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Augusta Oriole November 2017 Volume 85, Issue 2

The

Augusta High School

2020 Ohio

Augusta KS 67010

(316) 775-5461

www.orioleonline.com

AHSnewspaper@usd402.com

Market Day

Youth entrepreneurs test out small businesses Maddy Foy Reporter

John Bourget (10) serves himself pasta. The pasta stand was ran by Logan Thompson (11) and Gage Pressnell (11). Photo by Maddy Foy

Nathan Anderson (12) and Evan Houser (12) serve Eli Flower (10). Tyler Call (12) hung out at the taco table. Photo by Maddy Foy

Haylee Hoefgen (12) and Tyler Smith (12) serve their food to Jayson Shwinn (math teacher). Photo by Maddy Foy

Market Day consists of eight tables with a variety of desserts, foods and clothes. Many of the staff and students enjoyed the food from Market Day. Grace Allen (12) contributed to the dessert table. “We sold oreo balls, cake balls, and cheesecake,” Allen said. The oreo balls sold the most. Her table received many positive comments. “There were a lot of people telling us that it tasted good,” Allen said. Although, there was also concerns about dessert prices. “Some were unhappy with some of the prices,” Allen said. They dropped the prices at the end of the day. Her table had a candy raffle. “The candy raffle was for each four lunches,” Allen said. Nathan Anderson (12) was apart of the taco table. “The preparation was probably the difficult part,” Anderson said. At their table they had tacos, walking tacos and drinks. “Our drinks probably sold the most

from our table,” Anderson said. His table was not able to pay back the loan from the money they made. “Our table was the only table that did not break even,” Anderson said. Their drinks sold the most from their table. “We had a lot of good comments about our table,” Anderson said. There were also comments against the food. “A couple people said that it tasted kind of bland, but it was mostly positive comments that we got,” Anderson said. Kenzie Terry (10) bought food on Market Day. “I had two slices of pizza,” Terry said. She also bought a lemonade and cheesecake. “My favorite thing was the pizza,” Terry said. She enjoyed Market Day. “I like having market day every year,” Terry said. She was on a diet. “ I was on a diet, so i could not get a sample of a lot of things,” Terry said. Market Day was a great experience for the Youth Entrepreneurs.

Grace Allen (12) and Mikayla Coppinger (12) serve desserts to all four lunches. At their table they served oreo balls, cheesecake, and cake balls. They also provided a candy raffle to the lunches. Photo by Maddy Foy

Ty Luna (12) and Matthew Furr (12) talk about their business progress. They served pizza and pop. Photo by Maddy Foy

Caitlyn Cody (12) and Tessa Daigh (12) serve queso. They also sold Rice Fries and chips. Photo by Maddy Foy

Kenzie Terry (10) enjoys the rest of her pizza from Market Day. She also had another piece of pizza earlier. Photo by Maddy Foy

Thoroughly Modern Millie’ performs on stage Tatum reporter

Jimmy Smith (Hayden Jansen (10)) and Millie (Josie Hand (12)) argue after Millie arrives. Photo by Aubrey Stueven

After eight weeks of rehearsing the cast of “Thoroughly Modern Millie” took stage to perform for family, friends and teachers. “Thoroughly Modern Millie” is a musical about a feisty, young, flapper girl in the 1920s who plans to marry her wealthy employer. Millie (Josie Hand (12)) soon learns there is more to marriage than money. All the while her landlord Ms. Meers (Adrian Kaufman (12)) plans to sell her into white slavery. In order to get into these characters Hand and Hayden Jansen (10), who played Jimmy Smith, took the time to see from their character’s perspective.

“I like to really break down the character and get here and start feeling the character 30 minutes before the show. Part of it is thinking of the character less of a them and more of an I,” Hand said. Another important aspect of a musical is learning lines and lyrics. “I rely on my friends and family to help me run lines and practice it every day in my free time,” Jansen said. Though learning lines and getting into character is important, it takes more than just them to put on a production. “I use the headset to call people when their scene is coming up,” stage manager Katelyn Moore (12) said. “Early on I was doing t-shirt orders, posters and attendance.” Set crew plays an important role in

the musical. “[During rehearsals] I sat out [in the auditorium] and observe and if I see a problem I try real hard to talk to the crew about that,” set designer Cathy Stahmer said. Directors Jarrod McNutt and Tim Laner both had a hand in helping the play come together. “[I helped the cast with] learning their vocal parts and techniques for different notes,” McNutt said. After a good deal of work by many people the cast and crew were happy with their performance. “It was a long process and there were many hardships that came with it, but I think it’s really improved and turned out to be a great performance,” Jansen said.


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News

The Oriole

November 2017

Marching band ends on high note Tatum Moore Reporter

seemed to enjoy the music more since they chose it. “I think we felt more confident with the music since we picked it and knew it,” JC Bailey (10) said. Many had high expectations for the show after finding out the music was from the famous “Pirate of the Caribbean” movies. “We started on July 31 with a camp that lasted 8 hours a-day for a week. Then we had two evening practices

and an early morning practice once a week along with class time,” Hollis said. The band’s long hours of pracThe marching band’s hours of work tice paid off with a performance in during morning practices, class, evethe cold at Arkalalah, where they ning practices and a week-long camp received a I, which is the highest showed during their last performance rating on a one to five scale. of the year at Arkalalah. “I think we did great considerBand director Todd Hollis made the ing it was very cold and we were all decision to add a couple of practices ready to go home since we knew it between band camp and the school was our last show,” Lynch said. year because of the difficulty of the Along with the cold, show and to help band the band faced another members remember everychallenge. thing they learned at camp. “We added a new field “This year, there was a entry that day,” Hollis lot of tempo changes and a said. lot of time changes,” drum Normally, the band major Madelyn Lynch (12) marches on the side field said. and after receiving a cue Along with the highfrom the drum majors speed and time changes, they march onto the field. many movements the band At Arkalalah the band performed while on the field surprised everyone by were added. running to the far left “This was probably our corner of the field. most challenging and highThey were then lead in est degree of difficulty show a song pirates would have we have ever done,” Hollis sung called a sea chanty said. The marching band marches in the parade at Arkalalah, which was then ran onto the field as Although the show was held in Ark City. The band received a I for how they did in the paif they were pirates. more difficult, the students rade. Photo Courtesy Rachelle Meinecke

Girls are now allowed in Boy Scouts Tatum Moore Reporter A lot of controversy has occurred since Boy Scouts of America (BSA) announced that girls will now be allowed to participate in Boy Scouts and earn the rank of Eagle Scout. BSA hopes this change will increase the number of Boy Scouts, help families with multiple children who want to be in the same program and affect the program in a positive way. Others fear there will be a negative effect on the Girl Scout program. “I think [the change] has potential to decrease the number of girls in girl scouts,” Girl Scout leader Samantha Stueven said. Many argue that there are too many co-ed organizations and that there needs to be more organizations that are just for girls and just for boys. “I feel that boys and girls should be allowed to have their own clubs,” John George (12) said. Parents are worried about boys and girls not having organizations where they are free to be themselves. “I think that it’s important to allow girls to express themselves in a safe environment and Boy Scouts and other co-ed organizations may not allow that,” Stueven said. Some Boy Scouts are worried about

the effect on tradition and the number of boys involved in Boy Scouts. “Less boys will go out for Boy Scouts, and it will change traditions that have been around for over 100 years,” John said. Other Boy Scouts do not think there will be a large effect on the program. “[I think] most girls will want to stay in Girl Scouts,” Conner Davis (11) said. Many others think that it could have a positive effect on both boys and girls who are involved in Boy Scouts. “I think there will be benefits to girls who earn the Eagle Scout rank. Most people don’t know the highest rank for Girl Scouts like they do Boy Scouts,” Boy Scout leader Joel Davis said. “Anytime you bring in diversity it can provide benefit.” Others believe that girls should remain in Girl Scouts because it is meant for girls, while Boy Scouts was originally made only for boys. “I don’t think [girls] should [join

Boy Scouts], because it’s Boy Scouts that’s why they made Girl Scouts,” Conner said. If parents or leaders do not want the scouts to be mixed, there is the option of having a girls-only pack. “The biggest problem will be explaining how it is going to work,” Joel said. “It’s not going to be completely mixed; there will be separation.” Some believe the biggest problem could be finding parents to help monitor the scouts. “Naturally, there will be more monitoring and supervision because of harassment and flirting, but it will get worse as they get older,” Avin George (12) said. Currently small Boy Scout programs such as Venturing and Sea Scouting are co-ed, but none are as prominent as Cub Scouts. “The big change is girls being allowed to receive the rank of Eagle Scout,” Joel said.

President Trump shows off his executive order. The order is to remove Obamacare. Photo Courtesy of By Andrea Hanks (The White House) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

President attempts to solve national issues Maddy Foy Reporter President Donald Trump has gone further into replacing Obamacare with a new health care plan much less expensive, but this new healthcare may be a challenge for some people. The healthcare plan worries some. “It will affect it to where few people will have access to care,” Payne Roby (12) said. Social studies teacher Joan Reichardt agrees that if Obamacare resulted in the way it was planned, that it would have worked well. “It’s just that it got so deluded as it went through congress that what we ended up with was not intended,” Reichardt said. Roby had some ideas for what he would change about Helathcare. “If I could make changes, I would put the working class in control of healthcare,” Roby said. He thinks that the working class would do a better job at it. “With the working class in control, it would make it to where it is in the interest of the people,” Roby said. Some think that Obamacare needs some changes. “I would prefer that they keep the parts of healthcare that are working and fix the parts that are not,” Hess said. He has one major concern. “Whatever they do, it needs to be permanent,” Hess said. He thinks that keeping the healthcare plan permanent it would prevent this problem from occurring again. Reichardt believes that healthcare costs will increase greatly. “The insurance companies have been making a lot of money and they’re not going to give up on that,” Reichardt said. She thinks the plan right now is just going to give those insurance companies more opportunities to increase rates. Reichardt she believes they needed to allow more freedom for people to choose programs.

The Augusta Oriole Staff 2017-2018 Mission and Policy Our mission as the staff of the 2017-2018 Augusta Oriole is to provide the student body with newsworthy information and entertainment in a professional and timely manner. The Oriole serves as an open forum for student expression in Augusta High School, encouraging all sides to voice their opinions in order to better serve the entire school community. Signed letters to the editor of no more than 250 words are accepted and may be edited for style, grammar, length and taste. If a student or faculty member would like to submit an article or comic please turn it in for review by the 1st of each month. The Editor-In-Chief is responsible for all content approved. The Oriole is published every progress term, with exception of the online edition and in accordance with the Kansas Student Publications Act is written, edited and produced by the Digital Media Design and Production students with the guidance of an adviser. Contact ahsnewspaper@usd402.com questions or concerns.

Editor-In-Chief: Bailey Pennycuff Adviser Julie barker

Staff Lindsay Baugher Noah Coldwell Maddy Foy Cierra Jackson Gracie Johnson Charles Lighty Michaela Lord Tatum Moore Aubrey Stueven Sadie Williams


The Oriole

Opinions

November 2017

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Loving sisters by chance, mortal enemies by choice Gracie Johnston Reporter Sisters always share and have each other’s backs. There is an agreement called the sister pact. All the sisters are supposed to keep each others’ secrets and cover for one another from their parents. I have three sisters. Sometimes I think having three sisters is the best thing in the world. Other times, I wonder why a person like me got this unlucky. I am the second oldest out of four girls. Drama, Overachiever and The Baby are the fake identities I have given my sisters, in order to protect their true identities or maybe expose them. Who really knows? Drama is my oldest sister, and she always has some sort of problem. I have diagnosed her with AOR syndrome also known as always overreacting syndrome. It is truly a very serious case, but do not worry my family is attempting to get her help. Growing up with Drama as my older sister was always interesting because most times it felt like I was actually playing the role of the older sibling. However, Drama is no longer in the house, so the role of being the oldest was passed to me. Honestly, I thank her for preparing me for this job. My next sister is the Overachiever, and we are very close in age. The best thing about her is that I can always steal her clothes, makeup and whatever else I want. Unfortunately, she can steal my items as well. Overachiever is extremely smart and beats me in

The four Johnston sisters pose for a picture before the first day of school in 2014. Their mom forces them to act like they love eachother every year for a picture before the first day of school. Photo courtesy Angie Johnston

almost everything that I do. Sometimes I feel as if I am in constant competition with her. I remember a time that I beat her in a race. I was six. She did not like losing, and she still dislikes the feeling she receives after a loss. After she lost, she broke my arm. Although I won the race, I lost a lot more than she did. Since she does almost everything better than I do, my mother always feels the need to let me know that Overachiever is the best, and I am a failure. I can handle it though. I have come to accept that I will never be a better brownnoser than her. Now, to the youngest sister of them all. She has many nicknames, such as Devil-child, but the Baby seemed most fitting at the moment.

For those of you who have a little sister you will profoundly relate to me when I say this. Even though The Baby starts the fight, do not fight back because, with a bat of those Medusa eyes, your parents will ground you. “But mom it was self defense,” Nope, never works. The Baby always gets her way. I was attempting to do my homework and the brat walks to me and slams my laptop shut and throws my book bag on the floor. I warn her that I am bigger than she is and she should not mess with me. I am pretty sure that she is deaf because she did not hear me, and she decided to do it one more time. I did what any big sister would rightfully do. I pushed her to the ground. Before you overreact and call me mean, she had it coming, and she was not hurt. She decided to pull the “mom” card. For those of you who do not know what that is, it is when your sibling yells “Mom” to tattle on you. Long story short, I ended up grounded, and she ended up with a new doll. I could go on and on about my sisters but I am writing an article not a book. Ultimately, I trust my sisters with all of my secrets. Okay, I lied. Baby does not have secret-learning privileges, yet. The other two, however, in some ways, have my life in their hands. I know even though we fight, they will never turn on me, because once you join the sister pact you are locked in it forever.

Culture affects traditions Homework quantities Bailey Pennycuff Editor-in-Chief

In traditional American culture, Thanksgiving may be celebrated in different ways. Typically, families gather together to enjoy a plentiful banquet. My family members attend a Thanksgiving lunch at my parents’ house. The banquet consists of turkey, ham, stuffing, green bean casserole, mashed potatoes and gravy and various kinds of pies and cobblers for dessert. Dish options differentiate from year-to-year, but the main dishes remain. The best meal to have on Thanksgiving is juicy ham, smooth mashed potatoes with white gravy and plump rolls that are as soft as a cloud. The sweet butter on the dinner rolls must be lightly heated and almost a complete liquid. Traditions involved with Thanksgiving Day for my family could include watching the football game or even playing a gentle yet fun football game outside (weather permitting). Sometimes we split the family into teams and play an entertaining game of whiffleball or kickball. Watching the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is a traditional feature for the morning of Thanksgiving. My mom enjoys watching the parade. Even if my sisters and I do not particularly enjoy it as much as she does, we still sit down in the livingroom and watch the parade together. Another famous activity for

Thanksgiving in the Pennycuff household is shopping at various stores and outlets. Every year, Black Friday sales start earlier and earlier. Many sales even begin on Thursday night. Black Friday shopping is important because many affordable deals are available that usually are not. It is also important because of the family-time that is valued. In my family, Black Friday shopping is important and is considered a tradition now. My mom spends over ten hours shopping for Black Friday sales on average each year. Even though she shops throughout the entire night and during the wee hours of the mornings, her sleep deprivation is worth it for her to see her family smiling while opening the gifts on Christmas morning. However, leaving Thanksgiving dinner to go shopping is not permissible, even if the shopping is being done with another family member. Going “Black Thursday” shopping is an excellent activity to do with other family members, and can even bring family members closer together. However, the activity should only be done if the shopping occurs subsequent to the dinner and all other family activities. If any Black Friday shopper is too commited to shopping rather than spending the holiday with their family, then their priorities are in need of repairing.

cause unnecessary stress Gracie Johnston Reporter I have fallen asleep in the middle of doing my homework countless times. I will be up until 2 a.m. just attempting to finish all of my work that teachers have piled onto my other assignments. As an athlete, and a person who is very involved, I sometimes find it difficult to develop a time in my schedule to do my homework after school. I always end up doing something for my sport or a club that I am in, and then am forced to put a majority of my school work on the back burner. By the time I get to it, there is no longer sunshine outside of my window. Instead, the only light shining is the streetlamp outside of my window. Yes, it’s true. I should do my homework earlier, and I would not be up as late. However, I have at least two to four hours of homework every day after school. Ultimately, if I did my homework when I got home, there would not be any room to do anything else by the time I was done. Counselors frequently push students to become more involved around the school, which truly is excellent. Extra-curricular avtivities are very important. However, how can we do that when we are being eaten alive by homework? I am not saying that all homework

is completely unnecessary. All I am saying is that I go to school for eight hours each day and the last thing I want to do when I get home from school and extra curricular activities is more homework. Also, it is not like I am receiving all of this homework from one class. I am assigned homework for every single class that I am enrolled in. I know that some of you are reading this and rolling your eyes wishing I would stop complaining. I will not stop. 85% of teenage students in the United States are sleep deprived according to the National Sleep Foundation. I can tell you the reason why we are so sleep deprived. It is homework. It is timely and most of the time it is stressful. Oftentimes I feel like teachers give homework as punishment or busy work. Think about it though. If you do not give us homework, you would not have to grade it. So really, it could potentially be a win-win situation. I am calling all students and teachers to come together as one to create a movement. I am not working to abolish homework as a whole, but trying to reduce homework intake for each student. I believe that it would essentianlly make our school a better and happier place.


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Features

The Oriole

November 2017

English teacher Strategies to boost ACT composite score works toward masters degree Sadie Williams Reporter

es per sec m i t ti st 40 mins

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English teacher Becky Timberlake took over the Butler County Community College’s English courses. When former teacher Cindy Nickel announced her retirement, Timberlake saw an opportunity. “When Mrs. Nickel decided that she was retiring for sure, we were going to need a teacher to teach the Butler composition classes,” Timberlake said. This information inspired Timberlake to pursue her masters. “I needed a masters anyway, I just had never decided what I wanted to get it in. With [Nickel] leaving, I was like, I need to go back to school.” Timberlake said. At the time, Timberlake was a cheerleading coach. “It was a really hard decision to make because I loved being a cheer coach and I loved all of the girls,” Timberlake said. The cheerleaders look back fondly on Timberlake’s impact on the squad. “I miss being around her, like, all the time because I don’t have her as a teacher anymore,” squad member Evan Wilson (12) said. Timberlake also sacrificed time with her family to pursue her degree. “She’s not always home as early as she has been when she wasn’t going to school,” son Zach Timberlake (9) said. Despite these sacrifices, Timberlake thinks that the degree is well worth it. “I love just walking around on WSU campus, going to the library, and having discussions with other people, so it was really hard but I love both sides of it,” Timberlake said. The classes she has taken have enhanced her teaching. “For English literature you have to know a lot of history in whatever it is you’re reading. So, I’ve gotten a lot more content knowledge now which is a lot of fun, just knowing more things.” Timberlake said. She has one more year before she earns her master’s degree.

For juniors and seniors, the ACT (American College Testing) is an accepted but dreaded part of life. The ACT is an important test for high school students to take for many reasons. “It’s two fold. One is that a lot of schools base their acceptance to their universities on the ACT,” counselor Tracy Anderson said. “Most importantly, the ACT generates the most scholarship dollars. Most schools will offer scholarship aid solely on ACTs, then obviously your national scholarships focus on the ACT’s.” Although everyone knows of it, the majority of them do not know how to effectively prepare for the test. The most important concept to understand about the ACT is the structure. “There’s a reading portion where you read passages and answer questions on them,” Presley Williams (11) said. “There’s a grammar, kind of languagey portion. There’s a math portion, which is just math problems,

and it’s all multiple choice. The science lectures on the test. “There are ACT practice tests, and portion, which is awful, and you read a chart usually like a little summary and there are several ACT prep workshops you answer questions.” that are offered throughout the country and specifically in our area. It After one has a solid grasp of how the is difficult to study for the material on the ACT is set up, ACT, but these they can resources give start to you strategies work on time manon how to Writing take them,” agement. English (Optional) Anderson Each secsaid. tion of the RegardACT has less of a specific Reading personal time limit; preferences, if one does not finish understanding Math the material is the test in Science a tried-and-true that time, they method of preparare forced to stop ing for the ACT. where they are. g r If individuals has not “Timing is the part Source: act.o taken the test, yet, or want that caught me off guard the to improve their scores, testing dates most and is probably the reason why I missed most of the stuff that I did are scheduled every couple months. Dec. 9 is the next ACT test date. miss,” Katie Rockers (11) said. Another way to prepare for the ACT Although the registration has already is by taking practice tests, and going to passed, late registration closes today.

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Sadie Williams Reporter

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Junior’s job shadow for class project Aubrey Stueven Reporter Juniors enrolled in the compositions semester of English III have started work on the junior portfolio, which is the main project of the class. The project includes a two parts. One part is the job shadow, where students take a day and follow someone in their field of interest. The other part is a group community service-learning project. For most, the junior project brings stress, along with another task on an already busy schedule. “October is the most stressful month of the year, so having the project has made this year even more of a challenge,” Noah Stevens (11) said. For some, scheduling a job shadow was an issue because the companies they try to contact did not return phone calls or emails. This caused problems because many were left without a place to job shadow.

“I was going to do my junior job shadow over plastic surgery, and I called at least 10 different places, and none of them called me back, so

Reagan White (11) with a fourth grader at Garfield Elementary School.. She shadowed first grade teacher Kathy Shaffer. Photo by Lauren Burrows

when I called them back about a week later, they were all like ‘Oh, that’s what this sticky note is for,’ so it was kind of a forgotten sticky note,” Jaci Bogner (11) said. Groups of two or three students had the ability to job shadow the same person. This allowed them to work together when interviewing and spend the day with someone they were comfortable with. “Most of the day we weren’t together because[the teacher she job shadowed] had us working with students the whole day,” Reagan White (11) said. Along with a job shadow, the junior project includes a community service learning project. The service work includes six hours of volunteering. The project was completed in groups of 2-4 people, and the group picked a place to volunteer together. Though the groups had to each volunteer six hours, they do not have to accomplish all of the hours at the same time.


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Features

The Oriole

November 2017

Change in coordination effects student section trends Noah Coldwell Reporter For many schools, athletic games can be highlighted by a sectioned off area in the bleachers just for students to cheer on the team. These student sections are different school-to-school, but each with the same goal in mind, support their school’s teams. Because of the need for coordination in the student section, Student Council and history teacher Jake Sims created the O’s Zone. “I think we’re starting to figure it out. The student sections were a lot louder for the duration of games when I was in school than what we have now. I just think we need to find some things that are unique to Augusta,” Sims said. Not only are student sections a tradition at most schools, they also tend to affect the quality of game-play. “I believe it has a tremendous impact. It definitely gives a psychological advantage knowing your classmates

Members of the O’s Zone, the newly formed and named student section, raise their hands above their heads and form an O with their hands to signify their Oriole pride. The O’s Zone was developed to support not only sports teams but other school activities like the musical. Photo by Chase Hughes

are going to cheer for you the entire time,” Sims said. The O’s Zone was put in place to create a consistency in the trends and get the word out about good ways to support the school while coordinating with the rest of the students.

Stress levels soar as high school progresses Aubrey Stueven Reporter Having a maximum of eight classes can increases stress for many students, as well as homework, activities, their schedules, or the people around them. For each student, a different source of stress affects their lives. “The largest contribution to my stress right now is finding time to fit everything in,” Carly Condella (10) said. Condella participated in the school musical on top of her other classes, taking up a large portion of the time that she typically would have spent working on school work. For students who are involved in activities, finding time to do homework and study for school can seem like a daunting task. Sometimes, students resort to completing their homework done in the mornings or staying up late at night in order to complete their work for the next day. “Usually, I try to procrastinate as long as I can on my work because I feel like I work better [under a sense of] urgency,” Zach Roeder (12) said. Finishing homework the day it is due is not recommended by most students for the incoming class of freshmen. For the freshmen coming from the middle school, this is their first year

getting used to a block schedule. This means they have to transition from one way of taking their classes to another. The freshmen also have to relearn the teaching styles of the high school teachers. “[My stress level is] very high. The teacher’s don’t explain as well as they used to,” Elly Morales (9) said. To destress, students participate in different activities. Some practice sports on their own time or listen to music. They also think of clever ways to fit in time to have their homework completed. “How I deal with stress is by writing music and going on jogs. I do my homework during rehearsal to keep up in my classes,” Condella said. Instead of stressing on school work, some students stress is due to the people that surrounding them at school. This could be teachers or their fellow classmates. Some overly exuberant classmates tend to annoy others. “I think most of my stress is because of the idiots running around yelling. I deal with that by taking a deep breath,” Austin Taylor (9) said. For some, dealing with the stress of the people around them does not come as easily as taking a deep breath. Instead, they cope by taking a deep breath, listening to music or exercising.

“Word gets out through the O’s Zone Twitter usually, and the school intercom, Jake Sims just basically tells everyone,” Ashley Prentice (10) said. The advancement in communication has changed the way student sections behave and come together.

“I think the ideas have become a lot simpler since my freshman year, which makes it a lot easier for everyone to participate in the trends, but the seniors still think they get to be in the front all the time even if other people want to cheer there as well,” Prentice said. The pride and passion for high schools can cause conflict can also cause tension between schools. “I just remember playing Circle during football on their homecoming, and they stole one of the signs we put in front of the school. They showed off the sign in the middle of the game and our entire student section sprinted to the other side of the field to get it back,” Tommy Pittman (10) said. Although, with positivity in mind, chants and signs may sometimes get out of hand. “It’s probably not as school appropriate as I’d like it to be, and I think that’s an area that we can make some improvements on, but that’s not really something you can go and change,” Sims said.

Car competitions thrive Noah Coldwell Reporter From Steve McQueen’s Mustang in “Bullet” to Dom Toretto’s Charger in “The Fast and the Furious” franchise, and since their invention in 1886, automobiles have been a necessary part of modern society. As long as there have been cars, there have been people to view them. With the availability of vehicles to students, some have taken the opportunity to have their own show cars and visit shows that display the vehicles of their dreams. “My family and I visit about 10 different car shows a year. We typically like to go to the big ones, but my favorite is a small one for my dad’s friend’s memorial,” Sophie Stevens (10) said. Some students take it a step further and enter their own cars into competitions. “I don’t usually enter my car into

After placing in a bracket race, Briggs Erwin (11) poses for a picture next to his Trans Am. Photo courtesy of Briggs Erwin

shows, but I’m really into bracket racing and heads up racing,” Briggs Erwin (11) said. Cars can be a vital part of some students lives and can consume a lot of their free time. “Every day, I go to work and save money so I can buy engine mods and body parts to make my car run nicer and stuff like that,” Erwin said. An interesting hobby that can be introduced through this is photography. Cars offer a variety of styles; from big to small, in a rage of different colors. This offers a diversity of different photos and an abundance of creative options to take. “Taking pictures of cars has always just been one of my hobbies, and I’ve just always been into cars,” Braden Lowe (11) said. To the right person, cars can be a great way to spend free time. “I go out at least every weekend to go take pictures, it’s for sure one of my favorite hobbies,” Lowe said.

Outside the Alley in Wichita, Braden Lowe (11) poses next to his Scion FRS Photo courtesy of Braden Lowe


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Features

The Oriole

November 2017

Change in coordination effects student section trends Noah Coldwell Reporter For many schools, athletic games can be highlighted by a sectioned off area in the bleachers just for students to cheer on the team. These student sections are different school-to-school, but each with the same goal in mind, support their school’s teams. Because of the need for coordination in the student section, Student Council and history teacher Jake Sims created the O’s Zone. “I think we’re starting to figure it out. The student sections were a lot louder for the duration of games when I was in school than what we have now. I just think we need to find some things that are unique to Augusta,” Sims said. Not only are student sections a tradition at most schools, they also tend to affect the quality of game-play. “I believe it has a tremendous impact. It definitely gives a psychological advantage knowing your classmates

Members of the O’s Zone, the newly formed and named student section, raise their hands above their heads and form an O with their hands to signify their Oriole pride. The O’s Zone was developed to support not only sports teams but other school activities like the musical. Photo by Chase Hughes

are going to cheer for you the entire time,” Sims said. The O’s Zone was put in place to create a consistency in the trends and get the word out about good ways to support the school while coordinating with the rest of the students.

Stress levels soar as high school progresses Aubrey Stueven Reporter Having a maximum of eight classes can increases stress for many students, as well as homework, activities, their schedules, or the people around them. For each student, a different source of stress affects their lives. “The largest contribution to my stress right now is finding time to fit everything in,” Carly Condella (10) said. Condella participated in the school musical on top of her other classes, taking up a large portion of the time that she typically would have spent working on school work. For students who are involved in activities, finding time to do homework and study for school can seem like a daunting task. Sometimes, students resort to completing their homework done in the mornings or staying up late at night in order to complete their work for the next day. “Usually, I try to procrastinate as long as I can on my work because I feel like I work better [under a sense of] urgency,” Zach Roeder (12) said. Finishing homework the day it is due is not recommended by most students for the incoming class of freshmen. For the freshmen coming from the middle school, this is their first year

getting used to a block schedule. This means they have to transition from one way of taking their classes to another. The freshmen also have to relearn the teaching styles of the high school teachers. “[My stress level is] very high. The teacher’s don’t explain as well as they used to,” Elly Morales (9) said. To destress, students participate in different activities. Some practice sports on their own time or listen to music. They also think of clever ways to fit in time to have their homework completed. “How I deal with stress is by writing music and going on jogs. I do my homework during rehearsal to keep up in my classes,” Condella said. Instead of stressing on school work, some students stress is due to the people that surrounding them at school. This could be teachers or their fellow classmates. Some overly exuberant classmates tend to annoy others. “I think most of my stress is because of the idiots running around yelling. I deal with that by taking a deep breath,” Austin Taylor (9) said. For some, dealing with the stress of the people around them does not come as easily as taking a deep breath. Instead, they cope by taking a deep breath, listening to music or exercising.

“Word gets out through the O’s Zone Twitter usually, and the school intercom, Jake Sims just basically tells everyone,” Ashley Prentice (10) said. The advancement in communication has changed the way student sections behave and come together.

“I think the ideas have become a lot simpler since my freshman year, which makes it a lot easier for everyone to participate in the trends, but the seniors still think they get to be in the front all the time even if other people want to cheer there as well,” Prentice said. The pride and passion for high schools can cause conflict can also cause tension between schools. “I just remember playing Circle during football on their homecoming, and they stole one of the signs we put in front of the school. They showed off the sign in the middle of the game and our entire student section sprinted to the other side of the field to get it back,” Tommy Pittman (10) said. Although, with positivity in mind, chants and signs may sometimes get out of hand. “It’s probably not as school appropriate as I’d like it to be, and I think that’s an area that we can make some improvements on, but that’s not really something you can go and change,” Sims said.

Car competitions thrive Noah Coldwell Reporter From Steve McQueen’s Mustang in “Bullet” to Dom Toretto’s Charger in “The Fast and the Furious” franchise, and since their invention in 1886, automobiles have been a necessary part of modern society. As long as there have been cars, there have been people to view them. With the availability of vehicles to students, some have taken the opportunity to have their own show cars and visit shows that display the vehicles of their dreams. “My family and I visit about 10 different car shows a year. We typically like to go to the big ones, but my favorite is a small one for my dad’s friend’s memorial,” Sophie Stevens (10) said. Some students take it a step further and enter their own cars into competitions. “I don’t usually enter my car into

After placing in a bracket race, Briggs Erwin (11) poses for a picture next to his Trans Am. Photo courtesy of Briggs Erwin

shows, but I’m really into bracket racing and heads up racing,” Briggs Erwin (11) said. Cars can be a vital part of some students lives and can consume a lot of their free time. “Every day, I go to work and save money so I can buy engine mods and body parts to make my car run nicer and stuff like that,” Erwin said. An interesting hobby that can be introduced through this is photography. Cars offer a variety of styles; from big to small, in a rage of different colors. This offers a diversity of different photos and an abundance of creative options to take. “Taking pictures of cars has always just been one of my hobbies, and I’ve just always been into cars,” Braden Lowe (11) said. To the right person, cars can be a great way to spend free time. “I go out at least every weekend to go take pictures, it’s for sure one of my favorite hobbies,” Lowe said.

Outside the Alley in Wichita, Braden Lowe (11) poses next to his Scion FRS Photo courtesy of Braden Lowe


The Oriole

Sports

November 2017

7

Players, coaches prepare for basketball season Michaela Lord Reporter As basketball season approaches, the girls and boys basketball teams are preparing. Those athletes playing fall sports may not be in shape for the upcoming seasons. “I’m ready and excited for the season, but I’m not very in shape, it’s a whole different level of activity than football,” Clay Wesbrooks (12) said. Students are preparing for basketball season in their own ways. “Once football is done, I’m going to start running more. In football there is a group of students that run after practice,” said Wesbrooks. Conditioning before and during the season helps in many different ways. “The better you are conditioned the more able you are to work on actual basketball skills, and the more conditioned you are the easier it is to prevent possible injuries,” head girls basketball coach Tracy Anderson said. Before the season starts, the coaches can sometimes tell whether the season will go well or not based on who played in previous years. “I expect it to go fairly well because we are returning most of the players. We had a camp during the summer to get the players prepared for the season before tryouts,” head boys basketball coach Jake Sims said. Summer basketball camp usually last around four

to five days. “During camp, we went to the gym and worked on individual skills as a group,” Sims said. Not only do the coaches expect the season to go well because of the summer camp and returning players they expect it to go well if the players stay healthy. “I’m really excited for the season because we have a lot of returning players, so if we stay healthy, we should be the best we’ve ever been,” Anderson said. Tryouts started Nov. 13 and usually last two to three days. “Sometimes, I don’t feel like I need to use the third day of tryouts to make my decision of who should be on the team,” Sims said. The coaches can only let so many people on the team each year. “After tryouts, for freshmen, we try to keep 10 to 15, and for junior varsity and varsity, we don’t like to keep more than 20 players,” Anderson said. Basketball conditioning is slightly different before and during the season. “Before the season, we do speed training and agilities. During the season, we don’t do a lot of straight running. I try to do a lot of things with the ball in hand,” Anderson said. After tryouts, the players chosen to be on the team go straight into practice. “Early in the season it’s a lot of focus on individual skills and teaching team concepts offensively and

Football season comes to end Lindsay Baugher Reporter The football team’s season ended Friday, Oct. 27 after the game against Rose Hill. All that mattered for the season in Kansas was the last three games. “We played pretty well against Maize South, didn’t play well at all against Andover Central, and by that time, that was it, we knew the Rose Hill game wouldn’t matter,” head football coach Jason Filbeck said. The team had many challenges throughout the season, including when Easton Brown (12) hurt his knee during the homecoming game. “After Easton got hurt, we had trouble fixing offensive line,” Ryan Rogers (12) said. The team had to accept the challenges that were handed to them and work to reach their goals. “We had a couple injuries for some games that hurt us, but you know that’s part the game, part of our sport,” Filbeck said. A freshman kicked during varsity games. “I had to battle for [the kicker position] throughout the year and I had to keep doing good,” Tyler Kohls (9) said. Teams in Augusta’s district were

challenging opponents. “The biggest challenge is probably just that our league is pretty tough,” Filbeck said. “We have a few teams that are ranked in the state, and we, for whatever reason, didn’t play well enough to beat them.” During some games, players were not focused on the team as a whole. “We weren’t really all there, and everyone did individually and really didn’t care if they weren’t putting out everything that they had,” Ceetyn Anderson (11) said. Players felt things needed to change. “We came in some games like ‘We are way better than this team; we don’t even have to try,’ and then it got close, and we lost, and we shouldn’t have. We didn’t come out with the right attitude,” Rogers said. Anderson hopes for a closer team next year. “Make a whole group play as a brotherhood, play more as a team, get on everyone’s side and play more as a whole not just individual,” Anderson said. The team is looking forward to making next season better. “I want to, obviously, get back to the playoffs like we are used to around here and try to advance in the playoffs,” Filbeck said.

Players huddle together toward end of last game of the season. The Orioles beat the Rockets. The final score was 41-18. Photo by Lindsay Baugher

defensively,” assistant basketball coach TJ Meyer said. Before the season starts, students willing go to basketball summer camp go into the gym to work on individual skills with the coach and other players, but during the season, practices are slightly different. “During the season practices are fast paced, fun, energetic and everyone has the mindset of getting better,” Meyer said. Every player has their own opinion about the coaches and their techniques. “I wouldn’t say hate but yes there are definitely times when I do not like the coach, but a strict coach is sometimes needed for the team to be successful,” Cheyenne Pohlman (10) said. Being prepared to the best of your ability will help when conditioning starts, as well as when the season starts. “I go running with friends and being mentally prepared is important for the extra conditioning that will be added when the season starts,” Pohlman said. Basketball conditioning can be tough for some players depending on how prepared they are or the season. “Conditioning can be really tough if you are not prepared for it. We do lots of sprints and what we call conditioning stations that have lots of other cardio activities,” Pohlman said.

Teams whose players protested during National Anthem

Athletes refuse to stand Charles Lighty Reporter Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick started his peaceful protest of life in America by kneeling during the National Anthem before NFL games. Kaepernick started the protest to bring attention to the way black Americans are being treated in the United States. In a 2016 poll by CBSSports.com, 70 percent of people polled say they disagree with Kaepernick’s stance on the issues with black lives and only 30 percent support him. Kaepernick started kneeling to try and bring attention to issues that black members of American society were dealing with and rising racial tensions. This act has sparked outrage among Americans nation wide. Lunch guide Jan Schaible doesn’t agree with the protesting during the National Anthem. “I think it’s disrespectful. I also think that they should be punished. I say there should be about a $10,000 fine for every time they kneel,” Schaible said. Some students also do not support the protests. “I think it’s stupid. It is very disrespectful to our veterans. I also don’t think that Trump needs to be worrying about it, but they should stand for our country. If they can’t stand for our national anthem and our country, then they shouldn’t be able to play for our country. Simple as that,” Roman

Swartz (11) said. While a portion of people do not like the act in general and do not think that they have the right to do it, there also others who do not agree with it but still think that they have the constitutional right to do so. History and current events teacher Rick Hess is one who agrees that they have the right but doesn’t agree that they should. “I don’t personally like it, but I do understand that they have the right to kneel. I don’t think that we should try and make them stand and make them stop freely expressing their views,” Hess said. “I also don’t support the burning of the flag, but it is perfectly legal. If they want to take a stand, let them, they have the right. I just do not agree with it.” The debate over kneeling has caused multiple issues throughout the United States and many people have started to take a stand against the issue. The number of teams who are participating are starting to rise. The Houston Texans protested during the anthem because of talks from the NFL saying that punishments might be put into place for kneeling during the anthem. Up to 25 teams out of the 32 total have had a player or more who have participated in kneeling during the national anthem. The protest simple consists of players taking a knee during the national anthem and has even got team coaches and owners involved into the protest.


8

Sports

The Oriole

November 2017

Senior Night Honors

Clay Wesbrooks (12) stands on the track, with parents after being recognized for football. Photo by Lindsay Baugher

Tennis player Maddy Sanders (12) stands with parents, wrapped in a blanket trying to stay warm. Photo by Lindsay Baugher

Fall athletes share last home game with family Michaela Lord Reporter Every year before the last home game of the football season, the seniors are recognized on senior night. Each senior is recognized for a fall activity they are participating in during senior year. “We walk around the track and get awarded for the different activities we are active in and all of the hard work we’ve done in the last four years,” Easton Brown (12) said. As well as walking around the track, the senior volleyball players gave speeches at pink out, the last home game of the season. “The seniors say their speech and the rest of the team gives them their

gift. We got them each a sweatshirt with their initials on it, nail polish and balloons,” Madaline Lovette (10) said. Each underclassman player had to help pay for the seniors’ gifts. “We each gave $7 so that we could get the gifts for Kylie McDaniel and Teresa Steinkamp,” Lovette said. The majority of the seniors have a plan for their future. “I want to go to WSU and major in music education,” Kayla Knoll (12) said. Some of the seniors plan on attending a community college and then moving on to a university. “I want to go to Butler for a year to get my general education out of the way, and then KU afterwards,” Brown said.

The seniors know at the end of the year students are going to different colleges, taking on different jobs and drifting apart. “It’s really bittersweet because I know we all will move on and do great things,” Knoll said. The seniors are dealing with the stress about their graduation and college. “I’m really stressed out about college, but I know I’ll do fine I just need to apply myself,” Knoll said. Not every senior is worried about graduating or going to college. “I’m not worried at all,” Maddy Sanders (12) said. “I love being a senior because I know it’s my last year in high school, and I’m almost an adult. I’m going to KU for pre-med.”

Maddy Sanders (12) said. When people choose their careers, sometimes it happened accidentally and other times it was planned. “I’ve always loved medicine, and I’ve wanted to follow this career path since I was roughly 10,” Sanders said. Sanders is not sure what to do. “I’m not exactly sure what I want to do, but I’m going to do pre-medicine and test it out and just go from there,” Sanders said. Butler professors have been able to come to the high school to teach juniors and seniors duel credit courses. These courses are general education classes. “I took advanced American history, psychology, sociology and speech,” Sanders said.

Two golfers compete at state

Beckham injures ankle

Lindsay Baugher Reporter

Charles Lighty Reporter The young wide receiver for the New York Giants, Odell Beckham, Jr. is out for the season after undergoing surgery to repair his ankle. Beckham injured his ankle during the preseason to the ankle which lead to a sprain and took another hit to the ankle later on which put him out for the rest of the season. Giants fans are upset about losing Beckham as he is a fan favorite. After only four games, Beckham had 25 receptions for 302 yards with three touchdowns for the Giants. For fantasy team owners, like math teacher Tyler Hinkle, the injury is a blessing. “I think it will help me a lot with fantasy football, because I didn’t have him. I think it affects the Giants because Eli doesn’t have anybody to throw to anymore since their two stud, wide receivers are out,” Hinkle said. After the injury, a massive amount of fantasy teams who had Beckham decided to drop him. Photo by dv idshub.net

Lindsey Lewellen (11) and Sarah Price (10) went to Topeka to compete in the state golf tournament, Friday Oct. 13-16. This was Lewellen’s third time going to state, and it was memorable for her. “My third year was really memorable because it was in Topeka and it was with a new coach and with another girl, and that was a lot of fun,” Lewellen said. Lewellen had high expectations for the season, hoping to go to state again just as she had the two previous years. “[I wanted to]do the same as I had done last year, make it to state and do better at league and place at regionals, and I did all those things. Price was not as confident going to state as Lewellen. “I was super nervous; it freaked me out. I honestly didn’t think I was gonna make it to state,” Price said Lewellen and Price prepared for state together and also apart. “Lindsey and I did [go to El Dorado], and we went out just to practice, just to keep working on it,” Price said. Along with practicing, Lewellen made sure she had what she needed for the weekend.

“I clean my clubs before every tournament,” Lewellen said. State needed more preparation than regular tournaments. “For state, I had to specifically pack luggage, too, because we were going over night, and then this year for state, it was really cold so prepping sweats is a lot different than prepping everything else,” Lewellen said. The golf teams new coach, Danny Lundberg, was hopeful for his first season at the high school. “My expectation was to take a team to state, and we didn’t get there, and it was disappointing, but I was still proud of the way they competed at regionals. We missed out by 8 shots, which is pretty close,” Lundberg said. The goal of the season was to get the team to state. “I think if you had all the girls here, and we talked about it, I think all of them would say ‘yeah that was our goal, and we were good enough, and we just didn’t get it done.’ Hopefully, we do it next year,” Lundberg said. Lewellen and Price both tied with another golfer at the state tournament. Out of 90 girls, Price tied for 29th and Lewellen tied for 32nd.

Zac Burton (11) plays in a fantasy league where the team owner dropped Beckham. “I hate to see it happen, but he isn’t on my fantasy so it doesn’t affect me unless I’m playing somebody who has him, which nobody does in my league because they dropped him when he got hurt,” Burton said. Some can not wait for Beckham to return next season, as they miss his touchdown celebrations. “I can’t wait till he gets back because, when he is back, he will be healthy, and his dance moves and celebrations will be great,” Burton said. Maddy Barkus (11) watches football but does not think the injury is too big of a deal. “I don’t think his injury is as big of a deal as people are making it. He got hurt, but he will return. I know it won’t affect the teams I watch so I don’t feel any need to know or care about the issue,” Barkus said. The injury has also caused issues with the Giants’ front office. Beckham’s contract contains an option the Giants can pick up for a fifth season if he plays well. The Giants announced that although the injury is putting him out for the season, it should not affect the decision very much.

Oriole November 2017 issue  
Oriole November 2017 issue  
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