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issue 210 JULY 2017 UK £6.25

Lighting it up Birdy flies into open air shows

US row threatens shows at The O2 Victims group recoups £56k from Viagogo Deadline for watchdog’s IoW decision Committed to the unsigned and emerging live sector see pages 14-17

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contents I 3

Contents

issue 210

4-12 News

20-24 City Limits Bristol

The business of live music

8 Forthcoming Events

Key industry gatherings

14-15 NXT News Business activity in the unsigned and emerging artiste sector

16-17 NXT Feature Pitching at festivals

A look at the people and venues behind live music in the city

28-29 Production News Developments in technology and show production

30-34 Sector Focus LED Technology

The opportunities for unsigned and emerging acts at festivals

Comment from the key players in an essential live music business sector

14-17 NXT Profiles

36-37 Tour Plans

Insight from venue operators, artiste managers and A&R executives

Artistes, their agents and tour periods

18-19 Festival News The business of festivals, including a festival founder profile

38 Backstage Stars

Interviews with the key people who shape the industry

30

20

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News Editor: Neil Bracegirdle

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Editorial Contributors: Allan Glen, Claire Bicknell, Mike Gartside, Rob Sandall

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July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


4 I news

MMF slams threat to shows at The O2 A STAND-OFF between two major O2, says in a statement, “AEG US venue operators AEG and the always places artistes and fans first Madison Square Garden Company, and believes that artistes should with its offshoot Azoff MSG Enter- be free to play whatever venue tainment, could result in some of they choose. “However, MSG Entertainment’s the world’s top artistes being barred from playing at London’s The O2 aggressive practice of requiring artistes to perform at the LA Forum (cap. 21,000). It what seems to be a game in order to secure dates at Madison where artistes, promoters and Square Garden is eliminating that choice, which serves music fans are the pawns, neither the interests of Azoff-MSG boss Irving artistes nor fans. Azoff has suggested that “After exhausting all if an artiste plays AEG’s avenues, our hand has venue in Los Angeles, been forced by MSG’s rather than MSG-owned actions and AEG will now The Forum (17,500), then coordinate bookings they may have difficulty between The O2 arena getting a date at the pres- Annabella Coldrick and Staples Center to tigious Madison Square Garden (MSG, 19,000) in level the playing field for all.” Representing some of the UK’s top New York. In apparent retaliation, AEG is artiste managers, chief executive of threatening similar retribution if an the Music Manager Forum Annaartiste plays The Forum instead of its bella Coldrick tells LIVE UK, “Artistes Staples Center (20,000) in Los Ange- and fans’ interests appear to be completely absent in this corporate les, with The O2 linked in. AEG, which built and runs The battle now impacting LA, New York

The O2

and London.” “We would be very concerned if the dispute spreads and further limits artistes’ choice on which venues they can play across the globe.” The squabble is thought to have begun last year with Neil Diamond moving two concerts from the

Staples Center to The Forum, while Roger Waters and Chance the Rapper played Brooklyn’s AEG-managed Barclaycard Center (19,000) rather than MSG. No-one at AEG or Azoff-MSG was available to comment as LIVE UK went to press.

Decision looms for Struggle continues as Live Nation-IoW deal Viagogo refunds £56k

Isle of Wight Festival

THE OUTCOME of an investigation into the acquisition of a majority stake in the Isle of Wight Festival (cap. 42,000) by Live Nation Entertainment (LNE) is expected to be concluded by the end of August. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) is looking into the deal over concerns it constitutes a merger and would result in a “substantial lessening” of competition in the festival market (see LIVE UK issue 208). July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

Comment on the agreement, completed by LN-Gaiety – the joint venture between LNE and Irish live music entrepreneur Denis Desmond’s Gaiety Holdings – and the festival’s founder John Giddings, is being sought by the CMA. A deadline for the first phase of the investigation has been set for 31 August. LNE already owns eight of the UK’s biggest festivals including Reading (90,000), Leeds (80,000) and Download (85,000).

A GROUP battling to secure refunds for customers vastly overcharged by resale site Viagogo has successfully recouped more than £56,000. Victim of Viagogo was set up on Facebook by Claire Turnham after she paid £1,421 for four tickets to see Ed Sheeran at Dublin’s 3Arena (cap 9,500). Turnham believed she was spending £263 on the tickets and it was only when the sale was confirmed the full costs were displayed, something Viagogo put down to a system “glitch” (see LIVE UK issue 206). Viagogo customers from across the world have since joined the group, which has 850 members and the fight for refunds is continuing. “We are actually a relatively small pool, as there are hundreds of people trying to join the group but I have to keep it at a

manageable level,” Turnham tells LIVE UK. “We have managed to get £56,000 in refunds so far, but imagine what it would be if we were helping everyone. All those who have got refunds have really had to fight for it and many had been told they wouldn’t get anything, but kept going.” The majority of those affected by the supposed glitch were buying tickets for Ed Sheeran shows, although concerts for Drake and Celine Dion were also overcharged. To prevent more fans falling foul of resale sites, Turnham is linking up with anti-touting group FanFair Alliance. “Claire will be creating a guide, pulling together information about what you can do if you get ripped-off and also working with Citizens Advice,” says campaign manager Adam Webb.


news I 5

Arena renovation starts Carter leaves Amazon Live following terror attack RENOVATION WORK is underway at Manchester Arena (cap. 15,000 for concerts) following the damaged caused by the terror attack on 22 May, with the venue scheduled to reopen in September. A concert by John Legend on 16 September is expected to be the first event since the suicide bombing, which left 22 people dead and more than 100 injured. All shows at the arena are currently being rescheduled, cancelled or moved elsewhere. “The renovation work has now started in the main public area outside the arena and we are working extremely hard to ensure our re-opening in early September,” says a statement from the arena’s operator SMG Europe. Concerts by Take That, KISS and Kings of Leon were called-off following the attack and two by Radiohead where moved to a single date at Manchester’s Old Trafford Cricket Ground (50,000). Other shows affected included Celine Dion, Linkin Park and Bros. Acts due to play the venue from September include Neil Diamond, Lady Gaga, The Killers and Depeche Mode.

Manchester Arena

Meanwhile the One Love Manchester benefit concert held at Old Trafford Cricket Ground on 4 June in support of those affected by the bombing is expected to have raised more than £12 million in donations alone. It featured Take That, Katy Perry, Justin Bieber, Coldplay and Ariana Grande, the artiste who played on the night of the attack.

Keeping her head up AFTER MAKING her breakthrough with a cover version of Bon Iver’s Skinny Love, Birdy released her eponymous debut album at the age of 14. Six years on and the Hampshire-born artiste (real name Jasmine van den Bogaerde) is on her COVER ARTISTE third album Beautiful Lies, which was released in March last year featuring the singles Keeping Your Head Up and Wild Horses. Following the release, Birdy toured extensively in the US and Asia, but is now back in Europe for a concert at London’s Somerset House (cap. 1,500) and festivals including Scotland’s Belladrum Tartan Heart Festival (15,000) in Inverness, Hungary’s Sziget (70,000) in Budapest and Switzerland’s Zurich Open Air (40,000). “Birdy’s development has been relatively unique by current standards,” says her agent Ian Huffam at X-ray Touring. “There is no frantic rush for early achievements, which has given her a substantial fanbase throughout the world, and an enviable base to build upon. “Stepping up to play open air stages this summer has not proved difficult and Birdy has performed with aplomb.” The singer is managed by Sara Law at SL Artist Management.

THE NEW director of Amazon’s live music venture Prime Live Events, Jason Carter, has left the company after a month. Carter joined Amazon after 20 year’s at the BBC, where he launched BBC Introducing and organised events such as Radio 1’s Big Weekend, working as head of live music. It was recently announced Carter would head up Amazon’s concert and promoting division (see LIVE UK issue 209), but the plan was short-lived. “Jason has decided that for family reasons he needs to take some time off from full-time employment,” says an Amazon spokeswoman. The company is looking for a replacement. Prime Live has hosted concerts by Robbie Williams and John Legend in intimate venues for Prime customers, and has an upcoming show with Katie Melua at London’s Cadogan Hall (cap. 950).

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6 I news

BST hails six sell-outs Live music fans contribute £4 billion to economy says report

Bristish Summer Time

AEG PRESENTS says its British Summer Time (BST) series of events in London’s Hyde Park, which ranged in capacity from 50,00065,000, all sold-out, with 350,000 tickets sold overall. Held for the fifth year, BST spanned 10 days and featured artistes such as Phil Collins, The Killers, Kings of Leon, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers and Justin Bieber. The Killers 8 July show was the second fastest-selling BST concert since the Rolling Jim King Stones in 2013, when AEG first staged the event. “Clearly the barriers and concerns that people had that it wasn’t going to be a good experience for the band and fans has gone,” BST director Jim King tells

LIVE UK. “I think that illusion has been shattered now. “Every single show is quality and you can see by how early we can go on sale the positive outlook artistes have of it.” Last year five of the six shows sold-out, with acts such as Take That, Stevie Wonder and Carole King. “We’ve made unbelievable advancements in sound and made it the loudest festival in the UK, which is something people would have laughed at when we started,” says King. In total, around 500,000 people visited the site during the event, which included an outdoor cinema and comedy and cabaret shows during the days between concerts.

THE NUMBER of attendances at live as 34.5 miles, 41.5 miles in the East of music events reached 30.9 million, gen- England and 47.2 miles in Scotland. Overseas tourists are classified as erating £4 billion for the economy last year, says a report by industry umbrella anyone booking tickets using a credit or debit card registered to a home organisation UK Music. The third annual Wish You Were address abroad. The average spend Here report, complied by Oxford Eco- of overseas tourists was £850, while nomics, reveals attendances were up domestic tourists spent £150, accord12 per cent from 27.7 million in 2015. ing to the report. “Live music in the UK No figures are given for the is a tremendous success number of people attending story and makes a massive or how many concerts and contribution to our culture festivals various demographand general wellbeing, as ics attended. well as our economy,” says Revenue generated was UK Music chief executive also calculated to have risen Michael Dugher. by 11 per cent from £3.7 Using figures supplied billion to £4bn, taking into by the Music Venue Trust, account spend on tickets, Michael Dugher the report shows overall food, travel and accommodation, as well as indirect spend spend at venues under 1,500 capacwhioch the report says relates to the ity was up nine per cent from 2015, to £367m, while direct spend fell 13 supply chain. The number of ‘music tourists’ per cent to £202m. The overall figure increased from 10.4m in 2015 to 11.6m includes indirect spend of £165m, but in 2016, with overseas visitors up seven LIVE UK was unable to obtain any clariper cent to 823,000. Domestic music fication or supporting data to explain tourists are defined as people who trav- this at press time. Other figures in the report show elled at least three times their average there were 27m attendances at conwork commute distance to an event. For London shows this is calculated certs and 3.9m at festivals.

STAR amends code of Hope that Adele’s Wembley practice to include resale shows can be rescheduled THE SOCIETY of Ticket Agents application and become a STAR and Retailers (STAR) has reworked member if they comply with its code of practice to include sec- the code.” Among the codes requirements, ondary ticketing sites that agree to previously applied only to primary meet its conditions. agencies, are clearly Approved ahead of identifying the facethe organisation’s AGM, value of tickets and any the amendments foladditional booking fees low the most thorough and highlighting terms review of the code and conditions such as since it was set up in transferability. 1997, says STAR CEO “It is about customers Jonathan Brown. buying confidently from “The main aspects Jonathan Brown members, as they always are pricing descriptions, fitting it with advertising have,” says Brown. “The industry is codes, taking into account the being made accountable.” STAR currently has no resale Consumer Rights Act and reflecting face-value,” Brown tells LIVE UK. members and is yet to receive any “Resale sites can make an such applications. July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

WEMBLEY STADIUM (cap. 98,000) has refused to rule out rescheduling Adele’s two remaining dates at the venue, after the singer was forced to cancel the shows on medical advise. Having completed 121 concerts as part of her world tour Adele pulled out of the final two dates at Wembley on 1 and 2 July, after damaging her vocal chords. She had already performed inthe-round at the venue on 28 and 29 June. Those who bought tickets for the shows have been offered full refunds, although there is still hope the concerts, promoted by ITB, will go ahead at a latter date. “The event organisers are exploring options to reschedule and anyone who purchased tickets for the

cancelled shows will be given first access to purchase tickets in the event of any rescheduled dates,” says the stadium in a statement. Efforts to find alternative dates are likely to be hampered by Wembley relaying its turf prior to the football season beginning. Ed Sheeran is then due to perform at the venue on 15 and 16 June next year. “With Wembley being a worldclass stadium we always have these challenges,” says spokesman Rob Jorgensen. “We wouldn’t rule anything out or in at the moment, it depends on Adele and her team.” As LIVE UK went to press, it was not possible to clarify a rumour that the shows might be switched to Twickenham Stadium (55,000) in West London.


news I 7

Historic Queen’s Hall planning for the future the addition of a glass EVAN HENDERSON has been structure on the side of the appointed CEO of Edinburgh’s former church. Queens Hall, as a major reno“As a student in the ‘80s, I vation of the venue begins. saw lots of bands here and The venue, which can it holds great memories for accommodate 900 standme,” says Henderson. “It is an ing or 694 seated, starts the iconic venue and audiences first phase of refurbishment and artistes love it. For me with heritage repairs on the Evan Henderson it’s great to get a crack at a exterior of the building, with £750,000 of funds coming from the city centre venue.” The Hall puts on more than 200 shows Scottish Government and Historic Enviannually and works with promoters ronment Scotland. Henderson has taken up the position including DF Concerts, Regular Music having spent 17 years as programme and PCL Presents. It is also a venue for manager for ON with Fife Cultural Trust, The Fringe and International Festivals covering venues such as Dunfermline’s and a concert hall for The Scottish ChamCarnegie Hall (cap. 500) and Kirkcaldy’s ber Orchestra. “It’s 40 years since it became a concert Adam Smith Theatre (475). He replaces Adrian Harris who retired venue and the building will be 200 years old in 2023,” says Henderson. at the end of last year. Forthcoming acts include Sparks, Queens Hall is also looking to raise Johnson, Warpaint and £3.5 million towards a three-year refur- Wilko bishment of its public spaces, including Saint Etienne.

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Awards process begins NOMINEE SUBMISSIONS are now being taken for the annual Live Music Business Awards (LMBA), set to be held on Thursday 12 October at the Radisson Blu Portman hotel in London’s West End. The first stage towards finding this year’s winners across 22 of the 23 categories begins with submissions from live music business professionals and across the wider music business. The deadline for submissions is 26 July. “Every year the number of people submitting names for nomination and then voting grows dramatically, while at the same time, attempts to skew the voting process decline,” reports LMBA executive producer Steve Parker “It is reassuring to see so many contributing towards honouring the venues, events and people who have excelled during the past year.” Last year’s winners are not eligible for nomination this year. Tickets for the gala awards ceremony cost £135 + VAT, with discounts available for LIVE UK subscribers and delegates attending the LIVE UK Summit during the day. www.livemusicawards.co.uk.

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July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


8 I news

Forthcoming events 05 Sept

AIM Awards London www.musicindie.com/awards 14 Sept

Mercury Prize Awards London www.mercuryprize.com 17-19 Sept

PLASA 2017 London www.plasashow.com 26-28 Sept

International Festival Forum London www.iff.rocks 12 Oct

LIVE UK Summit London www.liveuksummit.com 12 Oct

Live Music Business Awards London www.livemusicawards.co.uk 12-14 Oct

Norwich Sound & Vision Norwich www.norwichsoundandvision.co.uk

Venue that ‘changed the landscape of live music’ AS LONDON’S The O2 (cap. 21,000) turns 10 years job and coming in my goal was not to mess it up. “We don’t need to change anything drastically, old the team behind the world’s busiest music venue say the main challenge ahead is maintaining as it works so well and you can tell from the people who’ve been here a long time, there’s a feeling we’ve their dominance. Since opening on 24 June 2007 with a show by Bon come of age.” To celebrate a decade at the top, the Jovi, the arena, redeveloped from the forvenue held a series of anniversary shows mer Millennium Dome by US venues and with acts including Celine Dion and sports giant AEG, has played host to more Ed Sheeran, with the Foo Fighters due than 570 artistes. in September. “It’s changed the landscape of live music,” “Over the last 10 years we have become a vice-president and general manager John must-play venue,” says programming direcLangford tells LIVE UK. tor Emma Bownes. “There are artistes who “There’s incredible content and it’s the John Langford have friendly competition about who has right venue in the right city.” Before taking up his role at The O2 last November, played here most.” Adapting to increasing festival exclusivity deals, Langford spent three years as director of live entertainment at Glasgow’s SECC and The SSE Hydro which have nudged back summer content, the venue (13,000) and prior to that, seven years as a promoter at co-promotes and promotes its own events including Stone Free Festival and Hola! London. It has also had Big Concerts in South Africa. He admits the moves were “a bit disruptive” on his to adapt to changing security challenges. “We are incredibly sensitive to what has happened family but says he has settled quickly in London. “When you at are at the No 1 arena in the world, why recently,” says Langford. “There’s a big responsibility when you have 25,000 people in the area on a go anywhere else,” says Langford. “I’m probably more sensitive to what promoter show night.” Other upcoming shows at The O2 include Bros, John needs are than anyone else here, because of my time at Big Concerts, but the team before me did a fantastic Legend and Lady Gaga.

Safety and security event launched THE TEAM behind the International Live Music Conference (ILMC) has announced plans for a security focused conference bringing together venues and sports security professionals and safety experts. The Event Safety & Security Summit (E3S), produced in collaboration with the National Arenas Association and European Arenas Association in the wake of the Manchester Arena terrorist atrocity, will take place

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July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

at the Intercontinental Hotel at London’s The O2 on 10 October. “ES3 will be a forum to share information and best practice, as well as the latest concepts and tools related to security at live events,” says ILMC head Greg Parmley. The invitation-only event will include presentations, panel discussions and keynote speeches.

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10 I news

Secondary sites misleading Really useful appointment fans says FanFair research AN INVESTIGATION by artiste manager-led anti-touting campaign group FanFair Alliance has revealed music fans are being distracted away from primary ticket sites by secondary platforms, even when face-value tickets are still available. The research found that of 100 upcoming tours for acts including Metallica, Lulu and Run The Jewels, secondary sites such as Viagogo, StubHub and Ticketmaster’s GetMeIn topped Google rankings 77 per cent of the time. Viagogo alone topped the search on 65 occasions, despite only six of the tours being sold-out. “We consistently see secondary ticketing platforms, led by Viagogo, using paid search to dominate search rankings and even masquerade as official agents,” says FanFair campaign manager Adam Webb. “The reason that Viagogo and other secondary sites can manipulate Google search in this way is simple - it’s because they can afford to. Their business model is

practically risk free and their service fees are typically set at around 20-30 per cent of the resale price. “We strongly recommend that would-be ticket buyers give search engines a swerve and check first with the artist or festival website,” says Webb. FanFair recently published the guide Tips For Beating The Touts When Buying Music Tickets Online. Meanwhile Devon-based Ticket Zone, which works over 500 events annually including Isle of Wight Festival (cap. 42,000) has signed FanFair’s Declaration, which condemns industrial-scale touting and calls for enforcement of existing legislation. “It’s really important we work together to make the ticketing market more transparent and fairer,” says Ticket Zone chief operating officer Wayne Munday. Of the major primary ticket agencies, only Live Nation Entertainment-owned Ticketmaster and AEG-owned AXS have yet to sign the FanFair Declaration.

After leaving the Roundhouse in REALLY USEFUL Theatres (RUT) Group, which owns and operates 2015, Gaydon launched booking and seven venues in London’s West End, events company GOAT Music and including London Palladium (cap. will remain a director. At RUT he will 2,286), has hired former Roundhouse work alongside MD Rebecca Kane Burton who took up the role head of music Dave in September (see LIVE UK Gaydon as head of issue 199), following four programming. years as general manager at The appointment sigLondon’s The O2 (21,000). nals RUT’s intention to “I’ve been keen to secure increase the amount of the right music person to live music shows its venpropel the London Palladium ues host, particularly at forward and secure the calithe Palladium which has Dave Gaydon bre of acts this world famous undergone a £1 million stage deserves,” says Burton. refurbishment in the last ”Dave’s credentials at the year and is attempting Roundhouse and beyond to secure permission to speak for themselves.” hold standing gigs. Acts to have recently “I feel privileged to be played the theatre include part of the move into a Coldplay, Bob Dylan, 10cc new era,” says Gaydon. and Brian Wilson. “There are a whole Among RUT’s other host of both heritage Rebecca Kane Burton venues are Theatre Royal, and contemporary artistes that I know will work fantas- Drury Lane (2,196), the Adelphi tically well in the intimate setting of Theatre (1,500) and Her Majesty’s Theatre (1,216). the Palladium.”

First panels announced MVT and TicketWeb in for LIVE UK’s Summit grassroots expansion THE MUSIC Venue Trust (MVT) and TicketWeb have launched a website specifically to target ticketing at grassroots venues. Called Grassroots Venues Tickets, it will enable fans to access show listings across the sector and buy tickets. The new venture follows the launch last October of TicketWeb Backline (TWB), effectively a white label service run by TicketWeb – a division of Live Entertainmentowned Ticketmaster – and promoted by MVT to indie venues and promoters (see LIVE UK issue 202). The new initiative uses much the same format, whereby TicketWeb shares the booking fee, with a “maintain and sustain levy” of 50p paid back to the venue and a commission paid to MVT. “We wanted to work with a partner July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

to develop a grassroots ticket that genuinely enables fans to know that what they are buying is directly supporting the venues they love that really need help,” says MVT CEO Mark Davyd. As with TWB, MVT says Grassroots Venues Tickets will see it “track, monitor and pay” any performance royalties due to PRS for Music on behalf of venues, providing TicketWeb-MVT has exclusive ticketing rights to an event. MVT says venues that have already signed up to the new website include Southampton’s The Joiners (cap. 200), Edinburgh’s La Belle Angele (600) and Stroud’s Prince Albert (100), while it says more than 60 clients have joined TWB, including Ramsgate Music Hall (cap. 125) and The Brook (550) in Southampton.

PROMOTER RISK and venue security will be among the main topics for discussion at the LIVE UK Summit, following the recent terrorist attacks. Set for Thursday 12 October at the Radisson Blu Portman hotel in London’s West End, the first conference sessions to be announced include The Risk Factor, covering the world of promoting, and The Next Stage, which will focus on the challenges facing the venue sector. “While we want to keep the event generally upbeat, as usual, we cannot ignore recent events and the impact they have had on promoter and venue decision-making, and the extra measures they now need to put in place,” says Summit

executive producer Steve Parker, who is also managing editor of LIVE UK. “Rather than have a long debate on the issue, we will have several experts to offer guidance and review the latest thinking on the subject.” Other sessions announced include Fields of Dreams, on the festivals sector, The Discovery Panel (artiste development) and The Winning Ticket (primary ticketing). Super early-bird registration costs £85 + VAT and is available online at www.liveuksummit.com. The LIVE UK Summit is followed by the Live Music Business Awards (www. livemusicawards.co.uk), held at the same venue.


news I 11

Scenic views for Music DHP brings in new promoter Newsbites Plus Sport shows FESTIVAL ORGANISER, promoter and multi-venue operator DHP Family has CASLTES, RUGBY Clubs and appointed Joshua Ward as a racetracks are among the national concert promoter new locations used as probased at its London office. moter Music Plus Sport (MPS) Ward, who has been broadens its horizons. working in the company’s Alongside its partnership marketing team with Jockey Club Live (JCL), for the past year, putting on music nights after will book and horse racing, the company Andrew Wilkinson promote shows has events including Little Mix at Donnington Park (cap. 17,900), Jess Glynne nationally as well at Alnwick Castle (8,000) in Northumberland and as at DHP venTom Jones at Gloucester Rugby Club’s Kingsholm ues such as Oslo (cap. 375) and Stadium (16,500). “The way in which we offer delivery of artistes is Borderline (300) in Josh Ward appealing, and we work with the grounds to exploit London, and the their facilities to the benefit of the venues and pro- company’s flagship Rock City moter,” MPS co-founder and CEO Andrew Wilkinson (2,450) in Nottingham. He has recently been protells LIVE UK. “It’s a chance to offer a broader opportunity for moting new acts under his artistes to perform across a range of venues in a short own Girls & Boys banner, which began as a club night space of time.” This summer MPS, which works with Live Nation at London’s Hoxton Square Entertainment, will put on 32 shows, with tickets for Bar & Kitchen (450). “With his ears and knack for events generally costing between £30-40.

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OUTDOOR EVENTS OFFICIAL BOX OFFICE AND PROUD PARTNER OF THE BARCLAYCARD ARENA

discovering great new music, it became abundantly clear to all of us that Josh’s future lay in being a national concert promoter,” says DHP Live director Dan Ealam. “Off his own back, we have seen him sell-out shows at Oslo, Omeara [300], Moth Club [280] & Bermondsey Social Club [120] and already taking acts through to Koko [1,400].” Ward adds, “It’s a great time for the company and I see being the new promoter in the team as a real opportunity.” DHP stages more than 1,500 events a year and runs festivals including Nottingham’s Splendour (20,000) and the multi-venue DotToDot.

REALLY USEFUL Theatre Group (RUTG) has hired Vanessa Andreis as its new commercial partnerships director, responsible for all non-ticketing revenue across the company’s venues, which include London Palladium (cap. 2,250) and Theatre Royal Drury Lane (2,196). Andreis previously spent 12 years at Warner Bros as director of promotions and partnerships, and most recently was executive director client services and partnerships at Lime Communications for two years. AGENT MARLON Burton has joined London-based agency and management company ATC Live. Burton moves from LHS Artists, taking a roster that includes Roots Manuva, Oscar #worldpeace, Splurgeboys, Javeon, Izzi Dunn and Cardinal Sound. His role is to help build the urban/contemporary side of ATC.

FAST, SIMPLE, FUN. WINNERS OF THE EVENT PRODUCTION AWARDS ‘BEST TICKETING COMPANY’

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


12 I news

Heavy rain forces Green Day show cancellation AN OUTDOOR concert featuring Green Day at Glasgow’s Bellahouston Park (cap. 35,000) was called off just hours before the band were due on stage, due to bad weather. Promoter PCL Presents announced the cancellation at 1.30pm on 4 June, with gates due to open at 2pm, following heavy rain. It would have been the first time Green Day had played in the city for seven years. “After many months of hard work and preparation, and after seven days of production and site crew working tirelessly around the clock, adverse weather conditions overnight and throughout the morning during the band’s load-in, led to issues on stage,” says PCL in a statement.

“A meeting between the onsite health and safety, event management, the artistes’ representatives and promoters concluded that it would be unsafe in the timescale to proceed with the event.” PCL’s Paul Cardow tells LIVE UK he was deeply upset by the cancellation, but couldn’t comment further until reports from the day were complied for insurers. Glasgow City Council, which owns the park, say they did not tell PCL to cancel the concert and the decision was taken by the promoter and the band’s management. Slaves, Rancid and Skids were also due to perform at the event, which was almost sold-out. Ticket holders have been told they will receive refunds.

Wagg named chair of MMF DIANE WAGG of Deluxxe Management including well over a thousand of the best has become the sole chair of the Music acts on the planet, who are represented by Mangers Forum (MMF), following a vote at our ever increasing membership.” MMF has also announced its annual general meeting. Claire Southwick of Primitive Wagg had been co-chair of the Management, Ellie Giles organisation with Stephen Budd (Various Artists), Paul Crockford of Stephen Budd Management (Paul Crockford Management), since 2014, but Budd has Steven Braines (The Weird & stepped down to concentrate Wonderful) and Tom Burns on other projects. (ie:music), as the first five board Nostromo Management’s Paul members elected under its new Craig, co-manager of Biffy Clyro, Diane Wagg voting system. was elected to the new position This see’s the organisation’s 16-memof vice-chair during the meeting. “Together we’ve overseen the continued ber board rotate on an annual basis, with development and progress of the MMF as members serving a three-year term and a trade organisation that represents and at least five stepping down each year is relevant to the full diversity of the UK’s for newcomers. Outgoing board members can be elected music management community,” says into the newly-created MMF Custodians, Wagg, of her’s and Budd’s efforts. “That work carries on to create a trans- a group meeting bi-annually to advise on parent and fair world for all artistes, MMF policy.

News, features and profiles See pages 14-17

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14 I

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From little seeds

Dougie Brown

THE XpoNorth Seedlings stage at the 16,500-capacity Belladrum Tartan Heart Festival, held 3-5 August in Beauly, Inverness, has announced a particularly packed line-up of emerging acts. Belladrum PR Manager Dougie Brown notes that the festival has a longstanding history of working with the grassroots elements of the industry. “We’ve been connected to the local and emerging scenes here since we started, and that’s very important to us – a lot of acts have started out on the Seedling’s stage and then returned to play the bigger tents, or in the case of Twin Atlantic headlining the festival,” he says. “For the most part, the emerging side of our line-up is curated via [multi-venue Scottish creative industries festival] XpoNorth since back when they were goNORTH,

and they’ve helped us to find the right acts for the Seedlings stage. “There are exceptions though – Hunter and the Bear for instance, are getting huge here, and they’re from Achiltibuie, so we’ve got them headlining the stage. It always feels particularly good to have a local act doing so well.” Brown adds that while the Seedlings stage represents the core of the emerging talent playing over the weekend, there are other opportunities for new acts to find their feet. “We take submissions directly when we’re considering our lineups, so that’s led to certain acts being put forward for our folk stage, for instance,” he says. “And then we have little secret shows in the bars too, often there’ll be a main draw supported by lesswell-known acts.”

Record Glastonbury score for PRS fund A TOTAL of 54 acts funded by various PRS For Music Foundation (PRSF) initiatives took to various stages this year at Glastonbury festival. Communications coordinator Maxie Gedge says that spread of wildly different artistes across numerous stages paid testament to the Foundation’s success. “Three of the acts were discovered this year specifically through our Glastonbury Emerging Talent competition, which named its winners – Josh Barry, Flohio and Young Yizzy – at a live final in April,” she says.

“The others have at some point been helped by Momentum or one of the more specific funds. “We’ve been running long enough now that acts at every level were on the bill this year: those who had only recently reached out to us, and those who were given funding at an important point in their caMaxie Gedge reer, which has helped them go on to bigger things.” Other acts funded by PRSF this year included Frank Carter & the Rattlesnakes, Dutch Uncles and Shame.

Tour Plans See pages 36-37

Stage Break Number 90

90 Wallis Road, London, E9 5LN Bookings: Bruno Cabral T: 020 8986 0090 E: events@numbergroup.com W: www.number90bar.co.uk Capacity: 500 PA/lights: No Dressing rooms: One

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

Booking policy: “We welcome emerging and unsigned acts and do an open mic night once a month.” Best acts currently playing venue: The Statue Thieves, YEWS, Locks and Two Cartoons Best advice for managers: “We have a database of 350,000 emails that I would be happy to use to promote

artistes and 50,000 followers across social media channels.” Acts who’ve played the venue: Dagny, Rick Ferguson, Mayflys, Ella on The Run, Orfan, Bare Hunter


50 I TOUR PLANS A GUIDE TO ARTISTES, TOURS & AGENTS Thursday 12 October 2017 Radisson Blu Portman Hotel Portman Square London W1H 7BG

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16 I NXT Feature

in association with

Dedicated to the business people who drive the unsigned and emerging artiste sector, ensuring a future for the UK music industry

What is not to like The good news is that promoting digitally really can lead to ticket sales for aspiring artistes. But separating the real fans who will buy tickets, music and merch from idle likers is another matter. Rob Sandall reports

F

or an artiste hoping to make progress in 1,000+ capacity venues on their first tours and need to remember that your not marketers, you’re musicians, so concentrate most on that,” he says. the music industry and build a sustainable their merch-per-heads can be crazy.” Walker, who last year launched management “There’s an artistic integrity that’s important long-term career, a loyal fanbase is an company Free Focus for developing the long-term to keep too, unless your ultimate aim is thin and essential ingredient. careers of digital stars, including Emma bubblegum-flavoured, but you’ll get no longevity It takes time and effort to build and, Blackery, Connie Glynn and Bethan as an artiste going down that route. if an act makes the right moves, it Leadley, goes as far as adding that “One of the best ways of gaining exposure is can actually contribute to the cashthere’s such a thing as getting out there who you’re associated with. Fable for instance has flow, through music and merchandisa little too enthusiastically. toured with The Cult. Piggybacking off the expoing sales. “In today’s market I believe that you sure of others is fine and a smart move – you’re But is finding those fans becoming can actually over tour,” says Walker. exposing yourself to an already established crowd.” harder, or are emerging artistes simply “Pre-social media, there weren’t as prone to focusing their attentions in Andy Devaney many acts breaking through or as eas- Appy talk the wrong place? “I think sometimes a downfall for emerging ily discoverable as today, and I feel like fans will Gigrev CEO Kevin Brown believes that musicians is that they can expect too much from often see a band once per year. engagement with fans across a digital space only “If they tour again in the same cycle those fans truly matters if you can understand who you’re placing their music online, and instantly expect millions of views without doing much more to pro- might not go back, as there are so many other acts communicating with. mote their material,” says Andy Devaney, co-owner they want to see and haven’t.” “We actually create personalised apps for acts of Avenoir Artist Management & Consultancy. of all sizes, which they can share and promote, as “A digital fanbase is an important factor – it’s not opposed to forcing fans onto using someone else’s “Likes are feeling increasingly on the same scale as going out on the live scene, platform,” he says. but it definitely has its benefits and it has to be “Artistes obviously prefer sharing something meaningless when it comes to done right.” with their own name on and for the fan there’s a any sense of useable data” Devaney, who with business partner Martin real sense of a personal connection having someKevin Brown West has worked with artistes including Estelle, thing branded from the artiste.” Street Politiks, London Roots and Shahin Badar, Brown notes that misleading ‘likes’ can cause says instead that fan interaction on the front lines, problems all the way from grassroots to A-list “But there isn’t a set formula. What works for one level acts. and crucially beyond the performance itself, goes a lot further than an act starting out might expect. artiste won’t necessarily work for another. The You“Likes are feeling increasingly meaningless “Staying on and watching your fellow show line- Tubers have grown on a basis of authenticity and when it comes to any sense of useable data or any up gives you the chance to mingle with the crowd regular content.” actual revenue potential,” he says. and will always lead to you gaining new fans, “Do the millions of people who react to Taylor through that personal touch,” says Devaney. Swift’s social media actually translate into people Prepare to engage “Another factor people seem to have lost hope Andy Hollis of 74 Music, which manages artistes willing to pay for tickets to shows? It’s impossible in are Mailing lists – get someone at your shows including Fables and Kovak, says that the to know while you’re interacting with fans on an to walk around with a clipboard, grab names and importance of keeping the live audience happy impersonal level.” email addresses of those that are already into your cannot be understated. Helping fans to feel special or exclusive in return music and engage with them.” for their loyalty is key, says Brown, to “To some extent there’s But what of those acts lucky enough keeping things moving, especially as crossover, but the audience to blow up on the internet before makyou’re on the way up. that comes to see you live are ing a live debut? “With our approach, you’re inviting your lifeblood,” he says. Mark Walker, who started with the fans to share relevant data and inter“It’s easy to press ‘like’ on a Barfly venue and Live Nation Entertainact with you – it’s easier to see who’ll band’s Facebook page, but it’s ment before moving to Kilimanjaro in want tickets for a show in a specific the engaged fans – those that 2008, is quick to emphasise the positive area, and to reward them with excluwill buy tickets to your shows correlations between online interest Mark Walker sive video and audio, or of course sell – who will follow your career Kevin Brown and real-life sales. music directly through the app,” he says. and that really matter in the long run.” “From working with acts who have come from “It’s fair to say that once an artiste reaches bigger Hollis also notes that the over-reliance on social the digital space, I have seen first-hand that sub- media credibility can lead to musicians taking on levels of success people might be a touch embarscriber numbers and likes do convert to ticket and roles they’re neither comfortable with nor adept rassed to have the Coldplay app on their phone, merchandise sales,” he says. for instance, but when an act is at a medium level in performing. “The digital stars I work with regularly sell-out “You need to be marketing-aware, but you also it can really grab attention.”

July 2017 • issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


NXT Feature I 17

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Building emerging careers an audience, it begins here.” Other emerging acts to watch: The Amazons Greatest lesson learned: “Never think you’ve seen it all.”

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David Regan, 46 Company name: Optimum Music Management, London

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Importance of playing live: “Any artiste has to be able to connect with

“Echo Arcadia are preparing to appear at the Indie Week festival in Toronto followed by an East coast US tour to support their second album release Visions Of Symmetry.”

MARCH 2017

T h e Wo r l d ’s B e s t S t a d i u m s F o r C o n t e m p o r a r y L i v e M u s i c

Favourite venues for showcasing/ playing: Zigfrid von Underbelly in Hoxton, London and Night and Day in Manchester

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Artiste roster: Searls, Echo Arcadia

Current live projects: “Searls has just completed performing backing vocals for Adele at Wembley Stadium, then made his solo live debut in London at the Underbelly and will follow this up with more gigs upon release of a new single in September.

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Worst live experience: “Following a concert in Aix En Provence the bands’ tour bus was broken into and all guitars and passports were stolen, resulting in days waiting for the British Embassy to provide replacement documents.”

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On The Beat Scouting the frontline Favourite venues for seeing unsigned acts Sofar Sounds (multiple venues), Paper Dress Vintage, The Groucho Club, Courtyard Theatre and Birthdays, all London.

James Dale, 34 LGM Records, London E: james@lgmrecords.co.uk When joined the company: June 2016 Company Signings: Amaroun, Jo Goes Hunting, Mono Club, Munro Fox Among favourite emerging acts: George Cosby, Lyla Foy, Samuel Jack, JAKL, Marie Naffah, Hollow Hand, Laura White, Gracey Lloyd

Importance of playing live: “Spotify have shaken the industry up to such an extent that bedroom recording artistes have just as much a chance of their music reaching the far corners of the globe as an artiste that gigs for 300 days a year. “Obviously live music will never die out because you will never be able to replace the thrill of being in the room with an incredible live act, but it isn’t essential for great artistes and songwriters to perform live anymore, it’s a nice bonus.” Best advice to unsigned act managers: “Concentrate on genuine fan engagement and quality content over anything else.” Emerging new acts on the label: Amaroun, Jo Goes Hunting, Mono Club

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festival

Festival is a 32-page news, features and information supplement of LIVE UK, published in December, January, February and March, when the bulk of festival production contracts are concluded. From April to October, it becomes a two-page section in LIVE UK.

New Jersey Weekender adds Feastival to attract families

THE CO-ORGANISER of the now defunct Jersey Live, Warren Le Sueur, has launched his own 10,000 capacity event at the same venue and weekend of the previous festival. Headlined by Two Door Cinema Club, Pendulum and The Happy Mondays, Weekender Festival at the Royal Jersey Showground this Sep-

tember also aims for a family audience, Le Sueur says, with the introduction of a food and family attraction, Feastival, which runs before the live music, which starts at 4pm rather than the 1pm of the previous event. “We’re creating a new brand,” says Le Sueur. “When people heard Jersey Live

was not happening they may have made plans to go elsewhere, which may impact us, but we are the event at the end of the summer and early September is the warmest time of year in Jersey. “We’re targeting people closer to us, with food vendors, taster platters for £5 and street entertainment.”

Le Suer, who parted company with fellow Jersey Live co-founder Warren Holt earlier this year (see FESTIVAL, Feb 17) after running the event together for 13 years, says 80 per cent of the audience is local and that ticket sales are equivalent to those of Jersey Live at this time of year. Tickets cost £95.

Warren Le Sueur

Anti-terror measures must adapt Boomtowners to save on rail travel the cheapest tickets between to changing tactics, say experts individual stations rather than LIVE MUSIC safety experts have advocated more dynamic antiterrorism measures at festivals following the attacks at Manchester Arena (cap. 21,000). While they stress that festivals are already doing a great deal to protect their public, they say the recent attacks demonstrate terrorists regularly change their methods and organisers must work with the authorities on a flexible response. Staying alert for hostile reconnaissance, maintaining staff employment protocols and being aware that a site presents a year-round target for terrorists are key factors in preventing an attack, according to Dr. Chris Kemp of Mind Over Matter Consultancy, who works with the NEC Group and Network Rail in the UK and with Wacken Open Air (cap.

80,000) and Roskilde Festival (75,000) in Europe. “We learnt from Manchester that, where public space is linked to private space, the public space is as dangerous as the event itself,” says Kemp. “Festival sites are there for the whole year, so activities could be taking place well before the event. We’ve developed a behavioural detection course, spotting the different activities [of anyone planning an attack].” Meanwhile Reg Walker of Iridium Consultancy, which works with festivals ranging from 20,000 to 100,000 capacities says, “Festival organisers have already put a great deal in place to mitigate terrorism risk. Criminality preys on these events and we advocate screening for bad actors between festivals and transport hubs.”

lighting rigging video structures

finelinelighting.com July 2017 • issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

a through ticket, which is often more expensive, saving an average of 28 per cent per journey. “The split ticket solution is a great way of cutting the cost of getting to the festival,” says Emma Veitch, Boomtown’s commercial manager. “We also hope it will encourage people to come Boomtown by rail and reduce the number of cars on the road.” About 6,000 Boomtown fans travBOOMTOWN (cap. 60,000) has teamed up with the split rail ticketing elled to the event by train last year, provider Raileasy to offer cheaper rail Veitch adds, and most people book their travel in the month before the travel to ticket holders. The Hampshire festival will run event, so although the scheme has only shuttle buses from Winchester sta- seen 1,000 initial enquiries so far, this tion to the festival at the nearby Mat- figure is likely to rise. Kip Parker, head of business develterley Estate this August and the two companies have set up a “white label” opment at Raileasy, says Boomtown’s train ticket-buying website, boomtown. proximity to a train station makes it ideal for such a partnership and he expects trainsplit.com. According to the travel ticket retailer, other festivals to adopt the system bethe system enables buyers to purchase fore the end of this season.

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festival news I 19

AIF initiatives boost joint booking and new artistes THE ASSOCIATION of Independent Festivals (AIF) has issued guidelines to festivals via a members-only Facebook group which offers ways in which independent festivals can cooperate to make joint bids for artistes. The guidelines follow extensive discussion at the association’s annual conference during which its president Jim Mawdsley said he “couldn’t wait” for the AIF to become a major booking entity. This was a response, he said, to increased conglomeration in the market in which multi-festival businesses like Live Nation Entertainment and Global were able to negotiate exclusive artiste deals across their portfolio, leading to lower artiste costs per event and increased scarcity for independents. However, Paul Reed, AIF’s general manager, has told LIVE UK that the guidelines take careful consideration of the law on price fixing. “Major promoters can sit round a table with all their festivals [to negotiate multi-festival deals],” says Reed. “We want to give AIF members that opportunity. We use social media to share resources while

members can have discussions through Facebook. But at the point where it gets commercially sensitive we request they have the conversation directly. “Ultimately agents can always say ‘no’ to a joint deal and seek independently negotiated deals with performers. Our guidelines will come in handy, particularly for the various costings incurred by international artistes and will benefit young festivals who’ve joined us.” In a separate initiative, AIF invited participating agents including Shaun Faulkner (X-Ray Touring), Olly Hodgson (Coda) and Chris Smyth (Primary) to propose two emerging artistes each to push for the 2017 season. Under the scheme events such as Kendal Calling (cap. 25,000), Bestival (40,000) and Shambala (15,000) will now variously feature artistes including DEAD!, Fizzy Blood and Westerman. “For us it’s a way of nurturing future headliners and enhancing our relationships with agents, putting some of our festivals on the radar of agencies who might not be aware of them,” adds Reed.

Walled Garden eyes expansion THE THREE year old Walled Gar- says Fordham. “Last year we extended to three den Festival in Sussex’s Brightling Park aims to break even this July as days and invited Cockney Rebel. ticket sales climb towards its 2,000 The artistes say they like what we capacity, with artistes including do and some have reduced their fees accordingly. The venue is a ABC, Embrace and Jennifer Paige. natural amphitheatre, Although the festisouth facing with treval is confined within mendous acoustics. a 2.7 acre 19th century “We think we’ll break walled garden, co-proeven this year and ultimoter Mel Fordham mately claw back the believes the event can losses of the first couple expand in future years of years. We’ve already beyond this setting sold over the 1,000 tickinto the wider estate, Mel Fordham ets to the Sunday that which also hosts the we achieved last year.” Brightling Park Horse Trials. The event is run by Walled “In year one we were joined by [Cutting Crew’s] Nick Van Eede, Garden Music Festival Ltd, with who lives locally and did a ver- co-director and racehorse owner sion of his hit Died in Your Arms Michael ‘Gardie’ Grissell. Tickets to Tonight in front of 700 people,” the event cost £50.

Summing Up

Interviews with festival founders

Mark Frary, 48 Although Ampthill Festival was established as a family gala and party-in-the park event attracting 8,000 people, the addition of a commercial rock and pop day, AmpRocks, was an unknown quantity to co-founders Mark Frary, a writer, Andy Hampshaw – a director of VIP travel agent TAG Global Touring – and IT lecturer Francesco Bove. Launched in 2010, this year’s 6,500 tickets sold out in 39 minutes for a bill featuring The Human League, Busted and Cast.

What prepared you for the task?

“Established almost 40 years ago, Ampthill Festival expanded the format in 2009, adding a proms day with a picnic, which was a success, thanks to the Capability Brown-designed Ampthill Great Park and the town’s talented musicians. The committee, chaired by Ian Scarr, wanted to make more use of the infrastructure and that success encouraged us to launch AmpRocks in 2010, when a few hundred people came to see Pauline Black of the Selecter. “Myself, Andy and Francesco drove the early years of AmpRocks and worried whether we would bankrupt the wider festival. We were very clear that it was a local event for local people and that it should be affordable. There is something attractive about seeing well known bands in your local park. In the first year we had around 300 people.”

What has made the festival a success?

“Many people in the town have similar musical tastes to me so I thought there would be a ready-made audience. A key moment was meeting the manager of The Feeling through my work as a journalist, and convincing him to get the band to headline. As always, having a known act in a previous year opens doors the following year, and it has become easier over time to get agents to speak with us. “I’ve attended many festivals, including Glastonbury, the Vs and Camp Bestival. Seeing the Pigeon Detectives play a secret set at Glastonbury is one of my favourite festival moments. I always come back from a festival thinking ‘must copy that’ and ‘must avoid doing that’. “The festival had grown to 3,300 by 2013 and we knew we had something good when we booked Happy Mondays as headliners in 2014. “We have always tried to grow organically and add a little something extra each time. This year we have added a comedy and acoustic tent as well as video screens on the main stage. We deliver an enjoyable experience and put in a lot of thought around how to add extra frills that make everyone remember the weekend.”

What have been your highs and lows?

“At one weekly meeting in the early years, where we discussed sales, it was depressing to discover we had only sold six tickets since the previous meeting. Thankfully, local residents were very supportive. Last year, a major electrical problem meant that one of our early acts couldn’t go on stage. We prayed that it wouldn’t wipe out the whole night. I had visions of festival-goers demanding refunds. Somehow, our production team got everything working again so the show went on. “As a high point, booking the Happy Mondays, getting them all on stage at the same time and seeing them get a huge crowd jumping along to Step On is right up there.”

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July 2017 • issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


20 I city limits

Bristol

An artist’s impression of Bristol Arena

It may have no venues above 2,000 capacity, yet there is a vibrancy in the city’s music scene comparable with that of Manchester, Glasgow and London – promoters and venue operators are supremely confident and there seems to be no end of artistes capable of drawing audiences. Allan Glen reports

F

Anton Lockwood

Conal Dodds

or one of the most vibrant major music cities in the UK, Bristol has always been something of an anomaly. While there is fierce competition at club level, there is nothing, at present, above the 1,934-capacity Colston Hall. That could all change with the opening of the 12,000-capacity Bristol Arena, due for completion in 2020. Despite Bristol City Council and preferred developer Bouygues UK parting ways earlier this year in a dispute over costs, Mayor of Bristol Marvin Rees tells LIVE UK that the project is progressing, with the council now in a pre-construction services agreement with the Buckingham Group. “Bristol has a very lively music scene with venues such as Motion [1,300, 1,100], the O2 Academy [1,600, 250], St George’s [580] and the Colston Hall hosting an exciting programme of music that supports local talent and attracts artistes from across the world,” says Rees. “An arena would add to this, allowing Bristol to host some of the biggest events that tour the UK, attracting visitors from across the region and building the city’s international profile.” The opening of the new arena, which is to be jointly run by Live Nation Entertainment (LNE) and SMG Europe, is welcomed by Anton Lockwood of Nottingham-based DHP Live, which owns Thekla (400) and runs 5,000-capacity multi-venue festival Dot

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

To Dot, which takes place at venues such as O2 Academy (1,600, 250), Swx (1,050, 250), The Fleece (450) and Thekla. While Lockwood believes the arena is likely to be a game changer for Bristol, he does issue one caveat: a small yet relatively important one. “Bristol is still a strong-selling city, yet when you open an arena it obviously takes a lot of money out of the market,” he says. “You’re suddenly doing 10,000 people a night at upwards of £20 a ticket. It does, however, provide that evolution path through the city.” Acts playing Thekla include Haley Bonar, The Moonlandingz, The Lemon Twigs, Tom Grennan, Nick Mulvey (all DHP promotions), Kate Nash (Crosstown Concerts) and The Strypes, a co-promotion between Goldenvoice and Metropolis Music.

Crosstown traffic

Also reporting strong ticket sales and welcoming the new arena is Conal Dodds, who is Bristol-based and has been putting on shows in the city since 1992, first with Metropolis and now with London-headquartered Crosstown Concerts, which he cofounded with former Metropolis executive Paul Hutton. Crosstown promotes the 21-24 June Bristol Sounds (5,000) event on the Harbourside, headlined this year by Manic Street


Exploring the live music networks in our key cities and towns I city

Colston Hall

Preachers, Craig David, Bonobo and Hacienda Classical. Tickets cost from £32.50 to £37.50. The company also stages the one-day Downs Festival (30,000) in September, a co-promotion with Team Love, which this year features Elbow, Seasick Steve, De La Soul, Soul II Soul, Roni Size and Groove Armada. Other Crosstown promotions in Bristol include Fenne Lily in Lord Mayor’s Chapel (150), Kier, Moses, Paris Youth Foundation and Souer in The Louisiana, Kiefer Sutherland in The Bierkeller (700), Lamb in Trinity Community Arts, Darlia in The Exchange (250) and Agnes Obel in the University of Bristol’s Anson Rooms (1,000). “The Bristol scene is really vibrant with dozens of gigs every night across most genres and lots of new exciting talent coming out of the city,” says Dodds. “We promote shows from 30 people to 30,000 and try to use as wide a variety of venues where possible. The only weakness I see is the lack of choice of affordable venues over 500 capacity … and the fact there are too many shows out there.”

Landmark changes name

Sarah Robertson, communications and special projects director at Colston Hall, says it is hoped the decision to change the name of the venue due to its association with the 17th century slave trader turned philanthropist Edward Colston (see LIVE UK news, issue 208) is a positive move.

limits I 21

Bristol Sounds

“The news has been greeted positively by the majority of people we have spoken to in the industry,” says Robertson. “We feel very strongly that, in order to attract the widest range of artistes and audiences to the hall, there can’t be any barriers in the way.” Acts playing the venue include Idina Menzel (promoted by LNE), Kraftwerk, Paramore, Little Big Town, Squeeze, The Kooks (all SJM Concerts), Ne-Yo (Robomagic Live), Holy Holy, Blanck Mass, The Flaming Lips and Mercury Rev, who performed with The Royal Northern Sinfonia (all in-house). A new name for the venue, which is due to close next year for a £48.8 million redevelopment, will be in place when it reopens in 2020. As a result of the refurbishment, the capacity of the main hall will be increased to 2,174, while a new 250-capacity performance area, The Cellars, is part of the plan. “The list of artistes that have graced the stage at Colston Hall is almost unparalleled in the UK,” says Robertson. “From Elgar to Rachmaninov, Duke Ellington to Miles Davis, the Beatles, the Stones, Bowie and Bob Marley. Not surprising perhaps for a venue celebrating its 150th anniversary this September.” Over at the O2 Academy, a £20m student accommodation development in and around Trenchard Street - part of which is above the venue - has resulted in the O2 Academy gaining a new façade and frontage. There have also been upgrades to production facilities, including a new lighting package. “There is such a spectrum of venues to play in Bristol, which

Sarah Robetson

Josh Westaway

A gem of a venue in the heart of Bristol St George’s Bristol is a Grade II* listed venue with a reputation for quality and excellence, attracting international classical, world, folk, jazz and Indie artists. The unique and intimate atmosphere, recording facilities, and great team, make St George’s perfect for artists and audiences alike. And with a stunning new extension, bac café bar and backstage spaces opening in February 2018, there’s even more to discover. Registered charity no. 295178 Photo by Simon Camper

For more information: stgeorgesbristol.co.uk | 0117 929 4929 | events@stgeorgesbristol.co.uk July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


22 I city limits Marble effect

Simon Bailey

means there is clear progression in the city,” says general manager Josh Westaway. “It’s also refreshing to know that we have support for grassroots venues from local MPs Thangam Debbonaire and Kerry McCarthy.” With approximately 120 shows a year, Westaway points out that ticket sales remain strong. “As expected, high-profile live events sell-out quickly,” he says, adding that those currently playing the venue include Two Door Cinema Club, Dizzee Rascal (both SJM), Wolf Alice (AEG Live), Rae Sremmurd, Busted, Loyle Carner, Airbourne and Stormzy (all LNE).

With two venues, The Marble Factory (600) and Motion, The MJR Group hosts upwards of 150 shows a year in the city while also promoting at other spaces, too. All shows are booked by promoter Tim Bailey, who says production at both MJR venues has recently been upgraded. Acts playing The Marble Factory include Ladyhawke, Angel Olsen, Turbowolf, Pulled Apart By Horses, The Wytches, Northlane, Ghostpoet (all in-house), Peter Hook and The Light (VMS Live), Danny Brown (One Inch Badge), Rejjie Snow, MoStack (both SJM) and Sampha (Goldenvoice). Fleece According to Bailey, Bristol is just behind cities such as London, Manchester and Glasgow in terms of ticket sales, “We have 50,000 students during term time and a diverse, creative population generally who are really interested in live music,” he adds. Among the acts playing Motion are Wild Beasts, Dinosaur Jr, (both in-house), Crystal Castles, Joey Bada$$ (both SJM) and Lethal Bizzle (LNE). Artistes MJR is promoting at other venues include The Divine Comedy at Colston Hall and Sylvan Esso at Swx.

o2academybristol.co.uk

Coming Autumn 2017... L’Acoustics Kara O2 Academy Bristol 1000 - 1600 standing capacity Contact General Manager Josh Westaway josh@o2academybristol.co.uk

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


Exploring the live music networks in our key cities and towns I city

limits I 23

Outsiders to insiders

Following a £200,000 refurbishment by owner Late Night Bars, Swx, formerly the Syndicate nightclub, is now a dedicated live music venue. All shows are booked by Simon Bailey of Oxfordbased promoter Future Perfect, who has taken on the role of commercial development and programming at the venue. “What we’re doing is trying to position the venue as a stepping-stone between Thekla and the O2 Academy and Colston Hall,” says Bailey, who adds that he is also booking a 250-capacity room at the venue. “Coming from outside of Bristol, what we didn’t want to do was tread on toes and be bidding against promoters. My thinking was, ‘It would be better to work with the local promoters and provide a space where they could bring their bands’. As such, there are no plans to book inhouse at the moment.” Artistes playing the venue include Goat, Mo, The Hunnah and Ride (all DHP), with MJR promoting Vintage Trouble, and Effigy, run by promoter Miles Jelfs of The Fleece, putting on Sunn O))). “This year we’ve put on about 40 shows and we hope to double that next year,” says Bailey. “The venue is starting to get really established now among local promoters.” Over at The Bierkeller, veteran Bristol promoter Dave Brayley echoes these comments regarding so much activity at one level in the market, particularly when the city also has to compete with

Live UK Ad 3.indd 2

O2 Academy Bristol

Cardiff 44 miles away for shows. “A successful venue needs the right infrastructure, marketing, management team and a connected booker to strike the deals,” says Brayley, who adds that artistes currently playing The Bierkeller include Royal Blood (LNE), The Shires, Blossoms, All Them Witches and Brian Jonestown Massacre (all SJM). “Bristol is awash with promoters, bookers and venues so the power is with the agents, which is not always good because artiste prices go up, ticket price goes up,” he notes.

Miles Jelfs

06/07/2017 11:33

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


24 I city limits

Holy Trinity

Offering audiences something different is often the only way to survive, says Emma Harvey, director of Trinity Community Arts. “With so much going on across Bristol, even having a good line-up is not enough to pack out a venue,” she says. “You have to really push the promotion in order to be heard. Bristol audiences are looking for something different and special so you have to bring that extra something if you want to stand out from what else is going on.”

‘The Bristol scene is really vibrant with dozens of gigs every night across most genres and lots of new exciting talent coming out of the city’ Conal Dodds

Artistes playing Trinity include British Sea Power (SJM), Temples (Goldenvoice), Hurray For The Riff Raff (Colston Hall), Creeper (LNE), Swans (One Inch Badge), Mew and Lamb (both Crosstown). As befits such a vibrant city, venue spaces are constantly being updated, with St George’s currently undergoing a £6.6m refurbishment. On completion next February, the venue will

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

boast two additional spaces, which can be combined to offer a seated capacity of approximately 140. Acts playing the venue, which hosts around 250 shows a year, include Badly Drawn Boy (SJM), Amanda Palmer (LNE), Oyster Band (MJR), Villagers and Low (both DHP) and 10cc’s Graham Gouldman and Heart Full of Songs (in-house). “The wide range of choice of shows is both the city’s strength and its weakness,” says Dagmar Smeed, St George’s head of marketing. “Audiences frequently complain that they have to choose between concerts, venues and other cultural happenings. The city is buzzing.” With so much activity, there is, inevitably, the odd casualty, as Miles Jelfs of The Fleece notes. “Sometimes having so many shows across the city can result in the odd clash, St George’s but for the most part, there is a good balance and everyone seems to be doing well,” says Jelfs. The venue hosts 300-plus shows a year and artistes playing include Carpenter Brut, Honeyblood, Black Peaks (all in-house), Slowdive (DHP), Inheaven and Frank Carter & the Rattlesnakes (both Kilimanjaro Live). With few venues around the 200-capacity mark, those who do work at that level are highly sought after by promoters, with The Exchange staging upwards of 250 shows a year, hosting acts such as Knuckle Puck, Jesca Hoop, Chastity Belt (all MJR), Joseph (AEG) and Kojey Radical (Metropolis). “Perhaps our biggest USP is that there are no other venues with our capacity in the city,” says the venue’s Matthew Otridge. “It’s either 150 and less or 400-plus.” Taking pride in the fact that most of those who work at The Louisiana have been touring musicians, Mig Schillace says the venue is one of the most over spec’d of its size in the UK, with some of the best in-house sound engineers around. Artistes benefiting at The Louisiana include Vøk (Crosstown), Blood Ceremony (Effigy), Beth Rowley (MJR), Tom Grennan, Julia Jacklin and Sløtface, (all DHP). As to how the market is performing, Schillace’s assessment sums up the feeling among most promoters in Bristol. “We now have shows most nights, with lots more national bands touring. The city is going through a great period at the moment.”


Bristol’s home of music for 150 years Find out more about our exciting transformation plans and celebrate with us colstonhall.org/colston-hall-150 #colstonhall150

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Thursday 12 October 2017

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The Winning Ticket (primary ticketing)

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28 I

Production news NEWCASTLE-BASED rental company Nitelites, which works with clients including Rag n’ Bone Man and We Are FSTVL (cap. 30,000), has become a certified partner of French audio manufacturer L-Acoustics, taking delivery of its flagship product the K1 system. Nitelites’ K1 comprises 48 K1, 24 K1-SB and 24 KS28 and compliments its existing stock of K2 and KARA units. “As Nitelites’ client base grew, it was getting requests for a stadium-sized PA,” says L-Acoustics’ Paul McMullan. “The company has impressed us with its technical proficiency and commercial strategy.” THE UK operation of Production Resource Group (PRG), PRG XL Video has appointed two new account managers to its music team, Robert Watson and Michael George. Watson’s experience includes project management at Glastonbury (cap. 140,000) and SW4 (20,000), while George moves from Blink TV where he specialised in filming and streaming live shows. PRG XL says it recently trialled this service at a Stormzy show from The O2 Academy (cap. 4,900), Brixton. COLOUR SOUND Experiment has invested in 100 LightSky AquaBeam moving lights as the West Londonbased rental company provides equipment to over 60 events this summer including V (87,000) and Secret Garden Party (20,000). The waterproof fixture has the international weatherproofing rating of IP44 and, says Colour Sound’s Haydn Cruikshank, “Will be ideal for stage and PA wing positions or for lighting in outdoor scenarios where the kit has no protection at all.”

Take That deliver rounded performance TAKE THAT decided to use an in-the-round format on their Wonderland tour, requiring a specially developed circular staging system, according to Koen Peters of Belgian stage construction specialist WIcreations (WI). The 20 metre diameter circular stage packs easily into a truck, says Peters, and can be built and derigged quickly at venues including Birmingham Genting Arena (cap. 15,700), The O2 (21,000), London, and Manchester Arena (21,000). “It’s an extremely complex and ambitious show that has evolved over that time and entailed a real collaboration between all the departments and disciplines,” says Koen.

tion it forms part of a TT logo within the stage. Video provider Video Design worked with Take That’s creative team including artistic directors Kim Gavin and Misty Buckley plus Ray Winkler of live music design specialist Stufish to provide a 20 metre ring of video projection above the stage using Take That’s Wonderland tour 16 roller drops for screens. “The roller-drops eliminate any The stage features a 9.5m by six metre elevator used during a num- pass-through light from the prober of songs and lifting to 4.1m jectors,” says lighting designer Tim above stage level. At its busiest, the Routledge. “Video Design proelevator accommodates the three vides four projector stacks, placed members of Take That – Gary Barlow, ‘North, East, South and West’ in the Howard Donald and Mark Owen – grandstands. The roller-drops are plus 12 dancers. It has a lifting ca- Kinesis controlled so we precisely pacity of 10 tonnes and uses four of choreograph their movements WI’s TP6 lifts, while in the down posi- and positions.” © Kris Goodman courtesy

Newsbites

Orchestra brings complete Blackout to Trafalgar Square MINIMISING THE length of closure of Trafalgar Square was a critical requirement for the 7,000 capacity performance by the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) at the tourist attraction, according to Blackout director Kevin Monks. The company provided

PA towers and four screen support truss structures beside the main stage, as well as rigging and drapes and ancillary structures. John Howes, event manager of Somerset House (cap. 1,500) and production manager for the concert, says, “Blackout has a really good

understanding of this project and its levels of professionalism are excellent. My relationship with them was crucial for an event in such a well-used public space.” The company used a combination of Thomas 52 Supertruss and Prolyte Truss, with extra Blackout

truss forming the main entranceway. The first equipment arrived in Trafalgar Square two days before the concert, and the 15-strong team built the support structures in time for the production load-in with lighting and video equipment the following day.

Mobile stages | Platform stages | Risers | FOH structures | Front of stage barriers

+44(0) 1560 600271 | www.fmx-ltd.com July 2017 • issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


I 29

Industry rallies for One Love Tributes paid to crowd SUPPLIERS OF the Ariana Grande production team had seven days to react when the singer staged a benefit concert for the victims of the terrorist attack which took place after her concert at the Manchester Arena (cap. 21,000). The 50,000 capacity One Love concert at Manchester’s Old Trafford Cricket Ground, to which Grande invited artistes including Liam Gallagher, Miley Cyrus, Take That and Coldplay, required suppliers including audio company Britannia Row to divert crew and resources from other tours to meet the technical needs. “[Audio company] Clair Global in the US was contracted for the Ariana Grande tour and they contacted us directly,” says Brit Row’s Lez Dwight, who explains the artiste’s touring equipment was initially held up at the Manchester Arena due to the police investigation. “We arranged for radio frequency (RF) gear, mics and in-ear monitors (IEM) and two extra SD7 consoles to go into Wembley Arena [cap. 12,000] where Ariana’s band, the ‘house band’ for One Love, rehearsed. The additional gear was added

safety innovator Upton

Britannia Row at work at One Love

to the tour FOH and monitor systems to accommodate visiting guest artistes and their engineers.” With Brit Row already working on Depeche Mode, Phil Collins and Robbie Williams, says Dwight, “The call on crew and equipment was a real challenge. We devised a plan, with duplicate SD7s, increased SD Racks and extra Clair Cohesion CO-12 PA to set up on Friday. We loaded in and tested on Saturday morning, with artiste rehearsals on Sunday right up to ‘doors open’. Liam Gallagher’s band played with no rehearsal at all. [Engineer] Colin Pink worked his two days off from the Hans Zimmer’s world tour.”

THE DEATH of Dr Mick Up- Live Aid (cap. 72,000) before ton shortly before his 80th attracting many international birthday this June prompted artistes and venues as clients. After retiring from Showsec a wealth of tributes from the live music industry, which in 2000, Upton became a key credits him as one of the first contributor to the UK’s first security professionals to pri- ever crowd management deoritise crowd safety at rock gree qualifications created by Buckinghamand pop events. shire New UniverUpton founded sity (BNU) and was crowd management awarded a doctorcompany Showsec ate in 2005 for his in September 1978, contribution. switching his profes“Mick was a piosional focus from arneer in the crowd tiste security, where management inhe worked with acts Dr Mick Upton dustry, making it including The Beahis life’s work to tles and David Cassidy, to audience welfare after enhance standards and probeing moved by the death of a mote a professional approach fan in a crowd crush at a Cas- to event security,” says managsidy concert in 1974. Partner ing director of Showsec Mark Gerry Slater joined the com- Harding. Andy Lenthall general manpany in 1982 when it became ShowSec International Ltd, ager of the UK’s Production working with clients includ- Services Association described ing George Michael and UK’s Upton as, “One of my heroes.”

Hurst brings lazer sharp focus for Sigma LASERS AND pyrotechnics were among the production facilities that accompanied drum ‘n’ bass duo Sigma as they loaded into the Royal Albert Hall (cap. 5,250) with just a day to set up. The short build time required as much pre-programming as possible, says show designer Andy Hurst, who aimed for a

look which celebrated the “historic” surroundings by using lasers to pick out the venue’s 19th century organ. He also “wrapped” the frontage of the hall’s choir stalls and the upstage area with 6mm LED. Using a combination of lighting equipment from Blackburn rental company HSL and the inhouse rig, Hurst deployed lasers

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by ER, LED screens, cameras and projection by Video Illusions and pyro by BPM. “While some elements of a show can be pre-visualised, there’s a lot of fine-tuning in the hall, so it was an intense day with everyone working right up until doors,” says Hurst. “But it’s great to pull off a high profile event in a prestigious setting.”

HSL at work with Sigma at the Royal Albert Hall

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July 2017 • issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


30 I SECTOR FOCUS

A walk on the bright side As well as showcasing the artiste in the best visual way possible, LED screen technology is also being used for lighting and set design. Add to that an increase in immersive and social experiences for the audience, and it’s about a lot more than pixels. Claire Bicknell reports

E

“Designers are thinking of more and more ach year brings ever more changes and inno- Bastille’s festival run. They have three ribbons of screen running across the stage at various unusual ways to incorporate LED into their overvations in LED technology. LED is being used in increasingly creative heights on custom made metal structures we all set designs – from Creamfields [cap. 70,000] ways on and around the stage and the past year fabricated. Each ribbon has 15 tiles of Roe Linx-9 with huge LED clad structures, to KISS with a staggered video stage roof and transparent LED has also seen many companies go into liquida- flexible screen fitted into them.” CT offers a 24-hour call-out facility to support combined with lighting,” says PRG XL director of tion or dissolve in the sector. But the leading players are going strong and its clients’ shows and, as part of the NEP Live the music and video team Stefaan Michels. “PRG has a team in Belgium – PRG Projects – react quickly to clients’ needs and have their own Events Group, it has an international reach to provide support across Europe, US, Middle East who create custom LED products for special views on what’s next in this fast-paced business. events and custom tour set-ups. On the occa“LED can be used from floors to ceilings and and Asia. Audiences are now becoming more accus- sion that a designer comes to us with a specific everywhere in between,” says Graham Miller, head of music & entertainment at Creative tomed to LED being used for a range of uses request which isn’t satisfied by traditional LED products, we can then use the team across a set, bringing a new Technology (CT). at PRG Projects to design something aesthetic to a live show. “The latest developments are lighter bespoke which matches their idea and “LED flooring has been a products and higher resolutions but they then work closely with the team in great gag recently, especially the creative products are very interShenzhen.” as the resolution of them esting – those which are flexible, The company’s latest innovation is has gone up and they have transparent or super lightweight.” the PRG SPACEFRAME™ -an ultra lightbecome more suited for outRunning for over 30 years, CT works weight, carbon fibre touring frame door shows,” adds Miller. across the spectrums of music, sports, with seamlessly integrated LED panels. “The overlapping of lightthe arts, TV and corporate indusIt is collapsible, fully wind braced with ing and video has been Stefaan Michels tries. Recent tours it has worked on Graham Miller in-built structural strength and helps happening for the last few include Adele, Queen, Depeche Mode years and it makes an interesting mix where to reduce pre-tour engineering time, shipping and Bastille. “We have a really broad range, from high reso- creatives can use a mixture of LED products and footprint and weight and load-in and out times. “In terms of the LED technology itself not a lution products for creating a lot of detail in small lighting fixtures for the show. “In the last year or so, I’ve seen some really huge amount has changed, however what is spaces, through to us doing a lot of innovative work with our carbon fibre 10mm product – this good uses of transparency for shows – I love it growing in importance is the back-end of the is super lightweight and is very thin, allowing when you can play with layers of screens to give screen – how it is supported, built and packaged,” explains Michels. “Production managers are us to make large screens when weight has been shows more depth.” Working with artistes such as Drake, Kings of focusing on making tours as efficient as possible an issue through to curves, cubes and ceilings,” Leon, Roger Waters and U2, PRG XL Video has its and are increasingly budget conscious. explains Miller. “Lighter screens, faster build, easier main“We’ve also been using flexible LED products own sourcing and development centre based in to make sweeping curves across the stage in Shenzhen, China, responding to the bespoke LED tenance, less labour and less truck space all contribute to the efficiency that they require.” custom ribbons, to give the stage a new look on needs of live music.

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

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SECTOR FOCUS I 31

PRG XL Video at Creamfields

Going the extra mile with support and time sensitive turnarounds is also an essential part of service for the leading players in this sector, as Michels reinforces. “Earlier this year we were able to assist Drake’s designers with a major new show element, which was customised, tested and shipped out to the tour within 48 hours, and we called in extra staff over the weekend to make it happen.”

Content possibilities

With nearly 30 years of experience in audiovisual (AV), YSLV has worked with clients such as the MOBO Awards, Live Music Business Awards, and the Caudwell Children Butterfly Ball, with

“Designers are thinking of more and more unusual ways to incorporate LED into their overall set designs” Stefaan Michels

performances by Kylie Minogue and Peter Andre. “The trend at the moment is to go bigger for screen size, as the price is going down,” says MD Richard Pask. “We’re also seeing a lot more creativity on the screen such as pictures within pictures – you may get three separate images on

the screen, and you couldn’t do that before, as it wouldn’t be possible with the pixels. “You may also see a ticker tape running along the bottom – there’s lots of different ways it could be used at a show to include more informative content. Tweetwalls are very popular too.” YSLV says it offers 24/7 support to its clients, has its own fleet of trucks and offers rigging and production services. “LED is being used for everything and anything,” adds Pask. “Screen backdrops, side of screens and live experiences for the audiences – there’s so much you can do with them.” “We also support other LED screen companies when they’re in the thick of things.”

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32 I SECTOR FOCUS

Creative Technology for Adele

Keeping up with trends

Celebrating 20 years in the industry, Lightmedia Displays has supplied LED screens to Bingley Music Live (15,000) for many years, as well as the Mouth of Tyne Festival, which involved navigating a narrow entrance into a castle setting. “We have the highest resolution modular screen for the outdoor market – a 3.9mm screen that is 5500nits, that’s over 65,000 LEDs per square metre,” explains MD Eddie Elliott-Smith. “From arriving on an event site, our mobile

units can be up and running and showing live video in less than 15 minutes. On the majority of events we now also integrate all aspects of social media as everyone wants interactivity.” “Touring bands are now immersing themselves in LED, the stages are getting wrapped with LED to form part of the overall lighting and AV design and lighting designers are featuring as much LED as possible, compared with only a few years ago.” Lightmedia also keeps updated with the latest trends from China, as well as trade shows, and

Lightmedia at Mouth of Tyne Festival

Elliot-Smith gives a hint of what might be coming in the future. “At a recent industry exhibition in Amsterdam we had the pleasure of seeing a 0.9mm LED screen,” he says. “It looked amazing, so did the price. The cost Eddie Elliott-Smith was over £28,000 per square metre. There was also an array of flexible LED tiles – you can now

Video, lighting and rigging technology for music, touring, theatre, TV and events

0845 470 6400

www.prg.com/uk

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

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SECTOR FOCUS I 33

ADI’s iCONIC 15 at MTV Titanic Sounds

wrap a circular column with tiles that are made of rubber material.” And as costs are reducing across the sector for many of the screens, he gives a word of warning. “We all know that costs are a major part of any business but discounted pricing is not always the answer. They can be as low a price as possible, but if they don’t turn up or the kit fails, how cheap is it then? “Quality, experience and peace of mind isn’t expensive – it’s priceless,” asserts Elliot-Smith.

Benefits to brands

ADI has provided LED solutions for live music clients for over 20 years, including for over 50+ post-race concerts around the UK for Jockey Club Live, the Liverpool International Music Festival (32,000) and for 250,000 fans at Leicester City’s Premier League title celebration last year, with a headline performance by Kasabian. “Imagine magnification is important but LED is also an incredibly creative and transformative technology that can add huge visual impact,

change mood and atmosphere and create more immersive and interactive experiences for the audience,” says director of screen rental Nick Robinson. “As brand partnerships and commercial sponsorship become more Nick Robinson important, LED technology can offer a dynamic platform for promotion and activation at live music events. We’ve put mobile screens in hospitality areas, entrances and other high footfall sites for brand activation.” ADI says it offers Europe’s largest and widest range of mobile LED screens – the iCONIC fleet – with screens that range in size from 12sqm to 120sqm. It also provides a variety of modular solutions and supporting services to help clients maximise the value of their screens, including event broadcast, production and social media solutions. “The iCONIC fleet couldn’t be easier to transport and deliver to site,” adds Robinson. “The unit is driven into its location, the screen set-up and positioned as required – all within an hour and operated by a single screen technician. “For busy sites or where a quick set-up, de-rig is needed the mobile LED screen option is incredibly well suited and cost effective.”

CHOOSE ADI FOR YOUR 2017 EVENT

2 x iCONIC 25 @ Liverpool International Music Festival

Modular Screens and iCONIC 15 @ MTV Titanic Sounds

2 x iCONIC 100 @ Nike We Own the Night Screens from the iCONIC Fleet

- The world’s largest, widest range of mobile LED screens - Modular LED solutions - OB and Production services Find out more at www.adi.tv/hire

0800 592 346 info@adi.tv | www.adi.tv July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

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34 I SECTOR FOCUS

YSLV for Peter Andre

Pixel myths

With over 10 years in the industry, Colonel Tom Touring (CTT), which is headquartered in Clarksville, Tennessee, and has a base in Salisbury, has a clients roster that includes Ed Sheeran, Adele, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Rod Stewart and Florence + the Machine. “Along with higher resolutions, we’re seeing more creative types of panels – for instance, panels of different shapes and sizes that can be used to create screens with very interesting shapes,” explains CTT chief operating officer Barry Otto. “On the Taylor Swift Speak Now tour we used hundreds of small modules to create the curves of her set – it was a cabling nightmare every day. Recently we supplied flexible panels for the Adele tour that created a really great round surface with very little wiring each day. “In the past you could get custom shapes created if you had enough lead time but a number of manufacturers are now creating stock units.” So, what’s coming next for the sector? With the so-called wonder material Graphene – led by Nobel Prize-winning scientists at the University of

LIVE MUSIC

REPORT 2017

(inc. p&p)

UKBV2017_01 Cover_Spine P1.indd 2

25/05/2017 17:17

Part 1

Theatres and Concer t Ha lls A

REPORT 2017

Open-air venues,

Part 2

stadiums, arenas, campus venues, arts centres, clubs, pubs & bars

UKBV2017_01

Cover_Spine

P1.indd 2

UK'S BEST VENUES FOR CONTEMPORARY

LIVE MUSIC Part 2

Open-air venues, stadiums arenas, campus venues arts centres, clubs pubs & bars

£20 (inc. p&p)

25/05/2017 17:17

A

Part 1: Theatres and Concert Halls REPORT 2017

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A LIVE UK REPORT 2017

£20

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A LIVE UK REPORT 2017

Part 2 Open-air venues, stadiums, arenas, campus venues, arts centres, clubs, pubs & bars

Free to subscribers of LIVE UK

ES

ORARY

O p e n - a i r v e n u e s , s t a d i u m s , a re n a s , c a m p u s v e n u e s , a r t s c e n t re s , clubs, pubs & bars

Open-air venues, stadiums arenas, campus venues arts centres, clubs pubs & bars

FOR CONT EMP

LIVE MUSIC

A LIVE UK R EPORT 201 7

A

Part 2

UK'S BEST VENU

U K ’s B e s t Ve n u e s F o r C o n t e m p o r a r y L i v e M u s i c : P a r t 2

Theatres and Concert Halls

UK’s Best Venues for Contemporary Live Music

FOR CONTEMPORARY

T h e a t re s & Concert Ha lls

T h e a t re s & C o n c e r t H a l l s

Part 1

“Graphene is now being utilised in some mainstream products, but we’ll have to wait and see where it leads in our world,” comments Otto. “Since the LED market has exploded and many, many companies are producing products the prices have really been driven down. At this point – regardless of the advantages – it will be some time before Graphene and other new materials

UK'S BEST VENUES

O p e n - a i r v e n u e s , s t a d i u m s , a re n a s , c a m p u s v e n u e s , a r t s c e n t re s , c l u b s , p u b s & b a r s

LIVE MUSIC

Eddie Elliott-Smith

ry Live Mus ic: Part 1

FOR CONTEMPORARY

“On the majority of events we now also integrate all aspects of social media as everyone wants interactivity”

will be able to compete on the cost scale.” LED pixel resolution is also an area Otto is keen to explain. “It’s very often misunderstood. Many people believe the higher the resolution, the better the picture. While that does mean more resolution, it doesn’t directly translate to a better-looking picture for the audience. “Your eyes – just like your ears – can only resolve a certain amount of detail. In the design stage you really need to look at the screen size versus the audience viewing distance to determine the required pixel pitch,” says Otto. “Don’t get me wrong, if a designer wants a 3mm screen, I’ll charge you for it. But the money will be wasted on everyone but the band, because they will be the only ones close enough to see the difference.” Ever evolving, LED tech will have even more creative uses on stage in the near future. One thing is for sure, the companies at the heart of the sector know their business well and will ensure that they are at the forefront of technological developments.

U K ’s B e s t Ve nues For Co ntempora

U K ’s B e s t Ve n u e s F o r C o n t e m p o r a r y L i v e M u s i c : P a r t 2

U K ’s B e s t Ve n u e s F o r C o n t e m p o r a r y L i v e M u s i c : P a r t 1

UK'S BEST VENUES

Manchester – there’s been a lot of talk about how this incredibly thin, strong and highly conductive material has the potential to transform LED and lighting technologies in general.

A REPORT 2017

Part 1: Theatres and Concert Halls

£20 (inc. p&p)

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Cont ac t 0 20 74 8 6 70 07 | info @liveuk .com | w w w.liveuk .com

July 2017 • Issue 210 • www.liveuk.com

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LP210 W


Europe’s arenas: the definitive report World’s Best Arenas For Live Music

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Comment | Profiles | Survey | Directory

Free to LIVE UK/Audience subscribers or available at £20 from www.liveuk.com For more information contact Jordan Statham 020 7486 7007 | jordan@liveuk.com

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10/07/2017 16:00 17:04 19/07/2017


36 I tour plans a guide to artistes, tours & agents Artistes

Period

Contact details

Afro Celt Nov David Farrow, DMF Music Sound System T 01392 437 744 david@dmfmusic.co.uk Alice Jemima

Nov Zac Peters, DMF Music T 01392 437 744 zac@dmfmusic.co.uk

Barbara Nov-May Phil Simpson, Strada Music Dickson T 01377 217662 with Nick Holland phil.simpson@stradamusic.com Bernie Marsden

Nov-Dec Alec Leslie, Consolidated Artists T 01829 730 488 alecconsol@aol.com

Bettye Lavette

Nov Gunter Schroder, The Kurland Agency T +1 617 254 0007 gunter@thekurlandagency.com

Boomtown Rats with Bob Geldof

Nov Alan Cottam, Alan Cottam Agency T 01254 668471 alan7000uk@yahoo.com

Caravan Nov Nigel Kerr, ABS Agency T 020 8399 3474 absagency@mac.com Chastity Brown

Jan-Feb Bob Paterson, BPA Live 2018 T 01359 230357 bp@bpa-live.com

Chick Corea

Nov Gunter Schroder, The Kurland Agency T +1 617 254 0007 gunter@thekurlandagency.com

Dan Reed Network

Nov Martin Jarvis, Fresh Start Agency T 0141 416 5753 Freshstart.mj@gmail.com

Eliza Carthy & The Wayward Band

Artistes

Period

Contact details

Dreadzone Dec Zac Peters, DMF Music T 01392 437733 zac@dmfmusic.co.uk Dub Pistols Nov Serena Parsons, Primary Talent International T 020 7400 4500 serena@primarytalent.com Duke Special

Nov-Dec Zac Peters, DMF Music T 01392 437 744 zac@dmfmusic.co.uk

Eliza Carthy Nov-Dec David Farrow, DMF Music & The T 01392 437 744 Wayward Band david@dmfmusic.co.uk Elle Exxe Nov-Dec Debra Downes, Dawson Breed Music T 020 7733 0508 debra@dawsonbreedmusic.com Graham Feb-Mar Steve Parker, Miracle Artists Gouldman’s T 020 7935 9222 Heart Full of Songs steve@miracle-artists.com

Alice Jemima

Artistes

Period

Jack Broadbent

Nov Gunter Schroder, The Kurland Agency T +1 617 254 0007 gunter@thekurlandagency.com

Jools May-Jul Holland & 2018 His Rhythm & Blues Orchestra

Contact details

Nick Peel, Miracle Artists T 020 7935 9222 nick@miracle-artists.com

Linda Lewis Nov-Dec Mark Lundquist in association with Alan Whitehead, MLM Concerts T 01483 224 118 mark@marklundquist.com Lindisfarne Mar 18 Chris Wade, Strada Music T 01377 217662 info@stradamusic.com McNally Nov-Dec Alan Cottam, Alan Cottam Agency Waters Band T 01254 668471 alan@alancottamagency.co.uk

Hawklords Nov Martin Jarvis, Fresh Start Agency T 0141 416 5753 Freshstart.mj@gmail.com

Maggie Reilly

Hope & Jan Chris Wade, Strada Music Social T 01377 217662 info@stradamusic.com

Molly Nov Alan Cottam, Alan Cottam Agency Hatchet T 01254 668471 alan@alancottamagency.co.uk

Nov-Dec Debra Downes, Dawson Breed Music T 020 7733 0508 debra@dawsonbreedmusic.com

Subscribers to LIVE UK can submit their artistes for free listing in Tour Plans, subject to available space and at the discretion of the publisher. Send your info to: Lindsey@liveuk.com

“We love it when a plan comes together!”

CaLL now For a Quote

For more inFormation: CaLL 0141 954 4641 / 07737 929381 or go to www.bandrunner.Com July 2017 • issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


a guide to artistes, tours & agents tour plans I 37 Artistes

Period

Contact details

Moon Dec Zac Peters, DMF Music Hooch T 01392 437733 zac@dmfmusic.co.uk Morbid Angel

Nov Nick Peel, Miracle Artists T 020 7935 9222 nick@miracle-artists.com

Orbital

Nov Dan Silver, Value Added Talent T 020 7704 9720 dan@vathq.co.uk

Pat Metheny Nov Gunter Schroder, The Kurland Agency T +1 617 254 0007 gunter@thekurlandagency.com Nov-Dec Bennie Edwards, Tony Denton Promotions T 020 8447 9411 bennie@tdpromo.com

Pauper Kings

Nov-Dec Alec Leslie, Consolidated Artists T 01829 730 488 alecconsol@aol.com

Renaissance Nov-Dec Wayne Forte, Entourage Talent Associates T +1 212 633 2600 booking@entouragetalent.com Right Said Nov- Mar Serena Catapano, Fred Cat Music Management T 07871 075 072 serena@catmusicmgt.com Rock Goddess

Nov Martin Jarvis, Fresh Start Agency T 0141 416 5753 freshstart.mj@gmail.com

Ruby Turner Jan-May Nick Peel, Miracle Artists 2018 T 020 7935 9222 nick@miracle-artists.com

Hope Social

Artistes

Period

Contact details

Artistes

Sian Cross Nov Serena Catapano, Cat Music Management T 07871 075 072 serena@catmusicmgt.com Sound of Nov-Dec Zac Peters, DMF Music the Sirens T 01392 437733 zac@dmfmusic.co.uk Steps Nov-Dec Gary Howard, United Talent Agency T 0207 278 3331 gary.howard@unitedtalent.com Sweet

Nov Nigel Kerr, ABS Agency T 020 8399 3474 absagency@mac.com

10cc

Dec Steve Parker, Miracle Artists T 020 7935 9222 steve@miracle-artists.com

Period

Contact details

Tom Russell Nov-Dec Bob Paterson, BPA Live T 01359 230357 bp@bpa-live.com Tyketto

Nov Martin Jarvis, Fresh Start Agency T 0141 416 5753 freshstart.mj@gmail.com

White Nov Jeff Aug, Maximum Booking Cowbell T +49 8324 933 851 Oklahoma info@maximumbooking.com Zalon

Nov-Dec Mark Lundquist, MLM Concerts T 01483 224 118 mark@marklundquist.com © Jon Tresko

Paul Young

Tedeschi Nov-Dec Wayne Forte, Trucks Band Entourage Talent Associates T +1 212 633 2600 booking@entouragetalent.com The Nov Kentucky Headhunters

Linda Lewis

Martin Jarvis, Fresh Start Agency T 0141 416 5753 freshstart.mj@gmail.com

The Shantics Nov-Dec Mark Lundquist, MLM Concerts T 01483 224 118 mark@marklundquist.com

Moon Hooch

The details shown above have been compiled from information provided to LIVE UK and whilst we make every reasonable effort to ensure accuracy, we cannot be held responsible if data is incorrect.

TEN YEARS AFTER

BARCLAY JAMES HARVEST JOHN LEES’

50th ANNIVERSARY Tour

THE BLUES FOUNDATION WINNER

JOE LOUIS

WALKER & BAND

50th ANNIVERSARY TOUR

BEST OF CLASSIC BARCLAY

www.kultopolis.com • agentin@kultopolis.com July 2017 • issue 210 • www.liveuk.com


38 I backstage stars Backstage

Stars Profile

Emma Milzani After a chance meeting in Italy with Glastonbury Festival booker Martin Elbourne brought her to London, Emma Milzani seized the opportunity to work for a relatively small operation called Channelfly – the forerunner of Mama & Company, working with venues such as Camden Assembly (200). She is now a promoter at Academy Events, the in-house promoting division for venue chain Academy Music Group, booking acts such as Papa Roach, New Model Army and Dillinger Escape Plan. What are your first live music memories?

“I grew up in Italy, in a region where you don’t have the luxury of seeing up-and-coming bands playing at local venues. I always had to look for new music outside of Italian bands, to the British and American scenes that were way more exciting at the time. “The turning point in my live experience was a festival in Milan called Sonoria, in 1996. I was 17 years old and Ash were the opening act on the main stage, followed by Bush, The Presidents of the United States of America, Sepultura, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, who were joined by PJ Harvey, and Moby closed the show. What a gig.”

How did you get into the music industry?

“I studied foreign languages and literature in Bergamo and graduated with a dissertation on David Bowie, entitled Rebel Rebel, you’ve torn your dress: David Bowie and the glam rock cross-dressing. “After that, I managed to get into a Masters on Music Business in Milan and as part of that, I had to take on an internship. “It was by chance I happened to meet Martin Elbourne at a local festival we were organising on Lake Iseo. I asked him for some tips and help and the rest as they say, is history. He’s the reason I ended up in London. “My adventure started off at the Camden Assembly, where I worked in the office, answering phone calls, listening to demos, helping with marketing and ticketing. The experience gave me such a broad view of aspects of the business and a real taste of programming and promoting a venue. April2017 July 2016• •Issue Issue210 195 • • www.liveuk.com www.liveuk.com

LIVE UK intervie ws key people who help shape our industry

“After a few months I got offered a role booking for The Enterprise [60], before working on a new [magazine] venture called The Fly, and then the Barfly [200].”

Bowie, to being given the amazing opportunity to celebrate his life and his 70th birthday in Brixton, where he was born.”

How has your career developed?

“The speed at which a lot of new bands are emerging and getting huge exposure really quickly means there are dangers of disappearing just as quickly. Bands need to move quickly and use all forms of technology to their own advantage for marketing purposes, particularly social media, but they also need to be talented, hardworking, ambitious and, very important, realistic. “Soon I will begin teaching a Live Music Event Management course at The School Of Music Business, which will be an interesting experience. Given Bowie is now out of the question, I would also love to work with Placebo and Editors, as they’ve had such an impact on my personal life.”

“Channelfly, the then umbrella company which owned the Barfly, acquired the Mean Fiddler brand and more venues, including the Borderline, and the Jazz Café, so I was able to work on larger shows and events with the wider team, including award shows with Kerrang!, Q and Classic Rock. “Since then I have grown my roster and my career to my current role, joining Academy Music Group [AMG] in 2016, following the acquisition of MAMA & Company by [AMG majority shareholder] Live Nation Entertainment.”

What have been your greatest highs and lows?

“I do not think I can call any of my experiences a big failure or disaster as yet. There are tough and stressful situations, but that is part of the job. There are some lessons that you need to learn and you can only do that by going through some lows in your career, but those need to be seen as an educational moment.” “No doubt about it, the sold-out Celebrating David Bowie show in January 2017 at the O2 Academy Brixton, featuring Gary Oldman, Simon Le Bon, Keane’s Tom Chaplin, La Roux, Def Leppard’s Joe Elliott and Tony Hadley has definitely been the highlight of my career up until now. “It almost felt like a circle was closing: as it all started back at uni with my dissertation on

You observations about the industry?

How do you wind down?

“I go back to see my family at home in Italy and my pets, running wild in the countryside. I also go swimming and I train in the gym, which helps release stress a little, and I’m a big fan of various TV series. “I definitely need to learn to relax more, so becoming disciplined to stop when I need to, clear my mind, relax and just enjoy stillness. We live in such a fast-paced world so we all need to find time to do that. “Maybe I’ll go see that famous American life coach Tony Robbins, to see whether he has some useful tips. I am kidding, of course.”


Our city centre Birmingham, Nottingham and Cardiff venues have been staging international and national tour shows since 2002. Overseen by In-House Promoter Markus Sargeant. The venues offer seated and standing formats, are highly versatile and are fully equipped with professional inhouse PA, lighting and experienced technical staff. Glee also has an in-house box office for ticketing and a marketing team.

VENUE CAPACITIES

BIRMINGHAM MAIN ROOM: 400 SEATED 600 STANDING STUDIO: 140 SEATED

NOTTINGHAM MAIN ROOM: 350 SEATED 450 STANDING STUDIO: 170 SEATED

CARDIFF 400 SEATED OR 600 STANDING Live music flourishes in the enticing show environment of The Glee Clubs, where a broad spectrum of singer-songwriters, indie-rock, pop, electronic, jazz, roots, blues, world and spoken word artists perform. The venues are universally acknowledged as key venues to play for touring artists, who require distinctive and meaningful destinations, where the desired and mercurial connection between artist and audience can be created. The essence of music at The Glee Clubs is best expressed by the artists who have performed over the years, including award-winners and those who have have played ‘legendary early shows’ and progressed to become thrilling pathfinders and trailblazers.

& THE JOHNSONS, JOANNA NEWSOM, FEIST, BAT FOR LASHES, SUFJAN STEVENS, REGINA SPEKTOR, ST. VINCENT, LAURA MVULA, JOHN GRANT, GLEN HANSARD, LYKKE LI, ÓLA , SCOTT MATTHEWS, BENJAMIN CLEMENTINE, ADELE, RICHARD HAWLEY, IMELDA MAY, NIGEL KENNEDY, MELODY GARDOT, RUMER, ROGER MCGUINN (THE BYRDS), CERYS MATTH TON, NEIL FINN (CROWDED HOUSE), RAY LAMONTAGNE, SONS, STEVENS, LAURA MARLING, HOWARD, LIANNE LA HAVAS, ANTONY & THE JOHNSONS, JOANNA NEWSOM, FRANK FEIST, TURNER, BAT FORMUMFORD LASHES, &SUFJAN REGINABEN SPEKTOR, ST. MICHAEL VINCENT,KIWANUKA, LAURA MVULA, JOHN GRANT THE STA G, ANNAGLEN CALVI, DAUGHTER, GEORGE EZRA,ARNALDS, EZRA FURMAN, THE PIERCES,BENJAMIN THE SHIRES, JACK SAVORETTI, IRON & HAWLEY, WINE, MARK LANEGAN, HENRY ROLLINS, LOW,GARDOT BEACH HOUSE, HANSARD, LYKKE LI, ÓLAFUR SCOTT MATTHEWS, CLEMENTINE, ADELE, RICHARD IMELDA MAY, NIGEL KENNEDY, MELODY THURSTON MOOREROGER (SONIC YOUTH),(THE DIRTY THREE,CERYS MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA, WHITE DENIM, NEW,HOUSE), THE CORAL, GRUFF RHYS (SFA), RODDY&FRAME, RUMER, MCGUINN BYRDS), MATTHEWS, PAUL HEATON, NEIL FINN BRAND (CROWDED RAY LAMONTAGNE, FRANKSUPERGRASS, TURNER, MUMFORD SONS RON SE PARK, BOY GEORGE, JOHN CALE, GLENN TILBROOK (SQUEEZE), RODRIGO Y GABRIELA, LEE SCRATCH PERRY, MR SCRUFF, LAU, SNARKY PUPPY, THE UNTHANKS AND BBC MUSIC (V LAURA MARLING, BEN HOWARD, MICHAEL KIWANUKA, LIANNE LA HAVAS, THE STAVES, JAKE BUGG, ANNA CALVI, DAUGHTER, GEORGE EZRA, EZRA FURMAN , ANTONYTHE& PIERCES, THE JOHNSONS, JOANNA FEIST, FOR LASHES, SUFJAN STEVENS, REGINALOW, SPEKTOR, VINCENT, JOHNMOORE GRANT, GLENYOUTH) HANSARD, LYK THE SHIRES, JACKNEWSOM, SAVORETTI, IRONBAT & WINE, MARK LANEGAN, HENRY ROLLINS, BEACH ST. HOUSE, JULIALAURA HOLTER,MVULA, THURSTON (SONIC R ARNALDS, CLEMENTINE, IMELDA NIGEL KENNEDY,RODDY MELODY GARDOT, RUMER, ROGER BYRDS), CE DIRTYSCOTT THREE,MATTHEWS, MANCHESTERBENJAMIN ORCHESTRA, WHITE DENIM,ADELE, BRANDRICHARD NEW, THEHAWLEY, CORAL, GRUFF RHYSMAY, (SFA), SUPERGRASS, FRAME, RON SEXSMITH, MAXIMOMCGUINN PARK, BOY(THE GEORGE WS, PAULJOHN HEATON, FINN (CROWDED HOUSE), RAY LAMONTAGNE, FRANK TURNER, SONS, LAURAPUPPY, MARLING, BEN HOWARD, MICHAEL LIANNE LA HA CALE,NEIL GLENN TILBROOK (SQUEEZE), RODRIGO Y GABRIELA, LEE SCRATCH PERRY,MUMFORD MR SCRUFF,& LAU, SNARKY THE UNTHANKS AND BBC MUSICKIWANUKA, (VARIOUS EVENTS) ES, JAKE BUGG, ANNA CALVI, DAUGHTER, GEORGE EZRA, EZRA FURMAN, THE PIERCES, THE SHIRES, JACK SAVORETTI, IRON & WINE, MARK LANEGAN, HENRY ROLLINS, LOW, B ULIA HOLTER, THURSTON MOORE (SONIC YOUTH), DIRTY THREE, MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA, WHITE DENIM, BRAND NEW, THE CORAL, GRUFF RHYS (SFA), SUPERGRASS, RODDY F SMITH, MAXIMO PARK, BOY GEORGE, JOHN CALE, GLENN TILBROOK (SQUEEZE), RODRIGO Y GABRIELA, LEE SCRATCH PERRY, MR SCRUFF, LAU, SNARKY PUPPY, THE UNTHANKS A C (VARIOUS EVENTS), ANTONY & THE JOHNSONS, NEWSOM, FEIST, BAT FOR LASHES, SUFJAN STEVENS, REGINA SPEKTOR, ST. VINCENT, LAURA MVULA, JOHN GRANT, MUSIC &JOANNA EVENTS PROMOTER , LYKKE LI, ÓLAFUR ARNALDS, SCOTT MATTHEWS, BENJAMIN CLEMENTINE, ADELE, RICHARD HAWLEY, IMELDA MAY, NIGEL KENNEDY, MELODY GARDOT, RUMER, ROGER MCGUIN DS), CERYS MATTHEWS, PAUL HEATON, NEIL FINN (CROWDED HOUSE), RAY LAMONTAGNE, FRANK TURNER, MUMFORD & SONS, LAURA MARLING, BEN HOWARD, MICHAEL KIWA A HAVAS, THE STAVES, JAKE BUGG, ANNA CALVI, DAUGHTER, GEORGE EZRA, EZRA FURMAN, THE PIERCES, THE SHIRES, JACK SAVORETTI, IRON & WINE, MARK LANEGAN, HENR WWW.GLEE.CO.UK/OUR-MUSIC-STORY LOW, BEACH HOUSE, JULIA HOLTER, THURSTON MOORE (SONIC YOUTH), DIRTY THREE, MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA, WHITE DENIM, BRAND NEW, THE CORAL, GRUFF RHYS (SFA), ASS, RODDY FRAME, RON SEXSMITH, MAXIMO PARK, BOY GEORGE, JOHN CALE, GLENN TILBROOK (SQUEEZE), RODRIGO Y GABRIELA, LEE SCRATCH PERRY, MR SCRUFF, LAU, SNAR HE UNTHANKS AND BBC MUSIC (VARIOUS EVENTS) , ANTONY & THE JOHNSONS, JOANNA NEWSOM, FEIST, BAT FOR LASHES, SUFJAN STEVENS, REGINA SPEKTOR, ST. VINCENT, VULA, JOHN GRANT, GLEN HANSARD, LYKKE LI, ÓLAFUR ARNALDS, SCOTT MATTHEWS, BENJAMIN CLEMENTINE, ADELE, RICHARD HAWLEY, IMELDA MAY, NIGEL KENNEDY, MELOD RUMER, ROGER MCGUINN (THE BYRDS), CERYS MATTHEWS, PAUL HEATON, NEIL FINN (CROWDED HOUSE), RAY LAMONTAGNE, FRANK TURNER, MUMFORD & SONS, LAURA MARL

MARKUS SARGEANT : MARKUS@GLEE.CO.UK : 07973 121 958

live uk 210  

LIVE UK is the only publication dedicated to the country’s contemporary live music business, providing news, features, tour plans and inform...

live uk 210  

LIVE UK is the only publication dedicated to the country’s contemporary live music business, providing news, features, tour plans and inform...