed in this book.

Printer/Binder D’Auria Printing Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 130 gsm matte printed CMYK, matte lamination with spot gloss UV

SC Brilliant typeface choices—Mazius is a perfect display companion for Jenson and somehow perfectly reflects the curves and angles of a shell. (The all-caps heads in Jenson are too light, unfortunately. I would have used the font’s small caps or a heavier weight.) The irridescent endpapers are a stroke of genius. This book is special.

Jacket/Cover Designer Jenny Chan / Jack Design

LH Nicely designed book with very well done reproductions. Unfortunately, it looks like

Jacket/Cover Printer D’Auria Printing

there were printing problems on and off throughout that were not the fault of design.

50

Scholarly Illustrated


Scholarly Illustrated

51


Princeton University Press Enchantments: Joseph Cornell and American Modernism Marci Kwon Designer Jenny Chan / Jack Design Production Coordinator Steve Sears Acquiring Editor Michelle Komie Project Editor Terri O’Prey Trim Size 7.25 × 9.875 Number of Pages 272 Print Run 1,750 Compositor Jenny Chan / Jack Design Text Type Sentinel Display Type ITC Avant Garde Gothic Paper 130 gsm matte Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Conti Tipocolor Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 130 gsm matte printed CMYK, gloss lamination with spot matte UV Jacket/Cover Designer Jenny Chan / Jack Design Jacket/Cover Printer Conti Tipocolor Designer Comments We were excited to engage with

SC I admire the audacity to create chapter openers

such a broad range of Joseph Cornell’s work in this

that typographically reference Cornell’s pieces. Most of

project. In particular, his graphic design projects offered

them are pitch perfect. Sentinel is a good choice for text,

a perfect inspiration for overall tone and for typography,

but this weight may be a bit light and sparkly for some

with his playful use of type and collage. It was

readers.

delightful to reference his whimsical use of typographic ornaments, decorative wood type, and exuberant layouts in this design. For the text type, Sentinel evokes a solid mid-century feel and provides a clean context for the eclecticism of the display types, which are intentionally idiosyncratic with the main geometric sans, ITC Avant Garde, influenced by Cornell’s design for a Surrealism catalogue. From the end papers to the color palette— gentle tones punctuated by a deep, rich blue—the idea of “enchantment” permeated all our design decisions.

52

Scholarly Illustrated


Scholarly Illustrated

53


Princeton University Press Mid-Century Modernism and the American Body: Race, Gender, and the Politics of Power in Design Katrina Wilson Designer Roy Brooks / Fold Four, Inc.

Designer Comments Display and text type are both set in sans serif typefaces that

Production Coordinator Steve Sears

were inspired by the clean lines and overt geometry of midcentury modern design.

Acquiring Editor Michelle Komie Project Editor Lauren Lepow Trim Size 7 × 9.75

Despite the number and variety of images, the layout attempts to leave ample white space to echo the open floor plans, picture windows, and resultant illusions of space found in residential architecture of the era.

Number of Pages 264

SC In designing a book based on an artistic movement it’s tempting to try to replicate

Print Run 2,000

the movement’s aesthetics, but that rarely works. Roy Brooks does a good job

Compositor Roy Brooks / Fold Four, Inc.

referencing the material within the functional parameters of contemporary design.

Text Type Avenir Display Type Super Grotesk Paper 120 gsm uncoated off-white

The typefaces do the heavy modernist lifting. FF Super Grotesk is an unexpected but period-appropriate alternative to overused Futura, and Avenir works well as text. I’d only have upgraded to the more refined Avenir Next, which has a much better italic.

Inks 4-color process

LH Nice title page spread and chapter opener spreads. Well-handled art placement.

Printer/Binder D’Auria Printing

Effective type choices.

Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 130 gsm matte printed CMYK, soft touch lamination Jacket/Cover Designer Roy Brooks / Fold Four, Inc. Jacket/Cover Printer D’Auria Printing

54

Scholarly Illustrated



RIT Press Communicating Knowledge Visually: Will Burtin’s Scientific Approach to Information Design R. Roger Remington and Sheila Pontis Ph.D. Designer Bruce Ian Meader Production Coordinator Marnie Soom Acquiring Editor Bruce A. Austin Project Editor Molly Q. Cort Trim Size 9 × 12 Number of Pages 188 Print Run 500 Compositor Bruce Ian Meader Text Type 10/13 Neutraface 2 Text Book (House Industries) × 3.6 in. Display Type House Industries Neutraface 2 Text Bold, Neue Haas Grotesk Display Black Paper 100 lb McCoy matte Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Jostens Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 120 lb Endurance silk cover, 4.5-in. French flaps, layflat super matte film lamination on one side Jacket/Cover Designer Bruce Ian Meader Jacket/Cover Printer Jostens Designer Comments The main text typography is Christian Schwartz’s wonderful Neutraface 2 Text Book and Bold, which has beautiful old style numerals and real small capitals, rare for a sans serif typeface. The title is set in Neue Haas Grotesk Display Black, also a wonderful typeface designed by Christian Schwartz. Among the goals was to showcase Burtin’s elegant information design solutions by making them as large as possible throughout the book. It was my distinct honor to design a book for authors Remington and Pontis. LH Nice handling of a variety of elements and use of a grid. The black bar, although echoing the cover, seems unnecessary in the interior.

56

Scholarly Illustrated


Scholarly Illustrated

57


Yale University Press Art and Graphic Design: George Maciunas, Ed Ruscha, Sheila Levrant De Bretteville Benoît Buquet Designer Jena Sher Graphic Design Production Coordinator Mary Mayer Acquiring Editor Amy Canonico Project Editor Kate Zanzucchi Trim Size 8 × 10 Number of Pages 232 pages Print Run 1,250 Compositor Jena Sher Text Type FF Scala Display Type Berthold Akzidenz and Schmalfette CP for the large type section openers Paper 128 gsm Gold East Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Regent Publishing Services Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Wibalin Black buckram, 4-color printed jacket, matte lamination Jacket/Cover Designer Jena Sher Jacket/Cover Printer Regent Publishing Services SC The display type and bold design reflect the content well. I especially enjoy the big, cropped, rotated type on the introduction and conclusion openers. Something about the jacket, though, feels very 1990s for a 2020s book on 1960s–70s avant-garde design. LH Very nice display with a lovely placed ampersand in the title. Well-placed art. Attractive part openers, nice judicious use of color. Well-handled figure captions.

58

Scholarly Illustrated


Scholarly Illustrated

59



Trade Typographic


University of Chicago Press Distant Early Warning: Marshall McLuhan and the Transformation of the Avant-Garde Alex Kitnick Designer Jill Shimabukuro Production Coordinator Lisa Hein

“Crisply written and brimming with original insight, Distant Early Warning offers a concise and engaging introduction to the work of one of the most influential thinkers of our current information age. Kitnick deftly reveals Marshall McLuhan’s decisive impact on some of the most important artists and movements of the second half of the twentieth century and, just as importantly, how his prophetic vision of media and its capacities to alter both society and individual psyches was itself informed by avant-garde artistic practices.” Robert Slifkin, New York University

BOOK + COVER DESIGN: JILL SHIMABUKURO

Acquiring Editor Susan Bielstein Project Editor Christine Schwab Trim Size 5.5 × 8.5 Number of Pages 216 Print Run 450 paper Compositor Jill Shimabukuro Text Type 10.2/14 Adobe Text Pro × 24p Display Type Helvetica Now, Whitney Index Paper 55 lb natural, 360 ppi Inks Black Printer/Binder Versa Press Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Notch Binding Materials 10pt C1S Jacket/Cover Designer Jill Shimabukuro Jacket/Cover Printer John P. Pow Company Designer Comments The design draws inspiration from Marshall McLuhan’s writings and publications. LH Very well designed. Cover elements nicely carried through into the interior.

62

Trade T ypographic

ISBN-13: 978-0-226-75345-4 ISBN-10: ISBN-13: 0-226-75345-X 978-0-226-75345-4 ISBN-13: 978-0-226-75345-4 ISBN-10: 0-226-75345-X 0-226-75345-X ISBN-10:

9 9

7 8 0 2 2 6 7 8 0 2 2 6

DISTANT EARLY WARNING Marshall McLuhan and the Transformation of the Avant- Garde

ALEX KITNICK

Alex Kitnick is assistant professor of art history and visual culture at Bard College. The University of Chicago Press www.press.uchicago.edu

Chicago

“Finally we have a golden key to a previously locked door. By opening what has been an unexplored territory, Kitnick forcefully reveals not only McLuhan’s influences on the artists of his time but also the multitude of artists who deeply influenced this ‘master celebrity’ of the theory of media. Kitnick dives deeply into the true meaning of McLuhan’s engagements with media. Through Kitnick’s amazingly energetic research and impeccable attention to both detail and form, similar to that of McLuhan himself, the reader is presented with the knowledge of who McLuhan is for our times, adjoined by a postscript cast toward the future. This book constitutes a fantastic achievement both for the understanding of media and contemporary art.” Dara Birnbaum, video and installation artist

Alex Kitnick

Kitnick tells this story by carefully drawing out the links among McLuhan, his theories, and the artists themselves. The tale is packed with big names: Marcel Duchamp, Niki de Saint Phalle, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Nam June Paik. Kitnick salts the narrative with McLuhan’s own words and his provocative ideas about what art is and what artists should do, showing him to be a richly multifaceted figure who transformed the role of the critic. Kitnick finishes the book by applying McLuhan’s ethos to contemporary and post-Internet art.

Distant Early Warning

Marshall McLuhan (1911–80) is best known as a media theorist—many consider him the founder of media studies—but he was also an important theorist of art. Though a near-household name for decades, McLuhan remains an underappreciated yet fascinating figure in the history of twentieth-century art. His connections with that world have been largely unexplored before now. In Distant Early Warning, critic and art historian Alex Kitnick delves into these rich relationships, arguing both that McLuhan was influenced by artists and that McLuhan’s work directly influenced the art of his time.

7 5 3 4 5 4 7 5 3 4 5 4

9 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0


2 What It Means to Be Avant- Garde

Contents

DISTANT EARLY WARNING Marshall McLuhan and the Transformation of the Avant- Garde

ALEX KITNICK

Introduction / 1 1 The Age of Mechanical Production / 11 2 What It Means to Be Avant-Garde / 34 3 Lights On / 51 4 Electronic Opera / 66 5 Massage, ca. 1966 / 84 6 Information Environment / 101 7 Culture Was His Business / 121 Postscript: McLuhan’s Art Today / 141 Acknowledgments 145 Notes 147 Bibliography 191

Index 197

The University of Chicago Press Chicago and London

62 / Chapter Three

3.7 James Rosenquist, Circles of Confusion (1965), from 11 Pop Artists, Volume I

(1966). © 2021 Estate of James Rosenquist/licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

deal with the human habitat as something given to us by Nature,” he claimed. “We have now to accept the fact and responsibility that the entire human environment is an artifact, an art form, something that can be staged and manipulated like showbiz.”33 Art and showbiz stand in dialectical relationship in this formulation: each is a form of manipulation, but art, McLuhan hoped, would do showbiz one better by programming the environment in a responsible

The Artist, like Narcissus, gets his nose nearer and nearer the surface of Life. Wyndham Lewis, Blast (1914)

McLuhan always imagined himself as a scion of the avant- garde. For him, however, avant-garde did not simply designate the early twentieth-century movements of Dada, Futurism, Surrealism, and Constructivism, which sought to merge art and life under the sign of politics. Rather, the term signaled a way of working that challenged convention in a much broader sense. In his 1962 The Gutenberg Galaxy, McLuhan calls the fifteenth-century painters Masaccio and Jan Van Eyck avant-garde for introducing the hard rules of perspective into a pictorially amorphous world. To earn the epithet one had to be technically inventive, but innovation was also “politically daring”: for McLuhan the rethinking of form had political effects.1 “The Charleston, with its aspect of a mechanical doll agitated by strings, appears in Russia as an avant-garde form,” he wrote in 1964, describing the effect of the jittery dance on a society accustomed to the elegance of ballet.2 The avant-garde rubs against society by introducing foreign elements, and by doing so it throws dominant tendencies into relief, even disarray. (In McLuhan’s Cold War example, dance has the power to shake up even the most authoritarian states.) For McLuhan, being avant-garde depends on context—one has to work against and within prevailing conditions to upset them—and, as such, nothing can be avant-garde in a vacuum or stay avant-garde forever. “Rimbaud’s avant-garde world of montage and transparency had become the old environment by 1911,” McLuhan wrote in 1967, which is to say that the modern world had caught up with the poet’s techniques.3 The avant-garde must constantly

Lights On / 63

fashion. “In our time we can see that pop art consists in taking the outer environment and putting it in the art gallery, or indoors somewhere,” he wrote in 1967, “suggesting that we have reached the stage where we have begun to process the environment itself as an art form.”34 For McLuhan, the next step was to reach back out and manipulate the media environment. Andy Warhol, the Pop artist par excellence, had similar ideas, even if he did not see his work as a responsibility. “Pop Art took the inside and put it outside, took the outside and put it inside,” he wrote in POPism, his memoir of the 1960s.35 3.8 Cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview, For every painting Warhol pro- November 1976. © Interview Magazine, New York. duced depicting a commercial object, he also stepped out of the gallery and into the media at large— the magazine stand, the publishing industry, the movie theater. The two sides of art and commerce worked in each other’s service, with Warhol leveraging one against the other to create a hybrid enterprise that was neither art nor showbiz but somehow a nebulous gap world of its own. If McLuhan suggested a working schema for artists, he also offered a model of how one might move in the world. “There were two types of people doing counterculture-type things,” Warhol wrote of the 1960s. “The ones who wanted to be commercial and successful and move right up into the mainstream with their stuff, and the ones who wanted to stay where they were, outside society. The way to be counterculture and have mass commercial success was to say and do radical things in a conservative format. Like have a well-choreographed, well-scored, anti-Establishment ‘hippie be-in’ in a well-ventilated, well located theater. Or like McLuhan had done—write a book saying books were obso-

Trade T ypographic

63


University of Chicago Press The Subversive Simone Weil: A Life in Five Ideas Robert Zaretsky Designer Jill Shimabukuro Production Coordinator Joan Davies Acquiring Editor Alan Thomas / Priya Nelson Project Editor Christine Schwab Trim Size 5.5 × 8.5 Number of Pages 192 Print Run 2,500 Compositor Jill Shimabukuro Text Type 9.8/15 Harriet Text (Okay Type) Display Type Gotham Paper 60 lb natural, 420 ppi Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Notch Binding Materials 3-piece case (spine: Rainbow Umber; sides: Chestnut); Rainbow Chestnut endpapers; Fimband Wedgewood Blue and Arctic Head/Footbands; Gold spine foil Jacket/Cover Designer Jill Shimabukuro Jacket/Cover Printer John P. Pow Company Designer Comments This biography honors the complexity of Simone Weil’s thought and influence. The typography is intentionally spare, and the jacket image was cropped dramatically, to suggest a fresh take on this eminent philosopher. LH Nice even look to the page. Solid typography.

64

Trade T ypographic


CHAPTER ONE

Introduction

Th e S ubv erS i v e

Simone Weil A Life in five ideAs

The Force of Affliction

How much time do you devote each day to thinking?

Howl, howl, howl, howl.

SIMONE WEIL

SHAKESPEARE’S KING LEAR

More than three-quarters of a century ago, on August 26, 1943,

Thought flies from affliction as promptly

the coroner at Grosvenor Sanatorium, a sprawling Victorian

and irresistibly as an animal flees from death.

pile located in the town of Ashford, about sixty miles southeast

SIMONE WEIL

of London, ended his examination of a patient who had died two days earlier. The cause of death, he wrote, was “cardiac failure

In December 1934, Auguste Detoeuf interviewed an applicant

due to myocardial degeneration of heart muscles due to starva-

for a job at one of his factories. Ordinarily, Detoeuf did not

tion and pulmonary tuberculosis.” But the clinical assessment

make hiring decisions—he was, after all, the director of Al-

then gives way to what appears to be an ethical judgment: “The

sthom, France’s largest maker of electric equipment. Yet lit-

deceased did kill and slay herself by refusing to eat whilst the

tle was ordinary about Detoeuf. A graduate of France’s elite

balance of her mind was disturbed.”1

engineering school, the École Polytechnique, Detoeuf neither

The deceased was buried in a local cemetery; a flat marker

talked the talk nor walked the walk of French industrialists. He

laid across her grave was engraved with her name and relevant

dressed, as one friend sighed, like a Romantic violin virtuoso,

dates:

and considered himself an intellectual manqué.1 Detoeuf no more belonged behind this particular desk than

Simone Weil 3 févrIer 1909 24 AOût 1943

the job applicant belonged in front of it. It was not because the applicant was a young woman—legions of women, after all,

ROBERT ZARETSKY Weil’s grave, its location highlighted on the cemetery map,

labored in French factories. Instead, it was because the young

has since become one of Ashford’s most visited tourist sites.

woman was a graduate of France’s other elite school, the École

By way of acknowledging the constant stream of visitors, a sec-

Normale Supérieure—which, like the Polytechnique, had been

The University of Chicago Press

ond marble slab explains that Weil had “joined the Provisional

founded by Napoleon—and that she had, until recently, worked

CHICAGO AND LONDON

French government in London” and that her “writings have

as a philosophy professor. Yet, the applicant was hell-bent on

established her as one of the foremost modern philosophers.”

finding factory work, with or without Detoeuf’s help. Given the

One can fit only so much on a grave marker. This is especially

86

Chapter three

t h e Va r i e t i e s o f r e s i s ta n C e

87

spilling dozens of copies across the sidewalk. With remarkable

war for long, though; soon escaping from his stalag, he made his

sangfroid, Weil gathered and repacked the scattered papers,

way to the Unoccupied Zone. It was there that he founded, with

then continued her delivery run. One of her younger Resistance

Emmanuel d’Astier de la Vigerie, one of France’s earliest Resis-

comrades, Marie-Louise Blum, was struck by Weil’s personality,

tance networks, Libération-Sud. In late 1942, French police

recalling that Weil took the time to explain to her the magnitude

arrested Cavaillès, ending his two-year run of clandestine Resis-

of their activities. Disobeying the law, Weil told Blum, is a seri-

tance activity. But, again, not for long: Cavaillès escaped from

ous affair. “One has to think it over a long time before taking the

prison and crossed the Channel the following March. After sev-

step, after assuring oneself that one has no other recourse, and

eral meetings with de Gaulle, during which Cavaillès won criti-

that the cause which requires us to break the law is truly that of

cal material support for his group, he returned to France. Trag-

justice and truth . . . This is a necessary evil, but we should never

ically, this did not last long either: arrested by German police

forget that it is an evil.”65

in August, Cavaillès was packed off to the notorious prison of

Notes INtrODuCtION 1

Francine du Plessix Gray, Simone Weil (New York: Viking, 2001), 212.

2

Simone Weil, First and Last Notebooks, trans. Richard Rees (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970), 335.

And it was an evil that carried enormous risks, exempli-

Fresnes, where he was repeatedly tortured. The torturers, how-

3

fied by the arrest and deportation of a fellow delivery person.

ever, never succeeded in getting the young philosopher to reveal

Weil, First and Last Notebooks, 335.

4

Weil, First and Last Notebooks, 335.

Weil was herself hauled twice to the police station for question-

information or names. In April 1944, they executed Cavaillès,

5

Gray, Simone Weil, 26.

ing. Yet the interrogations left the police more bothered than

throwing his body into a common grave, alongside a dozen other

6

Costica Bradatan, Dying for Ideas: The Dangerous Lives of the Philoso-

Weil, who showed the same calm with which she collected the

murdered résistants, outside the northern city of Arras. Rebur-

spilled and fluttering copies of Témoignage chrétien. When one

ied as “Inconnu no. 5 [Unknown no. 5],” Cavaillès’s remains

of her interrogators, who thought he had taken the measure of

were recognized by his sister soon after liberation and trans-

the frail and bespectacled woman, called her a “salope [bitch]”

ferred to the Sorbonne.

and threatened to toss her into a cell filled with prostitutes, Weil

Cavaillès always denied that his acts were heroic, or that he

replied she would be glad to make their acquaintance. Shortly

had even chosen to act in such a way. Whenever asked why, he

after, when she was released and sent home with a warning, the

would always reply, “C’est logique.” For the logician, this was

sense of relief at the station must have been palpable.66

anything but a cliché. We are creatures of necessity, Cavaillès told Raymond Aron, another classmate at the ENS and a Free

phers (London: Bloomsbury, 2015), 7. 7

Simone Pétrement, La Vie de Simone Weil (Paris: Fayard, 1973), 21–23.

8

Pétrement, La Vie de Simone Weil, 26.

9

Pétrement, La Vie de Simone Weil, 45.

10

Gray, Simone Weil, 9.

11

Simone Weil, Waiting for God, trans. Emma Craufurd (New York: Harper, 2009), 23.

12

Gray, Simone Weil, 47.

13

Pétrement, La Vie de Simone Weil, 179.

14

Reprinted in Simone Weil, ed. Emmanuel Gabellieri and François L’Yvonnet (Paris: Éditions de L’Herne, 2014), 249.

French recruit who would become one of the greatest intellec-

15

tuals of postwar France. “The reasoning of mathematicians is

Eugen Weber, The Hollow Years (New York: W. W. Norton, 1996), 34.

16

Pascal David, “Avec toute l’âme: Simone Weil et la philosophie,” in

In early 1943, Jean Cavaillès traveled to London in order to meet

necessary, the stages to mathematical theories are necessary,

Charles de Gaulle. A fellow student of Weil’s at the ENS, the pre-

and the struggle we are now leading is necessary.” As his fel-

17

Pétrement, La Vie de Simone Weil, 657.

cocious Cavaillès had been named professor of logic at the Uni-

low philosopher and résistant Georges Canguilhem explained,

18

Simone Weil, Seventy Letters, trans. Richard Rees (Oxford: Oxford Uni-

versity of Strasbourg, where he specialized in the rarefied field

moral action is the necessary result of rigorous thought. Joining

of the philosophy of mathematics. Serving as a military officer

the Resistance, for Cavaillès, no more entailed a moral choice

in 1940, he earned two citations for bravery before he was taken

than did the solution to a mathematical problem.67 Armed with

prisoner by the Germans. Cavaillès did not remain a prisoner of

a logic and ethic as imperious as that of his favorite thinker,

Simone Weil, ed. Gabellieri and L’Yvonnet, 94.

versity Press, 1965), 156. 19

Pétrement, La Vie de Simone Weil, 667.

20

Pétrement’s biography remains the standard account of Weil’s life. A professional philosopher, Pétrement was a close friend of Weil. Yet, while her monumental account is sympathetic, it does not, for the most

Trade T ypographic

65


University of Chicago Press Value in Art: Manet and the Slave Trade Henry M. Sayre Designer Ryan Li Production Coordinator Joan Davies Acquiring Editor Alan Thomas Project Editor Tamara Ghattas Trim Size 7 × 10 Number of Pages 256 Print Run 1,100 Compositor In-House Text Type 11/14.5 Arno Pro SmText (Adobe) × 27p Display Type Alright Sans Paper 128 gsm matte white coated Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder C&C Offset Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials White Matte Coated Jacket/Cover Designer Ryan Li Jacket/Cover Printer C&C Offset LH Nice design in confident hand.

66

Trade T ypographic



Duke University Press Magical Habits Monica Huerta Designer Aimee C. Harrison Production Coordinator Chris Granville Acquiring Editor Elizabeth Ault Project Editor Lisl Hampton Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 200 Print Run 1,500 pb / 45 litho Compositor Copperline Books Text Type Portrait Text (Berton Hasebe/ Commercial Type) Display Type ITC Franklin Gothic (Linotype) Paper 60 lb Offset Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Notch Binding Materials 10pt C1S / printed litho for case Jacket/Cover Designer Aimee C. Harrison Jacket/Cover Printer John P. Pow Company LH Nice handling of interior elements. Fun section breaks. The significance of the bird and rabbit ornaments wasn’t obvious to me other than elements from the cover carried over to the interior design.

68

Trade T ypographic


Trade T ypographic

69


Johns Hopkins University Press America’s Original Sin: White Supremacy, John Wilkes Booth, and the Lincoln Assassination John Rhodehamel Designer Amy Ruth Buchanan Production Coordinator Jennifer Paulson Acquiring Editor Laura Davulis Project Editor Kyle Kretzer Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 480 Print Run 3,000 Compositor Amy Ruth Buchanan Text Type Dante Display Type Brixton Wood (also mixed with the pistol), Wood Bonnet Antique No 7, AIWood Antique Condensed, Ashwood Extra Bold, Antique 2 Condensed Bold, Bullion Extra Condensed Paper 50 lb Glatfelter Hi Opaque A50, 440 ppi Inks Black Printer/Binder Maple Press Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Notch Binding Materials Sierra Black, Satin Silver S5 foil, Rainbow Antique Charcoal endpapers, bw headbands Jacket/Cover Designer Kathleen Lynch Jacket/Cover Printer Maple Press Designer Comments This is an important book. Original Sin will be the first book to explicitly name the ideology of white supremacy as the motivation for Lincoln’s assassination. The Derringer in the title is the gun Booth used to assassinate Lincoln but it also alludes to the role guns have played in the history of white supremacy. I am proud to have had a part in shaping this book’s presentation, but Kathleen Lynch and Amy Ruth Buchanan deserve the credit—Martha Sewall. SC I appreciate the way they carried the 19th-century broadside look from the jacket to the chapter openers. LH Confident use of typography. Pleasing design.

70

Trade T ypographic


Trade T ypographic

71


Johns Hopkins University Press The Black President: Hope and Fury in the Age of Obama Claude A. Clegg III Designer Amanda Weiss Production Coordinator Jennifer Paulson Acquiring Editor Laura Davulis Project Editor Julia McCarthy Trim Size 6.125 × 9.25 Number of Pages 672 Print Run 4,000 Compositor Amanda Weiss Text Type 12/15.25 Garamond Pro (Adobe) × 26p Display Type PSFournier Std Petit (Typofonderie), Sweet Sans Pro (MVB Fonts) Paper 50 lb Glatfelter Hi Opaque A50 Inks Black Printer/Binder Maple Press Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Notch Binding Materials Sierra Black, Lustrofoil B5, Rainbow Antique Eggshell endpapers Jacket/Cover Designer Amanda Weiss Jacket/Cover Printer Maple Press Designer Comments The interior text components were straightforward, although lengthy at 600+ pages. I chose to mix serifs and used PSFournier for the display typography, as Adobe Garamond was perfect for a legible and loose text, but looked too antiquated for display purposes. Additionally, I consciously chose to use the PSFournier Petit weight for the chapter titles as I felt the extra weight gave the openers a solid and sturdy presence on the page. My hope was to provide a no-nonsense design that feels elegant, inviting, and unified with the cover and overall package.

72

Trade T ypographic


Trade T ypographic

73


Leuven University Press The Art of Being Dangerous: Exploring Women and Danger through Creative Expression Edited by Jo Shaw and Ben Fletcher-Watson Designer Stéphane de Schrevel Production Coordinator Patricia Di Costanzo Acquiring Editor Mirjam Truwant Project Editor Beatrice Van Eeghem Trim Size 195 × 285 mm Number of Pages 256 Print Run 1,000 Compositor Stéphane de Schrevel Text Type Alegreya Display Type Francesca Paper 135 gr Magno Volume 1.08 Inks LED-UV full color Printer/Binder Wilco bv Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Paperback with flaps Jacket/Cover Designer Stéphane de Schrevel Jacket/Cover Printer Wilco bv, Printing and Binding SC The range of typefaces set the right tone, and avoid old stereotypes of “feminity”. There may just be one too many of them. LH Bold use of type for a bold subject. Interesting choices for alignment and pairing of type. Good use of color on the chapter openers. Clean open index.

74

Trade T ypographic



Penn State University Press Hell of a Hat: The Rise of ’90s Ska and Swing Kenneth Partridge Designer Regina Starace Production Coordinator Jennifer Norton Acquiring Editor Ryan Peterson Project Editor Nicholas Taylor Trim Size 6 × 8 Number of Pages 280 Print Run 4,000 Compositor Regina Starace Text Type 11/15.5 Freight Text Pro (Garage Fonts) × 27p Display Type Knockout (HTF) Paper 50 lb Natures Natural Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 100 lb C1S (paper over board) with Gritty Matte UV Jacket/Cover Designer Regina Starace Jacket/Cover Printer Phoenix Color LH Nice use of Freight. Fun incorporation of cover elements in the interior.

76

Trade T ypographic


Trade T ypographic

77


Texas A&M University Press Nepantla Familias: An Anthology of Mexican American Literature on Families in between Worlds Edited by Sergio Troncoso Designer Omega Clay Production Coordinator Kristie Lee Acquiring Editor Thom Lemmons Project Editor Pat Clabaugh Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 256 Print Run 1,000 Compositor Omega Clay Text Type 11/14 Minion Pro (Adobe) Display Type Gotham, Eames Century Modern Paper 60 lb house opaque white Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Arrestox cloth jet black, silver foil, red headbands Jacket/Cover Designer Antonio Castro Jacket/Cover Printer Sheridan Books LH Solid design.

78

Trade T ypographic



Yale University Press The Aeneid Vergil; Translated by Sarah Ruden; With an Introduction by Susanna Braund; Notes and Glossary by Susanna Braund and Emma Hilliard Designer Dustin Kilgore

Inks Black

Production Coordinator Aldo Cupo

Printer/Binder Sheridan Books

Acquiring Editor Jennifer Banks

Method of Printing Offset

Project Editor Susan Laity

Method of Binding Perfect

Trim Size 5.5 × 8.5

Binding Materials 10pt C1S, matte scuff-free layflat film lamination

Number of Pages 392

Jacket/Cover Designer Jenny Volvovski

Print Run 5,000

Jacket/Cover Printer Sheridan Books

Compositor Tseng Information Systems Text Type 10.5/14 Yale × 24p Display Type Louize Display (205TF) Paper 50 lb house smooth natural, 500 ppi

80

Trade T ypographic

SC To make a difficult text more approachable is a gift. The treatment of notes, line numbers, and glossary are all spot on.




Trade Illustrated


University of Chicago Press Tropical Arctic: Lost Plants, Future Climates, and the Discovery of Ancient Greenland Jennifer McElwain, Marlene Hill Donnelly, and Ian Glasspool Designer Rae Ganci Hammers Production Coordinator Joan Davies Acquiring Editor Joseph Calamia Project Editor Erin DeWitt Trim Size 8 × 10 Number of Pages 152 Print Run 2,000 jacketed cloth Compositor Rae Ganci Hammers Text Type 9.2/14 Arnhem Pro Blond (Fred Smeijers) × 25p5 Display Type Begum, Work Sans Paper 128 gsm white matte coated Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder C&C Offset Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Faimei FM-P19 Dark Green; Endpapers: 1-color Pantone 388 Uncoated; Spine Foil: Foiland 418 Gold; Head/Foot Bands: MT-109 Light Salmon and White Jacket/Cover Designer Rae Ganci Hammers Jacket/Cover Printer C&C Offset Designer Comments Tropical Arctic recreates a lush and verdant ancient Greenland. The colors, typefaces, and materials were carefully chosen to reflect that organic richness.

84

Trade Illustrated



University of Georgia Press A Better Life for Their Children: Julius Rosenwald, Booker T. Washington, and the 4,978 Schools That Changed America Andrew Feiler Designer Erin Kirk Production Coordinator Melissa Buchanan Acquiring Editor Lisa Bayer Project Editor Jon Davies Trim Size 10 × 10 Number of Pages 144 Print Run 5,500 Compositor Erin Kirk Text Type 11/16 Miller Text (Carter & Cone) × 23p (2 columns) Display Type Gotham (Hoefler & Co.) Paper 157 gsm/106 lb Chinese Sun matte, 348 ppi Inks Black + PMS Black 4c (duotones) Printer/Binder Martin Book Management Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Black cloth, silver foil stamp, 4/c endsheets Jacket/Cover Designer Erin Kirk Jacket/Cover Printer Martin Book Management Designer Comments I worked closely with author/ photographer Andrew Feiler and Jared Stevens at Prepare.Produce.Print to create duotones that capture the depth and clarity of Feiler’s photgraphs. This book raises awareness of the important history of the Rosenwald schools and the efforts to preserve them.

86

Trade Illustrated



Getty Publications L.A. Graffiti Black Book David Brafman Designer Kurt Hauser Production Coordinator Michelle Deemer Acquiring Editor Elizabeth Nicholson Project Editor Elizabeth Nicholson Trim Size 8 × 10 Number of Pages 176 Print Run 3,000 Compositor Kurt Hauser Text Type Calibre Display Type SangBleu Republic Paper 150 gsm Baijin pure white woodfree paper Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Artron Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Case bound; 2 part binding over 2.5mm boards, Faux leather JHT, foil blocking Jacket/Cover Designer Kurt Hauser Jacket/Cover Printer Artron SC How do you design a book about graffiti? One way is to treat it like any other artform, and they do that nicely here. I only wish the captions were a point size larger to handle the extra bold type. LH Good use of art in the front matter. Wish the title page type had a smidge more contrast. Trim size well suited to the subject matter.

88

Trade Illustrated



Getty Publications Mario Giacomelli: Figure/Ground Virginia Heckert Designer Jim Drobka Production Coordinator Clare Davis Acquiring Editor Karen Levine Project Editor Rachel Barth Trim Size 7.625 x 6 Number of Pages 160 Print Run 2,000 Compositor Jim Drobka Text Type Galano Grotesque Display Type Galano Grotesque Paper 157 gsm matte art Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder C&C Offset Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Paperback; 350 gsm 1-sided artboard Jacket/Cover Designer Jim Drobka Jacket/Cover Printer C&C Offset SC The stark contrast of the photography is echoed in a subtle way through the type: extra bold and light. Captions and extended captions are thoughtfully placed. LH Perfect trim size paired with the subject matter. Nice clean typography. Good halftones.

90

Trade Illustrated



Louisiana State University Press Above New Orleans: Roofscapes of the Crescent City Marco Rasi and Richard Campanella Designer Michelle A. Neustrom Production Coordinator Michelle A. Neustrom

Printer/Binder Kings Time Printing Press, LLC at

Acquiring Editor Rand Dotson

Toppan Leefung.

Project Editor Neal Novak

Method of Printing Offset

Trim Size 13.5 × 11

Method of Binding Smyth sewn

Number of Pages 264

Binding Materials 2-piece case with black cloth on

Print Run 5,000 Compositor Michelle A. Neustrom Text Type 10/13 Whitman (Font Bureau) Display Type Metropolis (Tugcu Design Co.) Paper 140 gsm matte coated white text Inks 4-color process

92

Trade Illustrated

spine and back, matte lamination front panel, green end sheets, black and white headbands, silver spine stamping Jacket/Cover Designer Michelle A. Neustrom Jacket/Cover Printer Kings Time Printing Press, LLC at Toppan Leefung



National Gallery of Art American Silence: The Photographs of Robert Adams, 1965–2015 Sarah Greenough; Afterword by Terry Tempest Williams Designer Margaret Bauer Production Coordinator Brad Ireland Acquiring Editor Nancy Eickel Project Editor Julie Warnement Trim Size 9.25 × 11.25 Number of Pages 304 Print Run 6,920 Compositor Margaret Bauer Text Type 11.25/14 Surveyor (Hoefler + Co.) Display Type Surveyor (Hoefler + Co.) Paper Mohawk Via Inks spot color Printer/Binder Meridian Printing, East Greenwich, Rhode Island Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Sierra cloth Jacket/Cover Designer Margaret Bauer Jacket/Cover Printer Meridian Printing, East Greenwich, Rhode Island SC I admire the unconventional type choice: Surveyor has a wide openness and handwrought imperfection that reflects the photography along with quiet, spacious layouts. LH Beautifully designed. Well chosen subtle use of color. Lovely halftones.

94

Trade Illustrated



University of New Mexico Press The Nature of Lake Tahoe: A Photographic History, 1860–1960 Peter Goin Designer Teresa Wingfield

Method of Printing Offset

Production Coordinator Felicia Cedillos

Method of Binding Smyth sewn

Acquiring Editor Elise McHugh

Binding Materials Printed case

Project Editor Elise McHugh

Jacket/Cover Designer Felicia Cedillos

Trim Size 10.5 × 12

Jacket/Cover Printer Pristone Pte. Ltd.

Number of Pages 356 Print Run 1,000 Compositor Teresa Wingfield Text Type 11/16 ITC Berkeley Old Style; 8.5/11.5 Plusquam Sans Display Type Plusquam Sans, ITC Berkeley Old Style

Designer Comments This book presented a challenge because of the large amount of images and the length of the captions that were paired with the images. Creating a balance between the main text, the images, and the captions was extremely important to the overall design. Also included in the book are gatefolds which also included captions of their own. It was all a balancing act to create a cohesive design.

Paper 150 gsm Condat Perigord matte

SC The type (both intro and captions) is too light for my taste, but the photography is

Inks 5/5 process and duotone

obviously the star here, and it’s presented beautifully, with all the right choices made

Printer/Binder Pristone Pte. Ltd.

96

Trade Illustrated

on sizing, placement, and bleeds.


Trade Illustrated

97


University of New South Wales Press Glass: The Life and Art of Klaus Moje Nola Anderson Designer Daniel New Production Coordinator Rosie Marson Acquiring Editor Elspeth Menzies Project Editor Emma Hutchinson Trim Size 275 × 235 mm Number of Pages 240 Print Run 1,800 Compositor Daniel New Text Type 10.5 Minion Pro (Adobe) Display Type Avant Garde Pro, Circular Standard Paper 170 gsm Mori silk Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Australian Book connection Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials hardback with hand tail bands, 3.0mm box board Jacket/Cover Designer Daniel New Jacket/Cover Printer Australian Book connection Designer Comments Klaus Moje’s beautiful art deserves as much space to breathe as possible. One of my main challenges was to create a layout that would allow the images to be placed close to where they are mentioned and to be placed quite large. The grid is essentially 2 columns, but only one column is generally used. This allowed the text to be spread out, giving plenty of space to images. I also liked the geometric feeling of this grid which I felt suited Klaus’s quite geometric designs. LH Nicely done. Beautiful reproductions.

98

Trade Illustrated



Penn State University Press A Jewish Bestiary: Fabulous Creatures from Hebraic Legend and Lore Mark Podwal Designer Regina Starace Production Coordinator Jennifer Norton Acquiring Editor Patrick Alexander Project Editor Alex Ramos Trim Size 7.125 × 9 Number of Pages 88 Print Run 2,000 Compositor Regina Starace Text Type 11.5/14.5 Arno Pro (Adobe) × 16p (2 columns) Display Type Windsor (Bitstream) Paper 150 g Munken Lynx Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder BALTO Print Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 3 piece case /Savanna cloth Jacket/Cover Designer Regina Starace Jacket/Cover Printer BALTO Print

100

Trade Illustrated


Trade Illustrated

101


Texas A&M University Press The Art of David Everett: Another World Becky Duval Reese Designer Kristie Lee Production Coordinator Kristie Lee Acquiring Editor Thom Lemmons Project Editor Pat Clabaugh Trim Size 9 × 10 Number of Pages 160 Print Run 1,500 Compositor Kristie Lee Text Type 10.5/15 Bookman Old Style Display Type Bookman Old Style, Antique Olive Nord, MS Reference Sans Serif Paper 80 lb matte white Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials Arrestox cloth black, silver foil, red headbands Jacket/Cover Designer Kristie Lee Jacket/Cover Printer Friesens LH Very nice reproduction of art throughout. Well designed.

102

Trade Illustrated



Trinity University Press La Finca: Love, Loss, and Laundry on a Tiny Puerto Rican Island Corky Parker Designer Janice Shay Production Coordinator Sarah Nawrocki Acquiring Editor Tom Payton Project Editor Steffanie Mortis Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 256 Print Run 3,000 Compositor Janice Shay Text Type Caslon Pro (Adobe) Display Type Providence, ErikRighthand Pro Paper 70 lb Rolland opaque natural Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect-bound hardcover, onepiece case, 95 pound gloss over 100 pt. board, four color process with nylon matte scuff resistant layflat film lamination outside Binding Materials Perfect bound hardcover (not sewn), one-piece case, square-backed (board in spine), encase complete with headbands; Rainbow Antique endpapers

Designer Comments Art on cover and interior by Corky Parker. SC This thing breaks all sorts of rules and has a lot of fun, and I love it for that, even if things can get messy. This wouldn’t work with most books, but here I think it was the right call to invite the illustrations and typography to the same party.

Jacket/Cover Designer Janice Shay

LH The hand-drawn touches and playful treatment of the art are most enjoyable. A

Jacket/Cover Printer Friesens

very pleasant book to explore.

104

Trade Illustrated



Yale University Press Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer Lisa Volpe Designer Laura Lindgren Production Coordinator Sarah Henry Acquiring Editor Katherine Boller Project Editor Megan Smith, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Trim Size 10 × 10.75 Number of Pages 288 Print Run 12,000 Compositor Laura Lindgren Text Type 10/17 Kastelov Kinetika Book Display Type Kastelov Kinetika (Book, Light, and Semibold) Paper 150 gsm GardaPremium natural Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Pristone Pte. Ltd. Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials JHT cloth, dyed Jacket/Cover Designer Laura Lindgren Jacket/Cover Printer Pristone Pte. Ltd. Designer Comments In Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer, another facet in the artistry of the “undisputed doyenne of American painting” (the New York Times) is now revealed: her camera work. With a clean, contemporary jacket and interior design, the catalogue presents the complete known body of O’Keeffe’s photographic art. The custom-dyed terra-

Mexico desert landscape. The jacket front image shows O’Keeffe, not in front of, but at work behind the camera; the back jacket image, O’Keeffe’s black-and-white Polaroid of a Jimsonweed flower, calls to mind her bright, modern, thoroughly unique Jimsonweed paintings. Generous full-page plates are complemented by all 409 works, which are reproduced at ample size to show the subtle and refined choices O’Keeffe made as she composed her art through the viewfinder of the camera.

cotta-colored cloth binding beneath the jacket and

LH I appreciate the well considered binding materials and clean design. Well suited to

golden yellow endpapers conjure the colors of her New

the subject matter. Typography nicely done.

106

Trade Illustrated


Trade Illustrated

107



Poetry and Literature


Duke University Press Maroon Choreography fahima ife Designer Courtney Leigh Richardson Production Coordinator Chris Granville Acquiring Editor Ken Wissoker Project Editor Liz Smith Trim Size 6 × 9 Number of Pages 144 Print Run 850 Compositor Copperline Books Text Type 10/14 Whitman (Font Bureau) × 25p3 Display Type Canela Text Black Paper 55 lb cream Inks Black Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials 12pt C1S / printed litho for case Jacket/Cover Designer Courtney Leigh Richardson Jacket/Cover Printer John P. Pow Company Designer Comments This author was so lovely to work with—having so carefully laid out every poem in the most beautiful way! This was just a matter of getting out of the way. I was super excited about the french flaps! SC Canela, the display face, is a great choice for emphasizing the contemporary nature of the work. I wonder why it’s not used for text as well, but Whitman is a fitting complement. The chapter openers on screened photography provide perfectly moody breaks. I only wish the photos varied.

110

Poetry and Literature



University of Georgia Press Hong Kong without Us: A People’s Poetry The Bauhinia Project Designer Erin Kirk Production Coordinator Rebecca Norton Acquiring Editor Beth Snead Project Editor Thomas Roche Trim Size 5.5 x 8.5 Number of Pages 126 Print Run 1,000 Compositor Erin Kirk Text Type 10/14 Warnock Pro (Adobe), SimSun (Beijing ZhongYi Electronics Co) Display Type Gotham (Hoefler & Co.) Paper 60 lb Natures Natural Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials 12pt C1S Jacket/Cover Designer Erin Kirk Jacket/Cover Printer Sheridan Books Designer Comments This book is a collection of revolutionary poetry drawn from the voices of Hong Kong during its anti-extradition protests. The poetry was submitted in the form of submitted testimonies, social media, found poems, and protest materials from anonymous sources. SC I have a lot of respect for those who can set multiscript content without favoring either language. It is done very well here. The two typefaces match well with their sharp stroke endings, though perhaps the Chinese is a tad light next to the Latin. Emoji also makes an appearance in one piece and is sized perfectly, which is surprisingly hard to do. There is also a smart treatment of dialog, using both position and typeface to distinguish speakers.

112

Poetry and Literature


Poetry and Literature

113


University of Pittsburgh Press Gumbo Ya Ya Aurielle Marie Designer Alex Wolfe Production Coordinator Joel W. Coggins Acquiring Editor Ed Ochester Project Editor Alex Wolfe Trim Size 7 × 9 Number of Pages 120 Print Run 2,000 paperback Compositor Alex Wolfe Text Type 10.25/14 Garamond Pro (Adobe) Display Type Metallophile Sp8, medium Paper 55 lb natural antique Inks Black Printer/Binder McNaughton & Gunn Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials 10pt C1S, gritty matte finish Jacket/Cover Designer Alex Wolfe Jacket/Cover Printer McNaughton & Gunn SC There are some wonderful typographic surprises here. It is a challenge to set a book of poetry in which the typesetting is critical to the meaning. The designer seems to preserve the author’s intentions while maintaining a cohesive and readable experience throughout.

114

Poetry and Literature


Poetry and Literature

115



Reference


University of Georgia Press Plants in Design: A Guide to Designing with Southern Landscape Plants Brad E. Davis and David Nichols Designer Mindy Basinger Hill Production Coordinator Melissa Buchanan Acquiring Editor Patrick Allen Project Editor Jon Davies Trim Size 9 × 11 Number of Pages 592 Print Run 2,500 Compositor Mindy Basinger Hill Text Type Main: 10.5/15 Caslon Pro (Adobe) × 20p4.5 (2 columns w/1p3 gutter); Account: 9.5/12 pt Caslon Pro (Adobe) × 13p4 (2 columns w/1p gutter) Display Type Caslon Pro (Adobe); Copihue (Letritas) Paper 128 gsm China Gold East matte art paper (86 lb) Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Kings Time Printing Press, LLC at Toppan Leefung Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Smyth sewn Binding Materials 12pt C1S Jacket/Cover Designer Mindy Basinger Hill Jacket/Cover Printer Kings Time Printing Press, LLC at Toppan Leefung LH Good control of many elements—well organized, easy to read information. Attractive section openers.

118

Reference



University of New Mexico Press The Ecology of Herbal Medicine: A Guide to Plants and Living Landscapes of the American Southwest Dara Saville Designer Mindy Basinger Hill Production Coordinator Mindy Basinger Hill Acquiring Editor Sonia Dickey Project Editor James Ayers Trim Size 7 × 10 Number of Pages 312 Print Run 2,500 Compositor Mindy Basinger Hill Text Type 10.9/15 Electra LT Std × 27p Display Type Electra LH Regular and Copihue Regular Paper 70 lb white offset, 380 ppi Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Versa Press Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Perfect Binding Materials 12pt C1S, matte scuff-free film lamination Jacket/Cover Designer Mindy Basinger Hill Jacket/Cover Printer Versa Press SC Like walking in a field of succulents and grasses. I appreciate the nice open margins, colored heads inspired by natural elements, and uncluttered maps and tables. It’s exactly what I would hope from an herbal field guide. LH Nice choice of subtle color throughout. Wish the text was a little stronger on the part openers—a little too close to the background color. Nicely designed.

120

Reference



University of New Mexico Press A Guide to New Mexico Film Locations: From Billy the Kid to Breaking Bad and Beyond Jason Strykowski Designer Mindy Basinger Hill Production Coordinator Mindy Basinger Hill Acquiring Editor Sonia Dickey Project Editor James Ayers Trim Size 5.5 × 8.5 Number of Pages 296 Print Run 1,500 Compositor Mindy Basinger Hill Text Type 10.543/13.75 Chaparral Pro (Adobe) × 23p10; 11.5/13.75 Mr Eaves Mod OT Book Display Type Mr Eaves Mod OT Book Paper 70 lb white offset, 380 ppi Inks 4-color process Printer/Binder Versa Press Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Notch Binding Materials 10pt C1S, matte scuff-free layflat lamination Jacket/Cover Designer Mindy Basinger Hill Jacket/Cover Printer Versa Press SC A daring use of color. I felt like I was traversing the varied earth tones and azure skies of New Mexico itself. Despite all that experimentation, the book is calming and functional, with all the information clearly defined. LH Nice handling of a variety of elements and good use of subtle southwest color throught. Attractive part openers; unfortunately part openers and the title page spread got a little too close to the gutter.

122

Reference



Texas A&M University Press A Field Guide to the Vernacular Buildings of the San Antonio Area Edited by Brent Fortenberry Designer Kristie Lee Production Coordinator Kristie Lee Acquiring Editor Thom Lemmons Project Editor Katie Duelm Trim Size 7 × 10 Number of Pages 320 Print Run 1,500 Compositor Kristie Lee Text Type 11/15 Minion Pro (Adobe) Display Type Source Sans Variable Paper 80 lb matte white Inks 4-color Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Method of Binding Flexbound Binding Materials Rainbow patriot blue antique endsheets Jacket/Cover Designer Kristie Lee Jacket/Cover Printer Friesens

124

Reference




Jackets and Covers


Aarhus University Press Series title: Tænkepauser. 1: Data, 2: Opmærksomhed, 3: Tarmen, 4: Vand, 5: Risiko, 6: Diktatur, 7: Ord: 1: Anja Bechmann, 2: Emma Louise Louth, 3: Christian Lodberg Hvas, 4: Søren Rud Keiding, 5: Antoinette Fage-Butler, 6: Jakob Tolstrup, 7: Linda Greve Designer Camilla Jørgensen, Trefold Illustrator Camilla Jørgensen, Trefold Production Coordinator Søren Mogensen Larsen Typefaces Dante (Monotype), Gotham (Hoefler&Co.), title font varies Paper Munken Premium Cream Inks LED-UV Coating/Finish The series uses embossing and coating 4+0 colors with neutral overprint varnish. Printer/Binder Narayana Press Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments The concept for the Series Tænkepauser (Reflections) is a visual expression of the meaning of the title. In this series all titles consist of one word only—and that word should preferably be selfexplanatory. The goal is to make the right choices with fonts, colors, designs and embossing that give the best associations to the subject. Judges' Comments Great use of a single pop of color throughout a wonderfully tactile series.

128

Jackets and Covers


University of Chicago Press Black Paper: Writing in a Dark Time Teju Cole Designer Isaac Tobin Art Director Jill Shimabukuro Illustrator Teju Cole Production Coordinator Joseph Claude Typefaces Futura Now Display (Monotype), Arno Pro (Adobe) Paper 80 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte scuff-resistant lamination with spot gloss Printer/Binder Phoenix Color Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments This was an important book for us, with a well known author, so everyone wanted it to look like a “big book.” The author wanted to feature his photographic installation (also called Black Paper), which wasn’t a natural choice for a cover image as it lacks a strong central image or clear focal point, and is very horizontal. My challenge then was how to best combine the image with large, powerful type. I actually drew a few different custom titling fonts, aiming for the “blackest” weight of type I could, before realizing Futura Schlagzeile / Futura Display was perfect. It seemed conceptually important for the book to be actually wrapped in “black paper”, but I wanted to distinguish between the black of the jacket and the blackness within the photos. The spot gloss both highlights the photographs’ materiality and makes the rest of the jacket feel more like paper. Judges’ Comments We loved this selection of images set against the black background.

Jackets and Covers

129


University of Chicago Press The Cosmic Zoom: Scale, Knowledge, and Mediation Zachary Horton Designer Isaac Tobin Art Director Jill Shimabukuro Illustrator Kyle Wagner Production Coordinator Joel Score Typefaces Helvetica Now Paper 80 lb C1S Inks Black ink only Coating/Finish Matte scuff-resistant layflat lamination Printer/Binder Phoenix Color Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments This book was inspired by Ray and Charles Eames’ “Powers of Ten” film, so it seemed natural for the design to follow suit—hence the Helvetica. Judges’ Comments Such an elegant yet fun type treatment.

130

Jackets and Covers


University of Chicago Press Geometry of Grief: Reflections on Mathematics, Loss, and Life Michael Frame Designer Rae Ganci Hammers Art Director Jill Shimabukuro Production Coordinator Skye Agnew Typefaces Mrs Eaves (Emigre) Paper 80 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Scuff-resistant matte film Printer/Binder Phoenix Color Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments This book looks at grief through the lens of fractal mathematics. The designer chose a cyanotype by Anna Akins, which feels perfectly suited to this unexpected combination of topics. It offers a field of blue with branching organic plant matter and is combined with diminutive type to create an overall understated and atmospheric jacket. Judges’ Comments Understated in the best way. Elegant.

Jackets and Covers

131


University of Chicago Press What’s Eating the Universe? and Other Cosmic Questions Paul Davies Designer Rae Ganci Hammers Art Director Jill Shimabukuro Production Coordinator Jill Shimabukuro Typefaces Gotham (Hoefler & Co.), Miller Display (Carter & Cone) Paper 95 lb Gloss C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Scuff-resistant stay-flat laminate, die cuts Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments Paul Davies’ playful cosmic questions and writing style allowed for a playful take on the jacket design. Die-cut holes nibble away at the cover and offer a glimpse of something beyond (a photo of the Cosmic Microwave Background was printed on the lithocase). It gives the impression of a dynamic and changing universe as well as the sense that there is more to see than what is visible at first glance. Judges’ Comments The die cut shapes really elevate this concept.

132

Jackets and Covers


Chinese University of Hong Kong Press American Life: A Chinese Historian’s Perspective Cho-yun Hsu; Translated by Carissa Fletcher Designer Chan Hei Shing@Hei Shing Book Design Production Coordinator Tsoi Ting Ting Typefaces Druk XCondensed Paper 220 gsm New Raglin paper Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Blue and red foil stamping, debossing Printer/Binder Hang Tai Printing Company Ltd. Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments This book represents reminiscences from the life of a sojourner, the author expertly analyzing the origins of the tension and conflict between different classes and ethnic groups in American society. The disposition of the book title “American Life” is the main visual of the dust jacket: Letters were collapsing, scattered apart which resembled isolated individuals of a fragmented society, losing their solidarity to individualism (the falling letter “i”), leaving the hollowed “American Life” on top, in debossed print. A slendered, woodblock-like typeface Druk XCondensed has been chosen, to add “weight” to letters, creating a kind of velocity, a falling down movement. Colors including blue, red and white, as well as stars, were all adopted from the national flag of USA. The flag elements, stripes and stars, also appeared on the cover, dilapidated, to create again the ruined, fragmented image of the country. Judges’ Comments The concept of the letters falling from the title was striking and effective.

Jackets and Covers

133


Georgetown University Press Blacks and Jews in America: An Invitation to Dialogue Terrence L. Johnson and Jacques Berlinerblau Designer Spencer Fuller / Faceout Studio

Designer Comments The thought was to find a way

Art Director Elizabeth Crowley-Webber

to graphically represent the conversation in a way

Illustrator Imagery from Shutterstock

the balances the seriousness of the topic while being

Production Coordinator Elizabeth Crowley-Webber Typefaces DIN Condensed, Poplar Paper 80 lb white endleaf

inviting enough to attract engagement. This ended up taking serious tones as well as inspiration from the Star of David to create a poster-like cover inviting the viewer in to the dialogue.

Inks Black ink only Coating/Finish Gloss film lamination Printer/Binder Phoenix Color Method of Printing Offset

134

Jackets and Covers

Judges’ Comments Love the energy of this type!


Georgetown University Press The End of Asylum Andrew I. Schoenholtz, Jaya Ramji-Nogales, and Philip G. Schrag Designer Jeff Miller / Faceout Studio

Designer Comments This cover was designed with the

Art Director Elizabeth Crowley-Webber

intention of subtle twists on imagery that would demand

Illustrator Imagery from Shutterstock

your attention and emotion, even though there’s almost

Production Coordinator Elizabeth Crowley-Webber Typefaces ITC Avant Garde Gothic Bold, Arno Pro

a stoic quality to the quiet and simple arrangement of elements.

(Adobe)

Judges’ Comments Strong and timely concept, well

Paper 95 lb stock

handled.

Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte film lamination and debossing Printer/Binder Versa Press Method of Printing Offset

Jackets and Covers

135


University of Georgia Press Hysterical Water: Poems Hannah Baker Saltmarsh Designer Erin Kirk Production Coordinator Rebecca Norton Typefaces Arno Pro (Adobe), Futura Bold Oblique (Bitstream) Paper 12pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Scuff-resistant layflat matte lamination Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments The type placement is perfect for this image.

136

Jackets and Covers


University of Iowa Press Radicals: Audacious Writings by American Women, Volumes 1 and 2 Edited by Meredith Stabel and Zachary Turpin Designer Kathleen Lynch, Black Kat Design Art Director Karen Copp Illustrator Nikiteev Konstantin, iStock.com Production Coordinator Karen Copp Typefaces Hand lettering by designer, Alternate Gothic EF (Elsner + Flake) Paper 10pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Gloss and matte lamination Printer/Binder Versa Press Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments Lively design, great use of color, and a wonderful continuation of the motif across both covers.

Jackets and Covers

137


University of Iowa Press We Heard It When We Were Young: Tales of Growing Up Mexican American in Small-Town Iowa Chuy Renteria Designer Kimberly Glyder

Judges’ Comments We just love the hand lettering and

Art Director Karen Copp

the retro feel of this one.

Production Coordinator Karen Copp Typefaces Hand lettering by designer, Archer (Hoefler & Co.), HiH Incline Paper 10pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte film lamination and debossing Printer/Binder Versa Press Method of Printing Offset

138

Jackets and Covers


McGill-Queen’s University Press Bitter in the Belly John Emil Vincent Designer David Drummond Art Director Rob Mackie Production Coordinator Rob Mackie Typefaces New Baskerville ITC Paper 93 lb Supreme Gloss Cover Matte Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte finish scuff-free Printer/Binder Imprimerie Gauvin Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments This is a poetry cover where the image and title really play off each other, with Jonah being spit out of the whale. Judges’ Comments We love how the art tells the story.

Jackets and Covers

139


McGill-Queen’s University Press Chronic Aftershock: How 9/11 Shaped Present-Day France Jean-Philippe Mathy Designer Heng Wee Tan Art Director Rob Mackie Production Coordinator Rob Mackie Typefaces Tusker Grotesk, Trade Gothic Paper 95 lb Gloss C1S FSC Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments The shadow of the disintegrating towers is cast by the symbol of France. This highlights the influence of 9/11 attacks on the French society. Judges’ Comments Strong and eye-catching concept and colors.

140

Jackets and Covers


McGill-Queen’s University Press Unbecoming Neil Surkan Designer David Drummond Art Director Elena Goranescu Production Coordinator Elena Goranescu Typefaces Bodoni (Bitstream) Paper 93 lb Supreme Gloss Cover Matte Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte finish scuff-free, spot varnish Printer/Binder Imprimerie Gauvin Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments You put a lot of yourself into these covers. Sometimes it can be very personal stuff you are using. I was going through some old slides that my father had. And so that was something that I was preoccupied with when this cover came up. I was just fascinated with the way slides represent an image, how they frame an image. Slides always had to be marked for the right way to put them inside the carousel. So that slide has a mark on it. That’s actually my father’s mark. So the poet will probably never know that. A lot of it’s coming from you, your own personal background. The title is Unbecoming. The slide is sort of disintegrating, or sort of melting, almost. And there’s an image there, but it’s barely decipherable. Judges’ Comments A powerful effective image.

Jackets and Covers

141


McGill-Queen’s University Press Unbound Gabrielle McIntire Designer David Drummond Art Director Elena Goranescu Production Coordinator Elena Goranescu Typefaces ITC New Baskerville Paper 93 lb Supreme Gloss Cover Matte Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte finish scuff-free Printer/Binder Imprimerie Gauvin Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments These are poems about ecstatic nature. The text on the unfurling pieces of paper is from the actual poems. Judges’ Comments A poetic approach that just works.

142

Jackets and Covers


McGill-Queen’s University Press whereabouts Edward Carson Designer David Drummond Art Director Elena Goranescu Production Coordinator Elena Goranescu Typefaces Bodoni (Bitstream) Paper 93 lb Supreme Gloss Cover Matte Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte finish scuff-free, blind embossing of 2 dots on front cover Printer/Binder Imprimerie Gauvin Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments For this poetry cover I played off the “You are here” location maps. Judges’ Comments Loved the sense of wandering achieved here.

Jackets and Covers

143


University of Minnesota Press Solo Viola: A Post-Exotic Novel Antoine Volodine; Translated by Lia Swope Mitchell Designer Michel Vrana

Designer Comments Designer did not illustrate the

Art Director Daniel Ochsner

cover but rather “remixed” stock illustrations to create

Production Coordinator Daniel Ochsner Typefaces Praktika Medium Extended (Fenotype), Bodoni Svty Two (ITC), Bodoni Std Book (Bitstream) Paper 10pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte layflat Printer/Binder John P. Pow Company Method of Printing Offset

144

Jackets and Covers

the final design. Judges’ Comments Great interplay of type and illustration.


University of Minnesota Press Watershed: Attending to Body and Earth in Distress Ranae Lenor Hanson Designer Casalino Design Art Director Ana Bichanich Production Coordinator Ana Bichanich Typefaces Hand-lettering by designer, Caslon Pro (Adobe) Paper 10pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte layflat scuff-resistant nylon lamination Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments For the cover of Watershed, a book about the body and earth in distress, the goal was to simultaneously show a human element (body) and nature (earth). The author’s daughter pointed us to photographer Joe Baumann’s work, and this image of a vein-like river felt perfect for the cover. The handlettering brought in another human element to complete the design. Judges’ Comments This one grabbed our attention. Great using of hand lettering with a strong image.

Jackets and Covers

145


University Press of Mississippi Poetic Song Verse: Blues-Based Popular Music and Poetry Mike Mattison and Ernest Suarez Designer Jennifer Mixon Art Director Todd Lape Illustrator iStock.com Production Coordinator Jennifer Mixon Typefaces HWT Arabesque Regular (designed by Terry Wüdenbachs, from Hamilton Wood Type Collection) Paper 12pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte Printer/Binder Ingram Lightning Source Method of Printing Digital Judges’ Comments Really great type!

146

Jackets and Covers


University of Nebraska Press To Hell with It: Of Sin and Sex, Chicken Wings, and Dante’s Entirely Ridiculous, Needlessly GuiltInducing Inferno Dinty W. Moore Designer Nathan Putens Illustrator CSA Images Production Coordinator Terrance Bolden Typefaces Bodoni Poster (Adobe), Futura Std (Adobe) Paper 80 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte lamination Printer/Binder Ingram Lightning Source Method of Printing Digital Judges’ Comments Attention grabbing image and colors.

Jackets and Covers

147


University of New Mexico Press origin story: poems Gary Jackson Designer Mindy Basinger Hill

Coating/Finish Scuff-free matte film lamination

Illustrator Courtesy of the author

Printer/Binder Versa Press

Production Coordinator Mindy Basinger Hill

Method of Printing Offset

Typefaces Metallophile Sp8 Light, Minion Pro (Adobe) Paper 12pt C1S Inks 4-color process

148

Jackets and Covers

Judges’ Comments Love the subtle details here!


Penn State University Press A Sensory History Manifesto Mark M. Smith Designer Henry Sene Yee Art Director Regina Starace Production Coordinator Jennifer Norton Typefaces Gotham (Hoefler&Co) Paper 12pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte layflat scuff-free Printer/Binder Integrated Books International Method of Printing Digital Judges’ Comments The visual plays to the sense. Well crafted.

Jackets and Covers

149


University of Pittsburgh Press Now You Know It All: Stories Joanna Pearson Designer Henry Sene Yee Art Director Joel W. Coggins Production Coordinator Joel W. Coggins Typefaces Jersey M54 (free font by Mohammed Rahman), Minion Pro (Adobe) Paper 95 lb Sterling Ultra Litho C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Grit matte finish with embossing (title and author name) Printer/Binder McNaughton & Gunn Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments Great cropping of the image. Beautiful type!

150

Jackets and Covers


University of Pittsburgh Press Randomly Moving Particles Andrew Motion Designer Joel W. Coggins Production Coordinator Joel W. Coggins Typefaces Objectiv Mk 3 (Adobe ), Sabon MT (Monotype) Paper 10pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte finish Printer/Binder Versa Press Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments Love the relationship between the image and title.

Jackets and Covers

151


Princeton University Press A History of Biology Michel Morange Designer Heather Hansen

Designer Comments This cover uses the concept of

Art Director Maria Lindenfeldar

Inheritance Charts; the ideas in this book are ’inherited’

Production Coordinator Danielle Amatucci Typefaces Plantin (Monotype) Paper 80 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte scuff-resistant Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset

152

Jackets and Covers

from biology and history. Judges’ Comments Simple and effective.


Princeton University Press A Matter of Obscenity: The Politics of Censorship in Modern England Christopher Hilliard Designer Lauren Michelle Smith Art Director Jess Massabrook Production Coordinator Danielle Amatucci Typefaces Garamond Pro (Adobe), Bodoni Svty Two Paper 80 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte scuff-free Printer/Binder CPI Antony Rowe Ltd. Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments A familiar concept with an excellent treatment.

Jackets and Covers

153


Princeton University Press American Afterlives: Reinventing Death in the Twenty-First Century Shannon Lee Dawdy Designer Karl Spurzem Art Director Maria Lindenfeldar Production Coordinator Erin Suydam Typefaces Filson Pro, Mostardesign Paper 100 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte scuff-resistant film Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments Beautiful design and illustration with a limited color palette.

154

Jackets and Covers


Princeton University Press Power to the Public: The Promise of Public Interest Technology Tara Dawson McGuinness and Hana Schank Designer Derek Thornton / Notch Design Art Director Maria Lindenfeldar Production Coordinator Ruthie Rosenstock Typefaces Futura (Bauer Type Foundry / Intertype) Paper 80 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte scuff-resistant film Printer/Binder Maple Press Method of Printing Offset Designer Comments This cover is meant to be smart, simple, and suggest the idea of sharing and sharing and releasing. The concept is simple, technology can help governments and non profits solve serious problems in the world. Judges’ Comments We loved the interplay between the art and the title. Jackets and Covers

155


Princeton University Press White Freedom: The Racial History of an Idea Tyler Stovall Designer Derek Thornton / Notch Design

Designer Comments This cover has a timeless look,

Art Director Maria Lindenfeldar

feeling both historical, and modern. The textures, burst,

Illustrator Derek Thornton / Notch Design

and title lettering were hand illustrated. These elements

Production Coordinator Ruthie Rosenstock Typefaces Hand lettering by designer, Archetype (T26 Digital Type Foundry) Paper 100 lb Mohawk Via Felt

were also manipulated to fit on the spine and back cover. The desired tone for this cover was gritty and rough, suggesting the raw and real struggle involved in racism, but also hopeful, hinting at how far we have come and where we are going. The cloth case under the jacket is

Inks 4-color process

also a classy surprise, and compliments the feel of the

Coating/Finish Matte varnish with gloss film

jacket nicely.

on underside Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset

156

Jackets and Covers

Judges’ Comments The whole thing just works together. Great design and layout.


Rutgers University Press Getting It, Having It, Keeping It Up: Straight Men’s Sexuality in Public and Private Beth Montemurro Designer Lindsay Starr Art Director Vincent Nordhaus Production Coordinator Vincent Nordhaus Typefaces Abolition, Lust, Futura Paper 10pt coated Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte Printer/Binder Integrated Books International Method of Printing Digital Designer Comments There were so many ways this cover could have gone wrong! The challenge here was avoiding something too explicit, juvenile, on-the-nose, or too safe, while still keeping it contemporary and eyecatching. Lindsay’s solution is elegant, a little irreverent, and attention grabbing. Judges’ Comments Such a fun treatment of the title!

Jackets and Covers

157


University of Tennessee Press Native Intoxicants of North America Sean Rafferty Designer Kelly Gray

Judges’ Comments The stylized feather detail has a

Production Coordinator Stephanie Thompson

graphic punch that captures the title well.

Typefaces Helvetica Neue LT Paper 100 lb Sterling Litho Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte laminate with spot UV Printer/Binder Thomson Reuters Method of Printing Offset

158

Jackets and Covers


University of Tennessee Press On Barbecue John Shelton Reed Designer Kelly Gray

Designer Comments We got the wet naps custom

Production Coordinator Stephanie Thompson

printed. The front cover photo was taken by Kelly Gray,

Typefaces Glypha LT Std, Minion Pro, Univers LT Std Paper 10pt C1S Inks 4-color process

the designer. Judges’ Comments This captures the subject and makes my mouth water.

Coating/Finish Matte Printer/Binder Thomson Reuters Method of Printing Offset

Jackets and Covers

159


University of Texas Press Resisting Garbage: The Politics of Waste Management in American Cities Lily Baum Pollans Designer Jenny Volvovski

Judges’ Comments The scientific treatment of an

Art Director Derek George

everyday object was a fun surprise on this one.

Illustrator Paul C. Gunn Production Coordinator Dan Pederson Typefaces FK Screamer (Florian Karsten), Lyon (Commercial Type) Paper 80 lb Mohawk Via Felt Cool White Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Varnish on front, gloss film on back Printer/Binder Phoenix Color Method of Printing Offset

160

Jackets and Covers


Vanderbilt University Press Borges: An Introduction Julio Premat; Translated by Amanda Murphy Designer Drohan DiSanto Production Coordinator Drohan DiSanto Typefaces Warnock Pro, Tusker Grotesk Paper 10pt C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte film lamination Printer/Binder Ingram Lightning Source Method of Printing Digital Judges’ Comments The scale of the type artfully merged with the portrait sets this apart.

Jackets and Covers

161


Wilfrid Laurier University Press On the Other Side(s) of 150: Untold Stories and Critical Approaches to History, Literature, and Identity in Canada Edited by Linda M. Morra and Sarah Henzi Designer Michel Vrana Art Director Lindsey Hunnewell Production Coordinator Lindsey Hunnewell Typefaces Alternate Gothic No. 1 (Linotype), Caslon Pro (Adobe) Paper 95 lb FSC Coated Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte scuff-resistant soft touch nylon Printer/Binder Friesens Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments Love the graphic interruption of the portrait here.

162

Jackets and Covers


University of Wisconsin Press Quertext: An Anthology of Queer Voices from German-Speaking Europe Edited by Gary Schmidt and Merrill Cole Designer Jeremy John Parker Art Director Jennifer Conn Production Coordinator Terry Emmrich Typefaces BankNue Lined, Gotham Medium Paper 100 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte layflat scuff-free lamination Printer/Binder Perfection Press Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments Inventive typography matched with a great layout.

Jackets and Covers

163


Yale University Press Clairvoyant of the Small: The Life of Robert Walser Susan Bernofsky Designer Jenny Volvovski Art Director Dustin Kilgore Production Coordinator Katie Golden Typefaces Trio Grotesk (Schick Toikka), Caslon Pro (Adobe) Paper 100 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte polypropylene Printer/Binder John P. Pow Company Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments The delicate imagery plays off the title quite well—beautiful.

164

Jackets and Covers


Yale University Press Gilgamesh: A New Translation of the Ancient Epic Sophus Helle Designer Jenny Volvovski Art Director Dustin Kilgore Production Coordinator Aldo Cupo Typefaces Graphik, Harbour Paper 100 lb C1S Inks Black + PMS 8025c (metallic copper) Coating/Finish Matte polypropylene, spot UV gloss Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset Judges’ Comments We loved how the fragments break up the formal aspects of this design.

Jackets and Covers

165


Yale University Press Latecomer State Formation: Political Geography and Capacity Failure in Latin America Sebastián Mazzuca Designer Sonia Shannon Art Director Dustin Kilgore Production Coordinator Maureen Noonan Typefaces Acumin Pro (Adobe Originals) Paper 100 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte scuff-free nylon layflat Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Digital Judges’ Comments This one grabbed us immediately. The treatment of the image is just right.

166

Jackets and Covers


Yale University Press Warda: A Novel Sonallah Ibrahim; Translated from the Arabic by Hosam Aboul-Ela Designer Monograph / Matt Avery

Designer Comments The jacket design brief called

Art Director Dustin Kilgore

for signaling to the reader the novel’s setting as well as

Production Coordinator Aldo Cupo Typefaces Signal Compressed Regular (Production Type), Neue Plak (Monotype) Paper 100 lb C1S Inks 4-color process Coating/Finish Matte polypropylene Printer/Binder Sheridan Books Method of Printing Offset

something about the main character Warda. In order to depict the protagonist without showing her too clearly— and trampling the reader’s own mental image—I used a close-up in combination with a coarse halftone screen. The halftone screen also being a reference to one of the main character’s work in journalism. The landscape in the foreground is a collage created by hand. Judges’ Comments We were drawn in by this odd and unexpected scene.

Jackets and Covers

167



Index

Compositors

Sher, Jena 58

Avery, Matt 34, 36

Shimabukuro, Jill 38, 62, 64

Bauer, Margaret 94

Starace, Regina 48, 76, 100

Bourgoyne, Barbara Neely 26

Tseng Information Systems 18, 28, 80

Brooks, Roy 54

Weiss, Amanda 72

Buchanan, Amy Ruth 70

Westchester 22

Chan, Jenny 50, 52

Wingfield, Teresa 96

Clay, Omega 78

Wolfe, Alex 114

Copperline Book Services 20, 68, 110

Zakrisson, Carl-H.K. 16

de Schrevel, Stéphane 74 Drobka, Jim 90

Designers

Fold Four, Inc. 54

Avery, Matt 34, 36, 167

Hammers, Rae Ganci 84

Bauer, Margaret 94

Hauser, Kurt 88

Black Kat Design 137

Henderson, Tina 42, 44

Bourgoyne, Barbara Neely 26

Hill, Mindy Basinger 118, 120, 122

Brooks, Roy 54

Ireland, Brad 46

Buchanan, Amy Ruth 70

Jack Design 50, 52

Casalino Design 145

Kirk, Erin 30, 86, 112

Castro, Antonio 78

La Villa Hermosa 24

Cedillos, Felicia 96

Lee, Kristie 102, 124

Chan, Jenny 50, 52

Lindgren, Laura 106

Clay, Omega 78

Lo, Jonathan 40

Coggins, Joel W. 151

Meader, Bruce Ian 56

de Schrevel, Stéphane 74

Monograph 34, 36

DiSanto, Drohan 161

Neustrom, Michelle A. 92

Drobka, Jim 42, 44, 90

New, Daniel 98

Drummond, David 139, 141, 142, 143

Nielsen, Nethe Ellinge 14

Faceout Studio 134, 135

Shay, Janice 104

Fold Four, Inc. 54

169


Fuller, Spencer 134

Starace, Regina 48, 76, 100

Glyder, Kimberly 138

Starr, Lindsay 157

Gray, Kelly 158, 159

Tauch, Matthew 20

Hammers, Rae Ganci 84, 131, 132

Thompson, Judy 28

Hansen, Heather 152

Thornton, Derek 155, 156

Harrison, Aimee C. 18, 68

Tobin, Isaac 129, 130

Hauser, Kurt 88

Trefold 128

Hei Shing Book Design 133

Volvovski, Jenny 80, 160, 164, 165

Hei Shing, Chan 133

Vrana, Michel 144, 162

Hendel, Rich 28

Wee Tan, Heng 140

Hill, Mindy Basinger 118, 120, 122, 148

Weiss, Amanda 72

Ireland, Brad 46

Wingfield, Teresa 96

Jack Design 50, 52

Wolfe, Alex 114

Jørgensen, Camilla 128

Zakrisson, Carl-H.K. 16

Kilgore, Dustin 80 Kirk, Erin 30, 86, 112, 136

Illustrators / Photographers

La Villa Hermosa 24

Cole, Teju 129

Lee, Kristie 102, 124

CSA Images 147

Li, Ryan 66

Gunn, Paul C. 160

Lindgren, Laura 106

iStock.com 137, 146

Lo, Jonathan 40

Jørgensen, Camilla 128

Lorenz, Catherine 42

Konstantin, Nikiteev 137

Lynch, Kathleen 70, 137

Notch Design 156

Meader, Bruce Ian 56

Shutterstock 134, 135

Miller, Jeff 135

Thornton, Derek 156

Mixon, Jennifer 146

Trefold 128

Monograph 34, 36, 167

Wagner, Kyle 130

Neustrom, Michelle A. 92 New, Daniel 98

Presses

Nielsen, Nethe Ellinge 14

Aarhus University Press 14, 16, 128

Notch Design 155, 156

University of Chicago Press 34, 36, 38, 62, 64, 66,

Parker, Jeremy John 163

84, 129, 130, 131, 132

Putens, Nathan 147

Chinese University of Hong Kong Press 133

Richardson, Courtney Leigh 22, 110

Duke University Press 18, 20, 22, 68, 110

Sene Yee, Henry 149, 150

Fordham University Press 40

Shannon, Sonia 166

Georgetown University Press 134, 135

Shay, Janice 104

University of Georgia Press 30, 86, 112, 118, 136

Sher, Jena 58

Getty Publications 42, 44, 88, 90

Shimabukuro, Jill 38, 62, 64

University of Iowa Press 137, 138

Smith, Lauren Michelle 153

Johns Hopkins University Press 70, 72

Spurzem, Karl 154

Leuven University Press 24, 74

170


Louisiana State University Press 26, 92

Deemer, Michelle 88

McGill-Queen’s University Press 139, 140, 141, 142, 143

Di Costanzo, Patricia 24

University of Minnesota Press 144, 145

DiSanto, Drohan 161

University Press of Mississippi 146

Emmrich, Terry 163

National Gallery of Art 46, 94

Gallina, Victoria 42

University of Nebraska Press 147

Golden, Katie 164

University of New Mexico Press 96, 120, 122, 148

Goranescu, Elena 141, 142, 143

University of New South Wales Press 98

Granville, Chris 18, 20, 68, 110

Penn State University Press 48, 76, 100, 149

Harrits, Cecilie 14

University of Pittsburgh Press 114, 150, 151

Hein, Lisa 62

Princeton University Press 50, 52, 54, 152, 153,

Henry, Sarah 106

154, 155, 156

Hill, Mindy Basinger 120, 122, 148

RIT Press 56

Hunnewell, Lindsey 162

Rutgers University Press 157

Hvilshøj, Ulrik 16

South Dakota Historical Society Press 28

Ireland, Brad 94

University of Tennessee Press 158, 159

Larsen, Søren Mogensen 128

Texas A&M University Press 78, 102, 124

Lee, Kristie 78, 102, 124

University of Texas Press 160

Lerner, Mark 40

Trinity University Press 104

Mackie, Rob 139, 140

Vanderbilt University Press 161

Marson, Rosie 98

Wilfrid Laurier University Press 162

Mayer, Mary 58

University of Wisconsin Press 163

McIntyre, Jennifer 28

Yale University Press 58, 80, 106, 164, 165, 166, 167

Mixon, Jennifer 146 Nawrocki, Sarah 104

Production Coordinators

Neustrom, Michelle A. 92

Agnew, Skye 131

Noonan, Maureen 166

Amatucci, Danielle 152, 153

Nordhaus, Vincent 157

Bichanich, Ana 145

Norton, Jennifer 48, 76, 100, 149

Bolden, Terrance 147

Norton, Rebecca 30, 112, 136

Bourgoyne, Barbara Neely 26

Ochsner, Daniel 144

Buchanan, Melissa 86, 118

Paulson, Jennifer 70, 72

Cedillos, Felicia 96

Pederson, Dan 160

Claude, Joseph 129

Rosenstock, Ruthie 155, 156

Coggins, Joel W. 114, 150, 151

Score, Joel 130

Copp, Karen 137, 138

Sears, Steve 50, 52, 54

Costanzo, Patricia Di 74

Shimabukuro, Jill 132

Critelli, Chris 22

Soom, Marnie 56

Crowley-Webber, Elizabeth 134, 135

Suydam, Erin 154

Cupo, Aldo 80, 165, 167

Thompson, Stephanie 158, 159

Davies, Joan 34, 36, 38, 64, 66, 84

Ting Ting, Tsoi 133

Davis, Clare 44, 90

Wiginton, Christina 46

171


Typefaces

ErikRighthand Pro 104

Abolition 157

FF Scala 58

Acumin Pro 166

Filson Pro 154

Adobe Text Pro 62

FK Screamer 160

AIWood Antique Condensed 70

Francesca 74

Alegreya 74

Franklin Gothic 68

Alright Sans 66

Freight Text Pro 76

Alternate Gothic 137, 162

Futura 129, 136, 147, 155, 157

Antique 2 Condensed Bold 70

Galano Grotesque 90

Antique Olive Nord 102

Garamond 24, 26, 72, 114, 153

Archer 138

Glypha LT Std 159

Archetype 156

Gotham 64, 78, 86, 112, 128, 132, 149, 163

Arnhem 36

Graphik 36, 165

Arnhem Pro Blond 84

Harbour 165

Arno Pro 16, 38, 66, 100, 129, 135, 136

Harriet Text 64

Ashwood Extra Bold 70

Helvetica 22, 62, 130, 158

Atlas Grotesk 34, 36

HiH Incline 138

Avant Garde 52, 98, 135

Hoefler Text 42

Avenir 54

HWT Arabesque Regular 146

BankNue Lined 163

Ideal Sans 46

Begum 84

Jenson Pro 50

Berkeley Old Style 96

Jersey M54, 150

Berthold Akzidenz 58

Kastelov Kinetika 106

Bluu Nex 18

Knockout 76

Bodoni 141, 143, 144, 147, 153

Louize Display 80

Bookman Old Style 102

Lust 157

Brixton Wood 70

Lyon 160

Bullion Extra Condensed 70

Metallophile Sp8, 114, 148

Bulmer 28

Metropolis 92

Calibre 88

Miller 86, 132

Canela Text 20, 110

Minion Pro 22, 30, 78, 98, 124, 148, 150, 159

Caslon Pro 104, 118, 145, 162, 164

Mostardesign 154

Chaparral Pro 122

Mr Eaves 122

Circular Standard 98

Mrs Eaves 131

Copihue 118, 120

MS Reference Sans Serif 102

Dala Floda 34

Neue Haas Grotesk 56

Dante 70, 128

Neue Plak 167

Din 38, 134

Neutraface 2, 56

Druk XCondensed 133

New Baskerville 139, 142

Eames Century Modern 78

New Rail Alphabet 14

Electra 120

Numberplate 24

Epilogue 42

Objectiv Mk 3, 151

172


Plantin 152

D’Auria Printing 50, 54

Plusquam Sans 96

Die Keure 24

Poplar 134

Friesens 28, 36, 102, 104, 124, 132, 140, 145, 162

Portrait Text 18, 20, 68

Hang Tai Printing Company Ltd. 133

Praktika Medium Extended 144

Imprimerie Gauvin 139, 141, 142, 143

Providence 104

Ingram Lightning Source 146, 147, 161

PSFournier Std Petit 72

Integrated Books International 40, 149, 157

Sabon MT 151

John P. Pow Company 22, 38, 62, 64, 68, 110, 144, 164

SangBleu Republic 88

Jostens 56

Scala Sans Pro 48

Kings Time Printing Press, LLC at Toppan Leefung 92,

Schmalfette CP 58

118

Sentinel 14, 52

Maple Press 70, 72, 155

Signal Compressed 167

Martin Book Management 86

SimSun 112

McNaughton & Gunn 114, 150

Sirba 48

Meridian Printing 94

Source Sans Variable 124

Narayana Press 14, 16, 128

Super Grotesk 54

Perfection Press 163

Surveyor 94

Phoenix Color 76, 129, 130, 131, 134, 160

Sweet Sans Pro 72

Porter Print Group 18, 20

Trade Gothic 140

Printer Trento s.r.l. 44

Trio Grotesk 164

Pristone Pte. Ltd. 96, 106

TT Jenevers 44

Regent Publishing Services 58

Tusker Grotesk 140, 161

Sheridan Books 22, 26, 30, 38, 64, 68, 76, 78, 80, 110,

Twentieth Century 30

112, 136, 152, 154, 156, 165, 166, 167

Unit Slab OT 44

Thomson Reuters 158, 159

Univers 40, 159

Verona Libri, Italy 46

Warnock Pro 112, 161

Versa Press 62, 120, 122, 135, 137, 138, 148, 151

Whitman 92, 110

Wilco bv 74

Whitney Index 62 Windsor 100 Wood Bonnet Antique No 7, 70 Work Sans 84 Yale 80 Printers / Binders Artron 42, 88 Asia Pacific Offset 48 Australian Book connection 98 BALTO Print 100 C&C Offset 34, 66, 84, 90 Conti Tipocolor 52 CPI Antony Rowe Ltd. 153

173



Acknowledgments

The AUPresses Book, Jacket, and Journal Show committee recognizes the individuals and companies whose generosity and expertise made the 2022 show and catalog possible. We would like to express our appreciation to our judges Stephen Coles, Tim Green, Lisa Hamm, and Lucy Kim for their time and efforts in this endeavor. We would like to thank Kate Kolendo and the AUPresses staff for their advice and assistance throughout the two days of judging. And lastly, many thanks to Friesens for supporting the work of AUPresses by printing and binding the catalog. Call for Entries Design and Production Wendy McMillen Award Certificate Design and Production Barbara Neely Bourgoyne Paper and Printing Maple Press Catalog

2022 AUPresses Book, Jacket, and Journal

Design and Typesetting Brady McNamara

Show Committee

Editor and Production Barbara Neely Bourgoyne

Barbara Neely Bourgoyne, Chair, LSU Press

Production Coordinator Carrie D. Teefey

Jennifer Blanc-Tal, Rutgers University Press

Typefaces Operetta, Acumin by Adobe

Ani Deyirmenjian, University of Toronto Press

Paper, Printing, and Binding Friesens

Mindy Hill, University of Mexico Press

Paper 12pt C1S (cover), 80 lb Rolland Opaque (text)

Kevin Barrett Kane, University of California Press Mark Lerner, Fordham University Press Wendy McMillen, University of Notre Dame Press Brady McNamara, Oxford University Press Regina Starace, Penn State University Press Carrie Downes Teefey, Wayne State University Press

175


©2022 Association of University Presses Association of University Presses 1412 Broadway, Suite 2135 New York, NY 10018 United States 917-244-1264 aupresses.org Printed in Canada