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Arrivée

the Long Distance Cyclists’ Association

www.aukweb.net

Number 123 Winter 2014


Mike Walsh, breasting the summit of the col de Cayolle (2,327m) whilst on tour in the Southern French Alps. Soon after he was one of our volunteer LEL van men. Photo: Sheila Simpson


February 2014 A big welcome to OCD members! We hope you’ll soon feel at home in AUK. This edition wasn’t designed especially for you (we just publish what members send) but might well have been. I’ve tried to remember to put an OCD logo on each event or tour that contains a claimable col - no prizes for any that were missed but you are welcome to point out any omissions. The count-down to 2015 Paris-Brest-Paris has started. Just like last time, if you ride a Super Randonneur series the year before then you are given preferential treatment regarding your PBP entry - even more so you ride an SR and a 1,000 km. NB You still also have to ride an SR in 2015 in order to qualify. Ivo Miesen describes a goodly list of Continental 1,000 and 1,000+ km randonnées on page 42, so there’s no need to miss out on a 1,000 if you can’t ride Undulate’s Millé Cymru, see page 5.

OrgNews4 International Round Up

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The AUK National 400

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Ed’s Mince Pie and Mulled Wine 50 km

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Official News

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Just a Minute

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Just a Second

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Officials’ Reports 2013/14

AUK has a batch of new board members this year, introduced by our Secretary, Paul Stewart, in Just a Second on page 11. Richard Phipps reports the usual crop of minor accidents during events registered with AUK in 2013, with just three severe injuries in a total of approximately 4,053,421 km. A severe injury for every 1, 351,140 km ridden - see page 15. We have a good mixed bag of articles ranging from a reprint of our first randonnée, the 1976 Windsor-Chester-Windsor, celebrating it’s revival by Steve Gloster (p28), to a tough new Permanent End To End (p22), and a wet 2014 Poor Student (p18). Have a good cycling year

Sheila

Arrivée is the free magazine of Audax United Kingdom, the long distance cyclists’ association which represents the Randonneurs Mondiaux in the UK.

Index - active links

Minutes of the 37th Audax UK AGM

Judith Swallow, our AUK/ACP/RM Correspondent, reminds us of the International Randoneur 5,000 and 10,000 awards on page 6 - claims have to be made before the end of August.

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AUK membership is open to any person, regardless of club or other affiliation, who is imbued with the spirit of long-distance cycling. Details in the Handbook. HOW TO CONTACT US: Membership Enquiries: Mike Wigley (AUK Membership Secretary), Higher Grange Farm, Millcroft Lane, Delph OL3 5UX  mike.wigley@Audax.uk.net Membership Application Form: www.aukweb.net/memform.php or ian.hobbs@Audax.uk.net Ian Hobbs (New Members), 26 Naseby Road, Belper DE56 0ER.  Membership fees: Renewal: £14 or £56 for 5 years (price of 4) New/lapsed members: £19 (inc £5 enrolment fee) or £61 for 5 years (price of 4) Household member: £5 or £20 for 5 years - no enrolment fee for new household members. Life member’s Arrivée: £9.

Accidental Information14

ARRIVEE

AAA News

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Extra Arrivée copies, if available, £3(UK), £4(EEC), £5(non-EEC) from Mike Wigley (address above)

Lessons from my Year of Servitude

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The Poor Student

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Contributions - articles, info, cartoons, photos, all welcome. Please see page 11 for useful uploading information.

The North-West-Passage

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Hummers Lumpy End to End

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Obituaries26 2011 Mileater Diaries

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(The First) Windsor-Chester-Windsor

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Fixed SR

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New Randonneurs & SRs

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AAA 12 points and over in 2013

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2013 Dartmoor Devil 100 km

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Foundation 50 & Good Stuff 100

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RRTY Roll of Honour

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The 4th Mille du Sud

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Continental rides in 2014

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Provence & Southern French Alps

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Into Shelob’s Lair

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Four go to Bormio

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On Test - Thermosoles

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L-E-L 2013 Finish List

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Permanent Events

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Calendar Events

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PUBLICATIONS MANAGERS February: Sheila Simpson, Tel: 0161 449 9309 

sheila@aukadia.net

May & August: Tim Wainwright, 4A Brambledown Rd, Sanderstead, South Croydon CR2 0BL. Tel: 020 8657 8179 Fax: 020 8651 4515  twain@blueyonder.co.uk November: Peter Moir, Tel: 01993 704913

2 Peel Close, Ducklington, Witney, Oxfordshire OX29 7YB peter@moir.co.uk

TO ADVERTISE Advertising Manager: Tim Wainwright, address above. Rates per issue: 1/12 page £25, pro rata to £300 per page. Payment in advance. Buisinesses must be recommended by a member. We rely on good faith and Arrivee cannot be held responsible for advertisers’ misrepresentations or failure to supply goods or services. Members’ Private Sales, Wants, Event Adverts: free. Views expressed in Arrivée are not necessarily those of the Club. Produced by AUK: editing, typesetting, layout, design and scanning by Sheila Simpson. Printed & distributed by: Headley Brothers Ltd, Invicta Press, Queens Rd, Ashford, Kent TN24 8HH Distribution data from: Mike Wigley and the AUK Membership Team.

MAY EDITION CONTRIBUTIONS: To Tim by 15th March

Our web site: www.aukweb.net To subscribe to an AUK email discussion list, send an email to: audax-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Note this group is not monitored by the AUK Board, who should be contacted directly with matters of concern.

 www.aukweb.net

33 Hawk Green Rd, Marple SK6 7HR

Audax UK Long Distance Cyclists’ Association (Company Limited by Guarantee) Reg Office: Timberly, South Street, Axminster, Devon EX13 5AD, England. © Arrivée 2014

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Events

OrgNews from John Hamilton

New Brevet Card Secretary After 17 years of producing Brevet Cards Pam Pilbeam has put away the photocopier. Your Brevet Cards should now be ordered from Tony Greenwood: Email orders to brevet-card@aukweb.net or phone/post at:

Changes to Fees In amongst the packed agenda at this year’s AGM there were a couple of important updates to event fees: The validation fee for BRM events has been reduced to 20p, the same as BR and BP events. The price charged to you for medals has been reduced to £1.50, to allow for the extra postage costs required. NOTE: The selling price remains unchanged at £2.00

2015 - National 400 Whilst it may seem like a long time away now, the Board are looking for experienced organisers to run the 2015 National 400. Having been held in the East in 2012, South West in 2013 and due to take place in Northern England in 2014 the preference is for a South East based event in 2015. These events need planning 18 months or so in advance, so it’s time to get your thinking caps on. Please get in touch with the Events Secretary if you’re interested.

Winter Event Tips By the time you read this we’ll be well into winter with its increased likelihood of bad weather and risks from cycling in poor conditions. As an Organiser you have a Duty of Care to take “reasonable measures” to ensure the safety of your event, for both participants and volunteers. Plan ahead for adverse weather conditions (after all they’re not unlikely over the winter months). Whilst you can’t control the weather there are plenty of things you can do to maximise the ability to run the event whatever the conditions. Plan your route carefully to take into account possible weather and road conditions. You may wish to consider an alternative route using more major roads for all or part (e.g. the start and or finish sections which will be ridden early/late in the day when conditions are at their coldest) of your event for use if conditions are bad. Keep your costs (and hence entry fees) low by using commercial controls. This minimises your risk in the event of a high DNS rate, and reduces pressure on riders to start. Remember it’s not just your riders but also yourself and your helpers. Will you be able to get safely to the start and anywhere else you’re needed? Make fallback arrangements in case you can’t. Again, a basic event and commercial controls can make things easier for you here. Consider creating a permanent version of your route. Offer this as a free alternative to riders who decide not to ride on the day. Remind riders that it is THEIR responsibility to assess the conditions and decide whether to ride or not. They should not assume that conditions are safe because you haven’t cancelled the event. Keep a list of email addresses for your entrants. If conditions are bad, E-mail your entrants beforehand advising them of the likely conditions. You may recommend that they don’t ride, but remind them it’s their decision, remembering that it’s not just the actual riding, but also getting to and from the start.

Weather Cancelled Events Despite all of the above, there will inevitably be occasions when the conditions dictate that it simply is not possibly to hold your event safely. The responsibility of participants to decide themselves whether to ride or not does not mean that you are absolved of your responsibilities, so in such conditions you may have to make the decision whether to go ahead with the event or not. Whilst we all try to avoid unnecessary cancellations, if you do decide 4

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

Tony Greenwood 38 Capper Road Waterbeach CB259LY Phone 01223 441489 that you cannot hold your event because of weather conditions, you can now agree with the Events Team to run your event as a “Weather Cancelled Event” – this allows you to re-run the event for the original participants within 30 days of the original date. Within this period you can choose whether to allow riders to ride at a time of their own choosing (permanent style), or to arrange your own re-scheduled date (or a combination) – different options will suit different events.

NEW FOR 2014 – In the past Weather Cancelled Events have been recorded as Permanent events. From 2014 they will be recorded as Calendar events in riders results lists. For more details on re-running as a Weather Cancelled Event contact the Events Secretary.

LEL Equipment Surplus The London Edinburgh London team have a large amount of equipment remaining from this year’s event. We plan to use this stuff again in 2017, but until then it’s available to Audax UK organisers. We have the following equipment, that you are free to use. Inflatable beds and electric inflators Removal blankets (ideal for sleeping) Coffee machines Large saucepans Audax UK banners Towels Laptops (very basic – OK for internet browsing/on-the day validation) We can arrange competitive pallet delivery (enough to supply a 50100 person event) to anywhere in the UK, subsidised by Audax UK for a maximum of £50. For more information contact Danial Webb: danial@londonedinburghlondon.com

2014 Event Publication Deadlines ~~~ If your event is before 1st Sept 14 It must be ready by 1st April 14 To be published in May 14 Arrivee

~~~ If your event is before 1st Dec ‘14 It must be ready by 1st July ‘14 To be published in Aug ‘ 14 Arrivee

~~~ If your event is before 1st March 15 It must be ready by 1st Oct 14 To be published in Nov 14 Arrivee

~~~ Please remember to check your events regularly for news and updates from your Events Team Delegate

www.aukweb.net


Events Get your “Ticket to Ride” The Steam Ride - 9th March 2014 ‘Hurricane Class’ AUK hauled

Steam Ride: London-Oxford (Didcot 1-Way): Choice of routes: follow LOL 200 into Oxford or take a direct route: The Railway, Barley Mow (3 Men in a Boat), Pendom Museum - both follow either side of the Thames to Didcot. Fast ‘n’ easy navigation. http://www.aukweb.net/events/detail/14-604/#more Steam Ride: Single Track: Beach to Beeches (Burnham Cafe) via Southall Rail Centre. Controls at Burnham Beeches and Southall. Start by Fat Controller whistle in tophat at Woody Bay (beach) Station. http://www.aukweb.net/events/detail/14-601/#more For a limited time only, rides qualify for the AC Hackney medal http://audaxclubhackney.co.uk/events/steam-ride/ Tim Sollesse info@steamride.co.uk

Mille Cymru 2: 29-30th June 2014

After an exciting 1st year at AC Hackney, coming a close 4th in the Club points table for the 2013 season. To commemorate this fantastic achievement, it’s only fitting to repay the hospitality we’ve received, with an equally exciting offering. The 1st edition of the London-Oxford-London (LOL) Special, a 200km Audax from London to Oxford and back, visiting along the way the well known Steam venues, including Didcot, Buckinghamshire, Southall, Chinnor & Princes Risborough, Cholsey and Wallingford Railway Centres. The route is sure to be favourite of Audax UK members and (we reckon) is just about the best new 200km round route between London and Oxford there is. About the Route The ride starts in Ruislip, on the beach by the Lido outside the Ruislip Lido Railway Woody Bay station www.ruisliplidorailway.org and threads its way northwest out of London through rolling woody countryside, over a rail-crossing, through Eythrope park, past Buckinghamshire Railway Centre http://www.bucksrailcentre.org to the first refreshment control at Quainton (55km) for elevenses. Then continues west to Oxford (90km) for lunchtime control and turns southwards through Abingdon and alongside the Thames to Didcot (112km) http://www.didcotrailwaycentre.org.uk for second lunchtime control. The route then turns east for the return via Wallingford past http:// www.cholsey-wallingford-railway.com to the third refreshment control at Chinnor (150km) and past www.chinnorrailway.co.uk for afternoon tea before the big climb of the day into the Chilterns. Here a choice of awaits: either a fast wide well-lit run along the A40 or second climb into the Chilterns via Burnham Beeches before the only info control at Southall http://www.gwrpg.co.uk/ and the final run to the finishing control at the Water’s Edge, Ruislip Lido (205km). We use quiet B-roads and country lanes where possible but expect to find some gravel on paths and some motor traffic on roads. The route is reasonably challenging but by no means a grimpeur. The major landfall is, of course, Oxford but we also cross the Thames again at Wallingford, Abingdon and Clifton Hampden. After the Chilterns, fast quiet B-roads provide an opportunity for you to stretch your legs (and your lungs). Give it a blast, ride to all the South east’s Steam Train venues and to Oxford and back in 1 ride - if you weren’t a Steam enthusiast at the beginning of the ride, your sure to return one. http://www.aukweb.net/events/detail/14-599/#more Or try 1 if our 50 km or 100 km events... Steam Ride: Quainton Express: Quainton Express, fast (no controls) undulating course to Quainton Memorial Hall for a WI tea. Alternate Quainton Control, receipt proof of visit required: http://www.bucksrailcentre.org http://www.aukweb.net/events/detail/14-598/#more www.aukweb.net

4 years on, the dragon is stirring once more in Cymru and the time has come for the fellowship to reunite. The Mille Cymru returns… 1000km, 75hours, 15,000m of climbing - an epic quest across Wales’ ancient land of myths and legends. We retain the same start, from Upton Magna just outside Shrewsbury but there’s a more civilised start time of 11:30am for a 260km first day through the Welsh Marches to Hay-on-Wye, over the Gospel Pass and on to Monmouth and the Wye Valley. Through Abergavenny, Brecon, and over the Eppynt to your first sleep stop at Llanwrtyd Wells. Day 2 will take you out to seek spiritual salvation at St David’s on the furthest tip of wild West Wales before returning to Llanwrtyd. Having warmed you up, Day 3 takes in the highlights of the Cambrian Mountains including the Devil’s Staircase, Elan Valley and the Dylife mountain road before heading up the coast to Snowdonia. Over Pen y Pass and down to Bangor for a final sleep stop. But you’re not finished yet. There’s the final leg across Snowdonia to Bala, then the last major climb of the Bwlch y Groes to Lake Vyrnwy. And finally the return to The Shire. This will be a full value event, with food at start, finish and overnight controls included, plus 3 sleep stops (with showers) and bag drops to Llanwrtyd Wells at 260km and 570km. There’ll also be an event jersey and free finishers medal. Entries open on 1st March. “One ride to rule them all, one ride to find them. One ride to bring them all, and in the green hills bind them. In the land of Cymru, where the dragons lie.” Croeso y Mille Cymru U.N.Dulates

Round Britain’s Coast 5000 km Challenge Information can be provided to help you do this in one go or in several slices using AUK’s DIY services. Building on the work of Bernard Mawson and Peter Coulson, details available from Don Black, 18 Cotton Mills Drive, Hyde, SK14 4TS, black898@btinternet.com. Summary at:

http://www.gpxeditor.co.uk/routes2/users/donmblack/RoundBritainsCoast.

Denmead SR Series 200 km Saturday 22nd March 2014 This late winter 200k is no longer a shoestring, we have on line entry and a nice warm hall at the start and finish with soup & a roll (included in the entry fee) to warm you up. The route goes through the Hampshire & Wilshire country lanes to Wilton, the home of Wilton carpets. The factory is now a shopping complex with numerous cafes. We then go via Amesbury to the Vale of Pewsey before returning to Denmead via Whitchurch and the chocolate box thatched cottages of Hampshire. The countryside is rolling and riders who have ridden in the past have enjoyed the route, so why not come to the sunny(!) south and give it a try. Pam & Dave Pilbeam Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Events International Round Up Audax Club Parisien’s Randonneur 5000

The application form and further information can be found at http://www.audax-club-parisien.com/EN/index.php?showpage=382 International BRM and LRM Events If you are thinking about riding an overseas brevet of 1000km or shorter, the full listing is on the ACP website: http://www.audax-club-parisien.com Collect a BRM Super Randonneur from 4 countries and you can join the select group of International Super Randonneurs. More details at: http://www.aukweb.net/results/isr/ If you want a ride to stretch your legs a little further, then the best spot for information is Tal Katzir’s list of LRM events at: http://israeli-randonneur.blogspot.com/2013/10/160en.html If you haven’t had the pleasure of meeting him, Tal is the intrepid Israeli randonneur who rode PBP 2007, Milli Miglia 2008 and LEL 2009 on his Brompton. You’ll now find him on a Bob Jackson, so if a white long-sleeve jersey and a pair of SPD sandals flash past on a white bike, that will probably be Tal. Also, if you do ride overseas brevets of 200km and above you can become an International Super Randonneur

For those of you who have completed the rides for this award within four years, which are: BRM Super Randonneur (200, 300, 400 & 600 in a season) Easter Arrow Paris-Brest-Paris Randonneur BRM 1000km plus Balance of BRM brevets to total 5000km You need to complete and send your application form to me by 31 August 2014, to be sent as a batch to ACP. Unfortunately, anyone who completed their ACP R5000 in the 2012/2013 season will have to wait until January 2015 to receive their medal as the awards are only processed once a year. Please note that for the ACP R5000 only ACPhomologated BRM rides count and longer rides cannot be substituted for shorter ones.

And to finish with The Randonneur 10000 The ACP have celebrated the 50th anniversary of the R5000 award with the R10000. It’s a challenge that is definitely a step beyond the R5000 award and well worth riding for, particularly as it requires a Super Randonnée (very hilly 600km permanents with longer than normal time limits). Marcus Jackson-Baker put a great write-up of his ride in the previous Arrivee. There are currently five French routes to choose from plus 16 routes in 9 other countries. Apart from the 50 hour randonneur option, you can choose to ride at 80km/day tourist pace if you prefer, though only Super Randonnées in the randonneur division count towards the R10000. Full information on the R10000 can be found On ACP’s website. Judith Swallow brevetbird@gmail.com

Congratulations to Nick Wilkinson who completed his first Super Randonneur series on his Brompton

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Events The AUK National 400 The 2014 National 400 will be on the 26th July in Yorkshire We had 108 entries for the 2013 event in the Southwest. The weather forecasts during the week were not inspiring, but nonetheless 88 turned up at the start. Chuffy and Baggy served breakfast , aided by Jamie, Peter, and others. The first shower began just as the riders left. Late starter, John, arrived and left in the rain. At Carhampton, Pam and her Minehead crew served tea and cakes to damp cyclists. Although there were some very heavy showers around, most riders managed to miss the worst. They did report extremely wet roads where downpours had just passed. A strong tailwind blew the cyclists over the Brendon Hills towards Taunton. Some had difficulty getting through the town because of the Taunton Somerfest. The tailwind meant riders arrived in a steady stream at Hadspen, the second control, early enough to induce near-panic in the controllers. Lara and Simon aided by Peter, Tony, Alan and Ian, coped heroically with the rush, despite the food still being in preparation. At Peasedown St John, Big Dave and his teapot provided refreshments before the Two Tunnels section. The tunnels, with background music, were a lowlit highlight for many of the riders. Tony and Kathy, with John and others, dispensed tlc and sustainance at Bulwark Community Hall

(well-known to riders of the Brevet Cymru 400 and Bryan Chapman 600). At Kingswood (above), Jonathan, with family and friends, prepared tiring cyclists for the southbound section back to Hadspen. The hilly bit, through Colerne, was probably the least popular section, being both steep and narrow. The team at Hadspen were in full swing for the return. The first riders turned up at around midnight, and a steady stream followed all the way to the closing time. The last rider opted for half an hour’s sleep as the controllers packed up. The first finishers arrived in the early hours; the last with seven minutes to spare. The rain held off until close to midday, so nearly all had a dry finish. 79 riders finished. Congratulations to all of them.

Ed’s Mince Pie and Mulled Wine 50 km This may only be a very short audax randonnée, but this is the one event that riders in Cornwall really look forward to in early December every year. It is a pleasant prelude to the season when the bike otherwise gets neglected and we put on some unwanted extra pounds. The hall at Carharrack was bustling with goodhumoured riders as they registered with organiser Eddie Angell (also as good-humoured as ever) for the fifth edition of the event. There was a good turnout from the Falmouth Wheelers and Trilogic clubs. There was plenty of hot tea and coffee on offer. The weather has always played its part in this ride. A few years ago the dangerously icy conditions led to the only cancellation of the event. There have been hailstorms and 80mph winds. But this year it was dry and almost warm. The trees still had many of their leaves and conditions were nearly perfect.

Wendy Wallis’ kitchen (above) has become an iconic symbol of this ride. Not only do she and her husband welcome 80 plus of us into their home, often when we are dripping in rain and mud, she also puts on such a spread of cakes and cream scones, and this year even pasties, that it becomes difficult to get up from a cosy chair by the AGA and get going again. But reluctantly we do so. Somehow the 20km ride back to the finish always seems a bit leisurely, at least for a while as we climb up the long hill past Truthall.

Eddie sent off the 85 riders in groups and we were soon warming up on the hill through Vogue before dropping down into Redruth and wending our way on up to Carnkie. On through the Great Flat Lode and up the short climb at Condurrow, and before long thoughts were turning to what delights Wendy might have in store for us at her farm near Helston.

At Black Rock we paused to regroup and then the thought of those hot mince pies and mulled wine began to draw us on, faster and faster along the ridge, and down the long descent through Lanner to the finish. They rounded off one of the rather special Cornish audax rides. Proper job, Eddie and team!  Simon Jones

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Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Official

Official News Minutes of the 37th Audax UK AGM Held at the Holiday Inn Hotel, York on 16th November 2013

The meeting started at 14:11 with the chairman prefacing the official business of the meeting by listing the Auks who had passed on during the year; these were David Lewis: former AUK points Champion, Bob Kynaston: organiser of CTC Tourist Competition, Jack Eason: former AUK points Champion and Randonneur of the Millennium, Martin Scott, Geoff Findon, former Organiser of Lincolnshire Wolds, Charles Comport: former Organiser of Windmill Ride, Alexander Duncan, George Scott, Peter Land and Arthur Comer. A short silence in respect of their memory followed after which John Radford was mentioned as an Auk involved in a Road Traffic incident on his way back from LEL and was on a long road of recovery. 1) The names and membership details were recorded on entry to the meeting. 2) The secretary advised having received apologies for absence from Peter Baker, Henry Bye, Becky Burns, Mary Doyle, Jim Hopper, Alex & Ali Pattison & Sheila Simpson and Darryl Whittle. Mike Kelly’s name was added from the floor. 3) Approval of the Minutes of the previous AGM was proposed by Simon Gent and seconded by Lucy McTaggart. 4) MATTERS ARISING: Dave Minter queried the validity of the previous AGM. IH agreed the notification had been late, but as noone had been inconvenienced or disenfranchised by it, nor any objection received felt it should stand. Peter Lewis asked about the proposed meeting to ratify it. IH replied in view of the trivial nature of the infringement, a General Meeting was not considered cost effective. 5) DIRECTORS’ REPORTS: Pam Pilbeam reported having produced just under 19,000 Brevets during the season, (except LEL) with most organisers being punctual and ordering by e-mail. The new matt Brevet cards are not popular and future stock will revert to the gloss finish. She has decided to retire after 17 years of card production and is happy that Tony Greenwood has volunteered to take the job on. She thanked him and then all the organisers she had worked with. After her report a formal vote of thanks was proposed for her many years of service. Chris Crossland requested a more accurate description in John Hamilton’s mention of the “Three Coasts” from “camping at the start” to “three nights’ accommodation.” Acceptance of all the Directors’ reports en bloc (including this change) was proposed by Lara Day, seconded by Julian Dyson and approved unanimously. _5a) ANNUAL ACCOUNTS: The Treasurer mentioned a new set of accounts had been provided because of a carry -forward discrepancy on the balance sheet rather than the actual accounts and confirmed to the Chair the corrected version was the one available at the meeting. Roger Cortis queried why the ACP Reserves had reduced from £4,000 to £1,750. Linda replied it was a balancing item as previously explained by e-mail, adding that the only required item was the commuted figure to ensure we had enough funds for prepaid subscriptions. He also queried why we were not paying Corporation Tax on temporary membership subscriptions. Linda replied that would be the case next year which Roger felt should be shown as a future liability. Andrew Mann queried the cost of a full audit. Linda replied that it would be approximately £2,000 and was not necessary, but they were checked by a qualified accountant. The chair confirmed there was no requirement for them to be signed off by a qualified accountant, but the accounts were prepared by the duly elected Treasurer assisted by a qualified accountant with an informal audit at the end of the year. He reminded the meeting that 8

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all officials were volunteers rather than professionals with constraints on their time, but would seek professional advice as needed (as Linda had, in fact, done and accepted their recommendations.) Mike McGeever suggested the Treasurer and dissatisfied parties confer, though it transpired the meeting could only approve or reject the accounts, and if the latter situation occurred, then consultation should take place. Acceptance of the accounts which was proposed by Gerry Boswell and seconded by Sonya Crawford was carried by 52 votes to 38. The chair advised, subject to the Treasurer’s agreement that the club would consult with its accountants and Roger Cortis to resolve any differences. 5b) TREASURER’S RECOMMENDATIONS: Roger Cortis asked what the size of the likely surplus would be; Linda thought it would be between £25 - £30,000. Acceptance of the recommendations was proposed by Lucy McTaggart, seconded by Mel Kirkland and approved unanimously. 6) PROPOSAL: Ian Hennessey clarified this motion was being proposed by him on behalf of the Board. Peter Lewis could not see the final arbiter on RM events was ACP. John Hamilton confirmed they would be revisited sometime in the future. PL then wondered why standard distances had been moved to an Appendix. JH advised the Regulation was that “any distance over 200km may be offered” and that the Appendix gave additional detail. Again PL wondered why the requirement to obey the rules of the road was an Appendix. Peter Coulson commented that laws of the land should not be in our Regs and JH added we did not want items there which we outside our control. Francis Cooke explained as a party to the revision the aim was to reduce the Regulations as far as possible, with explanations provided by the Appendices. Graham Holdsworth queried whether the bar on riding another event simultaneously with an Audax event contradicted the ability to gain points from a 24 hr Time Trial. IH explained that such Time Trials were recognised as Audax events. JH added it was to prevent riders claiming for shorter events within a longer entered event. Dave Minter said the rule would prevent riders on a cyclo-sportive event claiming it as a DIY Perm. IH agreed that was both the case and the intention. DM then maintained the acceptable proofs of passage in Appendix 9.8.1 did not include the original proof – a locally sourced stamp. JH replied the organiser specified a place and would likely be completely uninterested in an alternative in the correct location. DM then was concerned that organiser agreement was seemingly required for personal support at controls. JH confirmed that previously no personal support had been permitted, but it had changed for LEL. DM complained that it was possible to accept or reject the changes as a package with no possibility of amending individual items. IH agreed this was a problem as it was impossible to make substantive changes at an AGM without prior consultation. Louise Rigby wondered if she should receive personal support on her husband’s events and if she could use proofs of passage other than ATMs, which she disliked, on a Perm. JH advised she was receiving the same support on her husband’s events as every other rider and the relationship was immaterial. He was perfectly happy for her to use alternative proofs acceptable to the organiser. Keith Benton wondered how such a change in the allowable support would be policed. JH agreed it was impossible to do and IH added that as with much other in AUK, it was based on trust and honesty. Aidan Hedley opined as an organiser that the problem was being overstated with a lot of help available from other riders to anyone in difficulties. Edwin Hargraves admitted to stopping off at home for rest on occasion. Joe Applegarth suggested leaving the regulations unchanged just for the sake of a single event. Heather Swift noted that Appendix 9.9.2 permitted riders to stop anywhere. Robert Webb proposed voting on the proposal, seconded by Simon Proven. The result then approved the proposal with 69 members in favour and 8 against. 7) PROPOSAL: Chris Crossland spoke in favour of his proposal allowing discussion of AGM motions before the meeting to avoid any need for amendments at that time, whilst allowing more members to contribute. Francis Cooke considered it a big, albeit, imperfect advance which would require subsequent amendment. He queried how easy it was to change an Article. RP advised it www.aukweb.net


Official needed a vote at a GM achieving a ¾ majority, advising Companies House of the change. Paul Stewart offered strong support for the proposal. Marcus Jackson-Baker suggested floating dates, but CC advised the fixed dates were to meet Arrivée deadlines. Heather Swift queried whether notification to the membership would be restricted to a single medium and was advised that would not necessarily be so, although the final Agenda probably would be mailed. David Matthews noted the website was publicly available and wondered whether the AGM part would be limited to members. This appears to be possible. Rob Webb asked why the statement supporting an amendment was restricted to 100 words and CC replied that was unchanged from the current Article. There were 90 members in favour of the proposal with none against, so it was duly carried. 8) PROPOSAL: IH said there was no compulsion to widen the franchise although in view of the size of the Club, the approximately 100 members present were only a tiny minority of the membership of about 5,500 and the current situation was untenable. We are proposing to investigate the alternative ways to be more inclusive, which may carry a cost over the years and there are many pros and cons to be considered and we are seeking authority to research the possibilities before returning with a concrete proposal. Andy Clarkson believed that votes cast at the actual meeting could be swamped by proxy votes and would likely not attend in future. He considered it would neither solve any problems nor confer any benefits. IH replied that a vast majority of the membership had no effective say in the running of the Club. Lara Day felt it was not true that anyone could attend the AGM because of other commitments or cost issues. Billy Weir pointed out this was just an enabling motion. Heather Swift wondered whether the problem of a tiny unrepresentative proportion of voters at an AGM might be still worse at an EGM. Jon Ward replied agreeing that an EGM would be a compromise, but it was an attempt to speed up the otherwise timeconsuming process and that many of the current meeting would also attend an EGM. Roger Cortis suggested a dialogue to keep the members informed and IH agreed that was contained in JW’s answer. Aidan Hedley suggested restricting such correspondence to a private forum, which might differ from a public one. Dave Minter was strongly in favour, citing his Audax credentials, but was concerned that his influence was limited to a single occasion. Mike Saddler contrasted his position as a Life Member who had not ridden an event this season to a hypothetical 100 point rider absent from the meeting who would have no influence and considered that unfair. Chris Bolton pointed out it was a provision in the Companies Act and was common practice in most organisations. Rod Dalitz was in favour of a broader representation, but felt an EGM would be unrepresentative. IH hoped that problem would be overcome by prior consultation. The motion was carried with 79 votes in favour and 15 against. 9) PROPOSAL: IH clarified he was proposing this motion on behalf of the Board. It was to separate job titles from Directorships to allow people with specific experience to sit on the Board. Francis Cooke was in favour of the proposal, noting that some officials would prefer not to be Directors. In his own instance, he had stepped down from the post of Systems Manager as his partner was also on the AUK Board and he felt that two Directors in a single household was undesirable. Arabella Maude wondered if the meeting was still voting for Directors. IH confirmed the voting for Directors would take place and there would be advertisements for delegates as needed. Paul Stewart was concerned that while there was a feeling the governance needed to change, comparable clubs tended to have people appointed to particular roles. He felt it was a big change and the club had no new model to support it and for this reason amongst others suggested the Board be instructed to consider it and return with a fully-formed proposal at the next AGM. Simon Gent favoured the motion because the decision was not postponed until another meeting. Billy Weir opposed the motion as he felt a particular job function to be a Director. IH commented it was only restricting the requirement to match roles to Board seats, not insisting on it. David Matthews was happy for the Board to co-opt additional expertise as required, but did not want the additional unelected people to be www.aukweb.net

Directors. Roger Cortis summarised by saying that not all members of the current large Board wished to be Directors and the club was moving to a more common company situation, with this motion enabling, rather than requiring change. The motion was carried with 79 votes in favour and 10 against. 10) PROPOSAL: Rod Dalitz spoke for the motion to merge the two clubs, giving a brief history of OCD which was now struggling and its quarterly magazine was now produced on a spasmodic basis. He drew parallels between the AAA part of AUK and OCD and detailed the basis of the merger. Damon Peacock asked if OCD rides could double as Audax events. RD replied that they could not as there was no verification procedure. Marcus Jackson-Baker enquired amid some laughter whether there were any badges. RD replied there were membership lapel pins, grades for climbing achievements and an A4 certificate. Francis Cooke was very much in favour, though concerned in case AUK delegates were not happy to undertake the additional work. He was also concerned that AUK should support OCD, retaining its individual identity. IH confirmed the intention was to retain the unique identity of OCD within AUK. Pete Coates advised there was unlikely to be a systems problem incorporating the additional data and he would liaise with Nigel Hall as his likely The proposal was approved with 90 votes in favour successor. and 2 against. 11) PROPOSAL: Ian Oliver spoke for the proposal saying that yacf had evolved into the informal forum for discussion of Audax matters which, he felt, as a public forum was inappropriate and that AUK should have a members only forum. IH queried whether such a forum would stop such discussions on yacf and IO agreed there was no guarantee of that. Rob Webb, citing his 18 years experience of setting such forums up, said there needed to be a critical mass to work. He was surprised this subject was being discussed at an AGM and suggested the Systems Manager be asked to set one up for it to work (or not.) Pete Coates agreed it was an easy thing to set up, though he did not subscribe to yacf as he considered it boring. He suggested that as a private forum it would need moderation. IH mentioned such a forum already existed for Board use, largely as an experiment, which could be extended to the full membership. Mike Wigley, as Membership Secretary, was in favour but did not want the Board to be continuously answerable to the forum though he would be happy to participate. Mike McGeever felt it was a long overdue move; that Audax business belonged to an Audax site .and he disliked the anonymity of yacf. The proposal was approved with 94 votes in favour and none against. 12) PROPOSAL: Richard Phipps advised an error on the printed Agenda which specified Liam FitzPatrick as the seconder of the motion rather than Peter Lewis. Ian Oliver spoke for the proposal saying to ease communication and allow the Internet as an additional medium. As there were no comments from the floor, Peter Lewis then thanked IO for improving the original submission. The proposal was approved with 86 votes in favour and none against. Mike Wigley reminded members to check their e-mail addresses were up to date 13) ELECTION OF DIRECTORS: IH stood aside as his position was a contested one, handing over to John Ward, having checked there were no objections to this procedure. JW outlined the intended sequence, and then Peter Marshall spoke in support of Ian Hennessey, as an effective, diplomatic chairman who had overseen the evolution of AUK and would be a stabilising influence. Danial Webb then spoke in support of Chris Crossland. He was concerned that the strategic plan had not been implemented to increase the numbers of riders on longer events while the cash balances were steadily increasing. He thought that Chris had the right personal attributes for the role and had pledged to introduce a coherent strategy. DW offered a choice between a continuation of previous practice or taking a chance to make the most of a golden period of cycling. Robert Webb asked CC how he would run these meetings. He replied they would be more efficient and quicker having been better prepared. Simon Proven summed up echoing PM’s comments praising his experience and pragmatic diplomacy. He felt the Board had shown a willingness to modernise and that IH was a strong chairman. Chris Bolton, seconding CC’s candidacy, again agreed with DW, but was concerned Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

9


Official we were not making the most of the current cycling climate. He praised CC’s leadership in CTC committees and elsewhere describing him as a well-qualified person. The results of the ballot were 73 votes in favour of Chris Crossland, 34 for Ian Hennessey with 2 spoilt and Chris Crossland was duly declared the elected chairman for the coming year. Francis Cooke spoke in support of IH as LRM/ACP Correspondant pointing out the new Board was likely to consist of 6 old and 6 new members, the latter keen to make changes, so he wanted to maintain continuity amidst the change. He felt IH as the current correspondant was well versed in balancing the wishes of both clubs. Arabella Maude queried what language capabilities were required. IH replied that nearly all the LRM negotiations were conducted in pidgin English. .He had a basic knowledge of French and could make himself understood, but as an international organisation, most of the discussions were in English with some translations. The last meeting he had attended had been in 2011 when AUK managed to avoid the French and German proposal for compulsory verification of 1200km and longer events. They also managed to remove the requirement (against French wishes) to distribute badges to finishers on all 1200s. Roger Cortis spoke to support Judith Swallow, mentioning the role had changed greatly and required many overseas contacts, which she had. She was also a fluent French speaker. Arabella Maude asked the same question to JS who replied she had worked for Americans, French and Belgians as an international PA and had acted as translator for her boss as well as communicating in English with several nationalities. Rob Webb asked if she would try to change AUK’s relationship with LRM and if so, how. She replied that she wanted to represent AUK and keep its interests alive, ensuring its riders were subject to the same rules as other Randonneurs. Anne Learmonth as seconder for IH endorsed Francis’ comments and Chris Crossland speaking for JH said she was determined and stubborn enough to complete her chosen course. The results of the ballot were 61 votes in favour of Judith Swallow, 44 for Ian Hennessey with 1 spoilt and Judith Swallow was duly declared the elected ACP/LRM correspondant for the coming year. As Allan Taylor had withdrawn from the position of Recorder, on a show of hands, Peter Lewis was declared Recorder unopposed. The meeting was happy to vote the uncontested roles en bloc, and after JW had read the list of names and their job titles, they were all voted in unanimously. 14) DATE & PLACE OF NEXT AGM: Pam Pilbeam advised she was looking at other Holiday Inns in the middle of the country, as she had got a good price on this occasion and was intending to use that as a bargaining tool in the hope they would match it. George Hanna wanted to know where in the Midlands so Pam mentioned Telford or similar as a good base for a cycle ride. Lindsay Clayton complained the cost of such a venue disenfranchised those finding it prohibitively high and offered to organise the event next year. Pam accepted the offer and pointed out that previous venues had been Youth Hostels and the Racecourse Centre which were cheap, but led to a dramatic drop in numbers and this was the best attendance for some time. An alternative for the Board to consider, she suggested, was to separate the AGM from the Dinner and Prize giving. Mike McGeever suggested fixing the time now for the AGM in view of different previously advertised times and Richard Phipps countered that the Agenda should be fixed first. Edwin Hargraves, deputising for an indisposed Jim Hopper proposed a vote of thanks to the retiring committee, particularly Pam Pilbeam and Ian Hennessey. Lucy McTaggart also read a letter from El Supremo thanking the Board for their hard work during the year, and in particular Pam Pilbeam for her 17 years of Brevet card production and Richard Phipps for his seven years as Secretary. Keith Benton announced he had a small supply of LRM badges if any LEL anciens wanted one in addition to the event badge. 15) The Meeting closed at 17:10. 10

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

Just a Minute A near full house of Directors and candidates gathered before the AGM in York to put the world of Audax to rights. The Events team are busy: there are now just two 1000K+ events in the pipeline and the National 400 arrangements are being imposed haltingly. There was an extensive discussion about replacements for weather cancelled calendar events. Whilst cancellation of events due to challenging weather conditions is not encouraged, dangerous conditions belong to a different category. Although riders accept they are on a personal expedition, they are not always in the best position to assess the situation, nor do they have a proven track record of sensible decisions, so the final decision to run the event or not must remain with the organiser who should have received reports from local helpers of the prevailing conditions. Should it be necessary to cancel, it may be possible to allow the original entrants to complete the ride within the following four weeks, but not all events are suitable for such postponement and York Arrows may not be rescheduled. Pam has produced over 19,000 Brevet cards for the 2013 season and, apart from the usual suspects, most organisers have been punctual. The new matt cards are not popular and glossy stock will be specified on all future orders. Mike reports that, the membership total is very buoyant at 5,650 with October having been exceptionally busy for new recruits. Danial’s LEL report was relatively short as almost all the tasks had been completed, except for legal action against a non-performing supplier, scheduled for the following week. The event kit (blankets etc) is now in storage but will be available to organisers of longer events with delivery charges subsidised to a level to avoid penalising remote locations. He is wiling to organise LEL again in 2017 but on a different basis to 2013 and will submit his ideas to a future committee meeting. Discussions between Danial and Nigel indicate that updating the front end of the website will be a massive job. Danial has contacted Invent Partners to agree a front end specification and envisages a more magazine-like format. This will need an editor to keep content up to date. No timescale has yet been finalised as it is likely to be a very labour-intensive task. Clothing was included as part of the rebranding programme and Danial wants a different process, to the new logo, to choose the fresh design. Pam wants to retain the current system of members buying directly from the manufacturers to avoid her being a stockholder. An error by the printers in omitting the header sheets on a couple of renewal notices resulted in personal details being visible to all. These details will be removed from future such mailings. The CTC York Rally now seems unlikely to be held in 2014 following many resignations by members of the organising committee, but may return in 2015. Late organisers’ returns seem to be an increasing problem for the validators and the culprits will in future be reported to the Events team who will not allow them to organise further events until the delinquent details have been supplied. Insufficient postage on letters has become another issue, so a £5 fine was suggested to avoid surcharges being borne by organisers. Another suggestion of prepaid post labels will be investigated for the next meeting. As ever, best wishes for your cycling to be safe and enjoyable and I hope to see many fellow participants up the road as soon as the effects of a meeting with an incompetent motorist have worn off. As this is the final JaM on my watch I should now like to thank the other committee members for their support and assistance over the years. Being Secretary has been a privilege and a pleasure, but I am now passing the baton to Paul Stewart with my best wishes for his success in the role. For this last time, full Minutes will be available from me on receipt of a sae, though they are already on the website. 

Richard Phipps www.aukweb.net


Official Just a Second Sheila Simpson asked if I would write a few words to follow Richard’s valedictory ‘Just a Minute’, and as you can see I agreed. ‘Just a Second’ seemed a good working title though given the action packed AGM2014, ‘Seconds Out’ might be more appropriate, as one way or another there will be seven (!) new faces attending the January Board Meeting. That is my cue to add my thanks to the outgoing Board members – Ian, Pam, Richard, Peter C and Allan who have so generously supported AUK over many years. It’s fair to say the AGM was an action packed affair, the room overflowing with people clinging to walls, sitting in the aisles, hanging from chandeliers, etc. all anxious to claim the right to say, ‘I was there’. The meeting itself was a crucible, dotted with passionate, informed and articulate debate that was only occasionally interrupted by the Chair’s mic stand suffering periodic bouts of Shermer’s Neck. Such are the travails of the brave band who squared up to the longest AGM agenda in living memory, stocked with motions and debate to whet every appetite. Will we ever see it’s like again? For Reader, all the motions passed. Even the one I said shouldn’t. Bother. For whilst points don’t necessarily mean prizes, passed motions always means there is work to be done. Aside from the call for OCD to join with AUK – could there ever be a more apposite union? – the meeting agenda centered on Governance issues: breaking the link between Board membership & portfolio a.k.a. “jobs’, proxy voting, the publication of motions for amendment prior to submission, adoption of the AUK website for publishing notices and the introduction of a members forum. Quite how the latter will develop is hard to say. Whilst such a facility complements some of the aforementioned governance changes I suspect it will take more than frenzied discussion of Clause 38 sub Para ii for the AUK forum to become an internet sensation. In desperation I fear some may even resort to discussing ‘cycling’, ‘events’ and suchlike to fill the void between AGMs. I know most are thankful the AGM is but once a year, however as it happens this year it will be twice, or rather there will be an EGM to address the Board’s recommendation regarding proxy voting. This will likely coincide with a Board Meeting set for May/June. More on that later. Such is the story of the motions, but we also saw a mighty change of personnel. With a new Systems Manager, Publicity Secretary, Brevet Card production secretary, Recorder, and ACP Correspondent on the roster we can be sure of changes to come, aided and abetted by the new Chair and myself, the new Secretary. But first we must take stock and as I write that’s where we are now, hatching plans whilst being slaves all to the taskmaster which is the compilation of the AUK handbook. By the time you read this that will be long done and the new intake will be basking in the aftershock of their first Board Meeting. So I’ll cease channelling Gyles Brandreth and leave you to the delights of skimming the Handbook to count your name checks. Paul Stewart



Arrivee Contributers You can send files to the editors quickly 1. Go to AUK website 2. Log in as a member 3. Go to Arrivee Magazine 4. Go to Upload Photos 5. Drag & drop photo &/or article files from your file manager 6. Type your name and any useful info (event, time, place, names) in the Description box 7. Use the link to check your files have uploaded. 8. Email the relevant editor to notify that there is something new in MediaFile. www.aukweb.net

Nick Wilkinson, earning his SR on his Brompton. Photo: Tim Wainwright (with some edits by the editor) Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

11


This & That Family Audaxing

Tyron, Eve and Hadyn Potts at Clevedon on the Tasty Cheddar 2013

August 2010, Wickhamford near Evesham was when my eldest son Tyron joined me on Three Counties - Two Leaf Clover 100k ride. Tyron had riden many charity events over the years with myself. This ride was to be the first Audax for my son. We chose this randonnée as the location was near to where my son lived. The next ride together, we chose The Tasty Cheddar, October 2011. My youngest son Hadyn decided to enter this popular event also. Dad again was very proud to have both sons to join him on a Audax event. We enjoyed the day out together, the weather was fantastic (hottest October on record) spending much time at the splendid eating venues on route, and racing up the Gorge. London-Edinburgh-London, Frédérique Merlevède from French Flandres feeling at home on the Alston cobbles. Photo: Ivo Miesen

Another view of the LEL 2113 from France To my knowledge, ACP brevets are only organised in PBP years in the part of S.W France where we live. I was surprised therefore to meet 2 members of our local, racing obsessed, club in Valence d’Agen who rode the LEL this year, using ACP diagonales for their preparatory training. I have been asked to offer their congratulations to the organisers and teams of volunteers who made the event so memorable. The itinerary led them through some attractive countryside, the food provided, if ?foreign? to their tastes, was plentiful and nourishing, the control volunteers friendly and helpful and the overall organisation excellent. Especially welcome was the freedom from carrying money and the attendant transactions, Their only complaint concerned the road surfaces! They were so impressed that they will recommend the 2017 event to club members and those belonging to the many cycling clubs around here.  Noel Simpson

The next outing was to be April 2012, The Merry Monk 100k ride from High Ham in Somerset. This years event was hit by dreadful storms. Riding conditions were awful, with no let up from heavy rain and strong winds. Following three punctures and the failing of my waterproof clothing in the early stages of the ride, we reluctantly decided to abandon and take shelter in The Windwhistle Inn. We vowed over a pint we would make amends next year. Next time came around in April 2013. Instead of entering the 100k Merry Monk, we upped the mileage and entered 200k Nutty Nuns. I was a proud Dad, as this was to be the first 200 for my boys. The lads performed good at this distance, and to be honest were helping me and C. Butler along. A very enjoyable event thanks to organisers Mark and Helen. The next Potts family Audax in October 2013 was the Tasty Cheddar, where we were accompanied by my daughter Eve. It was a joy to ride with the three of them. Especially when we checked in at control points together and gave the POTTS name four times. What next for the family? A 300k pending for 2014. 

Steve Potts

London-Edinburgh-London, Julian Dyson in Teesdale. Photo: Ivo Miesen

London-Edinburgh-London, Dave Lawrenson approaching Whorton Bridge

12

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

www.aukweb.net


Official Official’s Reports 2013/14

The spread of event distances for BR events (percentage of BR events total in brackets) was:

(continued from November Arrivée)

200 km

Validation Secretaries We have just concluded our 9th season as Validation Secretaries. During the season, 540 events were validated.

300 km

400 km

600 km

600-1000 km 1000+km

2012/13

2176(86%) 200(7.9%) 77(3.1%)

59(2.3%)

1

11(0.4%)

2011/12

1474(83%) 131(7.4%) 74(4.2%)

91(5.1%)

0

4(0.2%)

Of these :

2010/11

85%

7.1%

3.8%

2.4%

0.2%

0.5%

320 were BP events,

2009/10

87%

6.6%

2.5%

2.8%

0.2%

1.4%

186 were BR events and 34 were BRM events. There were a total of 19,703 individual rides making this the club’s highest season ever, an increase of 8.93% over the previous LEL season 2008/9, and of 4.69% over the club’s previous record season 2006/7, a PBP qualifying year . This season’s rides covered a total of approximately 4,053,421km. 6392 rides were on temporary membership, the riders being neither AUK or CTC members.. 723 medals and 254 badges were sold on events by organisers, many of them being provided on a sale-or-return basis. Numbers of riders at each distance were: Distance

No of events

No of riders

< 100km

54

1,207

100km

215

10,253

150km

51

1,320

200km

164

4,485

300km

29

864

400km

15

419

600km

11

351

1400km

1

804

Sue Gatehouse and Keith Harrison

Permanents Secretary The growth in Permanent Events from the previous season (39% increase) has been much greater this year than in any year in the past decade, reflecting the national growth in cycling including cyclists taking part in Audax events. The proportion of DIY events has remained fairly steady, growing to 53% of all Permanent events this year. Permanent events to extend Calendar events have also increased to 137. Events completed for the 2012/13 Season compared with previous years:

All Perms 3900

2011/12

2010/11

2009/10

2008/9

2800

2430

2300

2160

2007/8 1790

DIY

2081(53%) 1385(49% 1160(47%) 1010(44%) 880(41%)

692(39%)

ECE

137

-

110

70

73

-

65% of Permanent events ridden were BR (or ECE) events and 35% were BP events. Proportionally the number of shorter (mostly 50km) BP events ridden has again risen compared with BR events, but by a much smaller shift. The growth in shorter and longer distance cycling reflects the split in previous years. The number of completed 600km Permanent events has dropped significantly compared with last year. www.aukweb.net

100 km

150 km

2012/13

270(20%)

1018(74%) 88(6%)

2011/12

203(22%)

616(67%)

95(10%)

2010/11

25%

68%

7%

2009/10

17%

76%

7%

1st (176) Steve Poulton 2nd (163) Mike Wigley 3rd (144) Tom Fox

We are still awaiting the facility for organisers to order brevet cards and pay fees online, at which time the validation and recording process will be much enhanced.

2012/13

50 km

Organisers award for having most entrants (excluding DIY & ECE events) this year has been contested by the same two organisers who have been top of the leader board for the last few year. Mike Wigley has closed in on Steve Poulton, but Steve still tops the table with the same number of entrants as last year. Billy Weir and Tom Fox were only separated by one event for third place last year, this year Tom has drawn ahead to claim a podium place.

26 Organisers used on the line validation during the season, handing cards back to riders at the finish control. This facility is available to trusted organisers of non-BRM events of 200km or less. It is proving very popular with organisers and riders and is helping the club break free from it’s reliance on stamped-addressed envelopes.



The spread of event distances for BP events (percentage of BP events total in brackets) was:

Thanks should also be given to the DIY organisers team, with a special mention for retiring organisers Alex Pattison, Ian Hennessey and Rich Forrest who have processed many DIY events during the last few seasons. Paul Stewart has checked and validated almost half of this year’s DIYs. Perhaps DIY cyclists could spread their entries a bit more evenly around the team next year? Rider podium places for most Permanent events completed this year sees Ann Marshall moving up to 1st place followed by Martin Malins. Billy Weir takes third place, but out-distances the other two for Permanent events kms covered. 1st (119) Ann Marshall - 12,010km 2nd (98) Martin Malins - 11,460km 3rd (574) Billy Weir - 12,316km Rider with most Permanent events points is Mike Lane with 109 points, closely followed by Chris Smith (AUK 1470) on 102 points Permanents events AAA prize of the year for the most AAA points scored in a single Permanent event goes to Mark Hummerstone who devised the aptly named “Lumpy End to End” and then finished as the sole survivor of the team that started, clocking up 28.5 AAA points en route. A total of 2,671.75 AAA points were gained during the year through 1,157 validated Permanent events. 20 riders completed one or more Permament events with more than 5 AAA, with a total of 29 such events being successfully ridden. 416 DIY events had AAA points recorded with them. Long Permanent events successfully completed included Lowestoft to Ardnamurchan, the Lumpy End to End and two PRoFs. Also, 7 DIY 1,000km rides were completed. 32 PRoFs were completed including one multi-stage randonnee (‘The Eiger Sanction’). After a gap of 3 years a long continuous PRoF was successfully completed (more below). Two-thirds of this year’s PRoFs included classic cols or mountain top Tour de France finishes. Finally, Permanent events Randonneurs of the year are jointly Graham Dore and Steve Bateman, who successfully completed the 3,100km of ‘Trafalgar to Trafalgar’, riding over distance because EU money into Spanish roads has meant that many of the roads on the route when Mick Latimer inaugurated the event in 1985 have now been altered or turned into motorways. They also achieved the first Trafalgar to Trafalgar by a tandem and the first by a partially-sighted cyclist and in the process set a new Audax single event distance John Ward record for both of these. Chapeau.  Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Official Accidental Information (see opposite) All but the newest Auks will by now be completely familiar with the post-season tabulation of incidents occurring on Audax events and for relatively new members I’ll just explain that as part of the effort to maximise riders’ safety a report is filed for all accidents and incidents on these events with a view to take steps as far as possible to prevent a recurrence. Organisers should send such reports to the validation team with the Returns form. If not already personalised, these should carry details of the event, distance, date and organiser to enable us to ensure we have a complete picture, and to avoid our bothering organisers again, in case of non-identification. And so to the interesting, or gory, bit – last season’s tabulation. Once again to protect the innocent, the organisers’ names and start place are not shown. Please also note that the summary of what happened is my own précis from reading others’ versions of events, so, being, at best, second-hand information, may not be used as evidence in any legal context. What startling revelations does the table display? Nothing startling, sadly. Just the usual number of riders falling off because of excessive speed for the conditions or because road conditions are less than ideal (Icy, greasy, muddy, gravelly or pot-holed covers virtually all of them.) Ice seems to have returned as an early season hazard and may well figure this year, too. Loss of concentration, sometimes resulting in crashes in a bunch is another factor.

Overall, the number of incidents has increased slightly with a greater number of slight injuries and a smaller total of serious ones. This is a welcome change even though all the changes are statistically insignificant. Cars are a factor in only two instances and seem to have been at fault in both of them. Fortunately and fortuitously, the injuries in both cases were minor, though the result of a car / bike interaction is not normally in the cyclist’s favour, as any number of us can confirm. Another incident involving a car was reported but has not been included as it was a near miss and therefore outside the scope of this review. Similarly, not included, was a case when a rider was driving home, having ridden a 400, fell asleep at the wheel and crashed his car. Please, please do not drive when you are that tired; it is simply not worth the risk and better that you learn from someone else’s bad experience rather than your own, having repeated the stupidity. Back on Audax events, AUK insures those members, who are normally UK residents, for 3rd party liabilities during events, subject to an excess, but for your peace of mind you may wish to take out insurance to cover personal injury or damage to your cycle. This is something to be negotiated on an individual basis and your usual insurance broker will be the best contact if you want to arrange it. With best wishes to all for an enjoyable and above all a safe 2014 season. Richard Phipps

Officials’ Reports continued

WE NEED YOUR HELP

Brevet Card production

We’ve started work on the new Audax UK website, and we’d like your help to build it.

Just under 19,000 cards have been produced this season. This does not include LEL cards (these were produced out of house). Organisers have ordered on time, except for a couple who are always late. 99% ordered cards by email and very few reminders were needed.

We need your news, event reports, ride stories and photos, to publish on the new site.

A change of brevet card design was implemented this year. It had been suggested that the cards should be a matt finish on the outside, to match the inner. This was not well received as the cards were not robust, so the next batch of cards will be on the original gloss one side card.

News and event reports should be no longer than 500 words, ride stories can be longer. Contact publicity@aukweb.net for more information

After 17 years of producing the cards I have decided to retire and I am pleased to say Tony Greenwood has volunteered to take on this job and I would like to thank him for taking on over. I would like to thank all the people who sent letters cards & emails on my retirement from the brevet card secretary’s job. I took this over from Bry Fergusson who I believe was the first official brevet card sec. (From AUK’s first event in 1976 to 1987 control times were calculated and cards were type-set and printed by the first club secretary, John Nicholas. From 1987 to 1999 cards were printed by Bry Ferguson, being laid out by Francis Cooke from 1987 to 1995. 1995-2006 layouts were produced by Peter Coulson, as Events Secretary. In 2007 Francis automated the layout process online as part of the Events Planner. For further details and a wonderful display of brevet cards through the ages go to: https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=73391.50 NB there are 7 chapters, you will need to scroll down and the seventh is on a second page - Editor). With Bry’s help I produced my first set of cards in 1996, putting the cards in one at a time as the card was too thick to go through the copier, and then took over from Bry full-time in 1999. As copiers improved in design AUK approved the purchase of a new copier that would take 50 cards, which speeded things up considerably but it still took 3 days to do the cards in busy periods. As copiers improved, AUK approved further purchases and today the latest copier will put through up to 999 cards at a time quite easily. This has cut down the production time needed. I have enjoyed my time as brevet card sec but after 17 years I decided to retire and I now have clothes hanging in my wardrobe not brevet cards, polybags & padded envelopes.  Pam Pilbeam

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Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

www.aukweb.net


Official Date

Dist No of offs Rider Err Mech Weather Road Other Driver? Serious Briefly

20/10/12

153

1

28/10/12

106

1

03/11/12

212

1

10/11/12

108

1

01/12/12

204

1

1 1 1 1 1

04/12/12

200

1

1

16/12/13

201

1

1

1

1

3

Rider crashed into rider ahead after concentrating on satnav

3

Rider crashed after puncture with poor brakes on steep hill

1

Rider crashed after losing concentration

1

Rider collided with car turning across him at junction

1

Rider skidded on wet, greasy bend

1

Rider fell after hitting edge of road

1

Rider skidded on ice, fell and chipped pelvis

27/01/13

201

1

1

1

Rider fell after losing concentration

02/02/13

203

1

1

1

1

2

Rider skidded on ice, broke thumb

10/02/13

104

1

1

1

1

1

Rider skidded on wet, pot holed road

17/02/13

106

1

1

1

Rider crashed on bend because of excessive speed

24/03/13

200

1

1

29/03/13

400

2

1

1

31/03/13

207

1

1

06/04/13

300

1

1

1

07/04/13

210

1

1

1

13/04/13

305

1

14/04/13

106

20/04/13

307

1

1

53

1

1

105

1

1 1

28/04/13

200

1

05/05/13

100

1

1

Rider fell on descent for no obvious reason

1

Rider fell on ice after skidding

1

1

Rider fell on icy turn. Later abandoned due to broken gear hanger

1

Rider crashed on damp descent

1

28/04/13

Rider fell on ice after skidding Touched wheels in group

1

1

21/04/13

1 1

1

1

0

Rider with chest pains ambulanced to hospital. Discharged after tests

1

Rider fell after beieng clipped by oncoming car (Hit and run)

2

Rider lost concentration then fell on left hand turn

1

Rider fell after hitting pot hole

2

Rider lost concentration then hit kerb, breaking arm

1

Rider blown over by gust of wind

05/05/13

400

1

1

1

Rider fell on sandy road surface. Overtired?

05/05/13

100

2

1

1

Crash within bunch. No reason given

12/05/13

210

1

1

2

Rider clipped post at exit from bridleway then fell heavily

19/05/13

150

1

1

2

Rider crashed on bend then abandoned due to broken rear mech

19/05/13

163

1

1

Rider crashed into child exiting private drive without looking

01/06/13

100

1

1

1

2

Rider crashed on sandy section of road

01/06/13

100

1

1

1

Rider crashed on sandy section of road

1

Rider crashed several times on a section with rough surface

01/06/13

608

1

1

02/06/13

52

1

1

1

1

Rider (aged 10) clipped kerb

08/06/13

600

1

1

1

Rider stalled on steep hill and fell.

16/06/13

84

1

1

2

Rider pulled muscle due to over-exertion up hill

22/06/13

613

1

1

1

Rider crashed on v steep descent due to excessive speed

29/06/13

203

1

1

1

Rider fell while clipping in

30/06/13

203

1

1

1

Rider stopped suddenly, unaware of another rider just behind

30/06/13

110

1

1

1

Rider crashed on descent while going too fast

06/07/13

300

1

13/07/13

600

1

20/07/13

209

1

21/07/13

100

0

1 1 1

1

1

Rider crashed with reckless MTB rider

1

Two riders collided after one hit a pothole and crashed

1

Rider fell at gravel strewn junction

1

Rider scalded herself with hot tea at control

04/08/13

213

1

1

1

Rider skidded on wet, slippery road markings while turning

10/08/13

105

1

1

1

Collision in bunch on roll-out (100 metres from start)

17/08/13

211

1

18/08/13

115

1

1 1

18/08/13

107

3

3

31/08/13

210

1

1

3

1

Crash after handlebar sheared

2

Rider crashed at too high speed on gravel patch

1

Three riders in a bunch crashed at excessive speed on mossy road

1

Rider crashed on descent due to speed wobble (shimmy?)

07/09/13

111

1

1

1

Rider fell on section of gravel.

15/09/13

209

2

2

1

Two riders skidded on muddy road

21/09/13

216

2

1

1

Two riders fell on wet, greasy road

22/09/13

120

1

1

1

1

Crash in bunch caused by excessive speed & sudden braking

22/09/13

120

1

1

1

Excessive speed on sharp bend in mid descent

29/09/13

103

1

1

1

Rider met horse, braked too hard and went over handlebars.

In the 2012/13 season, 49 riders sustained slight injuries, 8 riders sustained serious injuries and 3 riders sustained severe injuries, whilst cycling approximately 4,053,421km (validation report). A severe injury for every 1, 351,140 km ridden. www.aukweb.net

ArrivĂŠe February 2014 No. 123

15


This & That

Letter to the Editor OCD and AUK I enjoyed Arrivee issue 122 very much but was surprised by Rod Dalitz’s artice on OCD. He says that he received, ‘no negative responses,’ to the proposal to transfer the OCD bank balance to AUK. I wrote to Rd Dalitz in response to the suggestion, soon after it was floated in the OCD magazine, saying I did not support it. I can only think of three explanations: - My letter got lost in the post. This would only be the second time that this has happened to a letter of mine in nearly forty years. - My response wasn’t clear and has been taken as supportive. This does not seem very likely - I was (and still am) firmly against the idea and believe my views were clearly stated. - Rod Dalitz has decided to ignore my views and to write his article in a misleading manner. I would be very interested to learn which of these explanations is correct, or if there is another one that I have not thought of. Incidentally, I did discuss the proposal with two other OCD members, one a fellow ‘venerable’, and both were opposed to the proposal. Whether either of them wrote to make their views known, I do not know. I look forward to reading the next installment. Rob Kilby

OCD Reply Sheila Simpson forwarded your letter to Arrivee to me, so that I might respond. First, yes, I did receive your letter. Since you did not email but sent a hand-written hardcopy, I suspect you may not have kept a copy, and so I attach a photocopy so that you may review your exact words, rather than a memory of them. Of course I am sorry you received little or no feedback for your col reports, postcards, and claims. The only normal route for these is via the magazine, and if members submit insufficient material to publish a regular magazine, there is little to be done. In particular, it makes no sense to send a letter with even a secondclass stamp to acknowledge a postcard! I have always forwarded ALL postcards and contributions to the Magazine Editor. I have included ALL col claims into my annual report. After the introductory material in your letter, your exact words were “I think we should let the organisation die a peaceful death, rather than latching onto AUK (of which I am also a member).” I feel that I need make no apology for summarising this as “let the OCD die in peace” which I see as a rather neutral response, compared to a possible response that the AUK was a bad choice, or that another organisation would be a better choice. You have prompted me to re-count the emails and letters. I can tell you that out of a current membership of 225, I received: - 33 emails with positive support (words like “good idea”) - 5 letters with positive support including three cheques for £5 to ensure continuation; you can’t get much more positive than that - 6 emails which were neutral, people who did not care and would not join AUK - 1 letter which I took as neutral, “let it die in peace” With this level of support, I have no hesitation in pressing ahead with the merge with AUK. For the few who are not interested in AUK, it should be easy enough to ignore. RodDalitz



AAA News

2013 AAA Championships Louise Rigby’s achievements in 2012 set the scene for 2013 when both the AAA Champion and the AAA Opposite Sex Champion broke the previous AAA Champion’s points record (245½ AAA points). Many belated congratulations to Billy Weir, who raised the bar to a new level with a massive 323 AAA points. Many congratulations also to Ann Marshall, who was AAA Opposite Sex Champion for the second time and who also broke the previous overall AAA Champion’s points record with 261½ points. And chapeau to Martin Malins, whose total of 209¼ points would have been enough to win him the Championship in most recent seasons, but this time he had to be satisfied with runner-up status. Billy’s other accomplishments while on his way to the championship included an AAARTY of BR’s, 233 ½ AAA points from BR events (top rider in Dave Baxendall’s list of AUK Allrounder’s, and in Billy’s words “the toughest of the lot”), and the first to claim 3 3x3 AAA awards. Will anyone have the courage, determination and stamina to challenge these 2013 records in 2014? New AAA Century Award Just a reminder about the new AAA Century Award. The original Audax Altitude Award, the 3xAAA and 3x3 AAA will continue as now, and you can take as long as you like over them. Now there is a new AAA Century award for obtaining 100 AAA points. The difference with the Century award is that all the AAA points must be obtained in one season. It will be a tough challenge for experienced riders, and I wouldn’t expect to hand out more than three or four awards each year. For those who don’t have the time or the inclination to aim for the AAA Century award, there will also be an AAA Quarter Century award for obtaining 25 AAA points in a season, and an AAA Half Century award for obtaining 50 points in a season. And for the totally committed AAAddict an AAA Double Century award for 200 points in a season. Cloth badges will be made available in due course, and there is a new Roll of Honour on the AAA website and in the AUK Handbook. So for those of you looking for a new challenge in the coming season, here is something for you to aim for. And claims will be accepted for seasons from 2009 onwards. OnwAAArds and UpwAAArds.

The AAA Man.

Riding on Tiny Tyres

David Saunders writes to say that he has just published a book about his rides on the Moulton bicycle, including a number of Audax UK rides in the 1970s including: Windsor-Chester-Windsor, Cardiff-Fishguard-Cardiff, The 1978 Centenary of Cycling from Paris to Harrogate, Telford-Aberystwyth-Telford The book also tells the story of the Moulton Bicycle Club, which he started in 1975, the special bike built for him and of many tours. Limited availability, £70, email: davesanders@mac.com Stable Cottage, Whitton Court, Ludlow Shropshire SY8 AB

16

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

www.aukweb.net


Randonnées My entry into the legion of the damned was all too easy: a 3am alarm on September 8, 2012. Knowing then what I know now, the correct response was to go back to sleep. Because on a long hard audax you look into your soul and don’t always like what you see. At the end, the reward was merely a small cloth badge. But it is very beautiful, and hangs on the wall at home. I look at it a hundred times a day.. The first of my 200k rides each month for a year – to win the coveted Randonneur Round The Year (RRTY) badge – was an enjoyable day in the sun, as was the last one. The horrid rides were the ones in between, with ice, rain and winds. My first was the Hailsham-Folkestone perm organised by El Supremo (Dave Hudson). It is almost entirely on small lanes, passes the delightful Light Railway café at Hythe, and it could be started 4k from home. It was to be my route nine times in the year because there is no room for heroics on a RRTY: doing the rides is the challenge, never mind adding to your troubles with tricky navigation on unfamiliar roads. El Supremo offered good advice when he told me to stick to familiar routes and get them done early in the month so there is time for another ride if things go wrong. That first September ride was lovely – pretty countryside and sunshine. Alas it lured me into a false sense of security. The same ride a month later was bloody freezing and my GPS fell off when the handlebar bracket disintegrated. It was so cold the insulating tape bought in a garage at dawn would not stick properly. In an allegory for my entire RRTY attempt, I just about fixed it, with a bad bodge. Things were to get a lot worse. November brought three hours of torrential rain and a vicious headwind in the dark. December was an extension of an El Supremo 100k that saw me ride a loop of 70k to the start and arrive early to spend a freezing cold and anxious 30 minutes waiting for my riding companions, who unlike me had enjoyed a good night’s sleep and a decent breakfast and who then ripped my legs off with their speed. So the final 30k in the dark of a winter’s evening left me utterly shattered on the struggle home. My thoughts were only of failure, bankruptcy and death. January was chilly but February was bitter: six layers on top with feet encased in neoprene overboots, shoes, Sealskinz socks and thick wool next to the skin. Inside the shoes were chemical heat pads. My feet were still cold. This winter was horrid. Every evening there was an anxious wait for the 7pm online announcement (Twitter and Facebook – it’s a Young Persons Thing) from Kent Highways as to whether they would be gritting that night, and the expected minimum road temperature (which is different from air temperature quoted by weather forecasters). There are too www.aukweb.net

Lessons from my Year of Servitude in the Legion of the Damned Martin Brice

many tales of riders hitting the tarmac while riding on ice so it’s best avoided, in my book. It was almost the end of March before the magic news that they would not be gritting and the ride was snatched on March 30. It was still bloody cold, all the way round. At home afterwards the bath wasn’t filling up: cold and tiredness combined to make me forget to put the plug in. So much for March, but as TS Eliot said: “April is the cruellest month”. The ride was to be the 350k DIY by GPS alone from Hull to London Bridge station along the route of LEL. There was an all-too-brief 10 minutes sleep stop sitting on a bench in Cambridgeshire at 4am and 10 minutes sitting in a bus stop in London. But the constant headwind did for me and it took 20 minutes longer than the 24 hours 36 minutes allowed. Damn. After a few days to recover, the safe and secure Hailsham-Folkestone came to my rescue just one day before the end of the month. Phew. Real life intruded in May: nevertheless, one day before the end of the month the ride was bagged. By now, my confidence was rising. So in June there were no worries at all the “banker” was ridden nonchalantly. Each time, it was different – sometimes sunny, sometimes windy, but always a different experience. It was never boring. By now, it was all so easy. However, my hubris was followed by nemesis. July was El Supremo’s Medway Meander, which goes past a friend’s front door. Who would not pop in for a chat? There was plenty of time in hand so we chatted on. And who would not stop to help a lost fellow cyclist? He was German, and riding to Wales. Who would not ring their wife, and agree to offer him a meal and a bed for the night? Then we would, of course, go slowly enough for him to keep up on his heavily laden expedition bike. It was fortunate then, that I glanced at my watch. Arrgh! Panic! After a very fast time trial through the lanes of Kent the ATM receipt showed there was one minute to spare. After 14 hours and 31 minutes this was too close for comfort. But things went from bad to worse: my August ride was to be LEL but my time ran out at Moffat so I packed and took the train south, to spend a few days helping out at the finish. This, on reflection, was the high point of my

cycling year. But desperation loomed: time was running out for the last RRTY. It had to be done: those 11 rides were not going to waste. So it was then, on a sunny day, August 18, I rode away from home eastwards into a summer dawn to spend the next 200k in a dream world. It was all perfectly relaxed. After those ghastly days of winter, this would surely be a doddle. My year of servitude was coming to a close, not with a bang but a whimper. Occasionally I enjoyed a fortunate breeze, and revelled in the smoothness of the day. It was Dave Winslade’s Weald of Kent perm, which has oodles of pretty countryside and quiet roads. With only 50k to go I sat on a sunny bench in the lovely Kentish village of Tenterden and reflected on the enormous journey I’d undertaken. A perfectly nice chap walked up and tried to engage me in polite conversation about the bike, but I cut him dead. It was not yet time to move back into daily life. I wanted to spend longer in the time of understanding. The tangible rewards of a RRTY are small: Mike Wigley tells me my name is on a “roll of honour” on a website somewhere. The badge is made of cloth, and about 3 inches across. It is reddish-orange, the colour of my eyes at the end of some rides. I often think getting a RRTY badge was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. Worth it, though.

Lessons from a RRTY: 1. Stick to familiar routes and get them done early in the month 2. It’s hard, cold and uncomfortable. 3. Extensions of calendar events need careful timing. 4. It’s cold in winter. 5. In winter, it can be miserable – and cold. 6. When you’re cold and tired you don’t think properly. 7. Your “banker” ride is important. 8. Pride comes before a fall. 9. Don’t underestimate the toughness of a RRTY. 10. Time is miles. 11. A RRTY does wonders for your confidence. 12. It’s a bloody long way, but worth the effort. Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

17


Randonnées

Long bike rides are typically made memorable by two factors that the rider can’t control - terrain and weather. I’d been checking the weather for a week before the traditional painfest of an early January 200k, the Poor Student, and by 24-hours to go, the prediction was for 2-hours of rain in the morning followed by intermittent light showers and a bit of wind from the south west. I knew about the hills, and when I’d done the ride two years previously, managed them without completely ending up on my hands and knees, so everything was OK to go for the 2014 edition - and no reason not to press ‘Buy now’ on the £24 return train ticket journey. I met Rimas on the train ride out to Oxford from Paddington station, and being seasoned audax riders we indifferently dismissed the weather and terrain factors before getting stuck into the important conversations involving choice of saddles, tyres, wheels and clothing. Rain was falling steadily on arrival in Oxford, and we had 6k to cover through the town to get to the start and 10-minutes to get there. A tailwind and some fast pacing with another rider got us to the start only a few minutes late and with only around 20 of the 50-strong field having departed already, we were in good company for the start of the ride. The temperature remained below 5 degrees for the day and the rain hardly stopped. Riding with Rimas is a lesson in torture - a fast rider and always happy to take the lead, riding at 32kph plus into the wind, and then only slightly slower on the up-hills. I was worried about being able to keep up 5km into the ride, but my body soon became accustomed to the high pace and we eventually gathered a sizable group of around 10 on Cummnor Hill, which leaves Oxford behind and lead us out into the countryside. The wind was in our faces for the first 75k to Malmesbury, but Rimas and Colin Bezant (another audax regular around the south-east) were quite content to assume the patron roles at the head of the group with brief work-sharing done by me and a few others before Colin and Rimas assumed the lion’s share. Anton Blackie was in the group - I’d ridden the Poor Student with him and James Fairbank in 2012 in much more favorable conditions - and he was once again on a fixed gear bike. I jokingly told him he hadn’t learned his lesson with his gear choice. The joke was about to be on me, however. The rain increased in it’s ferociousness, and at the halfway point to the first control we were all completely drenched and having to ride hard just to keep warm. 18

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

The Poor Student

Michael Conway Photo: Jordan Carroll (AC Hackney)

We also picked up a Dutch woman, Bonnie who was on her first audax ever. She was meant to have been joined by a few of her Oxford based club-mates, but they all abandoned on seeing the weather. A tough rider she was, and I was even more in awe when I heard she’d run a 30-mile marathon a few days before. Audaxing always seems to attract the nutters. At Malmesbury, the traditional cafe stop was foregone in favour of a quick sandwich at the Co-op next door. The sight of a dozen cyclists standing in the rain shovelling sandwiches and chocolate into their faces must have been something for the local inhabitants. After 10-minutes of consumption we were on our way again. I’d forgotten to refill my one empty bottle, and resigned myself to rationing the one 750ml bottle until the next cafe stop in 70k time in Chipping Campden. Our group was now down to just five. Anton, Bonnie, two other riders and myself. It was during the next 20k stretch between Malmesbury and Cirencester that the ride took a turn for the completely insane. We came upon flooded roads in earnest and at regular intervals. Before this winter, any puddle longer than about 10-meters would have seen me turn around in an attempt to find an alternative. I’ve seen a rider take a fall into an unseen pothole and break a collar bone in such rides of bravery / stupidity. What we accomplished over the next 20k

was more marine-based than cycling based. Sections of flooding lasting over 100-meters and in parts having to refer to the GPS to decipher where the next road-turning was, as intersections were completely submerged. The level of flooding at the worst up to our knees, pedaling in deep water. This was insanity on the next level. Thankfully no-one in our group took a tumble, but there was a moment where I followed one rider’s line and saw him bouncing around - clearly in unseen pot-hole territory. I duly picked another line, more in the center of the road. I wasn’t so lucky a few minutes later barrelling down a sketchy, narrow descent that resembled a river more than a road, and hit a small, sharp pothole at speed, making my front wheel twang with a sudden metallic jolt. Amazingly no puncture, but it definitely had a bit of a wobble to it. At Cirencester we were at the half-way point with 100km covered. There was no turningback now. My legs were jelly from the hard pace and cold of the last 4-hours and I was fearful of the hilly section after Cirencester, the infamous Compton Abdable Alps which came after the 10km uphill drag of the ‘White Way’. We’d picked up a few more riders including a few ‘hitters’ who immediately cranked up the pace on the lower slopes of the hill. Something in me gave up at that point - I drifted back in the group and let the last www.aukweb.net


Randonnées rider overtake and slowly pull away. The rain fell steadily as I pushed on, occasionally seeing the red-tail-lights of the group getting further and further away. The pain of the gradual gradient was taking it’s toll and morale was at rock bottom. Near the top I pulled over for a natural break then pressed on to face the hills alone. The group I’d been with was the first on the road and the next group didn’t catch me for a good 2 hours, which gave me the time to achieve a whole new perspective on the day. With a drop in speed, and lower heart-rate, I began to notice the countryside - bleak skies and sweeping hills were inspiring at their summits, terrifyingly steep ascents and equally butt-clenching on the ways down. I was now out of water completely - very frustrating given the abundance of moisture all around on the ground and falling from the skies. I rode on for 10km trying to ignore my mild dehydration until I finally encountered an open pub at Kineton - a very small stone village that seemed to be caught in a timebubble in the 15th century. A glowing fire place warmed the pub and a few locals were nursing pints of ale and chatting away in hushed tones. I immediately became the focus of attention - a shivering lycra clad, mud-caked figure with ‘wild-eyes’. The landlord was an Irish woman who’s first words were ‘Are you mad to be riding a bike out there today where have you come from?’ I told her and she dismissed my answer like I’d completely lost the plot. I had a refill of water, thanked her for the trouble and rode away to face more hills. The rain was subsiding and eventually stopped, though the roads were still waterlogged and extremely sketchy. I noticed my front brake blocks were worn down way past the ‘wear limit’ and threatened to wear all the way down to the metal holders - not a good sign. I began slowing with more advance and using the back brakes more frequently. With another 10km before the second control in Chipping Campden I was caught by the next group on the road, comprised of 3 riders of Banbury CC and one other. I immediately took to Adam and Justin from the club, being impressed with the Pinarello Sestriere that Justin rode. These guys were strong riders and were well versed in clubetiquette slowing or stopping on the tops of hills for everyone to catch up before pressing on. Keeping the group together at this stage of the game was a good idea - safety in numbers and the best way to keep the ride pleasant and not make it a death-march for anyone. I liked this group and my energy levels started to pick up along with the pace of the group. At 143k we rode into Chipping Campden and waved at the group I had previously been with as they made their way out of the town. It was around 3pm and the rain was definitely now over, but the temperature was dropping along with the day-light. Eating a www.aukweb.net

Photo: Shell (Mike Sheldrake)

cold chicken and bacon pasty outside another Co-Op with shivering hands was so grim it was funny. The absurdity of the day had got to all of us and all we could do was laugh at ourselves. With the majority of the ride behind it was now time to get stuck into the final job of completing the last 60km. I made sure my bottles were both full and I changed my wet cycling cap for a dry warm one that I had stashed in my saddle bag. If only I’d remembered to bring a spare pair of gloves… In my mind the last stretch was a ‘flat run home’. I recalled in 2012 how Colin Bezant and I had ‘bossed’ the last section working together and completed the ride in a blaze of energy. This time round, however, huge steep hills sprung out from the landscape unexpectedly and the wind always seemed to be in our faces. Justin unfortunately managed to pick up two punctures in short succession and we waited without discussion - keep the group together. The day had taken

it’s toll on me and with 30km to go I was dropping behind on the hills, going to my lowest gears on even the slightest of drags. I was far from the blaze of energy in 2012. After eating a banana to pick up my sugar levels, we kept together with Adam and Justin doing much of the pace-making. The last hour was spent at an easy pace with lots of chatting amongst us to keep spirits up. Eventually we were on the main drag back to Oxford and finished at the Peartree services at 5.30pm - collecting receipts at the gas station to prove we finished the ride within the time limit. After exchanging Stravarecognising details with the Banbury boys, we went our separate ways. I wolfed down my usual post ride chocolate milk at the services before pushing on to Oxford station and managed in the nick of time to get on the 6pm to London. Rimas was on the same train and we caught up - reliving memories of a day and a ride I’ll not forget.

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The North-West-Passage This ride, organised by the West Pennine Road Club, was originally referred to simply as The Rochdale 200 and was, in March 1977, the first 200 km Brevet organised in the UK. It was repeated in the autumn. West Pennine also ran the first 400 km in the same year. Below, Peter Bond describes the 2013 edition held on the 16th February - The Editor. Developed out of a club reliability trial, this event attracts a lot of riders, from within and without the club, who want to ride fast. It sticks to main roads for much of its course which has the advantage that it is likely to be gritted and as safe as anywhere else in winter. That doesn’t guarantee the weather, however. I’ve done the ride in rain, hail, zero temperatures and snow. For the first time in my memory, the forecast was a completely dry, if cold day. A light wind would be to our advantage to the turn but shouldn’t be strong enough to trouble us on the way back. I wound my way through back lanes, past the silent encampment of travellers on the industrial estate, to the start at The Spring Inn. Among the familiar faces were Bob Johnson and Andy Clarkson, Shaun Towneley, Bob Bialek, Don Black and Ade Hughes. I warned Ade, that the start would be brisk, with West Pennine riders anxious not to be behind any audaxers. Inside the pub, there was a good service of tea and coffee. At 08:00, we rolled out. The first half-mile or so has several right angle bends and sets of lights, so that after about a hundred yards, I never saw the main pack at all. But there was no shortage of companions on the climb out of Little-borough towards Todmorden and I rode variously with John Radford, Mike Wigley et al, before Mike dropped back to sort out a rattle. A little later, on the outskirts of Burnley, I came across Bob Chatterton, puzzling over the legendary route-sheet and offered to guide him and Bill Green through Nelson and out onto the first significant climb of the day, from Barrow-ford across Greystones to Gisburn. Both Bob and Bill had been fellow-sufferers on the Red Rose Ride, almost a year earlier, when, despite it being April, we had been subjected to hail and fifty-mile-an-hour gales. Today’s ride was tropical by comparison and there was energy to spare for remarking on the sights. The first of these is Blacko Tower, on a mound to the right. It is a folly, built by a local benefactor to provide work for the unemployed. But the overpowering image is Pendle Hill, to the left. Today, it was etched with snow that combined with its dark bulk to give it the appearance of a huge ironstone boulder streaked with quartz. Pendle is a magnificent hill. I never tire of seeing it in its various aspects. 20

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Musing on Pendle, I was passed by three riders, who rode by with a curt ,“Morning,” as they strove to make up time. All wore dark glasses and none actually looked at me as they passed. This always gives me sense of “I’m a pretty serious rider, what I’m doing is important – and I’m faster than you,” whereas a smile would have conveyed, “I’m on the same ride, it’s good isn’t it?”. Still, each to his own, I suppose. Not long after this, I came up to the legendary climber, Chris Crookes, who had taken a hillier diversion through Worsthorne to miss a lot of the Burnley sprawl. I think he did similar variations, based on his local knowledge, throughout the ride, to make it more interesting. No dark glasses for him! Gisburn is an attractive town, pretty much a strip development along the A59 Skipton to Clitheroe road. Just past the fine church I turned left for Skipton and the undulating course along the west bank of the Ribble to Long Preston and Settle. The Ribble has a huge flood plain and there was plenty of evidence of the wet weather that has been our lot over the last couple of years. The road was very busy and, as far as I experienced, the traffic was patient, although the twisty nature of the road makes it difficult for motor vehicles to pass. The group a hundred yards or so ahead was obviously difficult to deal with even though they were in single file. Would it be controversial to suggest that a group of cyclists riding in single file, who know they are causing a long tail-back, ease off into twos, leaving gaps for traffic to gradually leapfrog them? Next year, I think I’ll take a leaf out of Chris’s book and ride up the left bank of the river, through Paythorne, Wigglesworth and Rathmell, further but pleasanter. In Settle we had our first control at The Naked Man cafe. Although I was champing at the bit, I made myself sit down outside with a cup of tea and cheese salad sandwich. I was about quarter of an hour over this but it was time well spent, as I frequently go too far without a break and suffer later. I knew I was going well because Ade Hughes was only just leaving as I arrived. From Settle, the routesheet simply enjoins riders to regain the main road north for Kirkby Lonsdale. In fact, there are three ways this can be done and, like most, I headed directly north through the town to take the route past the Giggleswick School cricket ground and over the steepish climb under Giggleswick Scar. From the summit, there is a relaxing plunge to the main road. The undulating main road to Kirkby Lonsdale was much less hard work than usual, though it was a shame that the weather conditions meant that the glimpses of Pen-y-ghent and Ingleborough were very sketchy. Somewhere near Ingleton, I came across Shaun and Bob sorting out a problem with Bob’s saddle. They had it in hand, so I pressed on past another famous landmark, The Mason’s Arms, and was soon pointing out to Brett the building in Cowan Bridge where several of the Brontë sisters went to school and where some of them caught fatal illnesses.

with Peter Bond The next control is just short of Kirkby Lonsdale down on the Devil’s Bridge, where the tea van was doing a brisk trade with cyclists and motor-cyclists. I was ok for food, so I just ate a banana and set off again. At this point I realised that you can always learn something. I’ve always returned to the main road the way I came in, which necessitates a stiff climb up to the right turn onto the Lancaster road; however, this time I noticed Julian Dyson going straight across the incoming road and round the lane to the right, to rejoin the main road higher up. This gives the same climb but more gradually and it is much less effort. I tailed Julian for the next twenty kilometres or so, along the broad flood plain of the River Lune. We passed first the village of Tunstall, to which church the Brontës used to trudge, a round trip of about six miles when they were only ten or eleven; then past famous inns like The Highwayman, and The Lunesdale Arms, through the pretty village of Melling and on to Hornby, where the road widens through the village before turning sharp right for Lancaster. There is a very good cafe in Hornby and a fine castle. I had originally intended to have a meal at the cafe but Julian had planned to eat at a snack-bar at the picnic site in Claughton, so I did the same. Like Devil’s Bridge, the snack bar is popular with motor-cyclists. Just before you reach the picnic site, there is a house on the right which has a signal box and signal in the garden. This is on the old Lancaster to Wennington line and a little further on this has been tarmaced to provide an excellent cycle and pedestrian path, which, in more relaxed mode, I have used as far as Caton. On this occasion Julian was going on through Lancaster on the official route, while I opted to turn left just after Caton to go the hilly way through Quernmore. It would be more physical effort but less busy than the city route. I was repaid with several sightings of snowdrops and almost none of traffic. I was beginning to feel it as I climbed up to the cross-roads in Quernmore but recovered on the long descent to Bay Horse. The higher route affords reminders of several rides that come this way: Glasson Dock away to the right on Morecambe Bay is the half-way house of the Red Rose and Good Companions rides (and a late control on the 3 Coasts 600). And a little further south is Knott End, which I have included on a DIY 200. The Barn, in Scorton, the next control point, is also a very welcoming place. I knew it would be busy, because it’s justly popular for its food and there would be several dozen riders in front of me. By the time I was rolling across the narrow bridge over the River Wyre on the epproach to Scorton, I had decided to buy a couple of bananas at the shop. This section parallel to the A6 is fascinating for geographers, historians and www.aukweb.net


Randonnées anyone who likes maps: the by-road squeezes along between the River Wyre, the Lancaster Canal, the A6, the west coast main line and the M6! Having bought my bananas, I got my card signed in the cafe, which was as busy as anticipated. Ade left just as I arrived and, surprisingly, Julian arrived just as I was leaving, so it must have been particularly snarly in Lancaster. After a little meander beside the Wyre, the route regains the A6 towards Preston. The official route stays on this for a few fast kilometres before turning left in Bilsborrow at The Roebuck but I left the A6 almost immediately to divert through the market town of Garstang, which is always visually interesting. After a little undulation this variation reaches the A6 again, though I almost immediately eschewed it to turn left onto the road to Inglewhite and Longridge by the Shell garage. The lone wind-turbine near Cabus confirmed that assistance was over for the day. In the summer, these lanes are a riot of colour, especially Duckett’s Farm which usually has a great array of hanging baskets. However, we were now heading into the wind and less of my effort was going into observation than before. I did, however, remember to look for the rock on the bank of the River Brock as I crossed it. I had made a break there on an earlier ride and been shouted at by a wren. As I climbed the sharp hill just before Inglewhite, I knew I was flagging badly and would need to eat and drink in Longridge. I was glad of my “markers” to help me tick off the miles: the elegant stand of tall trees at the top of the climb; the village green in Inglewhite, The Green Man pub to the right and the old AA mileage sign on the wall as you leave the village. The fine cross on the green dates from the 16th century, I think. It seemed to take forever to reach Longridge. I think the town must be named after the fell, which is very impressive and is absolutely what it says on the tin. Its chief claim to fame seems to be that Cromwell’s army set out from Longridge to defeat the Scottish royalists at Preston. The town itself must have one of the most inclined high streets anywhere. Half-way up it, I pulled to a stop outside the Co-op, where a gaggle of kids were spinning their scooters around, bought a milk-shake and sandwiches, wheeled my bike out of sight round the corner and sat down to eat and await developments. Sure enough, I was midsandwich when a boy rounded the corner on his scooter to see what was going on. I made animal noises and pulled a face at him and he beat a hasty retreat.

going through the village itself but it’s difficult to discern any evidence of Roman occupation at a glance. Just a little further on, beyond the hamlet of Little Town, I crossed the Ribble itself, which is wide and magnificent here, with a beautiful eddied surface like marbled glass. A sharp right after the bridge takes the route past what was, until very recently the De Tabley Arms, a long low coach-house with, presumaby, a long history of travellers’ tales of the road between the abbey town of Whalley and Blackburn. It has been converted into the inevitable apartments but at least much of the old building has been incorporated. Such musing was insufficient to block out the fact that I had started what is really quite a stiff climb all the way to Wilpshire on the outskirts of Blackburn. It is often said that the North-West Passage is “all about the last third” and that is a reasonable summation. So far, I was buoyed up by my break in Longridge and I was soon passing through the village of Salesbury, with its Bonny Inn and the curious continental-style church on the edge of the wild village green. A short urban section from Wilpshire brings you to the Blackburn by-pass, where I turned left and continued climbing, though more gently now. At the top of the by-pass is a huge roundabout which the routesheet warns about. I put up with this once, a few years ago, but ever since have used the cycle-path on the right of the dual-carriageway, which can be reached by turning right at the lights just past Read Caravans on the left of the by-pass. This affords a few minutes relaxation, although on this occasion I had to negotiate a jogger who had his iPod turned up so loud he couldn’t hear my warning calls! A jink across the road and through a hedge to the Whitebirks roundabout and I was back on course and climbing up past The Red Lion to start the climb of Haslingden Moor, which always looms large. Turning left at what used to be The Crescent, I began the slog up to The Britannia roundabout. It had always been a habit to depress myself on this leg by watching the angle of the head and tail lights of cars crossing the moor, to gauge how much climbing was still to be done but on this occasion my good form had got me this far in daylight. I could feel I was beginning to fade, so I plundered the emergency sandwiches and settled in just to get over the hills to the finish without killing myself.

This moorland crossing is a mixture of what my mother-in-law called “padding cans” home-steads with ramshackle buildings and dead cars and rubbish strewn about, farms converted to restaurants and now a new wind-turbine installation. After the final tough bend up to the summit, I relaxed on the descent to Haslingden and was pleased to see that the Farmer’s Joy has been re-opened, bucking the current trend. A few miles of urban traffic-jamming took me across Haslingden which always has a vaguely wild-west border town feel. I once rode into a street-fight there and had a sore shoulder for weeks afterwards. Negotiating the tricky roundabout on the south side of the town, I enjoyed the fast free-wheel down to the River Irwell, which rises on Deerplay Moor a few miles to the northeast. The route crosses it just where it turns south on its journey to the murky Mersey. I could hear the whistle of an engine on the East Lancashire Railway as it hauled the last train of the day from Rawtenstall to Bury but was unable to see any plumes of steam. A gentle climb brings the rider to the village of Edenfield and the last business of the day, the climb over Scout Moor past the romantically-located Owd Bett’s (below), the pub and possibly ancient coaching house at the summit. At the foot of the climb, I stopped to put my lamps on and eat a couple of sandwiches. It is surprising how even a short break before a hill re-vitalises you and I climbed pretty steadily. Whilst eating I had realised that I could still just about get round in ten hours and I had this very much in mind as I passed first the Scout Moor wind-farm which soars above the quarries near the village of Turn, then the pub and the steely grey waters of Ashworth Moor reservoir. I piled on what speed I could muster down the long hill through Norden to the centre of Rochdale. One of the great features of this ride is the provision of pie and peas in a warm pub at the finish. Ade must have had a good last leg because he had eaten and gone by the time I arrived. This event always has a good turn-out, as does its companion, the Mini-North-West Passage. I would like to thank Noel Healey and his helpers for running it annually, and from such a great venue.

Fortified, I bashed on, up the hill to the top of Longridge, then swooped down to the Coronation Arms, where I kept right towards Blackburn. The next village is Ribchester which, as might be imagined from its name, was a Roman settlement on the River Ribble. Our way takes us round the back of the village past the grand Ribchester Arms. I once made a point of www.aukweb.net

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Hummers Lumpy End to End Prologue – The Trip Down Travelling by train to anywhere in the UK is something of an adventure - let’s see: In the blue corner, the trip to Lands End went swimmingly well: a big fry-up at my house, onto the train(s) to Penzance, pre-booked seats and bike places on all services, fish & chips at a prize winning café and a mighty fine pub just up the road from the bunkhouse offering very drinkable beer at well under £3 a pint. In the red corner, the trip down to Lands End was something of a trial of nerves and temper. Having booked places to sit on every train mid-journey means you have to deal with people who have to be asked to move from your seat. The prize as the ‘star traveller experience’ of the whole trip went to the woman with a dog who insisted we were in her seat (we weren’t). In second place there was a complete idiot I nearly decked who was freaking out about the way the bikes had been stowed and was shouting at my chum Andy (who oddly was not a guard for Great Western Trains). In third place, the chap who pounced on us as we loaded our bikes onto the train, in fear we were bike thieves, and I shall pass over the puncture I had within 200yds of leaving the train in Penzance, the second puncture in the 200yds we rode to the pub.

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We set off just before 7am to meet up with Steve Mc Brien at the marvellously refurbished but shut Lands End experience. There was a reassuring southwesterly blowing at our backs as we snapped jocular pictures of the illustrious randonneurs at the starting post... After a quick breakfast at the Mount View hotel (Long Rock) we trundled through the rolling Cornish countryside, in good spirits, buoyed with high expectations of the days ahead. Despite the now persistent Cornish drizzle, the wind stayed on our backs, blowing us through small hedge-bordered lanes towards the King Harry Ferry and via St Austell to the banks of the Fowey. Within 100 yards of St Austell my rear tyre blew out for the 3rd time, resulting in an unplanned and unscheduled purchase of a replacement Ultra Hamsterskin. I may have paid a record price for the aforementioned tyre but this was more than eclipsed by the hearty recommendations of the two Halfords sales assistants (“I don’t use ‘em myself but they are shit hot at the price I reckon mate”) and a random stranger outside who saw it as his duty to advise me on how to fit it. For me, one of the highlights of the 1st day was going to be a revisit to the Minions tea rooms on Bodmin moor. I had first visited there in 2003 and it was with barely contained delight that I rolled in to find the owner had not changed since my last visit 10 years before.

over the next seven days. Andy had slipped quite a long way behind as we came off the moor at Bovey Tracy and I think it dawned on him that his loosely formed strategy of ‘riding into fitness’ was not going to be as successful as he had hoped. As he walked up the hill out of Widecombe, I think there was a realisation that this was a ride that was only going to get harder as it went on. Running some way behind our projected timescales, we had to recalculate our arrival time in Honiton and decided to opt for food in a Bovey Tracy Chinese, which had the added benefit of friendly but slightly inebriated locals coming in to point and laugh at us. As I sat there munching on Choys Special Noodles, it occurred to me that we were nearly there. After the climb up and over Haldon we were on the relatively flat charge-down to Honiton via a deserted A30 for an arrival at Ian Hennessey’s house around midnight. Somehow we lost Andy in Exeter and he arrived about an hour or so later than us in a somewhat reflective mood.

Day 2 – Honiton to Tregoyd/Three Cocks 280k (3238m) Originally, the route was shorter for day 2 but this meant we would have to start at some God-forsaken time in the morning on day 3. As a result, Toby suggested extending day 2 by around 50k. So a convoluted but still agreeable route was concocted taking in Watchet, Cheddar Gorge, Yate and Usk before the last climb over Gospel Pass to our second night stop at Tregoyd riding stables. Funny how something, that seems so straight-forward when laid out on a spread sheet weeks before can have an uncanny knack of unravelling. Given the lateness of arrival, we planned to leave around 7am but Andy, keen to get away early, set off before the rest of us. He was going to take an ‘easier route’ suggested by Ian out of Honiton but still had to climb to the same height to get to Dunkeswell. Ian’s recital from memory of the route to Watchet was impressive but we already had planned a northwards

From Minions, the rollercoaster between the two moors of Cornwall and Devon continued before we passed Tavistock and finally started the climb over Dartmoor to Princetown. Just after Whitchurch Common, a wedding party were gathered for what may be a customary postnuptial photo session for natives of the area. Toby and I (being joyful of being in Devon once more) stopped to admire the spectacle and wondered who would come out here to have their picture taken.

Leaving Devon at Simonsburrow. It was emotional:

Sometime later as I write this, the trials and tribulations of the Cornish Odyssey have already diminished. The Lands End Hostel (not part of the YHA) really was excellent. It is a great stop-off for the start, is clean, well-kept and they work hard to make it so. Plus it is just a stone’s throw from both the start and a good pub, The First and Last, is just up the road, does good beer and good food. Soon all of us were assembled in the public bar, lost amidst torn out AA UK, road atlas page, printed spead-sheets and St Austell Ales beer mats, eager in anticipation as to how the next 8 days would unfold.

Day 1 – Lands End to Honiton – 240k (4053m)

The trek across Dartmoor opened the door on the challenge that lay in store for us

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Randonnées excursion up through Combe Raleigh to get the blood pumping once more. At Limers Cross, we came across Andy who had sensibly decided that enough was enough. I was saddened to lose a chum so early in the ride but, as things turned out, I am sure he had made the right decision. The sections to Watchet (via Hemyock) for breakfast and onto Cheddar for lunch were familiar territory, although taking in the views of Devon and Somerset on roads previously travelled on Ian and Shawn Shaw’s events in broad daylight was something of a novelty. For a start, there were plenty of cyclists around and all manner of sparkling velos to behold outside the café at the foot of the Cheddar Gorge. The three of us sat listening to one chap regale his exploits on LEJoG to a group of enchanted yet generously apportioned women who were training for a ‘300k charity event’. I can’t vouch for Paul and Toby but part of me wanted to say, “Hey, we’re doing LEJoG too,” however, previous experience of explaining an Audax interpretation of any ride prevented me from opening my mouth. As we left the Gorge, a blip in concentration meant we all missed the left turn (B3371) off to Compton Martin and ended up coming down off the Mendips at Chewton Mendip, adding around another 23km to the route. Paul was having problems with his neck and shoulders and Toby’s bottom bracket was sounding like it was in the final death throes. By the time we arrived in Yate, Toby had already decided to DNF, return to base, fix the bike, then convert the remainder of week off into a series of 200k DIYs to Inverness. Paul had decided to stop in Yate and ride straight to Warrington to join us again as long as his neck/shoulder improved. Stephen McBrien had parted company from the group when we stopped at Long Rock and was some way ahead of us. This left me on my own and to the uninitiated, the thought of completing the remaining 1600k may seem like a desperately lonely and ambitious task. But the thing is, whilst I am reasonably gregarious I’m also used to riding on my own, am happy with own company and happiest when going at my own pace. www.aukweb.net

Farewells aside, within no time, I was across the Severn and in a takeaway in Usk where they very kindly let me sit and eat my kebab out of the wrapper and out of the cold. They even folded and wrapped the pizza (day 3 emergency food supplies) in a paper bag rather than me trying to find a way to mount a square box on my Carradice. In the cold of that Sunday night, this may not have been the best kebab I had tasted but the kindness they showed by closing the door for a shivering cyclist to scoff their grub in the warm was really appreciated. Despite the delays incurred, I did my best to arrive at The Crown (Pantygellli) before last orders to enjoy a well-earned pint of Wye Valley ale and a chat with any of the locals I could actually understand. They told me that Steve McBrien was still on the ride and had called by the pub around 3 hours before, so I assumed he was going strong and already tucked up in bed. As the road snaked past the decidedly shut YHA at Castel y Ffin, it started to spit with rain and by the top of Gospel Pass, it was chucking it down and blowing a gale. The AA road map didn’t actually show the road I needed to take on the descent and I didn’t want to go wrong so late in the day. I knew I had to take a sharp left to get down to Tregoyd but trying to find where you are on a phone with a touch sensitive screen and an almost flat battery in the pouring rain, in the dark, is not as easy as it sounds. Neither is managing the mostly downhill (you would think) single track road that would pitch to 1:5 at points where flocks of sheep seemed to want to hang out in the pitch black. I was very glad to get to Tregoyd in one piece, however, the relief of arriving was washed away by the next challenge; where was I supposed to be sleeping? After an hour of plodding about in the rain, I gave up and settled for an empty stable, wrapped in some discarded horse blankets.

farm, bidding ‘good morning’ to aghast equestrians I met on the way to the road. Despite being on two feet, I wasn’t quite with it and struggled to work out which road to take to reach the appropriately named Paincastle. In the end, I found a signpost which sort of tied in with the direction I had to go and followed a single track road winding its way steeply up into the rain and gloom. I can’t remember if it was at this point or when I ended up dumped back on the road to Hay on Wye (rather than in Paincastle) that I remembered Andy saying that the AA road map didn’t show the lanes we were supposed to be following in Wales. Still, I had to pass through Paincastle to get to Hundred House and the treasures that lay beyond. In the shelter of a café in Llandindod Wells, I have to admit that those treasures seemed rather further away than I had hoped for. I roughly knew the road that pitched and rolled north from Llanidloes (via Staylittle) but my confidence in finding Llanidloes itself was somewhat undermined by the fact that I couldn’t see the interconnecting lanes on my AA road atlas. In the end, I took a longer route via the A road in and out of Newtown to pick up the minor road to Pandy at Llanbrynmair.

experienced in some of the most scenic and beautiful parts of the UK. After the climb came the long and fast descent to Bala, followed by the pretty nondescript run into Chester with an arrival at the Travelodge in Warrington by 10pm. The dreaded third day was completed, within a reasonable time frame with the Yorkshire Dales to follow. Hurrah!

Day 4 – Warrington to Longtown - 270k (3300m) It would seem that the morning of day 4 was not to be a point of celebration for all of our brave party. Paul had made his own way to Warrington but was in too much pain to continue. Steve Mc Brien texted me to say that he had encountered various problems in the posterior area that made continuing unwise. Toby had planned a set of ~200k distances for the rest of the week and would team up with Judith Swallow who was meeting us at Longtown. From the party of five that had set off, I was the only rider left on the ride.

As I turned off the A470, as if by magic, from Pandy onwards the weather changed and offered a clear approach to Bwlch Y Groes. This turned out to be the best part of the day with fantastic views as you climb out of the small villages below – something that I took the opportunity to enjoy at leisure by stopping frequently near the top and taking pictures:

It was a solitary but determined Hummers who set off (late again) to wrestle through the traffic to the first checkpoint, Orell. I have nothing against the area but, by golly, it was grim going through the non-stop procession of traffic light and road works in what felt like a very built up region. After Wigan, the route climbed out of the urban sprawl towards Belmont to intersect a ridge I had ridden along 10 years before. There had obviously been a recent event there and encouraging comments dedicated to the participants had been written on the road, such as ‘GO Janice’ and ‘We love

Every day had this sort of contrast: dark moments, where grim determination was the only back stop to pull you through countered with the elation felt from fantastic moments

you Dad’. This graffiti, combined with the climb up to the unexpectedly pretty St Peter’s church lifted my sagging spirits considerably and, despite the head wind, I found new legs for

Day 3 – Tregoyd – Warrington 254k (3394m) I woke with a start at about 06:50 and tried to remember where I was. Oh yes, that’s right, in a bloody stable in South Wales and it is still pissing down outside. I tidied up my ‘dormitory’ and walked purposefully across the

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Randonnées the stretch down to Blackburn with the prospect of food on my mind. Despite its grim appearance and selection of very grim residents, Blackburn revealed a very fine café with an owner whose huge baps must have been a talking point for miles around. I went for the creamy egg filling and felt satisfied in a way that, had it been suggested by anyone else, I may have struggled to believe they were not being smutty. Unfortunately the same could not be said of the café encountered in Skipton but then again, perhaps I had been spoilt earlier in the day. From Skipton, the route took me north once more and passed through villages, daubed with Tour of Britain signs, across the beautiful Yorkshire Dales to Hawes. There were a couple of cracking climbs on this section but my recollection will always be riding next to the carved limestone slabs in the river on the climb towards Dodd Fell and the pub on top of Tan Hill. All in all, it was a superb tour of the Dales and I count myself very lucky to have been up there on such a beautiful afternoon:

turning up there at midnight. It transpired that a random collection of cyclists (Judith Swallow, Toby and a chap called John) had congregated at the Graham Arms asking ‘where’s Hummers?’ but sadly, I was nowhere close to base at the scheduled arrival time of 21:00. In my absence, plans had already been drawn up for Day 5. Judith and Toby had teamed up and were going to make their own way to Crainlarach but would meet me again in the evening. John had planned to ride with me on the next leg to just north of Glasgow where he would peel off to catch the train back to where he was camping. As we set off towards Moffatt, what was immediately noticeable was that after 4 days and a lumpy 1000km, my legs were a bit tired. John was riding considerably faster than the pace I had settled into and trying to keep up with him was a challenge. I had been in this area a month previously on LEL and the route to Moffatt shadowed the A74 using a minor road that seemed to take an awful amount of traffic – in particular, @**!ing big lorries. This time, my plan was to use the

make any ride memorable. I remember being presented with a tray of cake and tea by the landlady who told us “Right then, I’ll be off now to walk the dogs. Just pull the door to behind you when you go lads” leaving the four of us looking at each other, in the pub, on our own. Apparently, she is still there and nothing has changed. A steady but gentle climb out of Moffatt took us up past the Devil’s Beef Tub:

and on past the Crook Inn. We whizzed past this pub on LEL. This time we stopped to put on some warmer clothing and had a chance to read the bill postings. It looks like the property has been saved from being flattened or converted but is in state of suspension. Our control stop was in Biggar but we chose the café in Broughton (Laurel Bank Tea Room) which proved a much better solution. Besides, it had started tipping it down. Filled with more tea and cake, we sat out the downpour then set off for the leg over to Cumbernauld.

The views and scenery lifted my spirits far beyond the first half of the day and carried me through Brough, Penrith and Carlisle to the Graham Arms at Longtown, arriving there just before midnight. Luckily for me, there were a couple of chaps (who spoke no English) with travel suitcases trying to get in and the landlord had come out to see what the racket was just as I rolled up.

Day 5 – Longtown to Crainlarach - 264k (2967m) The original plan was for us all to be at Longtown by the early evening of day 4 rather than me 24

lanes further east and both of us were glad to be taking this route. At first, I wondered why these lanes were not chosen for LEL, however, as they started to pitch and yaw over some pretty poor road surfaces, it became clear why it may not have been a popular choice. Moffatt itself is pretty rammed with tea shops and we were quite spoilt for choice. John picked out one at the far end of the square and it transpired that the owner was the sister of the landlady of the Crask Inn (on the road to Tongue) that I had stopped at 10 years previously. The Crask Inn was an extraordinary find and one of those unexpected moments that

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This was a strange section where the countryside threw up some odd landscapes that didn’t seem to make any sense. Fields contained what appeared to be grassed over spoil heaps but too small to fit a picture of an industrialised past. Further on, there were lifeless fields of black stuff in an otherwise rural setting. All curious but not out of place when compared to Cumbernauld town centre. I have Googled this bizarre place, recently voted the ‘Worst Building in Britain’, which takes some doing. The road layout was a challenge at tea time and we didn’t hang around, although the climb up to Carron Bridge was a challenge of a different nature, even after a pint of beer.

I bade John farewell at Flintry and set off northwards, out of the hills and onto the rolling roads to Crainlarach. There was no headwind, it was a fine evening but I was knackered and the road surface was pretty hard going. For what on paper was the ’easiest’ day, the SYHA was a welcome sight and three beers were needed to address the balance.

Day 6 – Crainlarach – Applecross - 249k (3268m) Judith and Toby were already at the Crainlarich hostel when I arrived and had offered to join me for the next leg to Applecross. I even think we managed to leave at 6am, which meant that, with the exception of the odd articulated lorry, we had the A82 pretty much to ourselves all the way to across to Glen Coe with glorious views across the Scottish moorlands. Approaching Fort William, things got busier and apart from the frequent backup of over-revving traffic behind us, there were also a series of cycling groups that seemed to stream past us, no doubt on their way to John o’ Groats by a more direct route. In a moment of bizarre coincidence TOMSK from YACF bumped into us leading a largish group on their first End2End. Fort William presented a treasure-trove for somewhere to stop and, of course, our choice was none other than… sat outside Morrisons. As our route snaked westwards towards the Kyle of Localsh, the weather became colder and wetter, in fact miserable. This was no surprise as trips to Skye I had made in the ‘90s had been very patchy on the weather front and www.aukweb.net


Randonnées days of sustained downpours were not an extraordinary occurrence. To lift our spirits, a cup of tea, with perhaps a warming bowl of soup, was deemed necessary and relief came in the form of a stop advertising itself as a filling station/camp site reception/ convenience store/café just by the side of the road. From the outside, perfect, and Judith was already weighing up options for tea, cake and WIFI as we stepped through the entrance. Once through the door, reality uncloaked itself. There was no tea room, very little in the way of food and, I suspect, luxuries such as filling your tank with the chance of a riverside pitch under canvas resided firmly in the ambitions of yesteryear. Judith and Toby bought provisions on the basis that this may be the last retail outlet we would encounter before Applecross – which turned out to be a good call. I still needed something warm to eat and it was kind of the shop owner to suggest the hotel about 2 miles up the road that actually had the warmth, comfort and food we were hoping for in preparation for the assault on Bealach na Ba – the highlight of Day 6. I would like to believe that time travel does exist but unfortunately, this expedition only seemed to offer time travel in one direction i.e. backwards so rather than arrive at the foot of Bealach na Ba in the late afternoon sunshine, we arrived at the warning sign around 9pm, in the dark, with it spitting with rain. The introductory part of the road up to the Bealach is reasonably shallow in gradient although as the elevation increased, so did the cross wind coming from the right hand side, each gust trying to force us off the road into oblivion. In the darkness our lights picked out the reflective passing point signs that for a while, reassured us of the way ahead. As the road climbed towards the zig-zags near the summit, Judith announced that she could climb no more and was going to get off and walk. Toby and I continued, inching our way up to the pass but when I looked behind me I was startled as to how far Judith had dropped back behind us. Partly through a sense of gallantry but mostly because I was knackered, I waited for Judith and walked www.aukweb.net

with her up to where Toby had sheltered out of the wind. We were already 45 minutes later than the planned arrival time at the Hostel and I suspected that a descent back down to sea level from the Col would be no less challenging. I asked Toby to go on at his own speed to secure our beds and relieve the warden waiting for us to turn up. At Applecross itself, Judith and I had some debate as to where the hostel was but all were safely gathered in and scoffing grub by 23:00. Toby told the tale of his descent through the blackness, guided by his GPS rather than trying to follow the road, as it was less likely to result in him finishing prematurely down some gully.

Day 7 – Applecross – Lochinver - 245k (3482m) When planning the route, there had been a fair amount of debate as to which way to go and what could we use as proof of passage. Option 1 was to cross back over the bealach to the A896 and go north, whilst the other option was to go north from Applecross around the flattish coast to pick up the A896. In the end, I opted for the coastal route, with a picture of the sign post for Callakille as proof. The fine views of Skye and the Cuillin ridge from this road more than compensate for the lack of facilities. Once on the A896, you climb onto a plateau with mountains on either side of you. It is quite a spectacular section where you seem to be surrounded by massive sentinels on either side as you descend to Kinlochewe. I needed to control here and found the unexpectedly marvellous Whistle Stop Café, complete with an owner who seemed to model herself on Kathy Bates’ character in the film. As I munched through a massive fried breakfast, I became aware that someone was stood in front

of me. Looking up I saw a cyclist, older than me, who asked if he could join me for breakfast. This amiable tourist was none other than veteran cyclist, and legend, Rod Goodfellow. Rod knew some of the people I did and many others I had only heard of through stories, no, legends, of the AUK world. Ullapool was the last port of call for the day and was a tourist hotspot with quite a cross-section of shops and even a delicatessen where I managed to find a business card to say I had been there. For the first time in the ride, I was only around 2½ hours from the end of the leg and it was remotely possible that I would arrive at dusk. Out of interest, I texted Judith and Toby and, to my surprise, they were ½ mile down the road from me, sat outside Ullapool’s Tesco. I rode over to meet them and bought some provisions for a joint tea; three tins of beans, two tins of Macaroni cheese and two sticks of bread There were two ways to get from Ullapool to Lochinver; one was the route I had planned, 48k through the hills over a single track road (allegedly beautiful). The other was the route Toby and Judith were going to take: 60k of main road (‘main road’ being a relative term in the Highlands). In the end, I opted for the company. As it happened, the ride along Loch Assynt in the fading light was spectacular and despite the added 12km, we arrived in Lochinver at 21:30.

Day 8 – Lochinver – John O Groats - 244k (3677m) - 2046km total When I studied the AA road map a week before the ride, I noticed that unlike standard OS 1:50000 maps, the familiar chevrons one finds scattered along lumpy byways were all but absent from the roads I had chosen and were completely missing from minor (white) roads - except for the bit

from Lochinver to Kylestrome via Drumbeg. By a series of symbols the AA classified this as a road of ‘outstanding natural beauty’. It was indeed a beautiful road and the stretch to Drumbeg was simply enchanting, however, beyond Drumbeg, the route took on more of the character of a theme park rollercoaster. Although this was thoroughly enjoyable, when it eventually spat me back out onto the A894, I was pretty wrecked with still quite a distance to cover. Still, it wasn’t raining, the most challenging section of the day’s climbing was over and all I had to do now was to tour the rolling road between Tongue and Thirsk, where I knew it would get lumpy again. I also knew that from east of Thurso, it would be pretty much 30 miles of dead flat to John O Groats. This positive picture (and the scenery) kept me on the right side of sullen despair all the way to Durness where I stopped to shiver over a sandwich. Actually, I spoilt myself in Durness and stopped again in the hotel down the road for some hot soup and a pot of tea to help ward off the Black Dog that didn’t seem to want to leave my side. The final section had lost none of its charm and the countryside is very different to the other parts of the northern coastline. It is almost as if Dartmoor has been shifted 800 miles north as the road meanders from Bettyhill to Reay with spectacular views to your left and right coupled with some glorious descents to hold your attention. Then, just west of Thruso, the hills abruptly ended and it became almost pan-flat for the last 30 miles. From Reay, I decided to follow Cycle Network route 1 which turned out to be a worthwhile decision. This minor road is never that far away from the A836 but was a far more pleasant and picturesque route through the farmlands to John O Groats. As darkness started to fall, I could see the coastal lighthouses winking in the waters of the Pentland Firth which spurred me on and by 20:30 I found myself staring in disbelief at the completely renovated John O’ Groats experience. Gone was the ‘Is that all there is?” experience, supplanted by a, ‘Wow, look at that’. Unexpurgated version at: https://yacf. co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=76263.0

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Obituaries AUK Founder Member - Les Lowe

Les riding the 1990 Mersey Roads 24 Hour - photo Francis Cooke

The distances ranged from 100km to a Circuit of the Midlands. There are stories of these rides which should inspire many. A member of the CTC, The Twenty Four Hour Fellowship, The Road Records Association, The 300 000 mile club, the VTTA, The Tricycle Association and the Speedwell Bicycle Club and well as many other cycling related groups. Cycling really was his passion in life. He rode everywhere and was often seen riding along in distant parts of the country at any time of the year. He was infectious in persuading others to take up riding and then to widen their horizons Quietly spoken and with strong views upon cycling he did not suffer fools. There are many people who today ride because of his encouragement. I first met Les, shortly after he moved to Burton, in a cafe in Ashbourne, and we rode back homeward together. He soon became a regular visitor at Hadley End, dropping in to “hoover” up the table. He was already a randonneur and I soon became one too. The first 600km I rode, Windor-Chester-Windsor, was in his company. Afterwards we rode many together and he was good in nursing me along. Nursing others along was what he often did and if anyone was struggling they were recommended to ride with Les as he would get around the event.

Les was born near Ramsey on the Isle of Man on 22 Feb 1931. He started riding whilst still at school on the island and soon became well known. He moved to England for further education at Salford College where he gained an engineering degree. After service in the RAF, flying on Shackletons around the world, he began to work at Rolls-Royce Aero-engines in Derby, where he spent the rest of his working life. As a cyclist he was a tremendous mile eater. I believe that he rode 35, 24 hour races as well as very many 12 hour events. He was in the group who rode the 1975 Paris-Brest-Paris, who afterwards formed Audak United Kingdom, to give us what we have today. He was also a prolific record breaker, both nationally and regionally. He still holds records on two and three wheels on solo and tandem machines.

Together we rode in many countries including two glorious Swiss 12 hour races on our tricycles. Pottering along quiet lanes and impromptu diversions to get a big hill in or ride along a “must do” road he had stored up in his mind. Competing against each other in time trials. Long dark nights on randonnées. Tandem riding together. Casting around for digs, as he had to use up all the available daylight hours. The memories are endless. In later years he suffered poor health and spent some time in hospital. He had been in hospital and had then been moved to a care home for assessment when he was taken ill and moved back to hospital where he died on 11 Dec 2013. He will be remembered as a hard riding cyclist, but as a friend to all. It can truly be said that everybody liked Les.

Jim Hopper



Bob McHardy Bob passed away in Royal Sussex County Hospital on 10th December as a result of injuries sustained in an unexplained accident while riding home after riding and helping on Dave Hudson’s Rye Randonnée. No other person or vehicle seems to have been involved in the crash. Although a long time active member of both the Rough Stuff Fellowship and the CTC, Bob had also made his mark in Audax UK having achieved SR status in 2000 and a further six times, lastly in 2008. He also completed PBP in 2003, Boston-MontrealBoston in 2004 and LEL in 2005. In recent years he restricted his Audax rides to BP’s but was a familiar and welcome face on many El Supremo events of all distances. Under his shy and reserved demeanour was a sharp and well-organised brain; he did not say much, but when he did, it was worth listening. His paid profession was as an agricultural welder which dovetailed into his cycling with his home designed and built

triangulated small wheel cycles used on all the rides detailed above and seen in this photograph. The same engineering expertise was employed in keeping his 40 year-old Lotus Elite car working, which was an advanced and inspirational design for its time. His dress sense on the bike was also individual; not for him shorts or lycra, but rather collared shirts and ordinary trousers, though he did go as far as wearing a helmet. He was on the verge of selling his beloved car and was planning to use some of the proceeds to travel in 2014 to Sicily returning by cycle at an unhurried pace over the course of the next few months. He had previously toured USA in 2013 having ridden round Mongolia and Eastern Europe in previous years. He is survived by a younger brother, nephews and nieces and the cycling world has lost a popular and much respected colleague.  

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Richard Phipps www.aukweb.net


Mileater 2011 Mileater Diaries and Mick Latimer Trophy Yet another year has ‘rolled’ by but at least 2013 had a good summer. Now I’ve managed my second year of RRTY I notice the seasons but the months and years are beginning to merge; actually it’s probably growing old and forgetful that is having a bigger effect than riding each month. Although I only stop riding when there’s standing snow or thick ice, I’m more convinced than ever that the RRTY is a great idea – a good compliment to the Mileater! For the second year running Peter Baker was the entrant with the highest recorded mileage of 22,508 miles and so wins the Mick Latimer trophy for 2012 followed by Judith Swallow with 13,157 miles (the opposite sex winner). Three more riders recorded over 10,000 miles in 2012. The average number of miles recorded was 6,428 miles, a slight decrease on 2011. Here is a selection of the diarists’ comments from 2012: [author’s gratuitous comments – RH] “Not a great start to the year, gale force winds and I have had a heavy cold. I have been riding AAA events mostly 100km and would like to get 50AAA points this year.” 1/1/12 LR “Wild, wet and very windy all week lots of floods, fallen trees and debris made for an exciting week’s riding.” 6/1/12 SC “Saddle rail snapped half way to work, so much for unbreakable titanium! Didn’t get to work until 10.45” 29/1/12 SC “I suffered quite a lot. Oh where have my legs gone?” 16/2/12 RT “Now ill and car going to cost £675 to repair – bikes are so much cheaper.” 20/2/12 SC [Depends on the car and the bike but I love spending money on bikes and hate spending money on cars!] “North West Passage Audax. Rain, headwinds, busy roads, hail, poor route sheet, broken spoke, knackered rear bearing, broken front light. I survived, see you next year!” 18/2/12 RB “Starting to feel like I’ve got cyclist’s legs at last on hills but then having done more miles by the end of Feb than in all of last year there had to be some improvement! Starting to enjoy riding for itself rather than just training.” 27/2/12 MH “Up the Uts 200. Taking it easy – still coughing – but mojo returned towards the end!” 10/3/12 TD “… late finish so caught the train back to Epsom. Could have cycled in the same time!” 15/3/12 CL “Oh dear came off trying to get on the pavement, cut head, damaged shoulder, b%&$£*” 23/3/12 MC [Yes but was the bike OK?] “200k on Saturday to Princeton into stormy south wind. Last 10k into Princeton took almost 1 hour. I learned Kansas is Sioux for ‘South wind people’.” March ’12 SK “I have entered the National 400 on 16/17 June it will be my 23rd Nat. 400!” 2/4/12 RT

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“Bath Road evening TT - got lost! A horse took a liking to my bike, chewing the brake hood and lifting it off the ground whilst I was over the road signing on.” 18//4/12 SR “Thought I would get out at last and dodge the shower! I didn’t and got wet but my poor legs needed the recovery ride.” 20/4/12 RC “Windy and showery – got wet again. Cleaned bike in the afternoon – discovered that it’s predominately red in colour! Got soaked every day except Friday. Saw a swallow on Monday morning looking like he thought he’d made a mistake.” 27/4/12 SC “Red Rose ride on Kinesis, what a day only lunatics out, rain all day, winds that strong you had to lean on them, 2 riders blown off the road, standing water, 38 entries, 15 starters 4 packed at first control, 11 finishers!” 29/4/12 JR [Hope John is now recovered from injury] “Home from Mallorca and back into winter. Full waterproof and winter bike. Just managed to get out of Tewkes without the need of a boat! Rain all day and flooded roads, in a strange way rather enjoyed myself.” 1/5/12 LR “Cycling is dangerous. Nearly got run over by a Buzzard – crossed the road just in front of me and settled in a tree on the other side of the road – nearly ran over a hedgehog and heard a male Tawny Owl.” 11/5/12 EW “OMG 40C at 8.00 am and pouring rain. Only had mitts with me and hands froze.” 15/5/12 CL “… bit of road rage on a main roundabout. Some numpty didn’t understand the priority system – decided to chase me in his car but green lane is closed to traffic, bollard – ha ha!” 27/5/12 MC [Is it me but are the number of numpties increasing??] “Yatmon, fallen trees and roads like rivers. Is this really summer? But it all added to another AAA adventure.” 7/6/12 LR “Paris – Roubaix, handlebars snapped in two at 100k still finished in good time, repaired with a stick” 10/6/12 SR “Wet am again what happened to the drought?” 12/6/12 CL

‘jumping jacks’ until I could move my hands.” August ’12 SK “Finishing AAA year with 184.25 AAAs! With a meal and far too much wine at a local pub in Tewkesbury” 29/09/12 LR [- well done Louise!!] “Rain at last, lower temperatures, thank the Lord!” Sept 12 NS [I think I’m moving to SW France!] “Corker perm. 200.25 AAAs in 12 months” 25/10/12 LR [You know what I think!] “Roads beyond Auldhouse, one road – not to be used again – had a section of mud and potholes that required walking.” 2/11/12 CH “Dave’s Peteworth [?] 100, 3 loops getting wetter as the day went on. Great food at the control which we visited three times.” 25/11/12 CL As well as accumulating the most ‘Mileater’ miles in 2012 Peter Baker also rode every day of 2012 – chapeau [RH] Many thanks to all of the diary writers who have written such entertaining diaries, without whom this article would be impossible. It’s always a pleasure to read the anecdotes and recollections in the diaries I’m sent. Please accept my apologies for any misquotations or embarrassments, I have tried to maintain accurate copies of quotations but errors may have crept in, all of which are entirely my responsibility! Of course, if there’s anything in a diary that a contributor wishes to keep ‘private’ I will respect that desire and not publish in an article. Thanks especially to those I have quoted: CH Colin Horn, CL - Carl Laver, EW - Ed Woodward, JR - John Radford, LR – Louise Rigby, MC Michael Cant, MH – Mike Hunting, NS – Noel Simpson, RB - Rob Baird, RC - Robbie Calder, RT – Richard Thomas, SC - Steve Cockram, SK – Spencer Klassen, SR – Steve Roffe and TD – Tom Deakins All 2012 entrants should now have their medals, please contact me if you have not received yours. Entering the Mileater:

“100k populaire. Getting warm in the Midwest. Up to the 90’s on my 30+ ride home from the ride.” June ’12 SK

The entry fee changes have encouraged more Mileater entrants and I look forward to reading the diaries in the New Year.

“V. light traffic on Friday but still managed to see three on the ‘phone, two racing, and one texting! Plod nowhere to be seen.” 10/7/12 SC

The standard entry to the Mileater competition costs £4 per year and includes the normal diary. The engraved medal costs a further £10; a black and white impression of the multicoloured medal can be found in the handbook. Entrants can choose to purchase a medal at the time of entry or at a later date if they wish.

“Cannondale urban/jump bike completed. Rebuild/respray/ new parts all just under £100 with spare boxes [?] coming in useful. Shan’t record local usage in diary – doesn’t really count as serious cycling.” 25/7/11 MH [I record everything apart from the Sunday morning paper shop circuit! Anyway I hope the Mileater isn’t too serious!] “Toiling up these hills in SW France, I cannot accept that law of Physics which states that gravity is the weakest force on the planet or am I the weakest?” July ’12 NS “Rocky Mountain 1200 in British Columbia/ Alberta Canada. Bad weather during first 500k (cold & rain) caused an unfortunate 45% DNF rate. Near hypothermia twice but either walked until I could feel my feet or did

The Mileater competition and diary run from January 1st to December 31st each year, diaries must be returned by April 30th of the following year to count in the competition for the Mick Latimer trophy (although a medal will be produced whenever the diary is returned). If you would like to enter then send a cheque for £4 (or £14 if you wish to also receive the engraved medal) payable to Audax UK and an SAE (Large letter, over 100g postage please) to the organiser: Rob Hidderley, Woodfield House, 417a Stourbridge Road, Catshill, Rob Hidderley Bromsgrove, B61 9LG.  Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Randonnées A Blast from the Past - Hard-riding through two nights by David Pountney

(The First) Windsor-Chester-Windsor 600km BRM (1976) Most cyclists enjoy a challenge whether it be striving for a personal best in a time trial, a new roughstuff crossing or even riding up the local killer hill. In my case I wanted an endurance test longer than my local CTC 240 miles in 24 hours. A March CYCLING gave me a lead in a short news item entitled RANDONNEUR RIDE IN MAY. A 600 kilometre in 40 hours brevet ride, Windsor/Chester/ Windsor, was being organised by John Nicholas of Audax United Kingdom and was to be run during the last weekend in May. Audax United Kingdom is a newly formed club comprised of cyclists who enjoy the challenge of riding long and hard, with elementary route finding while using the minimum of outside help. AUK’s opposite number on the continent, Euraudax, enjoys great support and in Belgium alone over 40 clubs have become affiliated. I wrote for details and found that the WCW was to be the first event of its kind to be run in Britain and qualifies successful riders for similar continental events, notably the PARIS/ BREST/PARIS. It was to be run on the same lines as the PBP with set control points at which riders brevet cards were signed and arrival and departure times noted. Unlike the PBP riders could start at any of the 5 controls, thus saving unnecessary travelling. My companions for part of the ride were CTC members Cliff Bull from the newly formed South Worcestershire Section and Harry Kimberley the president of the West Bromwich Section. Cliff and I had scheduled to do the ride in 35 hours from the Worcester control and Harry 40 hours from the Wellington control point. The sound of heavy rain woke me around 6.00am on the Saturday and I wondered why on earth I had entered such an event! Still, I was cosy in bed, poor Harry would be splashing his way towards Worcester in order to meet Cliff and me at 9.00am. It was still raining at 8.00am and I was glad I had allowed my arm to be twisted and had accepted a lift to the start. The Worcester control was in the village of Martin Hussingtree and the controller was Bob Short of the Worcester St Johns. Cliff was there when I arrived and as we unloaded my machine the rain began to ease. Harry arrived a few minutes later looking remarkably fresh despite his 40-mile cape-clad ride. At 9am, with brevet cards signed, we set off, Cliff and I with 374 miles to do and Harry with a mere 334. The rain had now stopped and our spirits began to rise. As we crossed the M5 we saw that the southbound lanes were jammed solid as far as the eye could see, We learnt later that there had been a series of accidents and the traffic was stationery for 30 miles. Down through the Vale of Evesham we sped and in the first hour ticked off 17 miles. In 28

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Evesham we encountered our only traffic jam but with our manoeuvrable machines we were soon through and heading towards the dark ridge of the Cotswolds. Broadway was jammed with pedestrians most of whom sported 2 cameras and spoke with distinct American accents. From 17s we dropped to 7s as we honked our way up Fish Hill. Nearing the summit it became quite misty, whether from our efforts I don’t know but once over the top it cleared! That was enough climbing for us but not for one of the earlier riders, Les Lowe, who had diverted to the 1000 foot mark and added another 300 metres to his 0CD climbing total. Our major climb over we set about raising our average speed by doing bit an’ bit through Bourton on the Hill, Moreton in the Marsh to Chipping Norton and the 40 mile mark. Twenty minutes were taken to sample the delights of the town - from the inside of a tea room - and we were on our way again. We left the A44 for the A34 and found that there was very little traffic going in our direction and despite it being the Spring Bank Holiday weekend this was the case for the whole of the ride. Not long after leaving Chipping Norton we encountered a number of cyclists heading in the opposite direction and wondered whether they were also WCW riders. There was no way of telling at that stage of the ride but at the same time the next day there would be no difficulty! The next control at Yarnton was unmanned. We had been told that owing to difficulty in getting controllers some of the control points would not be manned all the time. So we signed each others cards and continued to a hostelry at Eynsham for lunch. Our lunch break was brightened by one of the local ‘bar proppers’ who, when he heard of our ride, went to great lengths to tell us that heavy thunderstorms were spreading rapidly from the south and would last the rest of the weekend! Undaunted but with furtive glances at the gloomy sky we set off again. At Swinford Toll Bridge the toll-keeper was too busy collecting from a queue of two cars to impede our progress. A traffic-free B-road took us through Cumnor, Wooton to Abingdon. Once back on the main road the pace rose to a steady 15’s as we approached the Chilterns. Suddenly Harry disappeared off the back, we eased and he caught us up. But he didn’t look too good, his face was bathed in sweat and he said his legs felt as though someone had tied lead weights to them. We climbed at Harry’s pace and gradually he regained his strength. The only explanation for his sudden demist was that his lunch of boiled eggs and 2 bottles of stout hadn’t agreed with him. By Nettlebed Harry had recovered. As we descended to Henley the bearded figure of Les Lowe climbed towards us. He had started

from Martin Hussingtree at 6.00am and had covered 126 miles while we had done just over 90. The Thames at Henley was almost as congested as the roads in Evesham and to our surprise a hill with a gradient similar to Fish Hill appeared as we left the town. It was Remenham Hill, a sharp half mile climb out of the Thames Valley. Another sharp climb on the A308 had us thinking that perhaps the south wasn’t so flat after all. Our first 100 miles (in 7.5 hours) was registered as we approached Maidenhead. The A308 carried us along towards Windsor and as we neared the town the sun broke through spot lighting the castle against a stormy sky. Against their better judgement the others had left me in charge of the map (Well it was my map) and I am afraid that my elementary route-finding skill in towns leaves much to be desired. So, instead of ending up in Slough we got as far as Datchet before realising we were heading in the wrong direction! More by luck than judgement we found the turn control at Slough. Our cards were signed and we headed north. It was surprising the new lease of life turning for home gave us, although Cliff and I still had 260 miles left and Harry 220. We made very good time to the hostelry at the top of Remenham Hill where we settled down in the garden with drinks and sandwiches for half an hours break. As we left Henley so our paths crossed with another WCW rider. This time it was Harry Aspen, looking bronzed and fit thanks no doubt to a full time cycling career since his retirement. Fit he must be having covered 170 lone miles at and average speed of just over 13s - and that includes stops. The descent from the Chiltens had Harry freewheeling away from us and after 5 miles I decided to take drastic action and go to the front myself. This slowed the pace down to a respectable 15 ‘s. From Abingdon we skirted Oxford, recrossed the Swinford Toll bridge and reached the deserted Yarnton control point at a little after 9.00pm. We signed each others cards and congratulated Harry on the completion of his second century. His reply was ‘Thanks, only 1.75 to go! ‘ At the A34 we left the route and headed for the Fortes 24 hour cafe at the north end of the Oxford bypass. Our meals were double helpings of everything and by the time we had finished the table had disappeared under 15 empty tea cups. Before we left I measured out 3 teaspoons of Accolade, put them in my empty water bottle and asked the tea boy to fill it with water. He obliged swilled the water round and tipped the whole lot down the sink! With dynamos whirring we rejoined the route and headed into the Cotswolds The south www.aukweb.net


Randonnées first published in Cycling magazine eastern approach to the Cotswolds is not nearly as dramatic as the west - just a series of undulations - and we ambled comfortably along at 13s. Midnight saw us passing through Chipping Norton where a hot dog van was doing a roaring trade. On the approach to Moreton in the Marsh I blew a front bulb and while the others carried slowly on I replaced it, aided by the light of a street lamp.

End to End riders. Thoughts of their battles occupied my mind as I skirted Bridgnorth and climbed towards Telford. Ignoring the Whitchurch signs I followed the old road through Dawley thus avoiding a lengthy diversion via Oakengates.

I caught Harry at Bourton on the Hill and together we slowly climbed through the sleeping village. Silhouetted against the stars at the top of the hill was Cliff, leaning on his bike and puffing away at his pipe, like a scene from a Patterson sketch .

As I dropped towards Wellington a lone cyclist climbed towards me. There was no mistaking that he was a WCW rider, going through a bad patch too. His eyes were heavy and his gear was much lower than the hill would normally call for - my turn was yet to come! In fact some 2 miles later I began to feel drowsy. Fortunately though, my arrival at the Wellington control snapped me out of it.

The road continued to climb to the top of Fish Hill, which at 940 feet was the highest point on the route. Down we plunged, eyes streaming as we strained to see beyond the limits of our lights. Suddenly the whole three lane road lit up, Harry had blown a rear bulb and all the power had gone to the front. His super light got us round 2 corners before that too expired and for the remainder of the descent he ‘glued’ himself to my back wheel.

The control was near the D12 turn - the scene of a trike 100. And one of the Mid Shropshire Wheelers was having a busy time signing WCW brevet cards and handing up drinks to the trikies. Now I had company. Trikie number 11 turned, passed me and I tucked in at a discreet 10 yards for the next 8 miles. My only complaint was that he got all the drinks and sponges. All I received were comments to the effect that I hadn’t got enough wheels.

The air in Broadway was fresh and free from cigar smoke and Evesham completely deserted. For a few miles our road followed the river Avon and we sampled the true delights of night riding. The air was heavy with fragrant scents from gardens and orchards, the river glinted below us and the only sound was that of a tawny owl searching for his breakfast.

From Hodnet I was on my own but continued to make good time spurred on by the increasing frequency of rain flurries, that turned to heavy rain just as I reached the shelter of a cafe at Frees Heath. Who should be leaving as I arrived but Cliff, he had taken a shorter breakfast break and was 30 minutes ahead of me.

We were now on familiar ground and it wasn’t long before we went our separate ways to early breakfasts. Cliff turned for Crowle just beyond the K8 turn while Harry and I stayed together to the Martin Hussingtree control. At 2.30am neither of us felt at our best and the palsied signatures on our cards confirmed not only the time but also our 260 and 220 miles. Harry settled down on the pavement with a pile of sandwiches which he hoped would be fuel enough for the 30 miles to breakfast. I only had 13 miles to go so took my leave and that was the last I saw of him for 12 hours. A deserted A38 took me to Droitwich the scene of much re-development with its resultant one way systems and pot holed roads. More by luck than judgement I emerged on the Ombersley road with wheels intact and heading in the right direction. As I joined the K8 at Ombersley so the first streaks of dawn crossed the sky. A thrush heralded the dawn chorus and by the time I reached Kidderminster it seemed that all the birds in the neighbourhood were singing at the tops of their voices to keep me awake. A diversion of half a mile in Kidderminster had me at my sisters door by 4.00am with 234 miles behind me. Within 30 minutes my bleary eyed sister had cooked my breakfast and I was well into my second pot of tea. An hour later after a wash, more tea and liberal applications of Deep Heat I set off on the remaining 140 miles. I rejoined the route and for the next 46 miles pedalled along in the wheel tracks of many www.aukweb.net

As I quaffed my second (or was it third?) cup of tea I took stock. I had now completed 280 miles in just under 24 hours and had averaged 15’s from breakfast. So I had eleven hours in which to cover the remaining 94 miles. ‘Shouldn’t be too difficult’ I foolishly thought. As I left the cafe Les Lowe swept by looking fresh despite the rainy conditions. I caped up and continued northwards. The combination of rain and another drowsy period saw me plodding along the A4l for 3 miles before I realised I should be on the A49. Back on route the sky began to lighten over the Clwydian Hills and the rain gradually eased. Beyond Tarporley I passed Cliff now on the homeward journey. “Looks as though he is struggling”, I thought. I hadn’t realised that the wind was getting up from the south,but I soon did! I reached the turn (Duddon village, 297 miles) at l0.30am and the landlord of the Headless Woman Inn signed my card. For 10 minutes I sat in the pub garden and ate my remaining, rather mushy, jam and banana sandwiches. Then with the thought “only 77 miles to go” I carefully lowered myself into the saddle and headed south. As I neared Prees Heath I began to fade so stopped for a meal and of course umpteen cups of tea. Now my thoughts were “still another 60 miles to do”. The break did me good because in the next hour I covered just over 13 miles and that included a brief chat to Harry. I saw him just before Hodnet and he related how, after I had left him, he had plodded on to Kidderminster, stopped on the

Windsor – Chester – Windsor

2014 Appeal for Volunteers 9th – 10th August 2014 Required at Windsor, Belbroughton, Chester, Upton Magna You don’t have to be a cyclist to be part of this great and historical event. Please see ‘Calendar’ for contact details

ring road to eat a sandwich and fallen asleep, was woken by the cold and arrived home shattered. But after 4 hours sleep and a meal he now felt ‘on top of the world. Riding back along the D12 I must have gone into a trance because all I can remember is suddenly thinking “I have passed the control point”. I made a mental note of the time and plodded on. A mile later through bleary eyes I spotted 2 familiar figures. One was the morning controller and the other Ray Page, his relief. Their cheerful banter snapped me out of my ‘droops’ and five minutes later I set off on the final 40 mile stretch. From Wellington I climbed Dawley Bank and was burned off by 2 lads on Choppers - I didn’t mind , at least I was still moving! The descent through Dawley resembled a battle field complete with trenches and shell holes so there was no chance of falling asleep. At Sutton Bank my path crossed that of Harry Aspen who was still going well and looking a lot fitter than I felt! I reached my lowest ebb between Bridgnorth and Kidderminster. Its not the easiest of roads at the best of times, and this certainly wasn’t one of my best times. For 14 miles it dips and climbs over a series of strength sapping hills. My speed dropped below l0mph, I drank Accolade, ate a Mars bar and finally at Shatterford polished off a large piece of Kendal Mint cake. Gradually a little strength returned to my legs although I was still crawling as I passed through Kidderminster, luckily none of my club mates were about to witness my sufferings It wasn’t until I reached the dual carriageway at Hartlebury that I realised the wind was dying and the clouds breaking up. As the weather improved so did my spirits. With 8 miles to go my speed was back up to 15’s. The pencil like spire of Ombersley Church hove into view telling me I only had 4 more miles to do. Droitwich seemed a friendlier place in the daylight and I hardly noticed the road works. Even the traffic laden A38 was a welcome sight. But the most welcome sight of all was the beaming face of Bob Short as he signed my card - The Windsor/Chester/Windsor Brevet was mine in 33 hours 25 minutes. Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Randonnées The On-one on the Humber Bridge. Photo: the author

Fixed SR

with Martin Tillin Upper Thames 200

I started audaxing 12 years ago (Nik Windle’s fault), on fixed, because it was the only bike I owned, and rode up to 300km events in the next couple of years. But hills were a problem – not going up, but down, with just a front brake. Since then most of my audaxing (a few SR series) has been on gears. When the frame on my old fixed broke last year (I commute all year round on fixed, using a 72”-86” gear range) it was replaced with a cheap On-one frame. With 2 brakes I wondered what a fixed SR series would be like...

So plans were laid, starting with the Upper Thames 200 (Cholsey, Sonning Common, Waterperry gardens, Ashendon, Chipping Norton, Standford-in-the-Vale, Cholsey). I have ridden this many times, but geared down a notch to 68” due to the time of year and rode to the start on a cold morning. As expected, I had to walk Wellplace Hill (unlike Steve Abraham who cycled up on his 92” gear!), but everything else was ride-able. The new route to Chippy from Bicester was an improvement on the old B road, but the headwind on the gradual uphill to the Cotswolds was the same as usual! Once at Chippy the ride is relatively easy, mostly downhill after Wychwood Forest, eventually to the finish and then home with a few fireworks to brighten things up.

Dean 300 Next up was my annual outing on the Dean 300 (Oxford, Cotswolds via Stow, Newent, Forest of Dean, Chepstow, Malmesbury, Membury services, Oxford), just about my favourite Audax, with an opportunity to visit 2 of the best cafes in the South; the Good News café in Newent and Amanda’s in Malmesbury. This year the weather was appalling with temperatures mostly sub-zero. Only 2 riders finished from a start of 3 (and several hours later than normal), but I didn’t even bother getting out of bed! Instead I rode it as a perm. at the beginning of May, but spring was barely more advanced than the usual weather at the end of March. The Dean is moderately hilly so I went with a

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Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

65” gear. The ride to Stow and Newent was testing, but all ride-able, and the hills prevented me noticing the stiff headwind until the return leg. The stage through the Forest of Dean is lovely and, whilst hilly, there is nothing very steep. Although I could ride it all apart from the short section after Breem, progress was much slower than the first 2 stages and my knees were creaking a bit by Chepstow. It was during this stage that I perfected descending with my feet out of the pedals and resting on water bottles, which did make going down hill a lot easier. After the Severn Bridge the (now following) wind made 65” a little bit on the low side, but I didn’t want to change gear (I had a flip-flop hub with 72” on the other side) because of the other hills yet to come. At least walking the Somerset Monument and Hackpen hills allowed me to enjoy the view. I finished in the dark, being slightly slower on fixed than gears, but it was still my second fastest time on the bike, for this ride. I learnt a couple of lessons for the next 2 longer rides to come...

It is probably worth the effort to change to a higher gear for parts of a ride if using 65” (too high cadence otherwise). Excessive climbing on brake hoods is hard on hands. 300km on a Brooks Swift is about as far as I want to go...

www.aukweb.net


Randonnées I made some changes ahead of the National 400, putting on my Brooks Swallow saddle which has been the most comfortable saddle I have ever owned. Also, I changed the handlebars from drops to some old tandem stoker bars, with TT brake levers (straight round sections to hold when climbing out of the saddle, long espoused by Phil Chadwick as a comfortable set-up for fixed). And added some 3T Tiramisu (small tri-bars) to allow me a get horizontal to rest back muscles, in place of riding on the drops...

National 400 The National 400 this year was held in the South West, based on Jamie Andrew’s excellent Avalon Sunrise (Tiverton, over Exmoor to Minehead, Taunton, Bruton, Bath, Chepstow, Kingswood, Bruton, Tiverton). I studied the route in advance and planned a couple of detours to avoid some of the worst hills (including following the river Exe through Tiverton). I rode out to Taunton on 65” (which turned out to be perfect for the wonderful climb up to Wheddon Cross), and also overnight back into the wind. Otherwise I was on 72” which was just about enough for the strong following wind, but 76” or even 81” would have been better. Everything was going well until Frome on the way back when I began to struggle, and ended up a bit exhausted after Taunton. I nevertheless made it back to HQ in time to catch my train back from Tiverton Parkway.

Highlights on this ride included: Excellent controls and friendly helpers. 2 tunnels path under Coombe Down before Bath. Climbing the easy way to the Somerset monument. Overnight detour to miss the worst of the steep gravelly lanes (local knowledge!). Tiverton canal path in the early morning light.

I made good use of the flip-flop hub on this ride again, and changed from 65” to 72” after the steady climb over Saddleworth Moor, (watching the orange velomobile disappear rapidly into the distance on the descent, never to be seen again) and Holmfirth hills. This gear was not really enough across flatland with a following wind, and I wished I had brought along my 81”. It was the first time I had ever ridden over the Humber Bridge, the main span being longer than the Severn Bridge, but overall shorter (and with shallower gradients). At the half way point at Boston Spa, I changed back to 65” for the ride west into the wind, and overnight. In fact I was quite glad to see hills again on the night section; 300km of flat had proved quite hard on my rear end, not being able to easily stand up and stretch on fixed.

Some highlights: The alpine-like climb over Saddleworth Moor. Humber river bike path and Humber Bridge, the Water Rail path & Holland Fen. The good company of many riders, but especially Becky & John from Macclesfield Wheelers for much of the undulating/flat bits. The surreal experience in Twyford Woods, with Mike Wigley and his horse box, surrounded by snoozing randoneurs in a tent, gazebo, mats, and duvets scattered around. The sunrise and mist, before a huge cooked breakfast at Donnington Services.

The quiet lanes before meeting the Bikers church at the Raven café! Passing Jodrell Bank. A second night camping at Poynton after steak and beer at the wonderful Boars Head. I finished this ride in very good shape, using the 72” again after the turn north-east with the then quite strong following wind on Sunday afternoon.

I offer a number of lessons for anyone considering a fixed SR – it’s worth a go! • Riding your own ride, is more important than riding with gears. • Research your route and know where you are going – planning is everything for a comfortable ride! • Learn how to modify your speed uphill to keep up a sustainable riding pace overall for the distance. • ‘Bullhorn’/TT bars & Tiramisu worked really well. • Changing gear on a flip-flop hub is worthwhile for the 3 minutes it takes, in terms of comfort & energy levels. • I found I need to eat a little more than when using gears. • Hills are your friends, after 300km on the flat. • The higher the gear the better, up to the point of having to walk too many hills. • The 24” gear is as fast as others with gears can ride when the gradient is >14%! Martin

A big lesson learnt on this ride was how to properly climb hills on fixed, not trying to ride up too quickly, but getting the pace and cadence just right for the gradient; I had not previously ridden with such a deliberately slow cadence up hill, but it worked very well.

Holl and Back 600 After feeling unusually tired at the end of the 400, I was a bit apprehensive of the Holl and Back 600, especially starting with a big climb over Saddleworth Moor, and the prospect of long flat sections into a headwind. I needn’t have worried, this turned out to be a superb ride from Poynton to Askern, Brough, Humber Bridge, Gainsborough, Wragby, Boston, Colsterworth, Donnington, Stone, Press Heath and Poynton. www.aukweb.net

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Randonnées

New Randonneurs We welcome 413 members to the ranks of AUK Randonneurs. They have ridden 200 km or over for the first time in the 20012/13 season. (NB this list is generated automatically from our records so may be incorrect if you have changed your name, or if you have returned to riding after a break of 8 years or more)

Robert ADAMS David ALDERSON Aidan ALLCOCK Dave ALLISON Kenny ALLISON Nephi ALTY Mick ANGLIM Nigel ARMSTRONG Timothy ARNOLD Karen ASTON Jason AUSTIN Louis AUTY Donald BADDON Katherine BALDWIN Paul BARKER Sean BARKER Ian BARNES Sue BARNES Robert BARRETTDUCKETT Neil BATTISON Agnes BAUDRY Richard BAYFIELD Steve BEARD Simon BEASLEY Andrew BEER Joe BEESTON Steen BERG Frances BERRY Jeff BERRY Colin BEST Dave BETTRIDGE Tim BEVEN James BLAIR Denise BOOTH Leiv BOYUM Sam BRADBURY David BRASS Dominic BRASTED Michael BREEZE Andrew BRENNAN Richard BREWIN Paul BROOKS Andrew BROWN Cathy BROWN Duncan BROWN Michael BROWNE Sarah BURGESS Simon BURGESS Gary BURLEY 32

Becky BURNS Peter BUSSEY Stephen BUTCHER Paul BUTTERWORTH Steven BUTTERWORTH Chris BYRNE Andrew CAME David CAMPBELL Steve CARDEN Norman CARR Phillip CARTER Timothy CHAPMAN Mark CHARLTON Amit CHAUHAN John CIRCUIT Jonathan CLAMP Rodger CLARK David CLEGG Bernadette CONEFREY Chris CONNOLLY Ivan CORNELL George CORY Alan COURT-HOWDEN Andrew COX Peter CRAWLEY Richard CROOK Jason CROWL Timothy CUMMINGS Paul CURRAN Lawrence DALEY Malcolm DANCY Will DAVENHILL Barbara DAVIES Colin DAVIES Ivor DAVIES Kristian DAVIES Mark DAVIES Sarah DAVIES Jill DAY Sean DAY Daniel DEAKINS Tynan DEAN Stephen DEMPSTER John DIXON Ritchie DIXON Craig DONALDSON Kathryn DORIS Ian DOYLE Toby DRAPER Janice DROHAN

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John DUGGAN Lee DUNN Nick DUNTON Garry DUTTON Bernard DYER Tony EDGE Goronwy EDWARDS Matt EDWARDS Jim ERITH Paul ERRINGTON David EVANS Sam EVANS Simon EVERITT Tony FALCONER-WHITE Mark FARRUGIA Caroline FENTON Helen FENTON Alistair FITZPATRICK Colin FLETCHER Adrian FLEWITT Pete FLYNN Alan FOX Chris FOX Andrew FRAZER Grant GAHAGAN David GALLAGHER Reuben GIBBONS John GIBSON Ian GILL Robert GILL Mark GLADWYN Darrel GLOVER Tony GOODALL Peter GOODINGS Ben GOTHARD Lydia GOULD Paul GOULD Phil GRADWELL Peter GRANTHAM Adam GRASSBY Jonathan GREENWAY David GREENWOOD Roger GREEP Eric GRILL Clive GRUNDY Ray GUNNER Chris GUY Barbara HACKWORTHY Jim HAFFEY Harry HAILWOOD

Paul HAILWOOD Mike HALE Ian HALLETT David HANN Frank HANSEN Simon HANSON Debra HARDMAN Nathan HARTLEY David HARVEY Graeme HARWOOD Richard HARWOOD David HAYDON Paul HEATH Mike HENLEY Peter HENLEY Andy HERBERT Alex HEWITT Gary HEWITT-LONG Bob HITCHCOCK Terry HODGES Ben HOLDER Peter HOLLAND David HOOPER Barry HORTON David HOWARTH Kevin HOWELL Mike HUGHES Andrew HUMPHREY Thomas HUMPHREY Richard HUNT Emma HUTCHINS Simon HUTCHINS David HYMAN Cecil ILSLEY Lee IMRIE Richard IRELAND Dominic IRVINE Phill JANSEN Jan-olov JANSSON Paul JENNINGS Christine JOHNSON David JOHNSON Paul JOHNSON Debbie JONES Gregoire JONES Peter B JONES James JOY Paul JULIEN Aleks JURCZYK David Mark KEELEY

Sandy KEITH Christopher KELLY Nigel KELLY Neill KEMP Paul KEOGHAN Trevor KIMBER Phil KING Simon KING Yvonne KING Howard KNIGHT Terry KNIGHT John LAKER Tess LAKER Martin PH LAVERICK James LAVERY Carl LAWTON Tom LEANSE Andrew LECKENBY Max LEONARD Alexander LOCKETT Oliver LOCKWOOD Stephen LONGMAN Paul LOVETT Bill LOWES Daniel LUNNON Robert LYONS Glen MACDONALD Duncan MACGREGOR Thomas MACKEN Ian MACNAB Paul MANASSEH Keith MANTRIPP Paul MANTRIPP Zak MAPLES Edward MARCHSHAWCROSS Chris MARCH_ Stephen MARTIN Tom MARTIN Greg MASON Richard MAY_ Dennis MCCULLOUGH Ian MCDONALD Alan MCDONOGH Joan MCGALLIARD Calvin MCKENZIE Alan MCLAREN Duncan MELLING Merv MIDDLETON Robert MIDDLETON www.aukweb.net


Randonnées New Super Randonneurs David MILLER John MINTA Chris MONK Duncan MONTEITH Alan MOORE Adam MORGAN Mary MORGAN Steven MORGAN Liam MORRIS Luke MORRIS Geoff MULLER nonmember N Simon NEATHAM Ian NEGUS Joanna NEVIN Philip NEWMAN Dallas NEWTON Martin NORRIS Paul NORRIS Mark NURCOMBE Angela NYE James ONEILL Tom ORR Gurpal PANESAR Justin PARKER Julian PARSONS Dave PARTINGTON Kevin PEARCE Philip PERRETT Ian PERRY Mark PINTO David PLANT John PLANT Julian PLUMMER Nick POLLARD Kris POOLE Robert PORTER Hadyn POTTS Tyron POTTS Nigel PRATT Andrew PREATER Chris PRESTON Nick PRICE Vicky PROBYN Stuart PROCTOR Michael PUMPHREY Christopher PURT Elizabeth RAYNER Tim REDFEARN Chris REED Tabitha RENDALL Alan RENVILLE Bill RICHARDSON Tony RICHMOND James RICKARD www.aukweb.net

Syd RIMMER Andy RINGROSE Stuart RITCHIE Sue RITCHIE Iain ROBERT Adrian ROBERTS Jan. ROBERTS Marcia ROBERTS Ricky ROBERTS Peter ROBINSON Andrea RODGERS Simon ROMAINE Julian RONALD Richard RONAN Michael ROPER Cristina RUIZ-PEREZ Gina RYALL John SABINE Kevin SAMMONS Edvinas SAPARNIS Chris SAUNDERS David SAWYER John SCAIFE Ian SCALLY Paul SEAMONS Hilary SEARLE Peter SEEDHOUSE Christopher SELBY SMITH Chris SELLINGS Arup SEN Gordon SEPHTON Chris SHARP Adrian SHARPE Keith SHEEHAN David SHIELDS Tracy SHORT Daniel SIKAR James SKILLEN James SMALL Jim SMALLMAN Jennifer SMART Mark SMART Eric SMITH Adrian SNELGROVE Robin SNELSON Yeshpaul SOOR Jonathan SPENCER Richard SPENCER Mike STEAD Trevor STEPHENS Neil STEVENSON Alan STEWART Andrew STOBBART Pip STOKES Sue STOKOE

Kevin TALBOT Richard TAVENER Adam TAYLOR Matthew TAYLOR Michael TAYLOR Christopher TEDD Peter THEELKE David THOMAS Stuart THOMPSON Adrian THOMSON Bill THOMSON Darren TIPTON Niall TODD Noel TOONE Rosa TOWNSEND Dominic TREVETT Sharon TRIVETT Alexander TURNER Michael TURNER Neil TURNER William TWEDDELL Michael VENNARD Peter VOGELSANG Gene WAHRLICH Ian WALKER Jeff WALKER Joss WALLACE Graeme WALSH Peter WALTON Martin WARD Mark WARE Ashley WARMAN Martin WATSON Mike WATSON Tom WATT Christopher WATTS Liz WEBB Robert WEEKS Natalie WHEATLEY James WHITE Will WHITE Darrell WHITTLE Derrick WILCOX Nick WILKINSON Aled WILLIAMS Alun WILLIAMS Jim WILLIAMS Stephen WILSHAW Dennis WITT Derek WOLFSON Patrick WOODDISSE James WOODIER David WYANT Kevin YATES Gianluigi ZOCCHEDDU

We welcome 108 riders to the ranks of AUK SRs. They rode a 200, 300, 400 and 600 km in 2013 ALDIS Martyn ALLCOCK Aidan ALLISON Dave ATKINS Brian BOWDEN Simon BREED Christopher BROWN Cathy BURNS Becky BUTCHER Stephen BUTTERWORTH Steven CAMPBELL Paul CARROLL Jordan CHAPPELL Jocelyn CHARLTON Mark CHAUHAN Amit CHEUNG Raymond CLARK Matthew COMISKEY Glenn CONYERS Paul CORNELL Ivan CRAMPTON David CULLEN Chris DAVENHILL Will DAWS Simon DAWSON Stephen DEAN Tynan DIXON Ritchie DORIS Kathryn DUCKETT Mark DUGGAN John EADES Mike EDWARDS Matt FENTON Caroline FROGGATT Jimmy GATHERCOLE James GERRARD Ian GILL Robert GOUCHER Richard GRADWELL Phil GREENWOOD David GRILL Eric HALLAM Matthew HENLEY Mike HERBERT Andy HODGES Terry HODGSON Phil HOOPER David HORTON Barry HUGGINS Grant IMRIE Lee JACKLIN Mark JONES Peter B KITAGAWA Toshihiko KNIGHT Howard

LEONARD Richard LISON Mark LOCKETT Alexander MARKEY Paul MARTIN Stephen MCLEOD Jamie MELLING Duncan MIDDLETON Merv MILLER David MONK Chris MOODY Michael MORGAN Jayme MUMFORD Marcus NEATHAM Simon ORNA Henry PARKER Richard PEEKE Alex PERRY Ian PLUMMER Julian POLLARD Nick REED Stephen RICHMOND Tony RITCHIE Stuart ROBSON Phil ROMAINE Simon SELBY SMITH Christopher SEPHTON Gordon SHARPE Geoff SHELDRAKE Mike SNELSON Robin SPENCER Jonathan STEPHENS Trevor STICKINGS Daryl TAYLOR Allan THOMSON Adrian TOLLEY Andrew TOMLINSON Phil TREVETT Dominic TRIVETT Sharon TURNER Will WADDINGTON Anthony WALKER David WALKER Jeff WEBB Jason WESTLAKE Simon WHITEHURST Phil WHITING Richard WHITTLE Darrell WILKINSON Nick WILLIAMS Jim WILLIAMS Johnatan WOOD Royston WYANT David ZOCCHEDDU Gianluigi

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Populaires

Martin Dean 100 km Audax

The third control, the Black Shed cafe alongside the Gloucester Canal

Saturday 20th September 2013 This new event for 2013, fills a gap in the West Country rides between the Three Towers and the Tasty Cheddar Audaxes. Appears as a fairly simple ride starting at Aztec West, north of Bristol going up into south Gloucester and back beside the Gloucester Canal, past the Wild fowl and Wetlands Centre at Slimbridge, with about 450 metres of climbing, this was going to be a doddle of a ride. Or was it ?

Climbing continues, it appears that most of these 450 metres are in a short stretch in the Wotton-under-Edge area. Turning to join the Old London Road saw several getting off their bikes as the climbing continued, I could see why they built the new London Road. Joining the B4058 at the top and continuing for some miles through Cockadilly, there’s a village name you wouldn’t forget, to turn for Selsey and cross some common where your attention is taken up with the launching and landing of Gliders at the local Gliding Club.

About 80 others were in the same mind as myself as we left the start and crossed over the M4 for the flat lanes through Tytherington and Cromhall (those of you who have ridden the Jack & Grace Cotton event will recognise those places) and continues on to Charfield.

As you descend off the common you are rewarded with some wonderful views of the valley below and the town of Stroud, but attention had to be paid to the route sheet as just before the cattle grid you are required to take a left. Several missed this point and ended up at the very bottom of the hill and had an extra climb to do, I wasn’t one of them.

Signs of the metres of climbing begin to appear as you ascend to the town but soon forgotten as you drift down the other side of the hill. Things rapidly change as you encounter a long hill taking you up into Wotton-under-Edge to locate the first control at the Royal Oak pub.

A fair bit of downhill through Kings and Leonard Stanley brought me into Stonehouse and the control at the Woolpack, up to half distance. Going out through the town, with its four roundabouts to negotiate, you come alongside the river Severn at Epney. As you follow the river down through

Ribble Blue

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Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

Saul and come into the third control alongside the fore mentioned canal at the Black Shed Cafe. Had a second cup of tea while I viewed the narrow boats going up and down the canal and the operator, whose job it was to lower the road barriers to swing the bridge to allow the boats to pass. The last 35km involved a series of turns before you got to the historic town of Berkeley with its castle with a infamous past involving the murder of Edward II in 1327. Riding the flat lanes for several miles, looking for a sign pointing to Rockhampton, saw many other place names but not Rockhampton, which got me thinking that maybe I didn’t check that last set of signposts properly. You have all been there and think should I carry on or turn back. Just when I’m about to give up and turn around it comes into sight so it’s first left into Thornbury, over the A38 and under the M5. After a few short miles along the B4427 and around a housing estate takes me to the finish at the Stoke Bradley Sports Centre. Many thanks to Richard Burton and his team from Stokes CC for a well organised event and if they are putting it on in 2014 can they save a place for me please.

www.aukweb.net


Populaires AAA 12 points and over in 2013 William WEIR ������������������������������ 323.00 Ann MARSHALL ������������������������� 261.50 Martin MALINS �������������������������� 209.25 Louise Sheran RIGBY ��������������� 134.25 Justin JONES ������������������������������� 133.00 Robert BIALEK ���������������������������� 116.50 Henry ORNA ������������������������������� 112.75 Chris KEELING-ROBERTS �������� 100.75 Mike LANE ����������������������������������� 100.75 Patrick CHERRY �����������������������������87.25 Colin WEAVER �������������������������������80.50 Sean TOWNLEY �����������������������������73.00 Ian RYALL ����������������������������������������63.25 Chris SMITH �����������������������������������62.75 Marcus JACKSON-BAKER ����������62.00 Cecil ILSLEY ������������������������������������60.25 Pete TREDGET �������������������������������60.00 Mark HUMMERSTONE ����������������56.00 Adam SHARPE ������������������������������56.00 Adrian HUGHES ����������������������������55.00 John BARKMAN ����������������������������51.00 John CLEMENS �����������������������������48.75 Martin LUCAS ��������������������������������48.25 Andrew PRESTON ������������������������48.25 Paul REVELL �����������������������������������47.75 Daniele CASSISA ��������������������������47.00 Graham MERRINGTON ���������������47.00 Adam KINSEY ��������������������������������45.50 Chris CULLEN ��������������������������������45.00 Peter BOND ������������������������������������44.75 Mike TATTERSALL ������������������������44.25 Christopher BREED ���������������������41.50 Adrian FLEWITT ����������������������������40.50 Daryl STICKINGS ���������������������������40.50 Mark HIGGINS �������������������������������40.25 Don BLACK 39.�������������������������������39.50 Ray ROBINSON �����������������������������37.00 Bruce DUNBAR �����������������������������36.75 Jonathan SAVILLE ������������������������35.25 David ATKINSON ��������������������������35.00 Jonathan ELLIS �����������������������������35.00 Martin FOLEY ��������������������������������34.50 Stuart RITCHIE �������������������������������34.25 Martin CROXFORD ����������������������33.50 Peter MASTENKO �������������������������33.25 Simon DAWS ���������������������������������33.00 Jordan CARROLL ��������������������������32.75 Chris BOULTON �����������������������������32.25 Roy BISHOP ������������������������������������31.75 Desmond WINTERBONE ������������31.75 Joel BROMLEY �������������������������������31.50 Mike STOALING ����������������������������31.50 Paul CAMPBELL ����������������������������31.25 Luke JOY-SMITH ���������������������������31.25 Paul WHITEHEAD �������������������������31.00 Ben TAYLOR ������������������������������������30.75 Julian WILLIAMS ���������������������������30.50 Matthew CLARK ���������������������������30.25 Paul RAINBOW ������������������������������30.25 Stephen ROGERS �������������������������30.25 Anthony WADDINGTON ������������30.25 Barbara HACKWORTHY �������������30.00 Jonathan BOOTH �������������������������29.75 Chris WATTS 29.75������������������������29.75 Duncan MELLING ������������������������29.25 Simon PROVEN �����������������������������28.25 Mark WALSH ����������������������������������27.25 Alberto CONTRERAS SANZ �������26.75 www.aukweb.net

Peter FORSTER ������������������������������26.75 Nephi ALTY ������������������������������������26.50 David HARRIS ��������������������������������26.50 Mike KELLY �������������������������������������26.50 Andrew REGISTER ������������������������26.25 Simon GENT ����������������������������������26.00 Daniel HENDRIKSEN �������������������26.00 Rob BAIRD ��������������������������������������25.75 Dave VINE ���������������������������������������25.75 Pat HURT �����������������������������������������25.50 John BASTIANI ������������������������������25.25 Mike THOMPSON �������������������������25.25 Andy WILLS ������������������������������������25.25 Kevin FIRTH ������������������������������������24.75 Jimmy FROGGATT �����������������������24.50 Robin HARPER ������������������������������24.25 Robyn THOMAS ����������������������������24.25 Mike WIGLEY ���������������������������������24.25 Hilary SEARLE ��������������������������������24.00 Pete STOTT �������������������������������������24.00 Martyn ALDIS ��������������������������������23.75 Richard EVANS ������������������������������23.75 Jim GRESTY ������������������������������������23.75 Toby HOPPER ��������������������������������23.75 Jon ROBERTS ���������������������������������23.75 Peter BELL ��������������������������������������23.50 Steven BUTTERWORTH �������������23.50 Steve RALPHS �������������������������������23.50 Brian ATKINS ����������������������������������23.25 Marienus STIGTER �����������������������23.25 Richard ELLIS ���������������������������������23.00 George HANNA ����������������������������23.00 Mike ROBERTS ������������������������������23.00 Mike SHELDRAKE �������������������������23.00 Graeme MCCULLOCH ����������������22.75 John PERRIN ����������������������������������22.75 Peter SIMON ����������������������������������22.75 Adrian LAGAN �������������������������������22.50 Jonathan WARNER ����������������������22.50 Byron BUCK ������������������������������������22.25 Eric FOGARTY ��������������������������������22.25 Aidan HEDLEY �������������������������������22.25 Alan JONES ������������������������������������22.25 Martin BERRY ��������������������������������22.00 Georgina HARPER ������������������������22.00 Peter JOHNSON ����������������������������21.75 Ian KELLAR �������������������������������������21.50 Mel KIRKLAND ������������������������������21.50 Alan PARKINSON ��������������������������21.50 Jamie ANDREWS ��������������������������21.25 Lars ERICSSON ������������������������������21.25 Tony DAVIS �������������������������������������21.00 Stephen MARTIN �������������������������21.00 Richard PHIPPS �����������������������������21.00 Jonathan SPENCER ���������������������21.00 Julian DYSON ��������������������������������20.75 Kevin MERRISON ��������������������������20.75 Steve PRICE ������������������������������������20.50 Russell CARSON ���������������������������20.25 Stephen POULTON ����������������������20.25 Stephen RUMBLE �������������������������20.25 Garry DUTTON ������������������������������20.00 Tony GREENWOOD ���������������������20.00 David HAYDON �����������������������������20.00 Robin SNELSON ����������������������������20.00 Tim TAYLOR ������������������������������������20.00 Neil VEITCH ������������������������������������20.00 Derek HEINE ����������������������������������19.75

Luke WILLIAMS �����������������������������19.75 Sean BARKER ���������������������������������19.50 Stephen DARLING �����������������������19.25 Simon SPOONER ��������������������������19.25 Jason BROOKES ����������������������������18.75 Neil FRASER �����������������������������������18.50 Ron LOWE ���������������������������������������18.50 David MATTHEWS �����������������������18.50 Martyn PEGGIE �����������������������������18.25 Richard WARNER ��������������������������18.25 Robert MCMILLAN ����������������������18.00 Peter COATES ��������������������������������17.75 Andy COX ���������������������������������������17.75 Gordon PANICCA �������������������������17.75 Ken THOMSON �����������������������������17.75 Nick WILKINSON ��������������������������17.75 Ashley BROWN �����������������������������17.50 Cathy BROWN �������������������������������17.50 Ray GUNNER ����������������������������������17.50 Chris MARCH ���������������������������������17.50 Graham GORDON ������������������������17.25 Richard GOUCHER �����������������������17.25 Edwin HARGRAVES ���������������������17.25 Brian JAGO �������������������������������������17.00 Alan STEWART ������������������������������17.00 Judith SWALLOW �������������������������17.00 Sharon TRIVETT ����������������������������17.00 Clive ANSELL ���������������������������������16.75 David CATLOW �����������������������������16.75 Alan DAVIES �����������������������������������16.75 Nigel GLAZE ����������������������������������16.75 Duncan JOHNSTON ��������������������16.75 Johnatan WILLIAMS ��������������������16.75 Robert BIRD �����������������������������������16.50 Peter HORNE ���������������������������������16.50 Robert WATSON ���������������������������16.50 Julian BROWN �������������������������������16.25 Gareth GRIFFITHS ������������������������16.25 Ian LLEWELYN �������������������������������16.25 Kevin RAE ���������������������������������������16.25 Mary-Jane WATSON ��������������������16.25 Andy WATT �������������������������������������16.25 Jason CLARK ����������������������������������16.00 Julian COLE ������������������������������������16.00 Lara DAY ������������������������������������������16.00 Royston WOOD ����������������������������16.00 Matthew HALLAM �����������������������15.75 Chris MONK �����������������������������������15.75 Marcus MUMFORD ����������������������15.75 Will TURNER �����������������������������������15.75 Simon WESTLAKE ������������������������15.75 David CRAMPTON �����������������������15.50 Graeme HOLDSWORTH �������������15.50 Dave LAWRENSON ����������������������15.50 David STARK ����������������������������������15.50 Adam GRASSBY ����������������������������15.25 Stephen REED �������������������������������15.25 Jim CHURTON �������������������������������15.00 Mark GLADWYN ���������������������������15.00 Nigel JONES �����������������������������������15.00 Julian PLUMMER ��������������������������15.00 Jason WEBB ������������������������������������15.00 Colin BEZANT ��������������������������������14.75 Leiv BOYUM �����������������������������������14.75 Aidan ALLCOCK ����������������������������14.50 Elaine BURGESS ����������������������������14.50 Roger BURGESS ����������������������������14.50 Ivan CORNELL �������������������������������14.50

Wyn EVANS ����������������������������������� 14.50 Paul HICKEY ���������������������������������� 14.50 Scott WILLIAMS ��������������������������� 14.50 Andy CLARKSON ������������������������� 14.25 Paul COLE �������������������������������������� 14.25 John DUGGAN ����������������������������� 14.25 Ian HENNESSEY ��������������������������� 14.25 Paul KELLY ������������������������������������� 14.25 Dave MINTER �������������������������������� 14.25 Simon ROMAINE ������������������������� 14.25 Phil TOMLINSON ������������������������� 14.25 Jonathan WALTERS ��������������������� 14.25 Dave BAXANDALL ���������������������� 14.00 Elliot COOPER ������������������������������� 14.00 Mary DOYLE ���������������������������������� 14.00 Simon JONES �������������������������������� 14.00 Richard KITSON ��������������������������� 14.00 Darryl NOLAN ������������������������������ 14.00 David PARKES ������������������������������� 14.00 Richard PARROTTE ��������������������� 14.00 Tony PEMBER ������������������������������� 14.00 Ian SHARPE ����������������������������������� 14.00 Bruce TAYLOR ������������������������������� 14.00 Paul TAYLOR ���������������������������������� 14.00 Iain ROBERT ���������������������������������� 13.75 Paul ROBERTS ������������������������������� 13.75 Trevor STEPHENS ������������������������ 13.75 Michael VENNARD ���������������������� 13.75 Anthony WHEATLEY ������������������ 13.75 Philip WHITEMAN ����������������������� 13.75 Matt EDWARDS ��������������������������� 13.50 Tim MITCHELL ������������������������������ 13.50 Jeremy NASON ���������������������������� 13.50 Jack NEAL �������������������������������������� 13.50 Reid ANDERSON ������������������������� 13.25 Nigel ARMSTRONG �������������������� 13.25 David BROWNING ���������������������� 13.25 Mark CHAMBERS ������������������������� 13.25 Matthew HAIGH �������������������������� 13.25 Stephen HODGES ����������������������� 13.25 Alexander LOCKETT ������������������� 13.25 Caroline NEALL ���������������������������� 13.25 Simon PATEMAN ������������������������� 13.25 Andy CARTER ������������������������������� 13.00 Robert HYDON ���������������������������� 13.00 Ashley WARMAN ������������������������� 13.00 Simon BENNETT �������������������������� 12.75 Neil MCDADE ������������������������������� 12.75 Sean QUIGLY �������������������������������� 12.75 Richard SPENCER ������������������������ 12.75 Ian STRAUGHAN �������������������������� 12.75 John STRAUGHAN ���������������������� 12.75 Warren THRELFALL ��������������������� 12.75 Adam YOUNG ������������������������������ 12.75 Richard JENNINGS ���������������������� 12.50 Allan LAWSON ����������������������������� 12.50 Adam TAYLOR ������������������������������ 12.50 David WEST ����������������������������������� 12.50 Stephen AGNEW ������������������������� 12.25 Steven ASHTON �������������������������� 12.25 Phil DYSON ����������������������������������� 12.25 Bob JOHNSON ����������������������������� 12.25 Andrew RODGERS ���������������������� 12.25 Tony BLAIKLOCK ������������������������� 12.00 Will DAVENHILL ��������������������������� 12.00 Barry DUNCAN ���������������������������� 12.00 Syd RIMMER ���������������������������������� 12.00

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Populaires

2013 Dartmoor Devil 100 km with Graham Brodie

Many stroll up the Hind Street but 79 year old George Sandford (R) from Plymouth rides with ease!

Sunday 27th October Two hundred keen cyclists descended on the town of Bovey Tracey on a blustery morning, to ride in the 21st Dartmoor Devil Audax event. Audax is derived from a latin word meaning audacious, and with a forecast of 50 mph winds, and rain over Dartmoor, the riders were being just that! For the start, there was some warm autumn sunshine as the first groups climbed the 1 in5 gradient of Hind Street and out on to the A382 to Moretonhampsted.

Lousie Rigby from Tewksbury with Devil fancy dress, near North Bovey 36

ArrivĂŠe February 2014 No. 123

Mike Steer on his way to completeing Devil No.21

A couple of squalls didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dampen spirits, and produced some fine rainbows to enhance the Dartmoor scenery. Soon they were into dark slippery lanes strewn with debris and potholes. After the descent to Clifford Bridge it was hard to see where the road was, if it was there at all! The first control point was in a bus shelter at Drewsteignton, where cakes were being dished out and riders inside the time limit collected a sticker on their cards. From here it was down past the plastic clad Castle Drogo into the valley and then across to North Bovey via some steep grubby lanes. On past Heatree Cross and Jays Grave and Houndtor. Here the riders began to get a preview of what the weather would be like later as strong crosswinds blasted between the Tors.

John Beesley and Gill Madge, near Moretonhampstead www.aukweb.net


Populaires

Riders arrivng at and leaving Princetown control for the final leg A fast descent into Ashburton brought the riders to Lavender House, the halfway point with fortification in the form of hot soup and crusty rolls! Several decided enough was enough at this stage but for the bulk of the field it was time for the long climb back onto the Moors via Holne and Hexworthy. Some heavy squalls produced very heavy downpours, with a lot of surface water, and there was even the occasional bit of hail thrown in but luckily these mostly lasted just a few minutes, so people who battled the crosswind into Princetown arrived slightly damp rather than drenched! Foxtor cafe was busy, the final control point where hot food and drinks were in plentiful supply. All who reached this point were now to be rewarded. The final section home would have a predominantly strong tail wind, so riders were pushed past the Warren House Inn. There was a hard section past Grimspound where the wind was curving over the hill, making it a very difficult couple of miles, but after a brief stop there for the final checkpoint, it was plain sailing back to the finish at the Kestor Inn at Manaton. There were some notable riders - Annemarie Manley and Geoff Sharpe completed their 12th Devil, John Thacker from Exeter completed his 12th event after recovering from a bad crash only 7 weeks ago. Mike Steer from Exeter finished and is the only rider to have completed the event 21 times, George Sandford from Plymouth finished and is the grand age of 79, and a fourteen year old youngster, Harry Hart from Tiverton, completed the event.

Well done to all who had a go at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ride!

Rainbow near Moretonhampstead www.aukweb.net

ArrivĂŠe February 2014 No. 123

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Populaires There were two principal motivations for organising the ride, firstly to put something back into AUK, which has given me considerable pleasure over the years, as a result of other members efforts, and secondly to assist a local charity.

Foundation 50 and Good Stuff 100

We were ambitious with our planning, getting support from local retailers and food suppliers to make our catering as good as possible. Having Mornflake at the start ensured that everybody had the option of a hearty porridge breakfast and having local baker and cyclist, Mr Chatwin, on board meant that every rider completing the event received a fantastic yellow jersey clad gingerbread man. With additional help from local supermarkets it meant that, after paying the necessary Audax costs, every penny of the entry fee went to the Charity. Running up to the event we managed with a team of two, but on the day we had help from friends, family company staff and the local Scouts, who took over most of the food service. We offered two rides, a 50km and a 100km, both of which were ridden in the week prior to the event to check route sheets. We thought this would cater for most of our expected entrants, but had requests for both longer and shorter distances. The riders were a mix of AUK and non-AUK members, with a number of previously non-cyclist taking up the challenge.

Lorna and Andy Fewtrell

As with many of these events there was a massive age range with the oldest rider being in their eighties and the youngest rider tackling the 100km being a 14 year old scout. Probably the oddest sight, however, was Postman Pat trundling around the 100k route on his postie bike. The weather was very kind to us and over a hundred riders entered the event, almost evenly split between the two distances. The event was successful in raising sufficient money to pay for weekends away for 15-20 disadvantaged or disabled youngsters.

Pat makes it to Audlem (before taking his head off)

Having ridden Audax rides for years it had occurred to me to organise one a number of times. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until 2013 that I finally took the plunge, I say I, but in fact it was definitely we. The work was equally distributed, I had the idea, and Lorna, my wife, did all the organising. How hard can it be? First things are to plan a route and find a venue for the start/finish. Being a regular cyclist makes finding a route relatively easy, but getting the distance to fit around the standard distances took a little effort and diversions around little used lanes. 38

ArrivĂŠe February 2014 No. 123

The Routes

Cafesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; were easy, they all seem to welcome cyclists now and my employer happily opened up their offices as HQ for the day, I think owning a significant part of the company helped here. Crewe (Start)

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The Up and Under Foundation helps disadvantaged youngsters (principally in Cheshire) with grants towards the costs of scout camps, school trips and other life enhancing adventures. The best thing about the charity is that all the money they raise goes to these good causes, with none of it being used for staff salaries, fancy offices or advertising agencies.

In 2014 we will be doing it again with even more riders and with the addition of a new route, a 160km ride over the Horseshoe Pass with so little climbing that it gets no AAA points. June 8th is the date, Crewe the venue, come along and be part of one of the newest and most exciting additions to the AUK calendar.

For more information, check out: www.upandunderfoundation.org www.foundationrides.co.uk

Yellow jersey gingerbread men from Chatwins the Bakers

Randonnée Round the Year Roll of Honour   John ABREY    Stephen AGNEW x 3    Geoff AIRD    Paul ALDERSON    Martyn ALDIS    Jeff ALLEN    Reid ANDERSON    Rhisiart AP GWILYM * Chris ASHER * Brian ATKINS    Chris BAILEY    Rob BAIRD x 2 * Sean BARKER    Mark BEAUCHAMP x 3    Geoff BELL x 3    Ross BENTLEY-DAVIES    Martin BERRY    Richard BERRY x 2    Mark BERTONI    Mel BETTS    Mark BIGAM    David BISSET    Don BLACK    Mike BLOOM    Peter BOND x 4    David BRADSHAW    Tony BRAMAH    Martin BREWSTER x 2 * Martin BRICE    Tony BRIGGS x 2    Richard BRITTON    Garry BROAD    Mark BROOKING x 2    Anton BROWN x 4    Julian BROWN x 2    Steven BRYCE    Rob BULLYMENT    Stephen BULMER x 2    Christopher BURTON * Steve BUTTERWORTH    Robbie CALDER    John CAPELL * Russell CARSON    Kevin CASSINGHAM    Gary CATLOW    Matt CHAMBERS    Alfred CHAMINGS    Kevin CHAPMAN x 2    Patrick CHERRY * Raymond CHEUNG * Matt CLARK    John CLARKE    Roy CLARKE    Andy CLARKSON    Linday CLAYTON * John CLEMENS    Sharon CLIFFORD x 2    David COLLEY x 3

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* Ian COLLINS   Michael COLLINS    Michael CONWAY * Paul CONYERS    Rachel COOKE    Elliot COOPER    Andrew CORNWELL    Andy COX x 2    Mark COX x 2    Colin CRAWFORD    Sonia CRAWFORD    Chris CROSSLAND x 2    Philip DANIELS    Stephen DART    Tom DEAKINS * Tim DECKER    Rudolph DEL-PRADO    Gordon DEWAR x 3    Emma DIXON    Jonathan DIXON    Neil DIXON    Jonathan DUCKWORTH    Paul DYTHAM    Dominic ELLIS    John ELLIS x 4    Geoff ERICSON * Lars ERICSSON x 2    Daniel ERSSER    David FAWCETT    David FENN x 3    Ian FINCH    Robert FINN    Nicholas FIRTH    Eric FLETCHER    Richard FORREST    Simon FORTUNE    Mark FOSSARD x 3    Jason FRASER    Norbert GAJDA x 2    David GALLE    Jon GAMMAGE    Peter GAWTHORNE x 3    Steve GINTY x 4    Steve GLOSTER * Michael GOATLEY    Julian GOUGH x 3 * Tony GREEN    Tony GREENWOOD x 2    Shaun GREGORY JNR    Shaun GREGORY SNR x 2

  Jim GRESTY x 2    Simon GROVE    Matthew HAIGH    Nigel HALL x 2    John HAMILTON    Bernie HAMMOND    Clive HANDY    Graham HANLEY x 2

  Adrian HANSON-ABBOTT

  Lee HARGRAVES    Georgina HARPER x 4    Ben HARRIS    John HAYES x 2    Malcolm HEATHCOTE    Aidan HEDLEY    Gerald HENDERSON x 2    Mike HENDERSON x 4    Ian HENNESSEY x 2    Andy HEYTING * Gary HIBBARD    Rob HIDDERLEY    Mark HIGGINS x 2    Martin HILBERS * Graham HODGES    Innes HOGG x 3    Peter HOLDEN    Neville HOLGATE x 2    Kevin HOPE    Chris HOPKINSON    Ian HORNE    Brian HOWE    Dave HUDSON    Ade HUGHES    Mike HUNTING    Richard HURLEY    Don HUTCHISON    Trevor HYDE    Peter IBBOTSON x 4    Michael IRONS * Mark JACKLIN * Dave JACKSON    Ian JACKSON    Tom JACKSON x 3    Marcus JACKSON-BAKER x 3

  Ralph JAMES x 2    Mark JARVIS    Miles JEFFERSON    Bob JOHNSON    Chris JOHNSON    Pete JOHNSON    David JOHNSTON x 3    Linda JOHNSTON    Ray JOINER    Justin JONES    Joe JORD x 2    Barry JORDAN    David KAHN x 3 * Paul KELLY    Ray KERRIDGE    Nic KETLEY x 2    Garry KING    Mel KIRKLAND x 2    Richard KITSON x 2    Tom KNOWLES x 2    Graham LACEY x 3

  Neil LANCASTLE * Mike LANE    Dave LARRINGTON x 3 * Carl LAVER    Ron LAWRENCE x 2    Dave LAWRENSON    Anne LEARMONTH    Maggie LEWIS x 2    Pete LEWIS x 2    Ka-Wai LI    Dave LIDDY * Mark LISON    Terry LISTER x 4    Ian LLEWELYN    Heather MACKAY    Alan MACLEAN    Graeme MAIR    Brian MANN x 4    Ann MARSHALL x 2    Archie MARSHALL x 4    Chris MARTEN    John MARTIN * Paul MARTIN    Peter MARTIN * Peter MASTENKO    Dave MATTHEWS    Arabella MAUDE    Jim MCCORMICK    Graeme MCCULLOCH    Bob MCDOWALL    Dick MCTAGGART    Lucy MCTAGGART x 2    Jim MCCORMICK * James MEARNS    Wendy MEARS    Jo MILES    Stuart MILLER    Chris MISON * Mike MOODY    Stuart MOORE    Kevin MORELAND    Duncan MURRAY    Joe NAYLOR    Jack NEAL * Phil NELSON    Martin NEWSTEAD x 3 * Darryl NOLAN    Tiho OBRENOVITCH x 3    Ian OLIVER * Henry ORNA    John OWEN    Roger PADDEY x 2    Paul PALMER    Gordon PANICCA * Richard PARKER    David PARKES    Duncan PARKES    Alan PARKINSON

  Alex PATTISON x 2 * Richard PEART    John PERRIN * Brian PERRY    Margaret PHILLPOTTS x 3    Stephen POTTS    Andy PRESTON x 2    Paul PRICE    Richard PRIDDY    Brian RAINBOW x 2    Paul RAINBOW x 3    David RANDERSON    Alan RAYNER x 3    Andrew REGISTER x 2    Paul REVELL    David RINGER    Mike ROBERTS x 2    Paul ROBERTS    Andrew RODGERS    Stephen ROGERS x 4    David ROWELL * Paul RULE    Mark RUSBY    Jeremy RUSS    Chris RUTTER * Ian RYALL x 2    Jonathan SAVILLE    Peter SCOULAR x 2    Terry SEANOR    Jasmine SHARP * Geoff SHARPE    Rob SHAW    Shawn SHAW x 3    Bill SHELDON    Sheila SIMPSON    Andrew SINCLAIR x 2    James SINGLEHURST    Dave SMITH x 3    Gerald SMITH x 2    Jane SMITH x 2    Peter SMITH    Ron SMITH * Chris SMITH (BURNLEY)    Tim SOLLESSE    Marjorie SOUTH    Peter SOUTH    Mike SPENCER x 2    Simon SPOONER    David STACEY    Jonathan STAINTON-ELLIS x 2

  Robin STEVENS    John STONE x 3    Peter STOTT * Ian STRAUGHAN * John STRAUGHAN    Judith SWALLOW x 4    Justin SYKES * Neil TALBOT

  Mike TATTERSALL x 2    Bruce TAYLOR    Tim TAYLOR x 2 * Andy TERRY    Richard THOMAS    Mike THOMPSON x 3 * Ken THOMSON    Martin TILLIN x 2    Mike TILLOTSON    Robin TOMES x 3    John TOMLINSON    Christophe TRACEY * Sharon TRIVETT    Brian TROKE x 2    Chris TURNER    Mary TURNER    Phil TURNER    Stephen UNDERWOOD    Jutta URENJAK x 3    Andy UTTLEY x 2 * Michael VENNARD    Els VERMEULEN    Ben WADDINGTON    Ivan WADDINGTON x 2    Patrick WADSWORTH * Mark WALSH    Graham WANLESS x 2    John WARD    Mark WATSON    Robert WATSON    Robin WEAVER    Danial WEBB x 2 * Robert WEBB x 3    Tony WEBSTER    Leo WELLS    Peter WESTON    Richard WHITE    Paul WHITEHEAD    Mark WHITEHOUSE    Werner WIETHEGE    Chris WILBY * Nick WILKINSON    Ken WILSON x 2 * John WILTON    Alan WITHERS x 2    Honor WOOD    Michael WOOD    Peter WOOD * Rob WOOD    Stephen WOOD    Rob WORMALD    Graham WYLLIE    Adam YOUNG x 2    Armorel YOUNG x 2    Matt ZORN

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

39


Overseas

The 4th Mille du Sud with Ben Taylor

Near St Michel-en-Beaumont

What is it ? Le 1000km du Sud is a BRM (Brevet des Randonneurs Mondiaux). The route is challenging It is located in Southeast France. Visited French departments: Var, Alpes de Haute Provence, Vaucluse, Drôme, Hautes Alpes, Isère et Alpes Maritimes. A beautiful and mountainous region... Therefore, the brevet has many climbs. With a few exceptions, participants will not be able to ride fast. They should minimize the time off the bike. Riders must be self-sufficient Self-reliance is part of the challenge. No personal following cars or motor-driven support of any kind are permitted (neither on the road, nor at the control places). Please demonstrate respect for organisers and riders. Any violation of this rule will result in disqualification. All participants are equal This is not a competitive event. There is no prize to win. No rider classifications will be made. Individual time results will not be published. No special reward will be granted to individual performance. Riders come to tackle a challenging route and to strive for a personal best. It’s a social ride. Friendship is the hallmark of randonneuring. Randonneuring is non-competitive in nature. Anyone registering to Le 1000 du Sud should be clearly aware of this. Time limit and finishers The official time limit for a BRM of 1000 km is 75 hours. This corresponds to an average speed of 13.3 km/h including stops. We know that Le 1000 du Sud is a difficult brevet. We will wait for the participants arriving after the 75 hour time limit, hoping that this will encourage them to continue. In 2013, if the arrival within 75 hours must be before Saturday, September 7 at 11:00 a.m., the finish control will remain open until Sunday, September 8. As in 2012, we will recognize a status of Finisher, which won’t be related to the ACP homologation. Any participant who takes the official start, rides the entire route, validates his/her brevet card at all controls and respects the rule of self-sufficiency, will be considered an official Finisher of Le 1000 du Sud. He/She will receive a diploma. Next Year’s event 3 - 6 septembre 2014 40

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

This start for this event was the village of Carcès, a fairly small village not far from Brignoles, in Provence, and fairly remote, being reached by a narrow winding road round a picturesque lake. When I arrived at the large hall at about 7am a collection of about 70 riders, mainly French and German, but a few other nationalities including an American and another Brit, were sat studiously eating breakfast and consuming coffee out of not cups but bowls as apparently is the French way. I fuelled up on porridge and bananas. An impressive medley of jerseys from different countries hung up on the stage gave the event a distinctly international feel. There was still a slight chill in the air but it was looking like being a nice day. After getting brevet cards stamped and setting off in batches, I found myself on the back of a group that was hammering along at a cracking pace and despite being a large group took quite a bit of effort to stay with. I pretty much did, however, until the top of the first proper col - le Col de l’Aire deï Masco, at which there was a secret control. Sophie, the organiser, and a couple of friends, were there stamping cards and serving up coffee and cake which was nice, and kept me going till lunch at a little restaurant just outside near Simiane La Rotonde. I probably spent a bit too long here, over an hour, but it was nice to have some time to relax in the heat of the day. The hills were coming thick and fast as I progressed through the first two official controls at Montbrun les Bains, and Crest, at which I obtained stamps, and on getting to the next one at Pont en Royans, night had fallen so I took a photo of the sign, although I was pleasantly surprised to find a few other riders congregating around a pizza place which was still open in the town. They weren’t still serving pizza, but did kindly manage to rustle me up an sandwich. A long climb up the col d’Herbouilly led into a night time stage cruising along on what felt like a fairly high plateau. I felt a little bit sleepy on this stage and did at a couple of points try to get a bit of sleep in a bus stop, of which there were many, but since it was about 1000m altitude it got a little bit cold once I stopped moving, but just having 10 minutes rest probably helped as much as anything and gave me time to reflect on how

the overall strategy of the ride was going, which was to ride through the first night, and get a hotel on the second night. The ideal way this would pan out would be to have done at least 600km by the time I got a hotel on the second night. I calculated that I had probably done about 350km at about half two, which had taken 18 and a half hours. That wasn’t too bad, if I could keep this up things would go ok. I fought off the dozies for a bit longer while meandering through Villard de Lans and Lans en Vercours, before embarking on the most spectacular descent of the ride, through hairpin after hairpin with the lights of Grenoble spread out far below like a sea of orange. It was starting to get light now and a bit of concentration was required to navigate through the suburbs of the south of Grenoble. I met the American rider at a cafe which had just opened and had a coffee and an orange juice with him and another rider, before pitching for the next control point at the top of Col du Festre, which was a moraleboosting milestone to reach as it meant a nice meal whilst relaxing in the knowledge that the next good few kilometres were downhill. The climbs so far had all been fairly benign in terms of steepness, but that was all blown completely out of the water on reaching the Col de Parquetout, which was about 12% all the way up. It was hard. I saw another rider walking it. It was rewarded however by the presence of another secret control at the top, with more coffee and cake on offer. I was quite pleased to make Guillestre, the 600km mark, at about 8pm - and while the first hotel I went to didn’t have any rooms

The author, about to climb the Cayolle

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Overseas free, they were able to point me in the direction of another one which did. I had a nice meal and a good 7 hours sleep in a comfortable bed. I should really have gone and got a pizza to have for breakfast as I would be leaving before the hotel served breakfast, but was slightly out of the town and couldn’t be bothered, so on leaving the next morning, still in the dark, I just took the first bit of the Col de Vars gently until to my delight I found a café half way up. It open at 6am and serving breakfast, basically just a croissant, black coffee and a basket of bread, but that was carbs, so should be ok. On getting to the top of the Col de Vars it didn’t seem as if I’d made much progress since leaving the hotel as I’d only travelled about 20km from it in over 2 hours, but it occurred to me that in this terrain, you have to regard progress differently – if you’re at 2000m and the next 20km is all downhill, you’ve effectively “done” 40km.

Climbing the route de la Vesubie out of St Sauveur sur Tinee - photos by the author.

Getting over the Col de Cayolle was another milestone as this was the highest point of the ride, at over 2000m, and the descent was one of the most enjoyable, with a nice mix of sweeping bends and hairpins. I was getting quite proficient in hairpins by this point – I’d figured the key is to be smooth, not fast. The sleep I’d had at Guillestre had set me up well because I was making good progress on this leg, and it was all downhill or flat from the official control at St Martin Vésubie until the route started climbing again on a lovely quiet little road after a river crossing at the lowest point. I had been quite hungry for a while so was very pleased to see a little place open serving food in the village of Le Broc - which was very quaint with its extremely narrow streets and 3 storey apartments. Even more pleased to see they served Entrecôte Grillée - yes, I’ll have that! It got dark as I was eating and a bit chilly, so this was a time to layer up. As I set off again, my front light’s status indicator had gone from green to orange. This meant the battery was running down. Not good. I didn’t know how many hours of light this meant I had left, but I needed about 9, and only the most optimistic estimate put it at that. This light had got round PBP no problem, but this ride was wholly different terrain - with climbing comes descending www.aukweb.net

and the amount of time I had used the medium power mode for descents in the dark must have eaten away at the battery. Well, there was nothing I could do about it so I pushed on, keeping it on low power mode to try to conserve the battery. If the worst came to the worst I could either walk or sleep till it got light. This was doubly annoying however in that sleep was probably not that viable given that it was quite chilly, and also because this had put a bit of a downer on things when I was enjoying myself, wasn’t really feeling dozy, and could quite happily have ridden all the way to the finish without wanting to sleep. At about half past midnight the battery finally spluttered its last bit of power into the light and I was plunged into darkness. This was a negative, and right now I needed TWO positives - one to cancel out the negative, and one, well ... just to have a positive. In desperation I got it out of its bag to check the voltage, as if it was 7.4V I was going to implement a hair-brained scheme to yank the wire out of it and try to attach it to my spare Di2 battery with the duck tape that I had bought to lash to my saddlebag the latenight pizzas that I never did find. The Di2 battery wasn’t going to be needed since the first one was still on full charge - but alas, the light battery was 14V, so probably wouldn’t have worked anyway, and I decided not to proceed with this. I walked for a bit, unsure what to do, lighting my way using my rear light and walking on the left hand side of the road. I sat down for a rest near the top of what I now know to be the Col de Luens, when a battered old white clio pulled up to check if I was ok, one of its occupants quite concerned that I might be accosted by “a wild boar with tusks on ‘em out ‘ere” (she happened to be from Yorkshire). They were fairly hippy-ish type people, some teaching, and some partaking in, rafting on the Verdon Gorge, and they very kindly took me into their campsite and offered me a tent and a blanket for the night. I was very grateful for this and couldn’t thank them enough. Their ‘campsite’ consisted of a few tents, a gazebo, and a very old curve-fronted lorry that had been done out like a camper van, with techno blaring out of it. I gratefully accepted their offer of a beer, and chatted to them for quite a while, and they were intrigued as to the scale of the adventure I was undertaking. This random kindness of strangers more than made up for the downer that my light running out had put on the ride, and amounted to at least the two positives that I felt I needed. Making some friends, albeit that I might never see again, was one, having somewhere warm to spend the night was another, but the best one was the scenery of the Verdon Gorges that I now got to do in the light. I’m not sure whether I slept much, but I got some good rest in the warmth of the tent, during which I wondered whether I had enough time to finish by BRM cut-off. The cut off was 11am, and I thought it got light

The Lac de St Croix

about 6am, and I guessed I was at about the 900km mark. That meant 100km to do in 5 hours. That felt doable. In fact when I got up at 6am it wasn’t quite light yet, and the lead rafter was brewing coffee, a cup of which I gratefully drank. At half past 6 it was finally light and I thanked the rafters profusely before setting off. I had 100km to do in 4 and a half hours, which meant 22.5 kph average. Quite hard, I thought, but not impossible. There was a point at which to write off all hopes of finishing in time - and relax, stop at a few cafés and enjoy the scenery. But that point had most definitely not come yet. I stepped on it. I was at about 1000m altitude, so it was a net downhill, but that didn’t mean it was all downhill. From looking at the routesheet I’d worked out that I had probably another couple of 300m climbs to do. Still, it was downhill at the moment, and this felt good as I hammered through Castellane at over 30, the morning mist hanging over the gorge. A bit further on it opened out into a wonderful panorama of the Lac de Sainte Croix, which the Verdon Gorge flows into. As I say doing this section in the light was a real treat and I would urge anyone who did it in the dark to go back there and do it again when they can appreciate it in all its glory. After descending to the lake I found a shop where I got a bottle of fanta and 3 snickers, this would have to do for breakfast, at least it was quick - I wouldn’t waste valuable time waiting to get served. The climb out from the lake was not steep and I took it fairly quickly, passing other riders on the way, who seemed in high spirits, as was I by this point. As I navigated back south from here, the kilometreage seemed to be ticking down faster than the time, and it felt more and more in the bag - I just had to not crash into any of the reversing vans, toddlers, market traders, or overflowing cafés while navigating through the bustling little town of Aups. Through a bit of traffic in Cotignac led to the final descent into Carcès and there it was, the same hall again with its big ‘Arrivée’ banner welcoming riders back. 10:35am comfortably within time. I’d done it. As I sat and ate pasta, drank coffee and chatted to other riders in the hall I thought just what an awesome experience it had been. The route was totally engaging throughout, and getting taken in by the rafters was an experience I’ll never forget. Also, being X-rated, and a big loop rather than an out-and-back, it was a ride that definitely felt like an adventure throughout. I would definitely recommend this route to anyone (who likes hills that is). Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

41


Randonneurs Mondiaux Continental Randonneur Mondiaux organisers meeting

Continental rides in 2014 Just like 4 years ago the events you ride in 2014 decide about your chances of entering PBP 2015. If you do a 1000k or more BRM, in addition to your Super Randonneur series (200, 300, 400, 600 km) you’re served first. There are two 1000k and over rides in the UK in 2014, both having a serious amount of climbing. If that’s a problem for you, or the dates don’t fit with your other commitments, there are plenty of other options just a short ferry ride away. In Northern France, Belgium and the Netherlands there will be five 1000k events and four 1200k events in 2014. Nicely spread out over the months of June, July, August and September. So plenty of choice. The really long rides season starts in Northern France with the 1000k of CC Raches. Information about this event is rather scarce, only a small entry in the French calender: http://ffct.org/randonner-a-velo/ou-quand-pratiquer/calendrier-desrandonnees/details-randonnees/?idr=108770 The event starts on June 28th in Allenes-le-Marais, just south of Lille. My experience with the CC Raches rides is that they are fully X-rated and draw only a small crowd. So prepare to be on your own. The French habit is that riders reserve a room in a Formula 1 hotel, most organisers route their events so that at regular intervals you pass this type of hotel. The first two weeks of July are densely packed with long events On the 2nd of July, starts Herentals – Cosne s/Loire – Herentals, a well established ride which quickly grew into a classic. Several AUK members have participated already and reports about this ride are very positive. This is the luxury way of riding a 1200. Hotels are booked for each night, luggage is transported to the overnight stops and the whole groups starts together each morning after breakfast. Basically it’s a stage ride at randonneur pace. First day a long haul of 365km, the remaing days stay under 300k/day. More information on http://www.randonneurs.be/page/28 The Lowlands 1200, starting on the 8th of july, is a complete contrast to both British events. You’re guaranteed to have no AAA points for the Lowlands. The ride is renowned for having hardly any climbing, sticking to the flat bits of the Netherlands and parts of Belgium and Germany. The Lowlands is organised by Quest rider Gerrit Schotman who is known for his fast routes. Rocco would have loved this one, it’s perfect territory for a fast rocket ride. You won’t be pampered like during the Herentals event but it’s still a far cry from an X-rated event. Several controls are manned, others commercial. So you’ll have a certain degree of service provided. And of course an event shirt. More information will be available on http://www.lowlands1000.nl The slower Lowlands riders are still on the road when further south, near Lille, the CC Orchies starts it’s 1000k event. This leads you to the invasion beaches of Normandy, if you want to combine visiting them while pre-qualifying for Paris-Brest. The Lille area is conveniently reachable by Eurostar to Lille or by ferry to Calais. Information, including a GPS track (a rare thing for French events) is available on: http://www.ccorchies.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=328 July ends with a truly European ride, linking the two seats of the European parliament in Brussels and Strasbourg. Reports about the 2012 edition stress it’s good value for money and the advantage of having hotel accomodation sorted out for each night. So again you’re pampered and it’s more of a stage ride within audax time frames. The ride starts on July 30th at the sports ground in Anderlecht but there’s a neutral section to the European parliament for the official start. Halfway between Brussels and Strasbourg there’s an overnight stop in Verdun. More information on the website of Aurore Cyclo http://aurore-cyclo-sortiesclub.skynetblogs.be/brm-2014 August is a month of 1000k rides, both starting on the 21th of August. Conveniently near the ports of Hoek van Holland and Rotterdam the Zoetermeer-Paris-Zoetermeer 1000k starts in the early evening. It’s an X-rated event although the organiser will await at the control at 42

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

the foot of the Eifel tower. The event gives you a good taste of riding to and from Paris, as will be the job to do in 2015. The routesheet will be of good quality and Leo Förster, the organiser, will provide you with a good GPS track. For those not using GPS there’s even a map of Paris on his website with the route to follow to the Eifel tower. More information on http://www.mrpbp.nl/pagina58.html The same evening, the 21th of august, the CC Raches organises it’s 2nd 1000k event of the year. Starting again in Allenes-le-Marais, just south of Lille. Information is scant again at the moment of writing, nothing more as the basic details of the event as mentioned in the French calender: http://ffct.org/randonner-a-velo/ou-quand-pratiquer/calendrier-desrandonnees/details-randonnees/?idr=108771 For September there remain still two very interesting events, starting with the Borders of Belgium on September 4th. This 1000k along Belgian borders offers you a good cross-section of the country. The ride offers a good balance between the natural beauty of the Ardennes mountains and forests, the forests of the northern regions of Belgium and the historic and cultural monuments, passing through Bruges, the Menenpoort in Ieper and the Roubaix velodrome. On the final day you’ll visist Baarle-Hertog, a Belgian exclave in the Netherlands and pass through the cycling tunnel under the Schelde river in Antwerp. The 2012 edition offered a very good route via many small lanes hardly known even by locals. The organisers offer an X-rated version and a version with two hotels organised by them. More information on their website: http://randocyclobelgium.weebly.com/2014.html The 2014 season finishes on September 15th with a very special ride. No out and back ride or a loop, no you actually ride somewhere, from the Netherlands to Italy. The ride starts in Merselo, near the DutchGerman border and finishes in Verona, at the foot of the Alpes. The ride offers very varying scenery, including some of the best parts of the Rhine valley and a crossing of the Alpes via the Passo di Resia. Again a 1200k where the riders are well taken care of. With an early morning start you can ride the event in 4 stages with 3 hotel/hostel accomodations to offer you a good night’s sleep. Drop-bag facilities and an event shirt add to the quality of the ride. Various international randonneurs and local event organisers assisted in providing a quiet and very scenic route. The website offers a wealth of information in both Dutch and English, including detailed advice how to return to the start. http://merselo2verona.wordpress.com/about/ With this huge amount of events just across Britain’s border there’ll be an event for everyone wishing to gain the highest level of prequalification for PBP or who simply wishes to enjoy a nice long ride Ivo Miesen without too much travel to the start.  Photos opposite, from the top, left to right: Rocky Huang looking confident at the LEL prologue, Igor Ilin (Russia) leading the first group towards Humber Bridge, Fast riders on the one of the first hills north of Humber Bridge, Mixed French/British group climbing to Whorlton, Some inevitable traffic, Barnard Castle, Tim Wainwright photographing on Yad Moss, Some riders chose to push their bikes up the Alston cobbles, Carefully rounding a dangerous corner in the Howardian Hills. www.aukweb.net


Randonneurs Mondiaux

From the Prologue (top left) to the London-Edinburgh -London event, out and back, the bunches gradually slow down and thin out. Photos: Ivo Miesen. Photo titles opposite.

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ArrivĂŠe February 2014 No. 123

43


On Tour

Provence & Southern French Alps

with Sheila Simpson and Francis Cooke David on the Bonette ascent

Bunchlet from the group in the Gorges d’Ubrieux

Needless to say, the average age of riders has been increasing and now ranges right through the 50s, 60s and 70s.

Most of us use European Bike Express to and from Orange, though a few travel by train or fly via Nimes. We carry our own luggage and move on roughly every other day, from hotel to hotel, using the ‘rest’ days to either do just that or to bag some extra cols. We used to get off the bus at Orange (40m) at 07:00 and ride to Buis les Baronnies for lunch and then over the Col de Perty (1302m). Now we ride to Vaison-la-Romaine for coffee and then to Buis les Baronnies (378m), at just 50km, for lunch and a laze around the hotel pool! The aim is not to bag as many cols as we can but simply to have a holiday in warmth and sunshine, in fantastic scenery, with good French food and wine. However, spectacular scenery comes parcelled with plenty of cols. I’ve never recorded all of these and only remember the really good ones, so don’t rely on this account to total up an OCD claim. The real climbs start, right from the doorstep on the second day, with a pretty, well-graded ascent through the Gorges d’Ubrieux to the

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col de Mévouillon (820m) and Sedéron for a picnic round the old village wash-house. Then the col de la Pigière (968m) and a long descent of the Jabron Valley, with a little climb over to Sisteron to wake you up at the end of 73km.

Sisteron, view from hotel

Roughly every other year, we lead a group tour in the French Alps, mostly new faces but with a sprinkling of riders encountered on other tours and Audax rides. In 2013 there were 3 more riders, apart from ourselves, repeating the tour.

There’s a choice of quiet lanes for the halfday ride to Turriers. You can travel the via la Motte du Caire and the Col du Sarraut (980m) or Bayons, with a torturous climb of les Tourniquets to the beautiful, remote col des Sagnes (1200m), for a spectacular descent to Turriers (1,000m) and a first view of the Alps, this year, thanks to the atrocious weather in May, with a reasonable covering of snow. www.aukweb.net


On tour A full rest day next, with a choice: climb the Mont Colombis (1734m) (the second most continuously steep climb that I know), or simply visit the barrage and cafe of the Serre de Poncon - both rides returning up the Gorges de la Blanche...

Our second rest day was the out-and-back to the col d’Allos, for lunch at the Refuge de Napoleon. Followed next day by moving on over the Cayolle.

Helen and Ken lunch above the Gorges de la Blanche

This is a well-graded climb through the Gorges du Bachelard, which only steepens after you cross the bridge (right) into the awesomely beautiful Parc National du Mercantour.

There were plenty of riders of all nationalities enjoying the mountain, one of whom learnt Eve’s age and salaamed deeply as she reached the summit’s stone marker. and over the col des Garcinets (1250m) - or, you can spend a day by the swimming pool. Those are only the foothills - next day we head for the real Alps; back east over the col de Garcinets and over the col de St Jean (1332m) into the valley of the Ubaye, which boasts 7 surrounding cols, all of which have time stamps at the summit to be collected on a card available from the tourist office in Barcelonnette, our destination for 3 nights.

AUK has three permanent rides from here. The toughest is the misleadinglynamed Mini Mercantour. This mini version is a circuit of the cols d’Allos (2240m), Champs (2095m) and Cayolle (2327m), a scenic 119km.

It’s well worth taking your time on the descent as there are views and alpine flowers - mountain pansies in many colours, big blue gentians, orchids, including the yellow alpine species - all worth savouring. It’s a long way down to Guillaumes, often the furthest that many riders have descended. Best feather your brakes to avoid a blowout! Another rest day in Guillaumes. This time to sample the circuit of the Gorges de Cians and Daluis. Fifeteen years ago, there was only the old road down the Cians but the route has been ‘improved’, tunnels built and the old road neglected, though worth a look...

The full Mercantour was three events, run simultaneously at cyclosportif, randonneur and tourist levels by the FFCT. It comprised the cols Cayolle (2326m), Bonette (2802m) and Couillole (1678m), with appropriate loss of height between each(!) but hasn’t been run for several years so I have resurrected it as a 190 km permanent.

Bike attempting a nose dive from Bonette summit

www.aukweb.net

Then through lavender fields to Aurel on the eastern (easy ascent) side of Ventoux. We used to ride to the bus the very next day, over Ventoux (1909m) with luggage. But having found the summit closed one year (for a car rally), we now stay three nights and choose the best (least windy) day for the ascent, either the out-and-back 56km AUK Perm route or one of two longer circuits taking in the Bédoin or Malaucene ascents. That leaves a pretty circuit of the Gorges de Toulourenc, col d’Aulan (845m), descent of the Gorges d’Ubrieux, with lunch again at the pizza restaurant in Buis, and col de Fontaube (755m) for the second rest day. The route to the bike bus can then take in the superb descent of the Gorges de la Nesque, at the bottom of which we are hit by the heat of Rhone valley, to top off the day with early dinner opposite the Orange amphitheatre.

Eve arriving at our favorite Ventoux summet cafe

Last year, most of us tackled the Bonette 60km out-and-back, though nobody actually entered its AUK Perm version. We stood no chance of riding together for 25km uphill but managed to meet up. The snow was at the lowest levels I’ve seen - only one side of the cime was open, just for walkers and cyclists, and it was closing as we left.

whether this or the (longer) south bank is preferable. Our route is undulating but at the end of the day we are ~400m lower than we started, which always has riders feeling good. Some of the best views are at the west end of the canyon or, if you have time for a rest day here, from a pedallo in the gorge itself.

Moving on next day we descended the Daluis and tackled a lightly trafficked main road climb over the col des Toutes Aures (1120m) to the Lac de Castillon and the booming tourist town of Castellane. There is a longer alternative route via Entrevaux and St Auban if you fancy some extra climbs. Our longest moving-on day, 82km to Oraison in the Durance valley, took in the north side of the Grand Canyon du Verdon. There are plenty of view points but it’s a toss-up Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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On tour

Into Shelob’s Lair - and how I learned my 3rd word of Italian

from Francis Cooke I’ve been a member of OCD for almost as long as I have of AUK; never done the claiming thing but always enjoyed the magazine and the pass guides, both generated mostly from postcards sent back to base from touring members, reporting conditions on the ground as they found them. Back in the ‘80s the OCD magazine was a wonderfully low-tech affair - articles and letters mostly typewritten apparently on a variety of machines, and illustrated with sketchy line drawings and maps. The ultimate in retro style though I don’t suppose anyone saw it that way at the time. The drawing reproduced here is signed by John Haigh who was the long-serving Claims Secretary, and dated 1989. It’s a copy of a postcard that was sent to him (copied because the magazine couldn’t do photos at that time), of the Passo di San Boldo (706m) on the southern edge of the Dolomites. I love tunnels, so naturally this image made a big impression on me, and I resolved to visit this place, wherever it was. The road is climbing a gully so narrow that six hairpins are in tunnels to allow enough space. The opportunity arose in 1994. Sheila and I had had a very successful Alpine trip in ‘93, including the superb Marmotte, which seemed like about as much fun as you can have on a bike in one day. Now we wanted to spread our wings a bit further, and resolved to ride the Dolomite Marathon (which was actually run the same weekend as the Marmotte) which is a very similar challenge but ridden over seven passes in total (well, six, with one crossed twice). The Bike Bus took us to Venice, or actually to a campsite on the Lido di Jesolo, a spit of mainland south of the lagoon. There we parked our bikes in a tent and took a waterbus to Venice for a day’s sightseeing, then returned for one night at the campsite (included in the bus fare). Next day we set off heading north round the lagoon, looking for our first taste of the Dolomites. Ah, paper maps. I remember those. In this area the map to use was the TCI (Touring Club Italiano) which was similar to, but not as good as, the Michelin 1:200,000. Like the Michelin, you could buy the road atlas quite cheaply and just tear out the pages you need. Later on, in the mountains, we found some much better local 1:50,000 maps sold by the tabacs and bars, and using these we 46

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were able to find and explore some magnificent passes, both on and off road. But for this first day, as far as I can remember, we just kept the sun on our backs and looked for (a) higher ground and (b) a notch in the skyline that might indicate a pass. Mostly it was pan-flat, and only just above sea level.

This was the best she got - I reckon the postcard photo wasn’t taken from the road but from some better viewpoint on the mountainside.

It wasn’t until after lunch that we saw our first ridge. This was soon crossed and turned out to be a false dawn, but ahead across a wide valley we could see a high cliffscape and, no obvious pass, but by now we were getting brown tourist road signs. Actually, this little road is pretty hard to find on any map, so for reference it is here: 46.004,12.17 (type that into a Google Map). After a day and a night on the bus, a day of strolling round Venice, and a day of flatland cycling, my condition was poor. Although 706m doesn’t seem like much of a climb, we were starting very low on a hot afternoon and I found it hard going. What I didn’t know at that time, but quickly learned in the next few days, was that a typical Dolomite gradient is 14% - unlike the 8%-10% I was more used to in the French Alps. So Sheila had a chance to get ahead and use a precious film (remember film?) to try for a replica of the classic view. www.aukweb.net


On tour

Climbing Passo Sella (2237m) on the Dolomite Marathon photo: Francis Cooke

Things were getting noisy - the road wasn’t by any means empty of traffic and the Italian driving style is nothing if not flamboyant. As a cyclist, the ones to watch out for are the small red cars, and there seemed to be two or three of these heading down through the tunnels. Tyres were squealing and exhausts howling, the tunnel mouths acting like megaphones and the facing rocks bouncing the racket back and forth in the ravine. As the gorge got narrower the visual effect reminded me of the back way into Mordor, as used by the two hobbits in Lord of the Rings. To complete the illusion, we were slowly approaching the first tunnel mouth - Shelob’s Lair! Did I mention that I love tunnels? - what a great ride! These days, I think all these tunnels have traffic light control. When we were there, only the top two did - and that was just one set of lights so we were expected to climb through one blind tunnel, then up the ramp across the ravine, then through the next tunnel, all on one phase of the lights. Well no, but at least we made it into the sunlight before (we had warning) yet another small red car launched itself out of the tunnel mouth opposite. What a din! After that it was one more push through the last tunnel to the top before the lights changed again.

Immediately at the top, we fell into a very unexpected small village, gasping for air. I pointed at a water tap and eyed a nearby villager, and deployed the only two words of Italian I knew - “acqua potabile?”. He cocked an eye back at me, and at the road we had come up, and said “dura!”. I learn fast. “Dura dura” I nodded back. “Dura!”” www.aukweb.net

A week later found us training for the Dolomite Marathon by riding round the Sella Ring. Along with, it seemed, hundreds of other cyclists. The Sella Ring is a 50km road circuit in the heart of the Dolomites, over four passes, amid scenery that is stunning by any alpine standards. Anticlockwise, the passes are Passo Gardena (2121m), Passo Sella (2237m), Passo Pordoi (2239m), Passo Campolongo (1875m).

Then after a big drop and climb to Campolongo we headed over Passo di Valparola (2192m) and another long drop to Cortina, followed by the toughest climb in this area, Passo di Giau (2233m) and another crossing of Campolongo for good measure. About 180km in total with about 5000m of climbing, and the OCD claim for that would have been 12715m, a pretty good day’s work! A novel feature, for us, was that the bunch (of

Sella

Pordoi

Gardena

Corvara

Campolongo

The Sella Ring

But - here’s the thing when looking at an OCD claim - the lowest point on the circuit (Corvara, at the N-E corner) is over 1500m and two of the other three low points are over 1800m. Total climb on the circuit is about 1700m - not a lot for four high passes. Still, all the climbs are big enough for OCD claiming purposes so that total claim of 8472m is a fairly easy day out. Along with the gorgeous scenery, this makes it a great place for OCD types to spend a day or two. You do have to be tolerant of motorcyclists, mind. The Dolomite Marathon itself used some of the same passes but also plunged into some deep valleys so that Campolongo, for example, was transformed into a monster climb. Instead of Passo Pordoi it took us over Passo Fedaia (2057m) - a long straight tunnel was eerily lit by naked-flame flares at intervals, burning by the roadside about ankle-high. (Did I mention I love tunnels?)

profile by: GPS Visualizer

several thousands) was almost exclusively German-speaking. Not that there was much breath to spare for conversation. Sheila had a long wait at the finish because I had a lot of puncture trouble on the day, due to a plastic rim tape melting on the descents, and so I ended up on the final climb with the broom waggon grinding along never more than a bend behind me. We finished our trip by exiting over mighty Stelvio (2757m). This was another sonic spectacular, with every grumble of thunder from above answered by a sinister crackling of ice from nearby glaciers, then rolling around the vast landscape for ever. This was just a bit too much drama, and ensured that a climb we had thought might take us four hours, took only three. Scenically we found more beauty on the quiet and narrow Passo di Gavia (2621m) - and then downhill all the way to Lake Como to catch the bus. Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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On Tour

Four go to Bormio (If we can do it, anyone can) Graham Merrington and Adrian Flewitt photos by Gid Aroussi and Adrian...

Good grief. My life was flashing before my eyes and, to be frank, it was slightly dull. That was up until now. I was entering the only tunnel on the Gavia some 3km from the summit and it was not lit, the gradient was steep (8.5%) and in a fit of idiocy, known only to those trying to save weight and reduce every gram carried on their bike, I’d fitted a lightweight front light that managed to penetrate the gloom no further than my front tyre. The ethereal silence of the tunnel caused by the darkness and fog (how did the fog get in the tunnel?) was rudely broken by motor bikes coming down

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towards me. I needed to get to the right hand side ... but where was that? My bearings were shot, my senses dulled by the conditions and 14 to 15km of riding up hill. The motor bike lights filtered through towards me to reveal I was in their lane. I swerved to the right and got off, waiting for them to pass. If I wasn’t so tired, I’m sure I would have been somewhat shaken, the bonus of fatigue. I put my right hand on the tunnel wall and walked the rest of the way, till I could see the milky light at the exit of the tunnel. Only 2 km to go to the top, surely over the worst now I thought, I should really have known better..

Above: the Stelvio descent

In terms of cycling prowess it is important to point out that we are not in the ‘hard as nails’ category ...

Below: Graham, Rob and Adrian approach Stelvio summit

A year in the planning Four of us had decided to take on two of Pat Cherry’s Ibex rides (3 and 4), those including the iconic climbs of the Stelvio, Mortirolio and Gavia and the underrated (by us anyway) Umbrail. The trip, a year in the planning, had started with a flight from Heathrow and a longish drive to Bormio in a hire car through some spectacular scenery and unsurprisingly slow roads. The whole ‘flights with bikes thing’ had caused much anxious faffing with bubble wrap, pipe cladding and cardboard, but all was well and the bikes were undamaged and ridable (Swiss Air include bikes in their luggage allowance). We had decided to do the Stelvio and Umbrail passes the first day and the Mortirolio and Gavia the second. Both were just over 100km, but with 3000m climbing for each one it was never going to be an easy weekend. In terms of cycling

www.aukweb.net


On Tour prowess it is important to point out that we are not in the ‘hard as nails’ category, whose tales of 1000s of km, abject suffering for the cause and being driven to the point at which consuming one’s own innards or a petrol station sausage roll seem the only option for survival, that often frequent the pages of Arrivee. We very much fit into the mere mortal, ”let’s stop for a nice coffee” category of audaxers. Choices of accommodation in Bormio were plenty in early September and we got an apartment a short walk from the town centre, which is very pretty, with plenty of excellent restaurants and a couple of good supermarkets. A key challenge of riding in the mountains at the start of any day is choice of clothing and what to carry ‘just in case’. The forecasts on all of the well known weather websites for the area had ranged from ‘5-10 degrees and rain’ up to ‘25 degrees and sunny’. Shorts, short sleeved jerseys and arm warmers it was, aside from Adrian who had decided to bring only his winter cycling boots. We gave him a hard time on this, which was to haunt us sadly the next day.

Day 1 the Stelvio On the Saturday morning it looked clear and mild. The route sheets supplied by Pat are excellent, with a map too, and signage to the Stelvio is unsurprisingly very good. We set off out of town with an international peloton of riders up the early slopes of the Stelvio. Adrian and I had triple chainsets and Rob and Gid had double compacts with 29 rear sprockets. As it turned out, every gear was used. The Stelvio was long, but not too hard (average 7.5%) although I went through my usual suffering and misery at the start, but after about half-way I picked up. The road was quite busy, which I expect it always is, motor bikes, sports cars and many cyclists. After the snow tunnels (which are not dark as light comes in the sides) and the major set of switch backs (this is the southern side) the road flattens and straightens and you can see the top although it is still some km off. Physically, it is difficult to see how you might train for these types of climb in the UK, the grade is relentless and I think the key is to find a pace, no matter how slow, you are comfortable with and keep plodding. To be fair, this is a mantra for many of my audaxes, so mentally I was in the same kind of place. www.aukweb.net

After a couple of hours we reached the summit, which was a relief and a disappointment. The summit of the Stelvio is a grizzly tourist strip of shops selling tat that wouldn’t grace a shooting gallery. After the obligatory photos and stamp for the card we quickly set off down the other side. The descent off the Stelvio is fantastic, although very technical at the top, but the road was dry and conditions excellent. The temperature rose dramatically as we came down and we stopped off in Prato dello Stelvio to fill our water bottles, refuel at a cafe and get a stamp. It is perhaps worth saying that at this point we had mentally decided that the main event, the Stelvio, was over. Only the Umbrail to go. The weather was perfect, hot even, and things were looking good.

Above: Don’t underestimate the Umbrail - Rob having just seen Elvis

When we got back we collected our final stamp for the day and in the evening visited one of the many excellent restaurants in Bormio, before going back to the apartment to fret about what the weather would be like tomorrow and whether the Mortirolo really was as bad as people said!

The Umbrail The drag to the bottom of the Umbrail was longer than we had expected and included a considerable amount of going up. The temperature had risen to 33 degrees and before we turned onto the climb we stopped to fill our bottles again. The Umbrail is only 13.5 km long and I’d read on various blogs (by heroes riding Italian racing steeds using gearing of 42 x 18 I expect) that it was nothing to worry about. Yet, the combination of the temperature, gradient and psychological unpreparedness meant we all needed to ride at our own pace, which was mostly very slowly. The bottom of the climb is wooded, with a great road surface and many steep switch backs. The road breaks out of the trees onto a section of unsurfaced rubbish that on this day was also combined with that greatest cruelty of riding in the mountains; the block headwind. It is at this point, having been convinced that such is the effort you’re putting in that you’ve just seen Elvis through sweat stung eyes, you pray for swift deliverance, perhaps cleaned up by a motorbike. The road stretches out before you and at this point I could see Adrian many switch backs ahead and Rob just behind. All were fighting their own personal battles and regretting not cutting back on beer much earlier in the year. The end finally did arrive (not under a motorbike) and we drifted to the top of the Umbrail’s flat summit, exhausted but pleased to have made it. The Ubrail summit is on the shoulder of the Stelvio and

the descent back to Bormio is excellent, just be careful of the road surface in those snow tunnels.

Day 2 the Mortirolo

... the grade is relentless and I think the key is to find a pace, no matter how slow, you are comfortable with and keep plodding

The second day dawned overcast and damp. This led to a great deal of ‘Elton John’ style histrionics about what should and shouldn’t be worn. Suffice it to say, I made the wrong call, of which more later. As we left the apartment and got a stamp it started to rain. The forecast was for intermittent light showers, which as it turned out must have been similar to what convinced Noah to build the Ark, as it threw it down till the road was nearly flooded. Thankfully, the first 30 km is down hill to the foot of Mortirolo and it is important that at this stage all navigation aids are on, because the start of the climb is not so easy to find (ignore the first sign for the Mortirolo). Going the wrong way uphill, having already very heavy legs from the previous day and having braved the wet cobbles in the villages on route, would have caused mutiny in the ranks. The fact that Lance Armstrong, fuelled by heaven knows what, thought the Mortirolo was the toughest climb he’d ever done should have been ample warning to four blokes in their forties on porridge and strong tea. This climb starts brutally, bottom gear stuff straight away and not to be changed. Gid, by far the strongest amongst us, had said in a jocular fashion that we shouldn’t

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On Tour The Gavia With some trepidation we set off for the Gavia – 17 km long and another iconic pass. The route we took sent us through a small village and onto the foot of the Gavia. We had agreed to all ride at our own pace and meet in the cafe at the summit.

Above: It looks steep because it is. Adrian on the Mortirolo.

worry as it gets easier further up. This turned out to be a hurtful lie of staggering proportions. The road surface is largely rubbish, broken tarmac and the gradients on the lower slopes are 15-18%. Nearer the top, the Pantani monument is a great excuse to stop and have a photo call. The climb fits into the ‘epic’ category, only 11.5km long but makes the wooded section of the Ventoux from the Bédoin side seem benign. It is treelined nearly all the way up and the mizzle that accompanied us kept us cool, but did limit tyre traction. When we finally arrived at the top, Rob and I in the gruppetto (is two enough to form a gruppetto?) Gid and Adrian had been waiting a while and had started to look

somewhat chilled. There is nothing at the summit, aside from a sign post. Rob had decided he had enough and was not keen to go on to the Gavia. He turned back and returned to Bormio. Three of us descended in the pouring rain on a well surfaced and what would have been a fast road in the dry. At this point I was wearing all the clothing I had, undershirt, jersey, gilet, rain cape, long fingered gloves – for the record, not enough.

The fact that Lance Armstrong, fuelled by heaven knows what, thought the Mortirolo was the toughest climb he’d ever done should have been ample warning ...

We reached the valley floor and so began a rather long and largely uphill ride to Ponte di Legno. We were all out of water and were in a good need of a sit down and hot drink before going on to the Gavia. We found a cafe and refuelled and got a stamp.

Thanks to Pat for the routes, his review of the GPX files and his encouragement before the off.

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The cafe at the top of the Gavia is excellent and full of wet cyclists from all over the world. The photos on the walls are worth looking at, especially the one of the 2m snow banks in June. I met the others and both stated how terrified they were in the tunnel, both had excellent lights, which made me feel slightly better. Now we only had the 30 km descent back to Bormio. As we left the cafe the rain started again. In the rather jolly way that is Adrian’s hallmark he informed us that the temperature now was “just 6 degrees”. I was wearing all I possessed aside from my two spare inner tubes and a tyre boot. We started to descend and I was already shivering before the first hairpin. After about 10 of these I had to stop to get feeling back in my hands. The others went in front and I began slowly going down on my own. They both came back for me at the bottom to see if I was okay, and to much hilarity I was so cold I couldn’t speak.

Below: More clothing needed. Gid and Graham layer up for the descent of the Mortirolo

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The rain began as we started the climb and I watched from the lower switch backs as Gid and Adrian disappeared into the gloom. The Gavia was less steep than either the Mortirolo or the Umbrail and as I gained altitude, even in the rain, I began to enjoy it more and more. There were very few cars and the low hum of my tyres on the wet road together with the strange light as the sun tried to break through the fog gave the scene an eerie feel. The gradient slackens in the middle of the climb and helped by a tail wind it made me feel like I was really progressing. This was what cycling for me was all about and every so often the clouds would part and I could see the valley below and the peaks around me. Then I reached that tunnel.

Both days had been truly incredible and will live long in the memory. To ride iconic mountain passes in such incredible surroundings was the stuff to bore the grandchildren about. There is always something to learn from days in the mountains in bad weather; good lights, more clothing and try and enjoy it. And remember, even audax mortals can do this stuff. www.aukweb.net


On Tour OCD Claims for 2013 AUK

RANK (TBA)

location

TOTAL 2013

Claim 2013 TOTAL 2012

Venerable

2273000

119613

Claim 2012

Chard

Ronald

Clarke

Sue

Venerable

1380022

30324

Clarke

Tony

Venerable

1445484

30324

Cowham

Gerald

Honourable 12

564000

44104

Dalitz

Rod

Commander

Europe

277795

21633

256162

7319

Eichmeier

Harald

Venerable 11

Europe

1327820

141267

1186553

156155

6765

Haggar

Mark

35684

35684

1403

Johnston

Duncan

266934

53834

213100

50296

2327

Morgan

Mary

7989

3819

2326

Morgan

Steven

4255

3817

1369

Poulton

Stephen

Officer 13

186225

9344

176881

10682

119613 687152

5786

429

Commander 13

Rattray

Julie

Venerable

2115000

AUK

Swallow

Judith

Officer 13

100800

60

Wanless

Graham

Honorable 06

705927

Waterton

Robert

Honorable 07

635735

19513

Waterton

Helen

Honorable 08

650445

19513

Webb

Alan

Commander 09

291595

38070

A number of regular OCD members appear not to have recognised that they can still claim, a number of AUK members have claimed and more continue to come in, but now we have to draw a line. Ideally

18775

claims should have been made before now but riders can claim retrospectively back to 1960, when Ordre des Cols Durs was formed. So, no hurry. Rod Dalitz

On Test - Thermosoles In the 2009/2010 winter I rode Mike Wigley’s “200k round the year challenge”. On a number of occasions riding 12 to 13 hours in subzero temperatures. Whilst my feet felt cold initially, the freezing conditions soon numbed them and I carried on cycling regardless. Once my feet thawed out, it became apparent (pain) that I had done serious damage to the nerves and circulation. This is irreversible and I had to limit my rides in cold weather to prevent further damage. However, a solution has arrived in the form of Thermosoles, which are electrically heated innersoles for your cycling footwear. The attached diagram shows the main features - but in essence these insoles have a thin electric plate under the ball of your foot which is powered by a lithium polymer battery and associated circuitry. Battery life varies from 2 to 8 hours depending on the external temperature. Recharging (up to 500 times claimed) takes about 4 hours from empty. My experience to date indicates that battery life at current external temperature of approx 4 deg C is 3 to 4 hours. Feet do not feel warm, rather an “absence of cold” which must mean that the heating is regulated to maximise battery life. The soles switch on/off at the heel. It is best to extract soles and switch off at cafe stops to avoid wasting battery life. Or to carry a fully charged pair of insoles to replace used ones. The soles are very light and easy to pack. Sizes quoted are a little large and trimming is limited because of the heating elements. You may need a one size larger cycling shoe/boot best to get the soles first and then check. The forward part of the insole is thin and flat, similar to a normal insole. The heel of the insole is raised a little. This should not be a problem and a positive advantage to those of us with high foot arches. (Might be a problem for the flat footed - please check with an expert) There are 2 models, normal and 3D. The latter is specifically designed for cyclists and runners to give good foot support and that is the one I have purchased to good effect. The 3D models are currently available from a source in Austria at 119 Euros + 5 Euro p&p. A quick google search gives the link and order info. Reassuringly, there is a UK service David Matthews centre available. www.aukweb.net

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Randonneurs Mondiaux

London-Edinburgh-London 2013 Finish List KEY: AT=Austria, AU=Australia, BE=Belgium, BG=Bulgaria, BR=Brazil, BY=Belarus, CA=Canada, CH=Switzerland, CN=China, DE=Germany, DK=Denmark, ES=Spain, FI=Finland, FR=France, GB=Great Britain, GR=Greece, HR=Croatia, IE=Ireland, IN=India, IT=Italy, JP=Japan, LT= Lithuania, NL=Netherlands, NO=Norway, PL=Poland, RU=Russia, SE=Sweden, SG=Singapore, SI=Slovenia, TW=Taiwan, US= USA, UZ= Uzbekistan, ZA=South Africa

Mellauner Michl M Minihold Markus M Schoenhart Markus M Watzl Horst M Zaba Christoph M Bentley Michael M Guy Craig M Lehane Pat M Maddison Simon M Pearson Martin M Smith Kerri-Ann F Anderson Chris M BRICHANT Miguel M Nizette Alain M NOLLEVAUX Claude M Roefs Guy M Rolland Gérald M Vaneeckhout André M VANMARSENILLE F M Vanmarsenille R M Kosev Petar M Dünner Richard M Macedo Nilson M Pereira de Castro M Sikar Daniel M Rudakou Yury M Bernhardt Luis M Bonner Kenneth M Côté Benoît M Deschenes Rene M Grant Peter M Lacelle Martin M McCaw David M Nichol Keith M Overduin Liz F Payne Terry M Person Ed M Shuralyov Stan M Smith Maurice M Wyne Theo M Adams Will M Barras Sylviane F Barras Jean-Paul M Bucher Karsten M Frommenwiler Remy M Luescher Alexandra F Schmid Peter M Wacker Andreas M Gereonsson Staffan M Alt Thomas M BÄR Stefan M Beyer Stephan M Block Carsten M Bressan Angelo M Brockmann Günther M Dehnert Hans Georg M Demuth Fabian M Drescher Joerns M Eberhardt Dr. Peter M Eckstein Hajo M Eickelberg Cornelius M Ernst Bernhard M Felber Dino M Felber Michael M 52

AT AT AT AT AT AU AU AU AU AU AU BE BE BE BE BE BE BE BE BE BG BR BR BR BR AUK BY CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA AUK CA CA CA CA CA CA CH CH CH CH CH CH CH CH CN DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE

Fellendorf Mike M Fingerhut Istvan M Freising René M Fuchs Ciril M Fuller Michael M Gehrmann Ulrich M Geist Detlef M Grau Andrew M Grau Thomas M Grebe Frank M Grunwald Winfried M Hansen Frank M Hartfeld Frank M Hassebrauck Thomas M Hassel Stefan M Heiber Tom M Heller Martin M Heyl Ludwig M Heyne Klaus M Hilgers Olaf M Himmel Morten M Hoenig Christoph M Hoetschl Konrad M Hofmeister Wolfgang M Holz Max M Houben Rudolf M Huber Armin M Jaufmann Gert M Jekel Manuel M Käb Armin M Kahl Silvio M Kaiser Jochen M Kaluschke Peter Kaminski Bernd M Keil Andreas M Klasen Stepp M Köhler Jürgen M König Axel M Krauss Alexander M Krenz Roger M Krohne Uwe M Kurzke Joerg M Landtau Stefan M Leissner Jochen M Linnemann Gerhard M Ludaescher Dieter M Madsen Helle F Maier Christoph M Margraf Kerstin F Martens Jürgen M Meid Patrick M Menzel Heinrich M Möhl Christian M Mueller Dirk M Nagel Manfred M Nagel Michael M Nitsche Wolfgang M Nolte Wolfram M Ollerdissen Stefan M Patzner Gabriele F Pauli Gerhard M Pless Simon M Pluns Ingo M Probst Michael M

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Rediske Meinhard M Rigter Bart M Ritter Thomas M Ritter Marita F Robbes Andreas M Rohde Uwe M Sacchi Rainer M Schade Andreas M Schiwon Uwe M Schmelting Tim M Schmitten Volker M Schmutzler Gerhard M Schoen Fritz M Schoenemann Ulrich M Schwanke Horst M Schweidler Franz M Seier Tobias M Serr Markus M Stenz Gernot M Störmer Ralf M Strecker Ingrid F Thiessen Florian M Thomsen Thies M Tichy Martin M Trepke Rainer M Viehl Roger M Vogelsang Peter M Wagner Andreas M Weise Frank M Willipinki Lars M Wimmer Christian M Wulff Henning M Zessin Joerg M Zimmermann Birgit F Aerts Peter M Ahrenholt Jesper M Andersen Jorgen M Christensen Hans M Christensen Claus M Gravesen Jens M Kjær Lars Christian M Krogh Helge M Larsen René M Mølgaard Erik M Petersen Martin M Rasmussen Christian M Alastuey Albillos M Almagro FÃbregas M Andrey Jose Manuel M Bajo Flores David M Berrueta Amiano F CAMPOS OLIVARES M Elorza Enekoitz M Fernández Palmeiro M Garcia Mundet M GONZALEZ T M Jimenez Castillo M Lizarribar Echaide M Mur Anselmo M Paredes Camargo M Queralt Torne Alex M Rodriguez Nuñez M SUNYER JORDI M VALLS ROIG JORDI M

DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE AUK DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DE AUK DE DE DE DE DE DE DE DK DK DK DK DK DK DK DK DK DK DK DK ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES ES

Foster Alexander M Mäkipää Mikko M Marttila Markus M Salonen Jaakko M Stedt Pertti M AMRHEIN Christophe M Aubrion Pierre M Aurelien Mesguich M BACHELARD PASCAL M BARBAUX Yves M BOUCHET philippe M Boudigou Didier M BOUILLOT Guy M Branly Pascal M BRAT Gerard M BRIOT JEAN-PAUL M CARRIER YVES M CHABIRAND Jean-C M CIBRARIO Jackie M DELATTRE Franck M DIVAY Marcel M Echevest Philippe M FABUREL Jean-G M FABUREL Geneviève F FITZHUGH N M Flaux Marcel M GELEDAN Eric M Gibon Stéphane M Gorog Sylvie F GREZE Gérard M HINGANT PATRICE M Houee Lionel M HUME Didier M JULIE Marc M KERAUTRET ROBERT M KERHERVÉ Lisette F KERHERVÉ Jean-P M Kleinert Dominique M LABARBE Philippe M Laurent Pierre M le Coarer Yvon M le Mélédo Hervé M Le Roux Pierre M LECOEUR Marcel M LEON richard M Lestic Herve M LITTRE Guy M LOUZAS Philippe M MACHON Jean-P M MARTIN Véronique F Mary Jean-pierre M Masterton Stephen M

FI FI FI FI FI FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR

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Randonneurs Mondiaux MATHIEU Bruno M Mauduit Christian M MERIE CHRISTOPHE M Merlevède Frédéric M Michel Bailleul M Mignot Vivian M NOEL LAGARDE M Peguin Bernard M PERNELLE Bruno M Ratle Alain M RESZETKO Pascal M Robinet Marc M SALLET Jean-Claude M Sbrissa Piergiorgio M Veilpeau Fabien M VERMEIRE JEAN-M M Verouden Henk M Vignoles Pascal M Weber Patrick M Abraham Steven M Agnew Stephen M Alderson David M Alderson Paul M Aldis Martyn M Allison David M Arias Gonzalez M Arundel Martin M Atkinson David M Auty Louis M Baird Rob M Barkman John M Bastiani John M Batty Anthony M Baudry Agnes F Beasley Simon M BENTON Keith M Berg Steen M Bialek Robert M Bishop Roy M Black Don M Booth Jonathan M Bowden Simon M Breed Christopher M BROWN Julian M Brown Andrew M Brown Graeme M Brown Cathy F Brown Ashley M Browning David M Bryce Steven M Buck Byron M Bullyment Rob M Burdeau Ishmael M Butcher Stephen M Butterworth Steven M Calder Robbie M Cameron Andrew M Campbell Fred M Carrington James M Carroll Jordan M Carroll Anthony M Castle Tim M Chambers Mark M Chappell Jocelyn M Charlton Mark M Churchard James M CLARK NICK M Clark Andrew M Clarke Roy M www.aukweb.net

FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR FR GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB GB AUK

Clarkson Andrew M Clayton Lindsay F Clegg Simon M Cockwell Roly M Cole Julian M Cole Paul M Comiskey Glenn M Connolly Chris M Conyers Paul M Cooper Elliot M Cornell Ivan M Coupe David M Court-Howden Alan M Cox Andy M Cox Gavin M Cox Iain M Crossley Samuel M Crossman Edward M Cullen Christopher M D’Oyle Edward M Dancy Malcolm M Davies Colin M Davies Kristian M Daw Sally F Daws Simon M Dawson Stephen M Day Lara F Dean Tynan M Deaner Andrew M Decker Tim M Dennison Stuart M Dixon Ritchie M Dobbs Chris M Doris Kathryn F Dossett Bill M Dowthwaite Mark M Doyle Ian M Duggan John M Dunbar Bruce M Dyson Julian M Eady John M Ellis Richard M Ericsson Lars M Evans David M Evans Richard M Fairweather Mark M Faulks Peter M Fenton Caroline F Field Patrick M Firth Nick M Fisher Ron M FitzPatrick Alistair M Fortune Simon M Foster Alex M Garner Lee M Gent Simon M Gibbons Paul M Giles Malcolm M Glaze Nigel M Glover Darrel M Goodall Tony M Gothard Ben M Goucher Richard M Gough Nicola F Gray Mark M Gray Colin M Gray Jonathan M GB Green Arthur M Green Mark M

GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB GB GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK AUK GB AUK GB AUK

Greenwood Tony M Greenwood David M Gresty Jim M Grundy Clive M Hadlington Rauri M Hagger Mark M Haigh Matthew M Hallam Matthew M Hallett Ian M Hanna George M Hanson Simon M Hargraves Edwin M Harper Robin M Harper Georgina F Harris David M Hatton David M Heaney Steve M Hellawell Ian M Hendriksen Daniel M Henley Mike M Hill Deane M Hill Diccon M Hodges Terry M Hodgson Philip M Hooper David M Howard Dan M Howell Kevin M Hufton Stuart M Hughes Adrian M Hummerstone Mark M Humphrey Julian M Hurd Chris M Hurt Pat M Hutchinson Brett M Hyman David M Imrie Lee M Irvine Dominic M Irvine David M Jacklin Mark M Jackson Thomas M Jackson John M Jackson Nick M Jackson-Baker M M Jago Brian M James Daniel M Jennings Richard M Johnson Peter M Johnson Bob M Johnson Paul M Joiner Ray M Jones Nigel M Jones Simon M Joy-Smith Luke M Kahn David M Kellar Ian M Kelly John M King Garry M Kinsey Adam M Kirkland Mel M Kitagawa Toshihiko M Knight Howard M Lagan Adrian M Lane Mike M Lees Andrew M Leonard Richard M Lewis Barry M Lewis Peter M Lewis Maggie F Lison Mark M

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Lockett Alexander M Lovelock Ian M Lucas Martin M Maciver Kenneth M Magnus Philip M Makaya Idai M Malone Mark M Maples Zak M Markey Paul M Marsay Richard M Marshall Peter M Marshall Andrew M Marshall Paul M Martin Stephen M Matthews Mark M McCulloch Graeme M McDonogh Alan M McLaren Luke M McLaren Alan M McLean Stuart M McLeod Jamie M Melling Duncan M Mennicke Peter M Merrison Kevin M Middleton Edward M MILNE ROY M Minter Dave M Monk Chris M Moody Michael M Moore Stuart M Neall Caroline F Neatham Simon M Newton Dallas M Noha Denise F Ornadel Dan M Parker Richard M Parkinson Alan M Parsons Julian M Partis Matthew M Pash Rod M Pearce Matthew M Peeke Alex M Pember Tony M Perry Ian M Phillips Chris M Pillinger Shusanah F Plummer Julian M Plumstead Mike M Pocock Gareth M Powell Dai M Preston Andrew M Proven Simon M Rainbow Paul M Ralphs Steve M Reid Ian M Revell Paul M Reynolds Fred M Richardson Bill M Rickard James M Roberts Jonathan M Roberts Paul M Robertson Alex M Robinson Ray M Robson Phil M ROGERS STEVE M Rowe John M Rumble Stephen M Ryall Ian M Sachs David M

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Randonneurs Mondiaux Sammons Kevin M Saparnis Edvinas M Scoble Edward M Scott Phil M Sear Paul M Selby Smith Chris M Sharpe Adam M Sheldon Bill M Sheldrake Mike M Shinn Daniel M SHIRE MALCOLM G M Simmonds Rob M Simon Peter M Sladdin Martyn M Slade Stephen M Small James M Smith Chris M Smith Dave M Smith Mark M Snelson Robin M Snook John M Sollesse Tim M Soor Yeshpaul M Southwood Tauny M Southwood Debbie F Spencer-Jones Jon M Spooner Simon M Spooner John M Stainton-Ellis Jon M Steen Michael M Stephens Trevor M Stickings Daryl M Straughan John M Straughan Ian M STRIBLING ALAN M Stringer James M Sudell Philip M Summers Arthur M Swallow Judith F TATTERSALL MI M Taylor Michael M Taylor Gary M Taylor Tim M Taylor Mathews Tom M Taylor-Vebel Andy M Tedd Christopher M Teoh Seet M Thomas Richard M Thomas Robyn M Thomason Martin M Thompson Mark M Thomson Ken M Thurlow Gregor M Till Simon M Tolley Andrew M Tomes Robin M Tredget Pete M Trevett Dominic M Turnbull Peter M Turner Michael M Turner Will M Twigg Richard M Veitch Neil M WADDINGTON A M Wadsworth Patrick M Wahrlich Gene M Walker Stephen M Walton Peter M Wanatko Artur M Watson Robert M Watts Chris M 54

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Watts Bob M Webb Robert M Webb Jason M Weller John M White Bruce M Whitehead Paul M Whitehurst Phil M Whittle Darrell M Wigley Mike M Wilkinson Nick M Williams Robert M Williams Luke M Wills Andrew M Wood Robert M Woodhouse John M Worters Jonathan M Young Adam M Zoccheddu Gianluigi M Carabassis Manos M DIMPAMPIS P M Papazis Mike M Patelos Panteleimon M Streich Steffen M VOULGARAKIS E M Voutzali Vasiliki F XIROGIANNIS K M Bursic Ares M Fojs Darko M Barry Eoghan M Bayley David M Brunicardi Mike M Burke Senan M Carey Ronan M Creaner Aidan M Diamond Niall M Finnigan David M Flavin Daniel M Kilduff Marc M McNamara Noel M MOORE RONALD M Ni Fhatharta Niamh F O’Donoghue Paul M O’Mearain Cian M O’Sullivan Kevin M O’Sullivan John M Ryan Damian M Patel Hiren M Alfano Costantino M AMEDEI STEFANO M Anti Giuseppe M Baron Stefano M BERTOSSI GIOVANNI M Bonicelli Michele M Brunelli Luca M Burini Luigi M Colonetti Luca M Coppari Marco M De Filippi Pietro M De Marchi Sabrina F Del Bono Giuseppe M DELLA SALA PAOLO M DELLA SALA PIETRO M Ferrarese Vincenzo M Garbari Umberto M GUGOLE CLAUDIA F LABBOZZETTA S M Masiero Renzo M Monti Giampiero M Nugnes Maurizio M Repossini Mino M ROMEI PAOLO M

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GB AUK GR GR GR GR GR GR GR GR HR HR IE AUK IE IE IE IE IE IE AUK IE IE IE IE IE IE IE AUK IE IE AUK IE AUK IE IN IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT IT

TADIELLO ANTONIO M Valsesia Dario M AOKI MASAKAZU M Bando Tsukasa M HIGASHI KIYOTAKE M Inagaki Mitsuaki M ISHIHARA TAKAYUKI M Ito Takao M Iwamoto Chikara M Kanari Kotaro M Kazuhiro Miura M Kimura Shunsuke M Litt David M NAGASHIMA H M OGAWA TATSUYA M Okubayashi Tsutomu M Suzuki Naoshi M Tokihiko MASAOKA M TOMIOKA YASUHIKO M Yahagi Tomoharu M Tuchtenhagen Ralf M Akkerman Ben M Beumer Gert M de Jong Anco M de Jong Arvid M Driessen Peter M Edema Jan M Haberlah Joerg M Houlleberghs Bart M Kamphuis Henk M Keijzer Fred M Leskens Anne M Meijer Gerco M Rademacher Frank M Schuurmans Wytze M Van der Meer L M Van Happen Jos M van Kuik Luuk M Waltman Frenk M Wissink Jan M Zeeh Markus M Bidacha Maciej M Bielenis Dariusz M Bijak Arkadiusz M Binkowski Andrzej M Buraczynski G M Gosciniak Wojciech M Huzar Henryk M Ignasiak Tomasz M Janicki Grzegorz M Klos Slawomir M Koziol Jacek M Kwapisiewicz Piotr M Lancucki Krzysztof M Nalazek Marcin M Osmanowski Piotr M Palucki Alexander M Pikula Jerzy M Piorkowski Stanislaw M Poplawski Jaroslaw M Rogoz Grzegorz M Sadek Rafal M Sekulski Pawel M Szyszka Artur M Tracz Jerzy M URZYCZYN CEZARY M Zurakowski Waclaw M Dunaev Alexander M Il’in Igor M Kryuchkov Dmitriy M Volkov Oleg M

IT IT JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP JP LT NL NL NL NL AUK NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NL NO PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL PL RU RU RU RU

Carlander Lotta M Classon Per-Åke M Egebäck Per-Erik M Eriksson Per Olof M Eriksson Henrik M Iivonen Ari M Jansson Jan-Olov M Karlsson Lars Johan M Linder Anders M Mellsop Tony M Möller Ulrika F Ohlanders Gunnar M Pettersson Åsa F Rosén Per Eric M Sandborgh Bengt M Sjöblom Reimert M Stenbeck Per M Loh Teck Meng M Yee Siew F Kavcic Tanja M Krasna Simon M Vovk Edi M Zaman Andrej M Jug Dejan M Pecar Bostjan M CHANG HSUEH-H M Juan Chien-Yeh M TZU-CHIANG HUANG M Yu Yi-Peng M Yuan-Sheng Tseng M Akbarian Hamid M Bell Carol F Boltz H. Edward M Booth Robert M Brougher Michele F Burke Brian M Carr Norman M Chin-Hong Patrick M CLAMP JONATHAN M Cramer Cathy F Dembinski Jan M Dosik Thomas M Goldin Norman M Heath Robert M Houck Timothy M Landis Robin M Larson Lesli F Leahy Patrick M LYNCH Theresa F Mangin III L. John M Misicko Greg M Morris John M Murray Paul M Nygard Jonas M Otcenas Susan F Placiakis Vidas M Poletto Massimiliano M Rouse Kevin M Tanner Bradford M Thompson W David M Tyer Vickie F Watts William M Yesko Stephen M Obliyarov Jamshid M Sulemin Rafkhat M Bucar Slavko M Critcher Gillian F Gahan Michelle F Grey Nigel M Jacobs Emmerentia F Walker Rob M

SE SE SE SE SE SE SE AUK SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SG SG SI SI SI SI Sl Sl TW TW TW TW TW US US US US US US US US US AUK US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US US UZ UZ ZA ZA ZA ZA ZA ZA

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Permanent Events online at: http://www.aukweb.net/cal/perms/index.htm Dist AAA Title Reid Anderson 200 2.75 Fleet Moss Randonnee Joe Applegarth DIY PERMANENTS SERIES (north east organiser) 1,000, 800, 600, 400, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50 David Atkinson 160 2.5 Daves Dales Tour 200 3 Daves Dales Tour Plus 200 3.25 Daves Dales Tour Plus Mk2 100 2 Daves Mini Dales Tour 100 0 Lucias Vale of York Meander Mark Beauchamp 200 0 A taste of the test An anoraks delight 200 0 George Berwick 2260 0 Round the Coast 1500 0 The Eightsome Reel 2600 0 The Scottish Star 600 0 The Twilight 600 Colin Bezant Cambrian Series 1,000 - 100 100 2 Col de Bavella 400 6.75 Col de Sevi Col de Verde 210 3 600 9.5 Col de Vergio 315 5.75 Col de Vizzavone Don Black 208 4.5 Bowland 200 100 2.25 Bretton 100 115 2.75 Edale 100 200 3.5 Manchester Loop 203 3.5 Round the West Riding 170 3.5 Slaidburn 170 133 2.75 Up and Down the West Riding 110 2.5 Widdop 110 203 0 Round Britains Coast, St. Just - Salcombe Round Britains Coast , Salcombe - Wareham 204 0 209 0 Round Britains Coast , Wareham - Lewes Round Britains Coast , Lewes - Dartford 209 0 200 0 Round Britains Coast , Dartford - Lowestoft 205 0 Round Britains Coast , Lowestoft - Coningsby 208 0 Round Britains Coast , Coningsby - Eastfield 210 0 Round Britains Coast , Eastfield - Alnwick 201 0 Round Britains Coast , Alnwick - Glenrothes Round Britains Coast , Glenrothes - Inverurie 203 0 Round Britains Coast , Inverurie - Inverness 206 0 214 0 Round Britains Coast , Inverness - Thurso 201 0 Round Britains Coast , Thurso - Ullapool Round Britains Coast , Ullapool - Mallaig 215 0 208 0 Round Britains Coast , Mallaig - Oban Round Britains Coast , Oban - Dunoon - Ayr 204 0 Round Britains Coast , Oban - Arran - Ayr 205 0 201 0 Round Britains Coast , Ayr - Dumfries 210 0 Round Britains Coast , Dumfries - Kendal 205 0 Round Britains Coast , Kendal - Mold 208 0 Round Britains Coast , Mold - Bala 207 0 Round Britains Coast , Bala - Fishguard 203 0 Round Britains Coast , Fishguard - Newport 202 0 Round Britains Coast , Newport - Ilfracombe 204 0 Round Britains Coast , Ilfracombe - St. Just Sarah Britton 100 0 Breakfast in Bampton 100 0 Exeter Circle Lorraine Brown Kingdom Come 400 0 Brian Callow 214 0 Bournemouth Square Matthew Chambers 400 2.75 Faffers 400 New Patrick Cherry 50 1 Forts and Ferries Grimpeur 129 2.5 The Ibex - Route 1 165 3.5 The Ibex - Route 2 103 3.25 The Ibex - Route 3 The Ibex - Route 4 110 3 Andy Clarkson DIY PERMANENTS SERIES (Yorkshire and east organiser) 1,000, 600, 400, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50 Geoffrey Cleaver Two Battles Permanent 212 0 Andy Corless 600 8.75 Airborne 600 600 0 Bordeaux - Barcelona www.aukweb.net

600 9.25 Devil Grimpeur 400 6 Hardknott Grimpeur 600 0 Manchester - London - Manchester 1 600 0 Manchester - London - Manchester 2 600 0 Manchester - Winchester - Manchester 1000 17 Maniac Grimpeur 400 7.25 Northern Pennines Grimpeur 200 3 NPS2A Penrith - Ambleside - Rosthwaite - Gosfo 200 3 NPS2B Penrith - Stanhope - Barnard Cas. - Hawe 200 3.5 NPS2C Burnley - Malham - Kettlewell - Keld - I 200 3 NPS2D Burnley - Settle -Tan Hill - Aysgarth 200 3 NPS2E Burnley - Slaidburn - Ingleton Keld - Ay 200 3 NPS2F Burnley - Kettlewell - Leyburn - Dent NPS2F Penrith - Kendal - Gosforth - Rosthwaite 200 3 300 4.5 NPS3A Penrith - Hexham - Barnard Castle - Grassington 300 5.5 NPS3B Skipton - Pateley Br. - Leyburn - Alst 300 4.5 NPS3C Burnley - Slaidburn - Keld - Middleton 300 0 NPS3D Burnley - Lancaster - Tebay - Richmond 300 5 NPS3E Burnley - Reeth - Stanhope - Hawes - S 300 0 NPS3F Kendal - Seascale - Seatoller - Alston 300 4.5 NPS3G Burnley - Lancaster - Dent - Barnard C 400 5.75 NPS4A Burnley NPS4B Burnley 400 7 NPS4C Preston 400 0 400 0 NPS4D Burnley NPS4E Burnley 400 0 400 0 NPS4F Kendal NPS4G Preston 400 0 1000 0 Prague - Venice 1000 0 Preston - Aberdeen - Preston Preston - Ayr - Preston 600 0 600 0 Preston - Edinburgh - Preston 600 0 Preston - Glasgow - Preston 400 0 Preston - Whitby - Preston 300 4.75 Southern Dales Grimpeur Chris Crossland 606 1.75 Another 3 Coasts 600 300 0 Bernies Little Flat One 600 0 Bernies Long Flat One 200 0 Bernies Tiny Flat One Buttys Brid Trip 310 0 200 0 Doncaster Doddle 100 0 Goodbye Yorkshire Christmas Pudding 53 1.25 Leap into the Aire 09 50 1.25 Mellow Fruitfulness 60 1.25 Perm into the Aire 110 2.25 Perm into the Dales 100 2.5 Season of Mists 100 2.25 Spring into the Dales 09 607 1.75 The 3 Coasts 600 200 1.75 The Good Companions 109 2.5 The Hebden Bridge Mini-V 405 6.5 The Old 240 202 1.5 The Red Rose Ride 403 0 The Spurn Head 400 400 0 Yorkshire Dales Yorkshire Moors 300 0 Yorkshire Wolds 200 0 Alan Davies 600 8 Sea Lovers 600 Thomas Deakins 100 0 Boudiccas Revenge 100 200 0 Boudiccas Revenge 200 200 0 Dick Turpins Day Out 600 0 The Flatliner New Julian Dyson DIY PERMANENTS SERIES (north west organiser) 1,000, 800, 600, 400, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50 Chris Ellison Mont Ventoux (100km) 100 2 Martin Foley 200 0 Border Hills 1000 0 DIY PERMANENTS SERIES (Scotland and North East organiser) New 1,000, 600, 400, 300, 200, 100, 50 200 0 Down to Longtown 206 3 Saltire 200km Tom Fox 100 0 Alfreton - Harworth Alfreton - Sudbury 100 0 200 0 Alfreton Figure of 8 New 100 2 Biggin Hilly Permanent New 600 0 Four + Two 200 0 Horncastle 200 404 0 Moors and Wolds 400 Notts, Lincs & Derbys 200 200 0 150 0 Oakham 150 ArrivĂŠe February 2014 No. 123

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Permanent Events 300 0 Skeggy 100 0 To the Races John Fyfe 200 4.75 Wildcat Grimpeur Peter Gawthorne 400 0 Lakeland 400 300 1.75 Southport - Lakeland - Southport 600 1.5 Southport - Scarborough - Southport 200 1.5 Southport - Settle - Southport 200 0 Southport-York Pete Gifford Fishlake 400 400 0 1000 0 Great Eastern Steve Gloster 200 0 Buxton or Bust 200 1.75 Cat and Fiddle 200 0 Cheshire Gap 100 1.75 Circuit of Clee New Droitwich - Towcester 200 0 200 0 Grand Union Horseshoe Pass 200 0 Lake Vyrnwy New 200 0 200 0 Lechlade on Thames 200 0 Long Mynd 100 0 Needwood Forest New Offa’s Byke 200 0 200 0 Severn and Dean 200 0 Shropshire Plains Vale of Belvoir 200 0 600 0 Windsor - Chester - Windsor 200 0 Wolves to Windsor New Colin Gorton 120 2.75 Steve Coates Memorial Blackdown Grimpeur John Hamilton 200 3.75 Barcud Coch 200 3.25 Clwydian Horseshoe 300 6 Enter the Dragon 1000 15 Mille Cymru Severn & Marches 200 3 Severn & Wye 200 0 400 5.5 The Irish Mail 300 4.5 Wrekin to Sea Tom Hanley Buccleuch 400 400 0 300 0 Cumberland Gap Guid Nychburris 500 0 Oot Tae Carrick 200 0 Ian Hennessey Blackdowns & Levels 300 0 Coast Roads & Coach Roads 100 2 100 2.25 Devon & Somerset Exe-Buzzard 600 600 0 200 3.25 Exmoor and Coast 600 8.25 Kernow & South West 600 Old Roads 300 300 0 150 0 Sea & levels 150 200 0 Sea & levels 200 200 4 Valley of the Rocks Graham Hines 210 4 Tour of North Yorkshire Moors Jim Hopper 200 3 Peak District Permanent David Hudson 200 0 Buckbarn ~ Sutton Scotney Daves Dover Dash 200 200 0 1000 0 ELs 1000 410 0 Els 400 205 0 Hailsham - Folkestone 200 212 0 Hailsham - Liss 200 200 0 Medway Meander Pulborough - Reading 200 205 0 200 0 Seaford Yalding 200 Sedlescombe ~ Herne Bay 200 0 300 0 The Hailsham 300 611 0 The Hailsham 600 Tony Hull DIY PERMANENTS SERIES (south west organiser) 1,000, 800, 600, 500 400, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50 Mark Hummerstone End to End - 7 x 200km Randonneur 200 0 1300 0 End to End - Brevet Populaire 1400 0 End to End - Brevet Randonneur 1900 28.5 Hummers Lumpy End to End Pat Hurt 200 0 Poor Student 200

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Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

Linda Johnston 200 0 Brittany Mesh 200 0 Brittany Seaboard 201 0 Carhaix and the Coast 220 0 Hidden Brittany 203 0 Menez - Hom et Roc Trevezel 200 0 Roscoff - Quimper Simon Jones 2600 0 Calais - Brindisi 1200 0 Igoumenitsa ? Istanbul 1405 0 Roscoff - Nice 4014 0 The Orient Express 450 0 Tour of Kernow 3100 0 Trafalgar - Trafalgar Chris Keeling-Roberts 116 2.75 Cheshire Peak 205 4.5 Dark & White Peak 106 2.25 Dark Peak 100 3 Goyt Peak 108 2.5 Mid Peak 100 2.5 Monyash Peak 110 2.75 Staffs Peak 103 2.5 West Peak 103 2.25 White Peak Chris Kula-Przezwanski 100 0 North Somerset 100 160 0 North Somerset 160 160 1.5 North Somerset Grimpeur 160 60 1 Over the Mendips Martin Lucas 1400 0 The Eiger Sanction 7 x 200km Martin Malins 100 1.75 AAA Milne Extended Calendar Events - see Handbook 100 1.75 The Reliable Peter Marshall 1250 0 Cherbourg to Perpignan 6 x 200km 200 0 Ouistreham Circuit 1100 0 Putting on the Biarritz 5 x 200km (+100km) David Matthews 200 3.5 Barmouth Boulevard 100 2 Brenig Bach 130 2 Momma’s Mountain View 200 3.5 Pistyll Packing Momma 138 2.25 The Clwyd Gate 200 3.5 The Clwydian 206 3 Tour of the Berwyns Keith Matthews Dorset Coast 200 2 Robert Ninnes Chester - Bala 200 2 Chester - Dolgellau 200 0 200 2.25 Chester to Bala (Backwards) 200 0 Chester to Dolgellau (Backwards) Alex Pattison 300 4.75 The Snow Roads John Perrin 200 2 ‘Gollen The Cheshire Loops 200 0 200 2.75 The Flashy Venetian Winston Plowes 100 2.25 Hebden Bridge Star 50 1.25 Hebden Bridge Starlet Jackie Popland 400 0 Youth Hostel Arrow 300 0 Youth Hostel Dart 200 0 Youth Hostel Dart Stephen Poulton Banbury Cross 200 200 0 200 0 Bristol Double Avon 200 Central Scotland 300 300 0 1000 0 Centre Tour Cheltenham 2012 Flyer 205 0 200 0 Cheltenham Flyer 200 100 0 Cheltenham Flyer Taster 400 0 Cheltenham Irish Sea 200 0 Cheltenham Old Clee Hill Flyer Cheltenham Olde Folks 200 200 0 100 0 Cheltenham The Vale 100 300 0 Cheltenham Wye & Brecon 500 0 Cheltenham Wye & Cardigan Bay Cotswold and Thames 200 0 300 0 Cotswold and Thames 300 100 1.75 Cotswold Corker Cotswold Super Corker 150 3 200 2.75 Cotswolds and Mendips Grimpeur 200 www.aukweb.net


Permanent Events 1000 0 Eastern Tour 1200 0 England Grand Tour Glos & Somerset 200 200 0 200 2.75 Gospel Pass 200 200 0 Malvern Elgar Dean 200 0 Midlands Vale 200 500 0 Midlands, SW and Wales Tour 600 0 North East Tour 500 0 Northern Tour 200 0 Pennine Tour 200 0 Severn Bridge High Loop 500 0 Severn Bridge, Gloucester and Cardigan Bay 200 0 Severn Estuary 200km 200 0 South East Oxford Loop 700 0 Southern Tour 600 0 Spa Tour Combination 500 0 Spa Tour Combination 400 0 Spa Tour Combination 50 1 Stroud 5 Valleys 400 0 SW and Wales Tour 205 0 Thames and Avon 200 100 0 Trossachs 1400 0 UK Grand Tour 300 0 Welsh & Borders Tour 150 2.25 YatMon 150 Herman Ramsey 400 0 Asparagus and Strawberries 300 0 Green and Yellow Fields 106 0 Manningtree 100 Manningtree 150 150 0 200 0 Manningtree 200 The Ixworth File 100 0 Alan Rayner 100 0 Denmead - Stockbridge 100 100 0 Denmead - Whitchurch 100 200 0 Denmead 200 300 0 Denmead 300 Denmead 400 400 0 600 0 Denmead 600 200 0 Denmead Coastal 200 200 0 Solent - Hungerford 300 0 Solent - Malmesbury Paul Revell 100 2.25 La’al Lakeland 100 Mark Rigby 300 0 A rough Diamond 600 8.5 Bryan Chapman Memorial 600 8.5 Bryan Chapman Memorial - Brevet Populaire 1337 18 High Roads, Glens and Sea Lochs (Brevet Populaire) 200 1.75 Kings, Castles, Priests and Churches 200 0 Mr Pickwick Goes to Hay in a Day 600 9.5 Mr Pickwick yn mynd i chwilio am ddreigiau 600 9.5 Mr Pickwick yn mynd i chwilio am ddreigiau - Populaire 200 0 Mr Pickwick’s Autumn Outing 200 0 Mr Pickwick’s Crych Cymru 200 1.75 Mr Pickwick’s March Madness 200 0 Mr Pickwick’s Summer Meander 200 0 Sam Weller’s Trip to Wochma 1337 18 West Coast, Highlands and Inner Hebrides James Roberson 215 0 Cheshire Cycleway Andrew Rodgers The Dean 300 300 4 Shawn Shaw 300 0 Aberystwyth - Poole Diagonal 200 0 Cherbourg - Ouistreham 200 0 Dorset Delight 300 4.5 Hardboiled 600 8.25 Hellfire 200 0 La Transmanche Poole - Aberystwyth Diagonal 300 0 400 6 Porkers 200 0 St Malo - Cherbourg 200 0 St Malo - Ouistreham 200 0 St Malo Route 2 (East) 200 0 St Malo Route 3 (West) 200 0 St. Malo Route 1 (South) Sheila Simpson 50 2 Alpe d Huez Circuit 50 1.5 Cime de la Bonette 163 4.25 Circuit of Galibier 50 1 Col de Cayolle 100 2 Corniches des Cevennes 105 2 Grande Serre and Col dOrnon Circuit 115 3.5 Mini - Mercantour 50 1 Mont Aigoual www.aukweb.net

50 1 Mont Ventoux 100 0 Normandy Landings 100 0 North York 200 0 Sea to Sea (Manche to Med) 5 x 200 1000 0 Sea to Sea (Manche to Med) 14 day Brevet Populaire 1000 0 Sea to Sea (Manche to Med) Randonnee 114 0 Suisse Normande New 190 4.5 The Mercantour 50 0 York - Selby Chris Smith DIY PERMANENTS SERIES (Midlands & Wales organiser) New 1,000, 600, 400, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50 Steve Snook 120 2.5 Deepdale and Fleet Moss 120 200 4.5 Park Rash and Swaledale 200 100 2 Silverdale and Wharfedale 100 50 1.25 Widdop 50 Tim Sollesse 100 0 Steam Ride:London-Oxford New Steam Ride:London-Oxford-London (LOL) New 200 0 Peter South 100 1.5 Benidorm PRoF 100 110 1.75 Villajoyosa PRoF 100 Paul Stewart 1000 0 DIY PERMANENT SERIES (south east organiser) 1,000, 800, 600, 400, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50 200 0 The Boat Ride 200 0 The Ditchling Devil John Thompson 1000 0 Lowestoft - Arndnamurchan 1000 Stephen Underwood 300 0 Wiltshire Cycleway Andrew Uttley 200 0 A Ride Around Ben Klibreck Jonathan Walters 50 1 Surrey Hills New New 160 2.75 Sussexy Beast John Ward 100 0 Isle of Wight End to End 100 0 New Forest 100 200 0 New Forest 200 300 0 New Forest 300 New Forest and Wiltshire Century 160 0 Mary-Jane Watson 100 1.75 Celts Trams and Castles (Isle of Man) 110 2.25 Three Peaks of Mann (Isle of Man) William Weir 200 3.5 Around Weald Expedition 100 1.75 Glen tae Ben 200 3.5 Meridian Hills Pippa Wheeler 100 0 Mad Hatter 100 Paul Whitehead 200 0 Summer Saunter to Wantage 200 0 Wantage Winter Wind Up Philip Whiteman 200 3.5 Montgomery Madness Werner Wiethege 100 1.75 Down to Downs New Mike Wigley 207 0 A Mere Two Hundred 150 0 Audlem 200 0 Eccleshall Holt 200 0 200 0 Holyhead-Prestatyn-Holyhead 200 0 Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch 200 400 0 Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch 400 Newport 200 0 100 0 Radway 200 0 Stockport Eureka 300 0 The Full Monty 600 0 To Holland and Back 200 0 Wilmslow-St Asaph-Wilmslow Nik Windle 300 1.75 Cheddar Gorge 300 Marlborough Connection 200 0 David Winslade 200 0 The Man of Kent 200 300 0 The Man of Kent 300 400 0 The Man of Kent 400 200 0 Weald of Kent Oliver Wright 110 2 Grindleford Grimpeur 100 2.5 Hathersage - Elton - Roaches

~~~~~~~~~ Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

57


Calendar Events 100 01 Feb 09:00 Sat ROA 5000 200 01 Feb 07:30 Sat ROA 25000 100 02 Feb 09:00 Sun ROA 5000 200 08 Feb 07:00 Sat 100 08 Feb 09:00 Sat 100 09 Feb 09:00 Sun 100 09 Feb 08:30 Sun ROA 1000 120 15 Feb 09:00 Sat 200 15 Feb 08:00 Sat 120 15 Feb 09:00 Sat ROA 5000 200 16 Feb 08:00 Sun 160 16 Feb 08:30 Sun ROA 10000 150 22 Feb 07:30 Sat Updated ROA 5000 120 22 Feb 08:30 Sat 120 22 Feb 09:00 Sat 200 23 Feb 08:00 Sun 150 23 Feb 08:30 Sun 100 23 Feb 09:00 Sun 100 23 Feb 09:00 Sun 50 23 Feb 09:00 Sun ROA 2000 200 01 Mar 07:30 Sat 100 01 Mar 09:00 Sat

58

Hellesdon, nr Norwich The Norfolk Nips - 3 BP £5 L P R T (170) 15-30kph NorfolknGood Audax sandk.tandem@btinternet.com Keith Harrison, 11 Heather Avenue    Hellesdon  Norwich    NR6 6LU Tewkesbury Sam Weller’s day trip to Wochma BR 203km 2300m [2700m] £4.00 c p r nm t 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Ashton Keynes, Cirencester Windrush Winter Warm-up BP 108km 650m £5.00 L F P R T 14-25kph Corinium CC 01285 659 515 peter@quernsgate.co.uk Peter Holden, 39 Querns Lane      Cirencester    GL7 1RL Cardiff Malmesbury Mash BR 1000m AAA0.5 £3.00 YH L P R T 15-30kph Cardiff Byways RCC ritchie.t.tout@uk.pwc.com Ritchie Tout, Sunnyside Cottage      Mynyddbach  Monmouthshire  NP16 6RT Dial Post, West Sussex Worthing Winter Warmer BP £5.00 F P R T 200 15-30kph Worthing Excelsior CC 01903 240 280 Mick Irons, 36 Phrosso Road  Worthing  West Sussex    BN11 5SL Chippenham Flapjack BP 102km £6.50 F P R T M 150 15-24kph Chip. & Dist. Whs. 01225 708449 Eric Fletcher, 174 Littleworth Lane  Whitley    Melksham  Wiltshire  SN12 8RE Leicester Rutland and Beyond BP 102km 1290m £4.00 F L P R S T 100 12-30kph Leic. Forest CC kimbo44@hotmail.com Kim Suffolk, 73 Colby Road  Thurmaston    Leicester    LE4 8LG Hailsham Mad Jack’s- John Seviour Memorial BP 125km 2450m AAA2.5 £6.00 R F P 50 14-25kph Andy Seviour Andy Seviour, 13 Blacksmiths Copse      Hailsham  East Sussex  BN27 3XB Rochdale North-West Passage BRM 2100m £6.00 R T P 15-30kph Rochdale mini-North-West Passage BP 1450m £6.00 R T P 10-20kph W. Pennine RC 01706 372 447 Noel Healey, 95 Shore Mount      Littleborough  Lancs  OL15 8EW Bedford Burford Bumble BR 210km £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph CTC Bedfordshire jackie.popland@ntlworld.com Jackie Popland, 48 Haylands Way      Bedford    MK41 9BU Honiton Glastonbury 100 Miler BP 166km 1440m £6.00 f l p r t 14.3-30kph Exeter Wheelers 01404 46993 ian@ukcyclist.co.uk Ian Hennessey, 10 High Street      Honiton    EX14 1PU Chepstow Gospel Pass BP 2280m AAA2.25 £2.00 X P R (150) 15-30kph Bristol DA Nik Peregrine, 46 Bridge Street      Chepstow    NP16 5EY Hartlebury, S of Kidderminster Sunrise Express BP 123km £5.75 P R T 100 15-30kph Hartlebury, S of Kidderminster Snowdrop Express BP 123km £5.75 P R T 100 15-30kph Beacon RCC 01562 731606 montgomery@beaconrcc.org.uk Philip Whiteman, 2 Drayton Terr  Drayton  Belbroughton  Stourbridge  DY9 0BW Cheadle, Stockport Newport BR 201km 750m £6.00 P R T 80 15-30kph Cheadle, Stockport Radway BP 153km 450m £6.00 P R T 50 15-25kph Peak Audax tim@mothy.org.uk Tim Hughes, 5 Peterhouse Road    Sutton  Macclesfield    SK11 0EN Corscombe, near Beaminster The Primrose Path BP 102km 1955m AAA2 £7 P L R T 55 12.5-25kph Arthur Vince, 01935 863 429 arthur.vince@btinternet.com Arthur Vince, 3 Back Lane  East Coker    Yeovil    BA22 9JN Henham, S of Saffron Walden Victoria C. C. - Brazier’s Run BP 106km £10.00 A(1) L P R S T 15-30kph Henham, S of Saffron Walden Victoria C. C. - Brazier’s Run BP £9.00 A(1) L P R S T 10-25kph Victoria CC kieronyates@mac.com Kieron Yates, 8 Oakcroft Road      London    SE13 7ED Grazeley, S of Reading The Kennet Valley Run BR 207km 1763m £6.50 L P R T 15-30kph Grazeley, S of Reading The Kennet Valley 100 BP 895m £6.00 L P R T 12-30kph Reading CTC philipmdyson@btinternet.com Phil Dyson, 25 Papist Way  Cholsey    Wallingford  Oxon  OX10 9LL

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

200 01 Mar 07:30 Sat ROA 25000 100 02 Mar 08:30 Sun 200 02 Mar 08:00 Sun 100 02 Mar 09:00 Sun 200 08 Mar 08:00 Sat 100 08 Mar 10:00 Sat 100 08 Mar 09:00 Sat ROA 5000 100 08 Mar 09:00 Sat 150 08 Mar 08:30 Sat ROA 10000 200 09 Mar 08:00 Sun 110 09 Mar 09:00 Sun Change of Date 200 09 Mar 08:00 Sun 100 09 Mar 08:30 Sun 100 09 Mar 08:30 Sun 50 09 Mar 10:00 Sun 100 09 Mar 09:00 Sun 200 15 Mar 08:00 Sat 150 15 Mar 08:30 Sat 100 15 Mar 09:00 Sat

Tewkesbury Mr. Pickwick’s March Madness BR 209km 2600m AAA1.75 [1700m] £4.0 c f p r nm t 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Bynea, Llanelli Carmarthenshire Stopper BP 102km 1720m AAA1.75 £4.50 C L F P R T 50 12-25kph Swansea DA jb@reynoldston.com John Bastiani, The Brambles  Reynoldston    Swansea  West Glamorgan  SA3 1AA Exeter Mad March Coasts and Quantocks BRM 201km 2725m AAA2 [1500m] £7.00 YH F P R T X 15-30kph Exeter Mad March Exeter Excursion BP 109km £7.00 YH F P R T 12-25kph Exeter Whs 01404 841553 robinwheeler571@btinternet.com Pippa Wheeler, Rull Barn  Payhembury    Honiton  Devon  EX14 3JQ Aldbrough St John, nr Darlington Yorkshire Gallop BR 1480m £5.00 X P R T 14.3-30kph Aldbrough St John, nr Darlington Ripon Canter BP 572m £5.00 X L P R T 12-25kph VC 167 01325 374 112 nigel.hall@finklecroft.me.uk Nigel Hall, Finkle Croft  Aldbrough St John  Nr. Richmond    DL11 7TD Alfreton, NW of Nottingham Three Fields BP 104km 1270m £5.00 L P R T 100 12-30kph AlfretonCTC tomandsuefox@yahoo.co.uk Tom Fox, 180 Nottingham Road      Alfreton  Derbyshire  DE55 7FP Catherington, near Portsmouth Lasham Loop BP 105km 1500m AAA1.5 £5.00 L P R T 14.3-30kph Hantspol CC jondse@ntlworld.com Jonathan Ellis, 42 Wessex Road      Waterlooville  Hampshire  PO8 0HS Droitwich Over the Malverns BP 159km 1500m £3.00 C P R T M 60 12.5-25kph Gavin Greenhow 01905 775 803 Gavin Greenhow, 44 Newland Road  Droitwich      WR9 7AG Lichfield Vale of Belvoir BR 212km 1329m £5.00 P R T L 15-30kph Lichfield Charnwood Forest BP 116km [928m] £5.00 P R T L 12.5-30kph YACF stevegloster@gmx.co.uk Steve Gloster, 24 Ash Street  Bilston  Wolverhampton  WV14 8UP   London, Ruislip Lido Steam Ride:London-Oxford-London (LOL) Special BR 2128m £5.50 L P R T YH 15-30kph London, Ruislip Lido Steam Ride:Quainton Express BP £5.00 L P R T YH 15-30kph London, Ruislip Lido Steam Ride:London-Oxford (Didcot 1-Way) BP £5.50 L P R T YH 15-30kph London, Ruislip Lido SteamRide: Single Track BP 620m £3.50 L P R T YH 10-20kph Uxbridge Loiterers CTC info@steamride.co.uk Tim Sollesse, 59 Lynwood Rd      Ealing  London  W5 1JG North Petherton, S of Bridgwater Dunkery Dash BP 102km 1600m AAA1.5 £8.00 F L P R T 15-30kph Bridgwater CC ktudball@aol.com Keith Tudball, 9 Winford Close      Portishead  N Somerset  BS20 6YG Andoversford, Nr Cheltenham Cheltenham New Flyer BRM £6 15-30kph Andoversford, Nr Cheltenham Cider with Rosie 150 BP 152km £6.00 P R T L 12.5-30kph Andoversford, Nr Cheltenham Character Coln BP 104km £5 P R T L 12.5-25kph CTC West stephen.poulton@btinternet.com

ROA 4000

Stephen Poulton, Leckhampton Lodge 23 Moorend Park Rd Leckhampton Cheltenham GL53 0LA

200 15 Mar 07:00 Sat ROA 3000 200 15 Mar 08:00 Sat 160 15 Mar 09:00 Sat 110 15 Mar 10:00 Sat 56 15 Mar 11:00 Sat ROA 5000 100 16 Mar 09:00 Sun ROA 3000

Cardiff Gate, NW Cardiff Making Hay BRM 203km £5.50 YH L P R T 15-30kph Cardiff Byways CC 02920 341768 evansrichardd@googlemail.com Richard Evans, 73 Conway Road      Cardiff    CF11 9NW Henham, Saffron Walden The Shaftesbury Spring 200 BR 203km 1775m [1700m] £5.00 L P R S T 15-30kph Henham, Saffron Walden The Shaftesbury Spring Century BP 162km 1410m [1380m] £5.00 L P R S T 15-30kph Henham, Saffron Walden The Shaftesbury Spring 100 BP 112km 997m [940m] £5.00 L P R S T 15-30kph Henham, Saffron Walden The Shaftesbury Spring 50 BP 481m [500m] £5.00 L P R S T 12.5-25kph Shaftesbury CC 01245 421 088 r.parrotte@btinternet.com Richard Parrotte, 23 Mayfield Road  Writtle  Chelmsford    CM1 3EJ Alford, Lincs The Wold and Fen BP £5.00 L P F T 12-25kph Alford Whs 01507 443 000 alan.hockham@hotmail.com Alan Hockham, 11 Trustthorpe Road  Sutton on Sea  Lincs    LN12 2LX www.aukweb.net


Calendar Events 100 16 Mar 09:30 Sun 50 16 Mar 10:00 Sun 100 16 Mar 09:00 Sun 200 16 Mar 08:00 Sun 160 16 Mar 08:30 Sun 200 22 Mar 08:00 Sat Updated ROA 5000 200 22 Mar 08:00 Sat ROA 10000 200 23 Mar 08:00 Sun 200 23 Mar 08:00 Sun 100 23 Mar 10:00 Sun

Otford, Sevenoaks Kent Invicta Grimpeur 100 BP 1890m AAA2 £5.00 F L P R T 12-25kph Otford, Sevenoaks Kent Invicta Hilly 50 BP 945m AAA1 £4.00 F L P R T 12-25kph West Kent CTC pmcmaster@blueyonder.co.uk Patrick McMaster, 207 Colyer Road      Northfleet  Kent  DA11 8AT Seaham Seaham Sircular BP 1700m AAA1.75 £5.00 F L P R T 15-30kph Dave Sharpe david-sharpe@lineone.net Dave Sharpe, 3 Elizabeth Street      Seaham  County Durham  SR7 7TP Winsford, Cheshire Scouting Mam Tor BR 207km 2570m AAA2.25 [2150m] £7.00 P R T 15-30kph Winsford, Cheshire Edale Run BP 167km 2370m AAA2.25 [2150m] £7.00 P R T 15-30kph Peak Audax pjbscott@sky.com Phil Scott, 59 Hawkshead Way      Winsford  Cheshire  CW7 2SY Alfreton Roses to Wrags BR 212km 1391m £6.00 F P R T 150 15-30kph Alfreton CTC tomandsuefox@yahoo.co.uk Tom Fox, 180 Nottingham Road      Alfreton  Derbyshire  DE55 7FP Denmead, N of Portsmouth Denmead SR Series 200k BR 202km £6.00 P T R L 15-30kph Communicare Pam Pilbeam, The Nest    Hambledon Road  Denmead  Hants  PO7 6QF Golden Green,Tonbridge Man of Kent 200 BRM 203km 1505m [1425m] £7.00 F L P R T (120) 15-30kph San Fairy Ann CC manofkentaudax@gmail.com David Winslade, 3 Albany Close      Tonbridge  Kent  TN9 2EY Hauxton, Nr Cambridge End of Hibernation 200 BR 1700m £6.50 L P R T M (45) 15-30kph Hauxton, Nr Cambridge End of Snooze 100 BP 980m £5.50 L P R T M (45) 15-30kph Cambridge CC Terry.Dickerson@TalkTalk.net

Terry Dickerson, 6 Ley Grove Cottages Whittlesford Road Little Shelford Cambridge CB22 5EX

100 23 Mar 10:00 Sun 200 23 Mar 07:30 Sun 100 23 Mar 09:00 Sun ROA 5000 100 23 Mar 10:00 Sun 200 29 Mar 08:15 Sat Change of Date ROA 10000 300 29 Mar 06:00 Sat 200 29 Mar 08:00 Sat 110 29 Mar 09:00 Sat 100 30 Mar 09:00 Sun ROA 25000 100 30 Mar 08:30 Sun 200 30 Mar 08:00 Sun 110 30 Mar 09:30 Sun 110 30 Mar 10:30 Sun

Kirkintilloch Ivy\’s Mad March Hare Charity Challenge BP £8.50 P,R,T,NM 15-30kph Glasgow Ivy CC richardbarnes776@hotmail.com Richard Barnes, 14 St Columba Drive      Kirkintilloch    G66 3JN Pendleton, Lancashire Delightful Dales BRM 208km 3300m AAA3.25 [3600m] £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph Burnley Sportiv burnleysportiv@yahoo.com Andy Corless, 31 Castlerigg Drive  Ightenhill    Burnley  Lancashire  BB12 8AT Todmorden Todmorden Loops BP 2850m AAA2.75 £10 F L P R T YH 12-30kph Todmorden Harriers Danial Webb, No postal entry in advance.  Please enter on the line Wigginton, N of York Fountains Monk’y-business BP 102km 641m £2.00 L P R T 12-25kph North Yorks DA 01904 795 695 gerry.boswell@hotmail.co.uk Gerry Boswell, 5 Invicta Court  Acomb  York    YO24 3NL Droitwich Three Counties Revisited BR 207km £4 C P R T M 14.4-25kph Gavin Greenhow 01905 775 803 Gavin Greenhow, 44 Newland Road  Droitwich      WR9 7AG Oxford The Dean BRM 307km 4000m AAA4 £4.00 YH B P X 15-30kph Norton Wheelers a_rodgers8@hotmail.com Andrew Rodgers, 99 Rivelin Street      Sheffield  South Yorkshire  S6 5DL Wormingford, Near Colchester Wormingford Dragon BR 218km £7 R L P T 15-30kph Wormingford, Near Colchester Wormingford Wyrm BP £5 R L P T 15-30kph CC Sudbury auk@lythgo.me.uk Viv Marsh, Lythgo  Chapel Lane  West Bergholt  Colchester  Essex  CO6 3EF Hailsham, E Sussex The WOW (World of Water)100 BP 102km 1440m £5.00 F P (50) 15-30kph David Hudson David Hudson, 151 Middle Road      Shoreham by Sea  West Sussex  BN43 6LG Lanchester, near Durham Killhope Grimpeur BP 103km 1800m AAA1.75 £6.00 L P R T 100 13-26kph Houghton Cycling Club 0191 584 3040 joeapplegarth@talktalk.net Joe Applegarth, 7 Market Cr  New Herrington  Houghton-le-Spring    DH4 7AP Long Ashton, Bristol Barry’s Bristol Ball Buster BR 214km 2000m £7 F L P R T NM (200) 15-30kph Long Ashton, Bristol Barry’s Bristol Bash BP 116km 1100m £7 F L P R T NM (250) 12.5-30kph Long Ashton, Bristol Barry’s Bristol Blast BP 116km £7 F L P R T NM (200) 12.5-30kph Las Vegas Inst of Sport audax@lvis.org.uk Marcus Mumford, 12 Gleneagles Drive  Bristol      BS10 7PS

www.aukweb.net

200 30 Mar 08:00 Sun 200 30 Mar 08:15 Sun 110 30 Mar 10:30 Sun 62 30 Mar 11:00 Sun 300 05 Apr 06:00 Sat 100 05 Apr 09:00 Sat 400 05 Apr 06:00 Sat 200 05 Apr 08:00 Sat ROA 10000 200 05 Apr 08:00 Sat 200 05 Apr 08:00 Sat ROA 25000 100 05 Apr 09:00 Sat 200 06 Apr 08:00 Sun 100 06 Apr 09:00 Sun

100 06 Apr 09:00 Sun Updated 100 09 Apr 10:00 Wed 100 09 Apr 10:00 Wed 200 12 Apr 08:00 Sat 200 12 Apr 08:00 Sat 100 12 Apr 09:00 Sat ROA 5000 300 12 Apr 02:00 Sat 200 12 Apr 08:00 Sat 150 12 Apr 09:00 Sat 110 12 Apr 09:30 Sat

Poynton, S of Stockport Chirk BRM £6.00 F P 15-30kph Peak Audax daz@delph45.fsnet.co.uk Darryl Nolan, 5 Grasmere Road  Royton    Oldham    OL2 6SR Stevenage Stevenage Start of Summertime Specials BRM 210km £6.00 P R T 150 15-30kph Stevenage Stevenage Start of Summertime Specials BP 115km £5.00 P R T 150 12.5-25kph CTC Stevenage & North He 01438 356 584 paul_gylyan.boielle@ntlworld.com Paul Boielle, 71 Lonsdale Road  Stevenage      SG1 5DD Stevenage Stevenage Start of Summertime Specials BP 520m £4.00 P R T 150 12.5-25kph Stevenage & NH CTC 07414 596877 luke.peters@live.com Luke Peters, 86 Skipton Close      Stevenage  Hertfordshire  SG2 8TW Chalfont St Peter 3Down BRM 2998m [3100m] £8.00 L P R T 15-30kph Willesden CC ianoli2010-audax@yahoo.co.uk Ian Oliver, 68 St Dunstans Avenue      London    W3 6QJ Copdock, Nr. Ipswich The Copdock Circuit - Spring in South Suffolk BP £5.00 L P R T M 12-30kph CTC Suffolk the.kells@talk21.com Dennis Kell, 9 Pheasant Rise  Copdock  Ipswich  Suffolk  IP8 3LF Coryton, NW Cardiff Buckingham Blinder BRM £8.00 X 15-30kph Cardiff Byways CC Robyn Thomas, 44 Cosmeston Street      Cardiff    CF24 4LR Honiton Valley of the Rocks 200 BRM 205km 3900m AAA4 £7.00 L P R T 40 15-30kph Exeter Whs ian@ukcyclist.co.uk Ian Hennessey, 10 High Street      Honiton    EX14 1PU Symington, Biggar More Passes than Mastermind BRM 2600m AAA1.75 [1760m] £7.00 F L P R 15-30kph Audax Ecosse 01750 20838 Russell Carson, 21 Ladylands Terrace  Selkirk      TD7 4BB Tewkesbury Benjamin Allen’s Spring Tonic. BR 206km 2050m £4.00 P T C NM (100) 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury  GL20 5TZ Trowell, Nottingham Charnwood in the Spring BP 105km 950m £5.00 L P R T 150 12.5-30kph Notts DA 0115 932 9978 Mark Chambers, 62 Queens Ave  Hallam Fields    Ilkeston  Derbyshire  DE7 4DJ Crosspool, Sheffield The Sheffrec Full Monty BR 202km 4000m AAA4 £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph Crosspool, Sheffield The Sheffrec Mini Monty BP 109km 2100m AAA2 £5.00 L P R T 10-25kph Sheffrec CC henry@henryfoxhall.co.uk

Henry Foxhall, West View  Grindlow  Great Hucklow  Buxton  Derbyshire  SK17 8RJ

Minehead Exmoor Spring BP £5.00 L P R T 100 10-20kph Minehead CC Richard Miles, Raglands  45 Tower Hill  Williton  Taunton  Somerset  TA4 4JR Marple, near Stockport Monyash Peak BP 105km 2400m AAA2.5 £5.00 P R T 30 12.5-30kph Marple, near Stockport An Icecream Wensdae BP 105km 800m £5.00 P R T 30 15-30kph Peak Audax chris.keelingroberts@ntlworld.com Chris Keeling-Roberts, 17 Lower Strines Road      Marple  Cheshire  SK6 7DL Bynea, Llanelli Carmarthenshire Snapper BR 202km 2200m £7 C L F P R T 50 15-30kph Swansea DA jb@reynoldston.com John Bastiani, The Brambles  Reynoldston    Swansea  West Glamorgan  SA3 1AA Hellesdon, nr Norwich The Old Squit BR £6 L P R T (80) 15-30kph Hellesdon, nr Norwich The Norfolk Mardle BP £5 L P R T (100) 15-30kph NorfolknGood Audax sandk.tandem@btinternet.com Keith Harrison, 11 Heather Avenue    Hellesdon  Norwich    NR6 6LU Poole hard boiled 300 BRM 4400m AAA4.5 £10 L P M (50) 15-30kph wessex CTC Shawn Shaw, 22 Shaftesbury Road    Longfleet  Poole  Dorset  BH15 2LT Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH Two Battles BR 209km 2300m £7.00 P R T 50 15-30kph Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH Towering Trees BP 157km 1630m £7.00 P R T 50 14-30kph Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH The Essex Bridge BP £7.00 P R T 50 15-30kph

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Calendar Events 50 12 Apr 10:00 Sat 300 12 Apr 06:00 Sat ROA 10000 110 13 Apr 09:00 Sun 64 13 Apr 09:30 Sun 200 13 Apr 08:00 Sun 130 13 Apr 08:30 Sun 100 13 Apr 09:00 Sun 50 13 Apr 10:00 Sun 200 13 Apr 08:00 Sun 110 13 Apr 09:00 Sun 53 13 Apr 10:00 Sun ROA 10000 200 13 Apr 08:00 Sun 110 13 Apr 09:00 Sun 64 13 Apr 10:00 Sun 110 13 Apr 09:30 Sun 100 13 Apr 09:00 Sun 100 13 Apr 09:00 Sun ROA 25000 200 13 Apr 07:45 Sun 100 13 Apr 09:00 Sun ROA 5000 400 18 Apr ::::: Fri 200 19 Apr 08:00 Sat 300 19 Apr 06:00 Sat 300 19 Apr 23:00 Sat Updated

Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH BP £6 P R T 50 10-20kph Geoff Cleaver

Just a Chuffing 50 audaxgeoff@gmail.com

Geoffrey Cleaver, 43 Goodere Drive  Polesworth    Tamworth  Staffordshire  B78 1BY

Upton Magna, E of Shrewsbury Yr Elenydd BRM 305km 4950m AAA5 £10.00 A(2) C F L P R T (125) 15-25kph CTC Shropshire undulates@hotmail.co.uk John Hamilton, 22 Oaks Crescent  Wellington    Telford    TF1 2HF Bishops Lydeard, NW of Taunton Dustman Dave’s Doddle BP £4.50 L P R T 10-30kph Bishops Lydeard, NW of Taunton Dustman Dave’s Diddy Doddle BP £3.50 L P R T 10-30kph Wellington Whs CC Philip Leavey, The Spinney  Chitterwell    Wellington    TA21 0HF Congleton, Cheshire Ironbridge 207 BR 207km 2130m £5.50 P R T 15-30kph Congleton, Cheshire Hawkstone 133 BP 133km £4.50 P R T 15-30kph Congleton CC Rob Waghorn, The Querns      Congleton Edge  Cheshire  CW12 3NB Falmouth A Cornish 100 BP 103km £5.00 F L P R S T 12-25kph Falmouth A Bunny Hop BP £5.00 F L P R S T 8-20kph Falmouth Whs. Adrian Hitchman , 39 Mongleath Rd  Falmouth  Cornwall    TR11 4PN Gourock Rivers Lochs and Glens 200km BRM 2550m AAA2.25 [2300m] £9.50 F L P R T A(1) 15-30kph Inverclyde Velo Robert Mccready, 4 Mccallum Crescent      Gourock  Scotland  PA19 1PY Hebden Bridge Spring into the Dales BP 2350m AAA2.25 £4.00 L R T YH 12-24kph Hebden Bridge Leap into the Aire BP 1325m AAA1.25 £3.50 L R T YH 8-20kph CTC West Yorkshire 01422 832 853 chris.crossland@halifaxctc.org.uk Chris Crossland, 14 Stanley St. West  Sowerby Bridge  W. Yorks    HX6 1EF Maidenhead Jack Eason Struggle BR 2365m [2388m] £6.00 P R T 15-30kph Maidenhead Jack Eason 10 Thames Bridges BP £4.00 P R T 15-30kph Maidenhead Jack Eason Giggle BP £4 P R T 12-25kph Willesden CC ianoli2010-audax@yahoo.co.uk Ian Oliver, 68 St Dunstans Avenue      London    W3 6QJ Northmoor, W of Oxford The Harlequin Hack BP 600m £6 YH C F L P R S T 100 15-30kph Harlequins CC jordancottage@sky.com Ken Knight, Jordan Cottage    Picklescott  Church Stretton  Shropshire  SY6 6NR Polegate, E Sussex For those who dont do hills 100 BP 105km 650m £5.00 F P T (50) 15-30kph Polegate, E Sussex Hell of the Sussex Coastal Hills BP 101km 1893m AAA1.75 £5.00 P F T (50) 13-25kph David Hudson Dave Hudson, 151 Middle Road  Shoreham-by-Sea      BN43 6LG Wareham Dorset Coast BRM 207km 2850m AAA2.75 £11.00 C L F R P T M 15-30kph Wareham Coastlet BP 102km 1300m £6.00 C L F R P T M 1/4 12-25kph Wessex DA 01305 263 272 pete_loakes@yahoo.com Peter Loakes, 1 Church Cottage  West Stafford  Dorchester    DT2 8AB Anywhere, to York Easter Flêches to York BRM £12.00 Fee per Team. 19th also 15-30kph AUK dk.benton@virgin.net Keith Benton, 127 Greenshaw Drive    Wigginton  York    YO32 2DB Huntingdon Double Dutch BR £3 X 15-30kph San Fairy Ann CC 01342 314 437 malinseastg@tiscali.co.uk Martin Malins, 64 Blount Avenue  East Grinstead  West Sussex    RH19 IJW Musselburgh Merse and Moors BRM 4200m AAA4.25 £6.00 X P L R (50) 15-30kph Audax Ecosse martinfoley@btinternet.com Martin Foley, 78 Denholm Road  Musselburgh  East Lothian    EH21 6TU Poynton, S of Stockport Plains BRM 310km £5.00 P X 15-30kph Peak Audax hamhort84@talktalk.net

Peter Hammond, 3 Dorac Avenue  Heald Green  Cheadle  Stockport  Cheshire  SK8 3NZ

300 19 Apr ::::: Sat

Uffculme, Devon Marlborough with Lights BR 311km 3400m £10 15-30kph Exeter Whs Jamie Andrews, Cemetery Lodge  Ashill Road    Uffculme  Devon  EX15 3DP

60

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

100 21 Apr 09:00 Mon ROA 5000 110 23 Apr 10:00 Wed 300 26 Apr 06:00 Sat ROA 5000 200 26 Apr 08:00 Sat 110 26 Apr 08:30 Sat 68 26 Apr 09:00 Sat

Kilburn National Arboretum BP 103km £5 P R T 12-30kph AlfretonCTC 01773 833 593 tomandsuefox@yahoo.co.uk Tom Fox, 180 Nottingham Road  Alfreton  Derbyshire    DE55 7FP Maidenhead Boulters Bash BP £3.00 P R T 15-30kph Willesden CC 07763 765 802 mick.hill56@hotmail.co.uk. Mick Hill, 5 Castle Farm,  Leigh Square  Windsor  Berks  SL4 4PT Cirencester Heart of England 300 BRM 307km 2800m £6.00 A(2) L P R T 100 15-30kph Corinium CC 01285 659 515 peter@quernsgate.co.uk Peter Holden, 39 Querns Lane  Cirencester  Glos    GL7 1RL Eureka Cafe, Wirral Eureka Excursion BR 215km £5.50 R L P T 50 15-30kph Eureka Cafe, Wirral Two Mills Tour BP 113km £5.50 R L P T 50 12.5-25kph Eureka Cafe, Wirral Two Mills Twirl BP £5.50 R L P T 50 12.5-25kph Chester & N. Wales CTC dmanu@outlook.com

ROA 4000

David Matthews, Hill View Cottage  Cross Lanes  Oscroft  Tarvin  Cheshire  CH3 8NG

300 26 Apr 06:00 Sat

Hauxton, Nr Cambridge BR [1700m] £7.00 L P R T M (60) 15-25kph Cambridge CC

Terry Dickerson, 6 Ley Grove Cottages Whittlesford Road Little Shelford Cambridge CB22 5EX

300 26 Apr 00:01 Sat 300 26 Apr 06:00 Sat ROA 4000 300 26 Apr 06:00 Sat 110 26 Apr 09:30 Sat 200 26 Apr 08:00 Sat 110 26 Apr 09:00 Sat 200 27 Apr 08:00 Sun 100 27 Apr 09:00 Sun Change of Date ROA 10000 200 27 Apr 08:00 Sun 200 27 Apr 08:00 Sun 100 27 Apr 09:30 Sun 100 27 Apr 09:00 Sun 300 03 May 06:00 Sat ROA 2000 400 03 May 06:00 Sat 400 03 May 06:00 Sat ROA 25000

Cambridge 300 Terry.Dickerson@TalkTalk.net

Manningtree, Colchester Green & Yellow Fields BRM 305km 1500m £4.00 P T X 15-25kph Flitchbikes CC tom.deakins@btinternet.com Thomas Deakins, 31 The Causeway      Great Dunmow  Essex  CM6 2AA Meopham Oasts and Coasts 300Km BRM 3178m £6 L P T R 15-30kph Independent 01474 815 213 tom56jackson@gmail.com Tom Jackson, 19 Denesway  Meopham  Kent    DA13 0EA Newton Abbot TQ12 1LJ Chris Bennett 300 BR 4050m AAA4 £9.00 A(2) L P R T S 15-30kph CTC Devon 01626 873562 rodpash@hotmail.co.uk Rod Pash, Little Green, 12 Dagmar Street  Shaldon TQ14 0DU        Reepham, nr Lincoln Lincoln Imp BP 112km 200m £5.00 P R F L T 10-30kph Lincs. DA Andrew Townhill, 80 Rudgard Avenue  Cherrry Willingham  Lincoln    LN3 4JG Wolverhampton, Broadlands (WV10 6TA) Cat & Fiddle BR 208km 2350m AAA1.75 [1700m] £5.00 P L R T 15-30kph Wolverhampton, Broadlands (WV10 6TA) Needwood Forest BP £5.00 P L R T 15-30kph YACF stevegloster@gmx.co.uk Steve Gloster, 24 Ash Street  Bilston  Wolverhampton  WV14 8UP   Galashiels Moffat Toffee Reinvented BRM 204km 2500m [2300m] £10.00 L P R T S 15-30kph Galashiels Broughton and Back BP 1380m £5.00 L P R T S 12-30kph Audax Ecosse 01896 758 181 pedaller1@sky.com Lucy McTaggart, 30 Victoria St.  Galashiels  Scottish Borders    TD1 1HL Halifax The Red Rose Ride BR 2600m AAA1.5 [1500m] £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph W. Yorks DA dmdodwell@gmail.com Dave Dodwell, 32 Parkside Avenue  Queensbury    Bradford    BD13 2HQ High Ham, SW of Street The Nutty Nuns BR 201km £7.00 F L P R T 15-30kph High Ham, SW of Street The Merry Monk BP 105km £7.00 F L P R T (200) 12.5-25kph Bristol DA 01823 690 038 lillymark@btinternet.com Mark Lilly, Applehayes  Main Road  Middlezoy  Bridgwater  TA7 0PB Merthyr Tydfil Rhondda Traverse BP 109km 2100m AAA2 £4.50 P R T 12-30kph Merthyr Cycling Club dpjones2014@gmail.com David Jones, 2 Brunswick Street      Merthyr Tydfil    CF47 8SB Alfreton, NW of Nottingham Everybody Rides to Skeggy! BR 302km 1141m £7.00 L R P T X 100 15-30kph Alfreton CTC 01 773 828 737 auk@ishorne.gotadsl.co.uk Ian Horne, 32 Ashop Road      Belper  Derbys.  DE56 0DP Chalfont St Peter, Bucks Severn Across BRM 407km 3500m £7.00 YH L P R T 70 15-30kph Willesden CC Liam Fitzpatrick, 13 Heron Close      Rickmansworth  Hertfordshire  WD3 1NF Chepstow Brevet Cymru BRM 401km 4900m AAA2.25 [2300m] £9.00 c f l p r t nm z 100 15-30kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ

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Calendar Events 150 03 May 09:15 Sat 50 03 May 10:00 Sat ROA 3000 100 03 May 09:00 Sat ROA 25000 110 03 May 10:00 Sat 54 03 May 10:30 Sat 300 03 May 05:00 Sat 200 04 May 08:00 Sun ROA 3000 100 04 May 9::00 Sun 400 04 May 14:00 Sun 200 05 May 08:00 Mon ROA 10000 100 05 May 10:00 Mon 56 05 May 11:00 Mon ROA 5000 100 07 May 10:00 Wed 100 10 May 09:30 Sat 100 10 May 9::00 Sat Updated 60 10 May 9:30 Sat Change of Date 200 10 May 08:00 Sat 100 10 May 09:00 Sat ROA 5000 300 10 May 06:00 Sat ROA 10000 200 10 May 08:00 Sat 100 10 May 09:30 Sat Updated 100 10 May 10:00 Sat Change of Date

Forfar Amulree for Tea BP 1552m £5.00 C P T S 15-30kph Forfar Lintrathen Loop BP 587m £2.50 C L T R P 10-25kph Angus CC 01307 466123 d.c.husband@btinternet.com David Husband , 78 Old Halkerton Road  Forfar  DD8 1JP     Hailsham, E Sussex The Hell Forest 100 BP 103km 1360m £5.00 P F (50) 15-30kph David Hudson Dave Hudson, 151 Middle Road  Shoreham-by-Sea      BN43 6LG Parkend, Forest of Dean The Lumpy Scrumpy 100 BP 1850m AAA1.75 £5.00 YH C P T 75 12-25kph Parkend, Forest of Dean Dean Bluebell Doddle BP 1200m AAA1.25 £4.00 YH C P T 75 12-25kph Royal Dean Forest C.C. p.steve21@yahoo.co.uk Steve Price, 7 Allsopp Close      Newnham On Severn  Glos  GL14 1DP Wigginton, York Wigginton 300 BR 302km £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph CTC North Yorks 01904 769 378 dk.benton@virgin.net Keith Benton, 127 Greenshaw Drive  Wigginton  York    YO32 2DB Forfar Deeside Loop BR 2450m AAA2 [2025m] £8.00 L C P R T 15-30kph Angus C.C. d.c.husband@btinternet.com David Husband, 78 Old Halkerton Road      Forfar  Angus  DD8 1JP Grange School Pavilion, Hartford Ron Sant Memorial Ride BP 106km £5 P R T S 15-30kph Weaver Valley Derek Heine, 10 Whitehall Drive  Hartford    Northwich  Cheshire  CW8 1SJ Poole Porkers 400 BRM 5900m AAA6 £10 L P R T M (50) (20/4) 15-30kph Wessex CTC Shawn Shaw, 22 Shaftesbury Road    Longfleet  Poole  Dorset  BH15 2LT Bredbury, Stockport May-as-well Solstice BR 202km 700m £5 P R T 60 (05/03) 15-30kph Peak Audax 01457 870 421 mike@PeakAudax.co.uk Mike Wigley, Higher Grange Fm  Millcroft Lane  Delph  Saddleworth  OL3 5UX High Easter, Nr Chelmsford The Counties Festival 100 BP 105km £5 L P R T (70) 15-30kph High Easter, Nr Chelmsford The Counties Festival 50 BP £5 L P R T (70) 12-25kph ECCA 01245 467 683 Terry Anderson, 1 Claypits Road  Boreham  Chelmsford  Essex  CM3 3BZ Hurst, E of Reading Dinton 100 BP 103km £3.00 L P R T 60 15-30kph Reading DA emaich7@gmail.com Mike Hardiman, 7 Somerset Close  Woosehill    Wokingham    RG41 3AJ Alveston, N Bristol South Glos 100 BP 106km £5.00 P R T 150 12.5-25kph Bristol DA 01179 672893 Alex Rendu, Whitethorn  Cock Road  Kingswood  Bristol    BS15 9SJ Dore, Sheffield Peaks and Troughs BP 103km 1584m £5.00 F L P T 12-30kph Sheffield District CTC John Cripps, 8 Brincliffe Crescent      Sheffield    S11 9AW Dore, Sheffield Feeling a Bit Peaky BP £5 F L P T 10-22kph Sheffield District CTC John Cripps, 8 Brincliffe Crescent      Sheffield    S11 9AW Egmanton nr Tuxford, N of Newark Lincolnshire Cross BR 218km £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph Egmanton nr Tuxford, N of Newark Ogee 100 BP 109km £5.00 L R P T (100) 12.5-30kph Bolsover & District CC 01246 825 351 matt.connley@talktalk.net Matt Connley, 7 Eskdale Close  Bolsover  Chesterfield    S44 6RL Honiton Old Roads 300 BRM 3400m £8.00 LPRT 15-30kph Exeter Whs 01404 46993 ian@ukcyclist.co.uk Ian Hennessey, 10 High Street      Honiton    EX14 1PU Thorneyford Farm, Nr Morpeth Chevy Chase BR 201km 3000m AAA3 £7.00 F L P R T 60 27/4 15-30kph Thorneyford farm, Nr Morpeth Burma Road BP 1600m AAA1.5 £5.00 FPRT 12-25kph Tyneside Vagabonds northern.audax@gmail.com Aidan Hedley, 16 The Close  Lanchester    Durham    DH7 0PX Wigginton, York Wiggy 100 BP £2.50 A(1) YH L P R T 12-24kph CTC North Yorks 01904 769 378 dk.benton@virgin.net Keith Benton, 127 Greenshaw Drive  Wigginton  York    YO32 2DB

www.aukweb.net

200 10 May 08:00 Sat 130 10 May 08:30 Sat 200 11 May 08:00 Sun 160 11 May 08:00 Sun 100 11 May 10:00 Sun ROA 10000 200 11 May 08:00 Sun 160 11 May 08:30 Sun 100 11 May 09:00 Sun 200 11 May 08:00 Sun 160 11 May 08:30 Sun 100 11 May 09:00 Sun 54 11 May 10:00 Sun 600 17 May 06:00 Sat 100 17 May 09:00 Sat Updated 160 17 May 08:00 Sat 100 17 May 09:00 Sat

Willington Hall, E of Chester Seamons CC ‘Tour of the Berwyns’ BR 208km 3100m AAA3 £5.00 L F P R T 100 (12/5) 15-30kph Willington Hall, E of Chester Seamons Llangollen Panorama BP 131km 1750m AAA1.5 [1500m] £5.00 L F P R T 100 12-25kph Seamons CC cyclistdavid@hotmail.com David Barker, 221 Dane Road  Sale    Manchester    M33 2LZ Lymington New Forest Excursion BR 204km £6.00 C L P R T 100 (7/5) 15-30kph Lymington New Forest Century BP £6 C L P R T 100 (7/5) 15-30kph Lymington New Forest Day Out BP 104km [2m] £6.00 C L P R T 100 (3/5) 10-20kph W J Ward 01590 671 205 cyclingnewforest@gmail.com John Ward, 34 Avenue Road  Lymington  Hants    SO41 9GJ Meopham, nr Gravesend Hop Garden 200km BR 1550m [1800m] £9.00 F L P R T 15-30kph Meopham, nr Gravesend Hop Garden Century Ride BP 1350m [1550m] £9.00 P R T 15-30kph Meopham, nr Gravesend Hop Garden 100km BP 975m £9.00 F L P R T NM 10-30kph Gravesend CTC pmcmaster@blueyonder.co.uk Patrick McMaster, 207 Colyer Road      Northfleet  Kent  DA11 8AT Shenstone, Staffs Castleton Classic Revised BR 213km 2963m AAA3 £8.00 F L P R T 15-30kph Shenstone, Staffs Derbyshire Dales BP 1680m £7.50 F L P R T 15-30kph Shenstone, Staffs Staffordshire Lanes BP 102km 680m £5.50 L P R T 12.5-25kph Shenstone, Staffs Rosliston Roller BP £4.00 F,P,R,T 10-25kph North Birmingham CTC audax@nbctc.co.uk Terry Dwyer, 5 Damson Grove      Solihull    B92 9EN Chepstow Bryan Chapman Memorial (Classic) BRM 619km 8300m AAA8.25 £30.00 BD C F L P R S T Z (4/5) 15-30kph Cardiff Byways CC ritchie.t.tout@uk.pwc.com Ritchie Tout, Sunnyside Cottage      Mynyddbach  Monmouthshire  NP16 6RT Crich, Derbyshire Tramway 100 BP 104km £6.00 P R T 150 11-25kph Alfreton CTC

Sandra Wilson, 12 Gray Fallow  South Normanton    Alfreton  Derbyshire  DE55 3BQ

Meriden, Warwickshire Cotswold Challenge BP 1300m £8.00 C L P R T NM 100 15-30kph Meriden, Warwickshire Warwickshire Wanderer BP 105km 602m [1000m] £8.00 C L P R T NM 100 12-25kph CTC-heartofengland audax2014@ctc-heartofengland.org.uk

Jon Porteous, Tumnus Corner  Springhill Gardens  Webheath  Redditch  Worcs B97 5SY

400 17 May 06:00 Sat 200 17 May 08:00 Sat 100 17 May 10:00 Sat 160 17 May 08:00 Sat 100 17 May 09:00 Sat 100 17 May 09:00 Sat ROA 25000 200 18 May 08:00 Sun 200 18 May 07:30 Sun 150 18 May 08:30 Sun 110 18 May 09:00 Sun

Musselburgh The Southern Uplands BRM 5000m AAA5 £2.00 X P T 15-30kph Audax Ecosse martinfoley@btinternet.com Martin Foley, 78 Denholm Road  Musselburgh  East Lothian    EH21 6TU Troutbeck Bridge, Cumbria The Cumbrian 200 BR 203km 3900m AAA4 £5.00 YH L P R T S (60) 15-30kph Troutbeck Bridge, Cumbria La’al Lakeland 100 BP 107km 2350m AAA2.25 £5.00 YH L P R T S (60) 12.5-30kph Lakes School Windermere paul@revells.com Paul Revell, Kirklands,  Brow Edge,  Backbarrow  Ulverston  Cumbria  LA12 8QL Uffculme School, Uffculme Coast to Coast BP 1900m [1500m] £6 P R T 14-25kph Uffculme School, Uffculme Coast and Back BP 1300m [1500m] £6 P R T 12-20kph CTC Devon Roy Russell, 52 Whitchurch Avenue      Exeter    EX2 5NT Washington, W Sussex The Devils Punchbowl 100 BP 104km 1100m £5.00 F P (8/5) (50) 15-30kph David Hudson Dave Hudson, 151 Middle Road  Shoreham-by-Sea      BN43 6LG Broken Cross, nr Macclesfield World’s End BR 210km 2450m AAA2 [1930m] £8.00 F L P R T 14.3-25kph Peak Audax perrin_john@sky.com John Perrin, 20 Princes Way      Macclesfield  Cheshire  SK11 8UB Claughton, N of Preston Fleet Moss 212 BR 212km 3290m AAA3.25 £5.50 P R T 15-30kph Claughton, N of Preston Lunesdale Populaire BP 158km 2280m AAA2.25 £5.50 P R T 100 13-30kph Claughton, N of Preston Pilgrim’s Way BP 112km 1540m £5.50 P R T 10-25kph Ribble Valley C & RC harveygws@btinternet.com Susan Harvey, 15 Kingsley Drive      Chorley    PR7 2NE Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

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Calendar Events 160 18 May 08:30 Sun 100 18 May 09:00 Sun 54 18 May 09:30 Sun 200 18 May 08:00 Sun 150 18 May 08:30 Sun 110 18 May 09:00 Sun 200 18 May 08:00 Sun 100 18 May 09:30 Sun 200 24 May 08:00 Sat 100 24 May 08:00 Sat 300 24 May 06:00 Sat 400 24 May 09:00 Sat 600 24 May 06:00 Sat 400 24 May 09:00 Sat ROA 10000 300 24 May 06:00 Sat 100 25 May 09:00 Sun ROA 5000 200 25 May 08:00 Sun 120 28 May 09:00 Wed 600 31 May 06:00 Sat ROA 10000 200 31 May 08:00 Sat 300 31 May 06:00 Sat ROA 10000 100 31 May 09:30 Sat ROA 25000 62

Devoran, S of Truro The Granite and Serpentine Way BP 167km 1880m [1671m] £6.00 C F L P R T 15-30kph Devoran, S of Truro A Lizard Loop BP 106km 1419m [1637m] £5.00 C F L P R T 12.5-28kph Devoran, S of Truro Carns and Killas BP 730m [760m] £5.00 C F L P R T 10-28kph Audax Kernow martyn.aldis@syntagma.co.uk Martyn Aldis, Sundown  25a Kersey Rd  Flushing  Falmouth  Cornwall  TR11 5TR Elstead, Surrey The Stonehenge 200 BR 201km 2210m £5.00 F L P R T 15-30kph Elstead, Surrey The Danebury 150 BP 152km £5.00 F L P R T 12.5-30kph Nicholas Davison, The Bield  Mill Copse Road    Fernhurst  West Sussex  GU27 3DN Elstead, Surrey The Elstead 100 BP 115km £5.00 F L P R T 12.5-30kph CTC West Surrey Group 01428 642013 nickandmarion.davison@hotmail.co.uk Nicholas Davison, The Bield  Mill Copse Road    Fernhurst  West Sussex  GU27 3DN Look Mum, No Hands! The Great Escape BR 2000m £7.00 YH F T NM R 15-30kph Islington Cycling Club 07918 147548 secretary@islington.cc David Shannon, 20 Castle Road      Finchley  London  N12 9ED Uffington Blowingstone BP 106km 1346m £5 P T R 15-30kph CTC Oxon Nick Dunton, 44a High Street  Sutton Courtenay    Abingdon  Oxon  OX14 4AP Aldbrough St John, Nr Richmond Hartside 200 BR 203km 2752m AAA3 [3000m] £6.00 FLPRT 14.3-30kph Aldbrough St John, Nr Richmond Northern Dales Summer Outing BP 1475m [3000m] £4.50 FLPRT 10-30kph VC167 07834750576 david.atkinson577@virgin.net Dave Atkinson , 23 Hailstone Drive  Northallerton  North Yorkshire    DL6 1SP Kinross Tayside Transgression BR 303km 2921m [2960m] £12.00 C P T R NM (80) 15-30kph Kinross Cycling Club 07980 475151 Trevor Keer, 21 Morlich Road  Dalgety Bay    Dunfermline  Fife  KY11 9UE Manningtree, Colchester Asparagus & Strawberries BRM 414km 2600m £4.00 PT X 17/05 15-25kph Flitchbikes CC tom.deakins@btinternet.com Thomas Deakins, 31 The Causeway      Great Dunmow  Essex  CM6 2AA Poole Brimstone 600 BRM 7700m AAA7.75 £10 L P M (50) (24/5) 15-30kph Wessex CTC Shawn Shaw, 22 Shaftesbury Road    Longfleet  Poole  Dorset  BH15 2LT Poynton, S of Stockport Llanfair...................................gogogoch 400 BRM £8.50 XP 15-30kph Peak Audax 01457 870 421 mike@PeakAudax.co.uk Mike Wigley, Higher Grange Fm  Millcroft Lane  Delph  Saddleworth  OL3 5UX Thorneyford Farm, Nr Morpeth The Mosstrooper BRM 4100m AAA4 £6 C P T A 15-30kph Tyneside Vagabonds northern.audax@gmail.com Aidan Hedley, 16 The Close  Lanchester    Durham    DH7 0PX Caton, NE of Lancaster Bowland Forest Populaire BP 1800m AAA1.75 £3.00 P R T 75 12.5-20kph CTC Lancaster 01524 36061 mikehutchinson@fastmail.fm Mike Hutchinson, Heatherdene  9 Whinfell Drive  Lancaster    LA1 4NY Pendleton, Lancashire Dales Delight 200 BRM 203km 3600m AAA3.5 [4100m] £5 L P R T 15-30kph Burnley Sportiv burnleysportiv@yahoo.com Andy Corless, 31 Castlerigg Drive  Ightenhill    Burnley  Lancashire  BB12 8AT Chapel-en-le-Frith The Old Lead Miners Trail BP 2350m AAA2.25 £5.00 P R T S 60 12.5-25kph Peak Audax davecatlow@PeakAudax.co.uk David Catlow, 9 Friars Close  Rainow    Macclesfield    SK10 5UQ Exeter Kernow and Southwest 600 BRM 8200m AAA8.25 £15.00 YH L F R Z 60 15-25kph Exeter Whs 01404 46993 ian@ukcyclist.co.uk Ian Hennessey, 10 High Street      Honiton    EX14 1PU Pateley Bridge Dales Grimpeur 200 BR 215km 4596m AAA4.5 £5.00 L P R S T 15-30kph Hambleton Road Club paul.roberts901@tiscali.co.uk Paul Roberts, 37 The Close  Romanby    Northallerton    DL7 8BL Portmahomack, nr Tain Quinaig Quest BRM 313km 4142m AAA4 [2000m] £5 A(2)CFLPRS(14/5) 15-30kph CTC Highland 01862 871 136 biker_carroll@hotmail.com Steve Carroll, Creag Charrach  Rockfield Village  Portmahomack    IV20 1RF Tewkesbury The Silk Run BP 800m £3.50 P, T, 10-25kph BlackSheep CC ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park    Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

200 31 May 08:30 Sat 100 31 May 09:30 Sat Change of Date 200 31 May 07:30 Sat 170 31 May 08:30 Sat 130 31 May 09:00 Sat 100 01 Jun 09:00 Sun 110 01 Jun 09:30 Sun 110 01 Jun 09:00 Sun 200 01 Jun 08:00 Sun 100 01 Jun 10:00 Sun 52 01 Jun 10:30 Sun 200 01 Jun 08:00 Sun 200 01 Jun 08:00 Sun 100 01 Jun 10:00 Sun ROA 10000 400 07 Jun 10:30 Sat 50 07 Jun 10:30 Sat Updated 200 07 Jun 08:30 Sat 100 07 Jun 09:30 Sat 53 07 Jun 10:00 Sat 300 07 Jun 06:00 Sat 600 07 Jun 06:00 Sat 100 08 Jun 09:00 Sun

Long Melford Edmunds Folk Sally Forth & Paddle BR 205km 1524m £5.00 C L P R T S 15-30kph Long Melford Edmund\’s Folk Sally Forth BP 106km 774m £5 C L P R T S 10-30kph Cycle Club Sudbury peterwhiteley133@hotmail.co.uk Peter Whiteley, 133 Melford Road      Sudbury  Suffolk  CO10 1JT Wem, Shropshire Four Rivers Ride BR 215km 3150m AAA3.25 £7.00 F L P R T 40 15-30kph Wem, Shropshire Three Rivers Ride BP 2200m AAA1.75 [1800m] £7.00 F L P R T 50 15-30kph Wem, Shropshire Two Rivers Ride BP £7.00 L F P R T 50 12-24kph Shropshire DA sandehargraves@googlemail.com Edwin Hargraves, 22 Trentham Road      Wem  North Shropshire  SY4 5HN Boothferry, Goole Beverley 100 BP 102km 270m £3.50 P R T 30 15-30kph Goole Vermuyden CC 01405 761 790 harvey.tripp@btinternet.com Harvey Tripp, 40 Carter Street  Goole      DN14 6SN Congleton, Cheshire Just the Plains of Cheshire BP 118km 724m £4.50 P R T 15-30kph Congleton, Cheshire Just the Hills of Cheshire BP 1700m AAA1.75 £4.50 P R T 12.5-25kph Congleton, Cheshire The Hills & Plains of Cheshire BR 210km 2285m AAA1.5 [1500m] £5.50 P R T 15-30kph Congleton CC 01260 271258 Rob Waghorn, The Querns      Congleton Edge  Cheshire  CW12 3NB LLangefni, Anglesey Anglesey Lanes BP 104km 1200m £3 L P R T 12-30kph LLangefni, Anglesey Anglesey Wandering BP £2 L P R T 10-24kph Holyhead CC j.h.sharp@bangor.ac.uk Jasmine Sharp, 409a Crafnant  Ffriddoedd Road    Bangor  Gwynedd  LL57 2GX Padiham, Lancashire Tan Hill 200 BRM 206km 4500m AAA4.5 £5 P X 15-30kph Burnley Sportiv burnleysportiv@yahoo.com Andy Corless, 31 Castlerigg Drive  Ightenhill    Burnley  Lancashire  BB12 8AT Portmahomack, nr Tain Cromarty Cruise BR 1730m £5 A(2) C L P R T S (40) 15-30kph Portmahomack, nr Tain Dornoch Dander BP 765m £2 A(2)CFLPRTS 12-24kph CTC Highland 01862 871 136 biker_carroll@hotmail.com Steve Carroll, Creag Charrach  Rockfield Village  Portmahomack    IV20 1RF Alfreton Moors and Wolds 400 BR 404km 2425m £8.00 P R T X 15-30kph Alfreton Victorian Post Boxes 50 BP 669m £3 FLPT 10-25kph AlfretonCTC nigel.randell8664@gmail.com Nigel Randell, 15 Hammer Leys      South Normanton  Derbyshire  DE55 3AX Great Dunmow, Essex Flitchbikes 200 BR 218km £6.00 L P R T M (30/5) 15-30kph Great Dunmow, Essex Flitchbikes 100 BP 107km £6.00 L P R T M (30/5) 12.5-25kph Great Dunmow, Essex Flitchbikes 50km BP £5.00 LPRTM(30/5) 8-20kph Flitchbikes CC tom.deakins@btinternet.com Thomas Deakins, 31 The Causeway      Great Dunmow  Essex  CM6 2AA Kirriemuir The Snow Roads BR 4800m AAA4.75 £12.00 A(2) C F L P R T S(80) 15-30kph Angus Bike Chain alexandalli@kirrie.eclipse.co.uk Alex Pattison, 1 Angle Park Crescent      Kirriemuir  Angus  DD8 4TJ Pendleton, Lancashire Swan With Two Necks 600 BRM 8000m AAA8 £10 L P R T Z 15-30kph Burnley Sportiv burnleysportiv@yahoo.com Andy Corless, 31 Castlerigg Drive  Ightenhill    Burnley  Lancashire  BB12 8AT Abergavenny Monmouthshire Meander BP 1500m AAA1.5 £5.00 YH F P L T 15-25kph Abergavenny RC waville@yahoo.com

Jonathan Saville, 9 Trehonddu  Llanvihangel Crucorney Abergavenny Monmouthshire NP7 8DG

160 08 Jun 08:00 Sun 100 08 Jun 09:00 Sun 51 08 Jun 09:30 Sun

Coppice House, Crewe Tough Stuff BP 162km [502m] £10 L P R T NM (150) 15-30kph Coppice House, Crewe Good Stuff BP 102km 502m £10 L P R T NM (150) 12-30kph Coppice House, Crewe Foundation Ride BP 189m £7.50 L P R T NM (100) 10-25kph Up and Under Foundation audax@upandundergroup.com

200 08 Jun 08:00 Sun

Andy Fewtrell, Up and Under Foundation  Coppice House  Quakers Coppice Crewe CW1 6FA

Ware BR 209km 1634m [1509m] £4.00 L P R S T 15-30kph

Herts High Five

www.aukweb.net


Calendar Events 160 08 Jun 09:00 Sun 100 08 Jun 10:30 Sun 51 08 Jun 12:00 Sun 200 08 Jun 08:00 Sun 200 14 Jun ::::: Sat ROA 3000 200 14 Jun 08:00 Sat 150 14 Jun 09:00 Sat 100 14 Jun 09:30 Sat ROA 5000

Stephen Poulton, Leckhampton Lodge  23 Moorend Park Road Leckhampton Cheltenham GL53 0LA

140 14 Jun 22:30 Sat ROA 3000 300 14 Jun 07:00 Sat ROA 10000 600 14 Jun 06:00 Sat 600 14 Jun 06:00 Sat 200 15 Jun 08:30 Sun ROA 25000 100 15 Jun 09:00 Sun 200 15 Jun 08:15 Sun 130 15 Jun 09:15 Sun 51 15 Jun 10:15 Sun 84 15 Jun 10:00 Sun ROA 5000 400 20 Jun 06:00 Fri 350 20 Jun ::::: Fri 200 21 Jun 08:00 Sat

Ware Four Counties 150 BP £4.00 L P R S T 15-30kph Ware Two Counties 100 BP 108km £4.00 L P R S T 12-25kph Ware One County 50 BP £3.00 L P R S T 10-20kph Hertfordshire Wheelers 07985 019214 graham.knight5@gmail.com Graham Knight, 25 Lordship Road  Cheshunt    Waltham Cross  Herts  EN7 5DR Wimbledon Common The London Ditchling Devil BR 205km 2400m [2700m] £12 F P R T 15-30kph Willesden Cycling Club paudax@gmail.com Paul Stewart, 25 Devonshire Gardens  Chiswick  London    W4 3TN Anywhere, (Bovey Tracey) Dart-Moor-Ghost-Dart BR 1850m £10 FLRT 14.3-28.6kph CTC Devon 01626 833 749 kevin.hindstreet@btinternet.com Kevin Presland, Hind Street House  Hind Street  Bovey Tracey  Devon  TQ13 9HT Apperley, Nr Cheltenham Gospel Pass 200 BR 3075m AAA3 £12 A(1)CPRTL 14.3-30kph Apperley, Nr Cheltenham YatMon 150 BP 2230m AAA2.25 £9 A(1)CPRTL 12.5-30kph Apperley, Nr Cheltenham Hoarwithy 100 (2Severn2Wye) BP £5 A(1)CPRTL 12.5-30kph CTC West stephen.poulton@btinternet.com

200 21 Jun 08:00 Sat Change of Date 600 21 Jun 05:30 Sat ROA 25000 110 21 Jun 09:30 Sat Change of Date

Bovey Tracey, Devon Dartmoor Ghost BP 145km 1850m £10 FLRT 12.5-28.6kph CTC Devon 01626 833 749 kevin.hindstreet@btinternet.com Kevin Presland, Hind Street House  Hind Street  Bovey Tracey  Devon  TQ13 9HT Galashiels Alston and Back BRM 2700m £5.00 PBX 15-30kph Audax Ecosse 01896 758 181 pedaller1@sky.com Lucy McTaggart, 30 Victoria St.  Galashiels  Scottish Borders    TD1 1HL Mytholmroyd, W. of Halifax The 3 Coasts 600 BRM 607km 5611m AAA1.75 [1631m] £10.00 A(3) L P R T Z YH 15-30kph Mytholmroyd, W. of Halifax The East & West Coasts 600 BRM 605km 4380m [5380m] £10.00 A(3) L P R T Z YH 15-30kph Mytholmroyd, W. of Halifax The Good Companions BR 2697m AAA1.75 [1631m] £5.00 A(2) L P R T YH 15-30kph CTC West Yorkshire 01422 832 853 chris.crossland@halifaxctc.org.uk Chris Crossland, 14 Stanley St. West  Sowerby Bridge  W. Yorks    HX6 1EF Hewas Water, The Merlin Centre Merlin’s Coast to Coast BP 101km 1429m £10 F P R T NM 12-30kph Probus Pedallers 01726 338354 Kathryn Mcfarlane, 3 Bos Noweth  Probus  Truro  Cornwall  TR2 4HE Rhos-On-Sea, Conwy Cestyll Cymru BR 203km 2265m AAA1.5 [1500m] £15 L P R T 15-30kph Rhos-On-Sea, Conwy The Legend of Gelert BP 135km 1400m £10 L P R T 12.5-25kph Rhos-On-Sea, Conwy Glan-y-Mor BP 750m AAA0.75 £9 L P R T 10-20kph Rhos-on-Sea Cycle Club cbwilby@gmail.com Chris Wilby, Gwenallt  Henryd Road  Gyffin  Conwy  Conwy  LL32 8HN Stevenage (Marriotts), SG2 8UT Bike Week - Stevenage Circular Cycle BP 747m £6.00 L P R T (4/6) 12-28kph Stevenage & N Herts CTC 01438 354 505 jim@stevenagectc.org.uk Jim Brown, 38 Brick Kiln Road  Stevenage      SG1 2NH Anywhere, to York Summer Arrow to York BR £12.00 DIY Also on 21/06 15-30kph Anywhere, to York Summer Dart to York BR 360km £5.00 DIY Also on 21/06 14.3-30kph AUK dk.benton@virgin.net Keith Benton, 127 Greenshaw Drive    Wigginton  York    YO32 2DB Bridge of Weir, Renfrewshire Katrine Kapers Revival BR 203km 2670m [2775m] £8.50 C F L P R T 15-30kph Glasgow CTC graham.hanley@btinternet.com

Graham Hanley, Kelton 59 Kilgraston Road Bridge Of Weir Renfrewshire PA11 3DP

Broken Cross, nr Macclesfield Knockerdown BR 201km 3150m AAA3.25 £8.00 F L P R T 14.3-25kph Peak Audax perrin_john@sky.com John Perrin, 20 Princes Way      Macclesfield  Cheshire  SK11 8UB Bushley, Tewkesbury M ae Mr Pickwick yn mynd i chwilio am ddreigiau a chwedlau BRM 601km 9500m AAA9.5 £17.50 C F L P R T S Z NM 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Hulme End, nr Hartington Lutudarum BP 1800m AAA1.75 £6.00 C F P T 12.5-25kph Peak Audax perrin_john@sky.com John Perrin, 20 Princes Way      Macclesfield  Cheshire  SK11 8UB

www.aukweb.net

200 22 Jun 08:00 Sun 100 22 Jun 09:00 Sun 55 22 Jun 09:30 Sun

Hereford, Leisure Centre BR 210km 3200m AAA3.25 £6.00 FLPRTS 15-30kph Hereford, Leisure Centre BP 105km [1450m] £6.00 FLPRTS 14.3-24kph Hereford, Leisure Centre BP £6.00 LPRTS 14.3-24kph Hereford Wheelers

Maurice Tudor, Apartment 1  Barton West 73 Barton Road Hereford Herefordshire HR4 0AU

100 25 Jun 09:30 Wed 1000 27 Jun 11:30 Fri Updated ROA 10000 300 28 Jun 05:00 Sat ROA 5000 600 28 Jun 06:00 Sat 300 29 Jun 02:00 Sun 200 29 Jun 08:00 Sun 150 29 Jun 08:30 Sun 100 29 Jun 09:00 Sun 50 29 Jun 10:00 Sun 100 29 Jun 10:00 Sun 51 29 Jun 10:30 Sun 200 29 Jun 08:00 Sun 150 29 Jun 08:30 Sun 100 29 Jun 09:00 Sun Updated 300 04 Jul 21:00 Fri 160 05 Jul 09:00 Sat 200 05 Jul 08:00 Sat 200 05 Jul 08:00 Sat 100 05 Jul 09:00 Sat 300 05 Jul 06:00 Sat 110 05 Jul 10:00 Sat 200 05 Jul 08:00 Sat ROA 25000

Hereford Towns Hereford Villages Hereford Hamlets

Hampton Hill, W London London Midweek Sightseer BP £5.00 C L P T 10-20kph Hounslow & Dist. Whs 020 82873244 billcarnaby@blueyonder.co.uk Bill Carnaby, 225 High Street  Hampton Hill    Middlesex  TW12 1NP Upton Magna, E of Shrewsbury Mille Cymru BRM 1022km 15000m AAA15 £75.00 A(1) BD C F L P R T S Z 13.3-20kph CTC Shropshire 01952 251403 undulates@hotmail.co.uk John Hamilton, 22 Oaks Crescent  Wellington    Telford    TF1 2HF West Stafford, Dorchester 3D 300 BR 312km 5150m AAA5.25 £6.00 A(2) C F L P R T 30 15-25kph Wessex DA 01305 263 272 pete_loakes@yahoo.com Peter Loakes, 1 Church Cottage  West Stafford  Dorchester    DT2 8AB York Station York-Langholm-York (YLY) BRM 608km 6000m AAA2.5 [2500m] £15 F Z T 15-30kph VC 167 northern.audax@gmail.com Aidan Hedley, 16 The Close  Lanchester    Durham    DH7 0PX Bethersden, nr Ashford, Kent Fairies Flattest Possible 300 BRM 304km £5.00 C F L P R T 15-30kph Bethersden, nr Ashford, Kent Fairies Half-Flat 200 BR 201km 1000m £5 C,F,L,P,R,T 15-30kph Bethersden, nr Ashford, Kent Fairies Fairly Flat 150k BP £5 C,F,L,P,R,T 15-30kph Bethersden, nr Ashford, Kent Fairies Flat 100k BP £5 C,F,L,P,R,T 15-30kph Bethersden, nr Ashford, Kent Fairies Easy Peasy 50k BP £5 C,F,L,P,R,T 15-30kph San Fairy Ann CC manofkentaudax@gmail.com David Winslade, 3 Albany Close      Tonbridge  Kent  TN9 2EY Easingwold, N of York Mother Shipton 100k BP 103km 769m £2.00 L P R T 12-25kph Easingwold, N of York Linton Locks 50k BP 204m £2.00 L P R T 12-25kph North Yorks DA 01904 795 695 gerry.boswell@hotmail.co.uk Gerry Boswell, 5 Invicta Court  Acomb  York    YO24 3NL Hampton in Arden A Cotswold Adventure BR 207km £6.00 RFPT 15-30kph Hampton in Arden Solihull CC mini Randonnee BP 156km £5.00 RFPT 15-30kph Hampton in Arden A Warwickshire Wander ! BP £4.00 F P R T 15-30kph SOLIHULL CC Roger Cliffe, 11 Warren Drive  Dorridge    Solihull    B93 8JY Great Dunmow, Essex Hereward the Wake BRM 301km £8 X R L P T M (26/06) 15-30kph Flitchbikes CC tom.deakins@btinternet.com Thomas Deakins, 31 The Causeway      Great Dunmow  Essex  CM6 2AA Bangor, N Wales Aberdaron Day Out BP 1500m £4 LPRT 15-30kph Holyhead CC j.h.sharp@bangor.ac.uk Jasmine Sharp, 409a Crafnant  Ffriddoedd Road    Bangor  Gwynedd  LL57 2GX East Grinstead Meridian Hills BR 3500m AAA3.5 £5 FPR 15-30kph San Fairy Ann CC 01342 314437 malinseastg@tiscali.co.uk Martin Malins, 64 Blount Avenue  East Grinstead  West Sussex    RH19 IJW Oundle, Northants Triple Reservoir Challenge BR 204km £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph Oundle, Northants Single Reservoir Challenge BP 101km £4.50 L P R T 12.5-30kph CTC Northants & M K Richard Daniells, 6 Matson Close      Rothwell  Northants  NN14 6AY Stornoway, Isle of Lewis Golden Road and Standing Stones BR 3850m [3200m] £12 A(3) 80 L P R S T F C 15-30kph Stornoway, Isle of Lewis Hebridean Hundred BP 113km 1068m £5 A(3) R S P T (22/6) 12.5-30kph Hebridean CC ian_d_gilbert@yahoo.co.uk Ian Gilbert, 19 Churchill Drive      Stornoway  Isle of Lewis  HS1 2NP Tewkesbury Mr. Pickwick Takes Flight BR 206km 1800m [2700m] £4.00 c f p r nm t 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

63


Calendar Events 67 06 Jul 10:00 Sun 66 06 Jul 10:00 Sun 100 06 Jul 08:30 Sun 200 06 Jul 08:00 Sun 100 12 Jul 09:00 Sat 600 12 Jul 07:00 Sat Updated ROA 10000 600 12 Jul 07:00 Sat ROA 10000 200 12 Jul 08:00 Sat 160 12 Jul 09:00 Sat 110 12 Jul 09:30 Sat 200 13 Jul 08:00 Sun 170 13 Jul 08:30 Sun 100 13 Jul 09:00 Sun 100 13 Jul 09:30 Sun 200 13 Jul 08:00 Sun 160 13 Jul 08:30 Sun 110 13 Jul 09:00 Sun 200 13 Jul 08:00 Sun 100 13 Jul 09:00 Sun 100 13 Jul 09:00 Sun 200 13 Jul 08:00 Sun 100 13 Jul 09:00 Sun 55 13 Jul 10:00 Sun 600 19 Jul 06:00 Sat 200 19 Jul 08:00 Sat 100 19 Jul 09:00 Sat 64

Carharrack, Cornwall Mines and Mineral Railways (ON-road) BP 820m £5.00 C L P R T 8-28kph Carharrack, Cornwall Mines and Mineral Railways (OFF-road) BP 1257m [773m] £5.00 C L P R T 8-28kph Audax Kernow brindisijones@tiscali.co.uk Simon Jones, The Cottage  Pulla Cross    Truro  Cornwall  TR4 8SA Combe Down, Bath Mendip Transmitter BP 1650m AAA1.75 £7 N.P.R.T 15-30kph Bath CC Robert Mcmillan, 228 Bloomfield Road      Bath    BA2 2AX Stornoway, Isle of Lewis Outer Hebrides Island Hop BR 2300m £10 A(3) 80 FLPRSTX (22/6) 15-30kph Hebridean CC ian_d_gilbert@yahoo.co.uk Ian Gilbert, 19 Churchill Drive      Stornoway  Isle of Lewis  HS1 2NP Alfreton To the Races BP 108km £6.00 L P R T M 100 14-28kph Alfreton CTC iwh.audax@outlook.com Ian Hobbs, 26 Naseby Road  Openwoodgate    Belper    DE56 0ER Galashiels Borderlands Roc Trevezal BRM £10.00 P,L,R,T,S 15-25kph Audax Ecosse 01896 758 181 pedaller1@sky.com Lucy McTaggart, 30 Victoria St.  Galashiels  Scottish Borders    TD1 1HL Leighton Buzzard The Buzzard BRM 5600m £5 X 15-30kph Exeter Whs 01404 46993 ian@ukcyclist.co.uk Ian Hennessey, 10 High Street      Honiton    EX14 1PU Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH Brix\’n Water BR 216km 2300m £7 P R T 50 14.4-30kph Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH Brix\’n Bouquet BP 1400m [2300m] £7 P R T 50 14.4-30kph Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH Double Bouquet BP 750m [2300m] £7 P R T 50 14.4-30kph Geoffrey Cleaver audaxgeoff@gmail.com Geoff Cleaver, 43 Goodere Drive  Polesworth  Tamworth    B78 1BY Denshaw, NE of Oldham Bowland BR 4400m AAA4.5 £5.00 P R T 14.3-30kph Denshaw, NE of Oldham Slaidburn BP 3200m AAA3.25 £5.00 P R T 12.5-25kph Denshaw, NE of Oldham Widdop BP 2500m AAA2.5 £5.00 P R T 10-25kph Saddleworth Clarion 07850 208 977 nephi@alty.fsnet.co.uk Nephi Alty, 13 Ambrose Crescent  Diggle    Saddleworth    OL3 5XG East Finchley, N2 9ED Suburban Breakout BP 103km 1085m [755m] £5 PRT 15-30kph Central London CTC nick@centrallondonctc.org.uk Nick Bloom, 32 Fortis Green Avenue  Fortis Green    London    N2 9NA Milton, Abingdon Barbury Bash BR 210km £5 R T P L 4/7 15-30kph Milton, Abingdon Barbury Bash BP £5 R T P L 24/6 15-30kph Milton, Abingdon Barbury Bash BP £5 R T P L 4/7 15-30kph Didcot Phoenix CC Ian Middleton, 4 Isis Close      Abingdon    OX14 3TA Otley, West Yorkshire Yorkshire Mixture BR 203km 2400m AAA1.75 [1750m] £5.00 L R T S 15-30kph Otley, West Yorkshire The Two M’s Ride BP 107km 1050m £4.00 L R T S 12-25kph Otley, West Yorkshire Over Jordan BP 101km 1800m AAA1.75 £4 L R T S 12-30kph Otley CC chris.boulton@lineone.net Chris Boulton, 15 Adel Towers Close      Leeds    LS16 8ES Smallworth, Garboldisham, nr Diss Garboldisham Groveller BR £6.00 P R T 15-30kph Smallworth, Garboldisham, nr Diss Garboldisham Grafter BP £6.00 P R T F 15-30kph Smallworth, Garboldisham, nr Diss Garboldisham Grinder BP £6.00 P R F T 15-30kph Diss CTC tomandeileenelkins@hotmail.co.uk Tom Elkins, 6 Marston Lane      Norwich    NR4 6LZ Broken Cross, nr Macclesfield Three Steps to Severn BRM 610km 4800m [4300m] £8.00 F L P T 15-25kph Peak Audax perrin_john@sky.com John Perrin, 20 Princes Way      Macclesfield  Cheshire  SK11 8UB Corwen Barmouth Boulevard BR 204km 3650m AAA3.75 £5.00 P R T 50 15-30kph Corwen The Brenig Bach BP 107km 1920m AAA2 £5.00 P R T 50 12.5-25kph Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

60 19 Jul 10:00 Sat

Corwen BP 1000m £5.00 P R T 50 12.5-25kph Chester & N. Wales CTC

The Bala Parade dmanu@outlook.com

ROA 5000

David Matthews, Hill View Cottage  Cross Lanes  Oscroft  Tarvin  Cheshire  CH3 8NG

200 19 Jul 09:00 Sat 300 19 Jul 06:30 Sat 200 19 Jul 08:00 Sat

Fulford Scout Hut, York Three Bridges BR £3.50 L,P,T,R 15-30kph Clifton CC 07799023760 greg.melia@cliftoncc.org Greg Melia, 10 Curzon Terrace  York      YO23 1HA Penzance Many Rivers to Cross BR 307km 4940m AAA5 £3.00 BXYHC 15-30kph Penzance Four Hundreds 200 BR 207km 3760m AAA3.75 £3.00 BYHXC 15-30kph Audax Kernow martyn.aldis@syntagma.co.uk

200 20 Jul 08:00 Sun 140 20 Jul 09:00 Sun 110 20 Jul 09:00 Sun Change of Date 200 20 Jul 08:00 Sun 100 20 Jul 09:00 Sun ROA 5000 200 20 Jul 08:00 Sun 100 20 Jul 08:30 Sun ROA 25000 1300 21 Jul 11:15 Mon ROA 25000 160 26 Jul 08:45 Sat 100 26 Jul 09:30 Sat 200 26 Jul 08:30 Sat Change of Date 400 26 Jul 10:00 Sat New Event 200 26 Jul 08:00 Sat 200 02 Aug 08:00 Sat 60 02 Aug 10:00 Sat ROA 5000 200 02 Aug 08:00 Sat 200 03 Aug 08:00 Sun 200 03 Aug 08:00 Sun 110 03 Aug 09:00 Sun 50 03 Aug 09:30 Sun 400 09 Aug 07:00 Sat ROA 10000

Martyn Aldis, Sundown  25a Kersey Road  Flushing  Falmouth  Cornwall  TR11 5TR

Awbridge, Nr. Romsey, Hampshire Hungerford Hurrah BR 2200m £6.50 L P R T 50 6/7 15-30kph Awbridge, Nr. Romsey, Hampshire Hungerford Hooray BP 1450m £6.50 L P R T 50 6/7 15-30kph Southampton & Romsey CTC alanandemma@talktalk.net Alan Davies, 7 Queens Close      Romsey  Hampshire  SO51 5EG Earlswood Down the Vale BP £6.00 PRT 15-30kph MC & AC Jim Lee, 107 Shustoke Road      Solihull  West Midlands  B91 2QR Newton Abbot, Devon Torplex Two Hundred BR 210km 2900m AAA3 £7.50 F L P R S T 15-30kph Newton Abbot, Devon Devon Delight BP 107km £7.50 F L P R S T 10-25kph CTC Devon graham@gjbrodie.freeserve.co.uk Graham Brodie, 81 Twickenham Road      Newton Abbot    TQ12 4JG Steyning, W Sussex The Devils Punchbowl 200 BR 207km £5.00 F P T 15-30kph Steyning, W Sussex The Double Devils Punchbowl 100 BP 108km £5.00 F P T 15-30kph Dave Hudson Dave Hudson, 151 Middle Road  Shoreham-by-Sea      BN43 6LG Brodick, Isle of Arran The Highlands, Glens & Western Isles BRM 1302km 17950m AAA18 [2200m] £10 T NM YH X 60 12-30kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Bildeston, Suffolk 100 miles of Suffolk Lanes BP 168km £5.00 L P R T S 15-30kph Bildeston, Suffolk Bildeston Lanes BP 104km £5.00 L P R T S 15-30kph Bildeston, Suffolk Suffolk Lanes Extravaganza BR 209km £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph Cycle Club Sudbury 01449 741048 pamandrobinw@gmail.com Robin Weaver, 14 Chapel Street  Bildeston    Ipswich  Suffolk  IP7 7EP Ingleby Barwick, Teesside National 400 BRM 3920m £30 A(1) F L P R T S (200) 15-25kph AUK 01325 374 112 nigel.hall@finklecroft.me.uk Nigel Hall, c/o Andrew Clarkson  76 Arthurs Avenue  Harrogate     HG2 0GB Trowell, Nottingham The Cheshire Cat BR 206km 3630m AAA3.75 £7.00 L P R T 80 15-30kph Notts DA 0115 932 9978 Mark Chambers, 62 Queens Avenue  Hallam Fields Ilkeston  Derbyshire  DE7 4DJ Bolsover Clumber to Humber (John Kerr Memorial Ride) BR 211km £5.00 L P R T 50 15-30kph Bolsover Robin Hood 60 BP £5.00 L P R T (100) 10-20kph Bolsover & District CC 01246 825 351 matt.connley@talktalk.net Matt Connley, 7 Eskdale Close  Bolsover  Chesterfield    S44 6RL Harringay, London Straight Outta Hackney BR £11.00 CFLPRT 15-30kph Audax Club Hackney 07932672561 justinjones1969@gmail.com Justin Jones, ACH HQ  39 Harringay Road    London    N15 3JB Wickhamford, SE of Evesham Neville Chanin Memorial - Over The Severn BR 213km 3134m AAA3.25 £7.00 F P R T 15-30kph Wickhamford, SE of Evesham Three Counties - Four Leaf Clover BR 202km £6.00 F P R T 15-30kph Wickhamford, SE of Evesham Three Counties - Two Leaf Clover BP 111km £4.00 F P R T 15-30kph 8TP Wickhamford, SE of Evesham Three Counties - Clover Leaf BP £2.00 F P R T 10-25kph Evesham & Dist. Whs petehutch1959@btinternet.com Pete Hutchinson, Hazelwood  Shinehill Lane  South Littleton  Evesham WR11 8DQ Galashiels Over the Hill and Back BRM £5.00 PBX 15-30kph Audax Ecosse 01896 758 181 pedaller1@sky.com Lucy McTaggart, 30 Victoria St.  Galashiels  Scottish Borders    TD1 1HL www.aukweb.net


Calendar Events 300 09 Aug 06:00 Sat ROA 25000 600 09 Aug 06:00 Sat 110 13 Aug 10:00 Wed 100 13 Aug 10:00 Wed

Tewkesbury A Rough Diamond BR 301km 2500m [3450m] £6.50 c f l p r t nm 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Windsor Windsor - Chester - Windsor BRM £20.00 A(1) F L P R T S Z (100) 15-30kph YACF stevegloster@gmx.co.uk Steve Gloster, 24 Ash Street  Bilston  Wolverhampton  WV14 8UP   Maidenhead Riverside to Riverside BP 118km £3.00 P R T 15-30kph Willesden CC anemograby@hotmail.com Anne Mograby, 5 Castle Farm  Leigh Square    Windsor  Berks  SL4 4PT Marple Memorial Park White Peak Grimpeur BP 103km 2310m AAA2.25 £5.00 P R T 60 (8/8) 12.5-25kph Peak Audax 01457 870421 mike@PeakAudax.co.uk

ROA 10000

Mike Wigley, Higher Grange Farm  Millcroft Lane  Delph  Oldham  Saddleworth OL3 5UX

200 16 Aug 08:00 Sat 120 16 Aug 09:00 Sat

Belbroughton, N Worcestershire Kidderminster Killer BR 211km 3750m AAA3.75 £7.25 F L P R S T (70) (8/8) 14.3-30kph Belbroughton, N Worcestershire From Clee to Heaven BP 1950m AAA2 £7.25 F L P R S T (65) 13-25kph Beacon Roads Cycling Clu 01562 731606 montgomery@beaconrcc.org.uk

200 16 Aug 08:00 Sat 100 16 Aug 09:00 Sat 53 16 Aug 10:00 Sat 200 17 Aug 08:00 Sun 160 17 Aug 08:30 Sun 100 17 Aug 09:00 Sun 100 17 Aug 10:00 Sun 110 17 Aug 09:50 Sun 100 20 Aug 10:00 Wed 300 23 Aug 04:00 Sat 200 23 Aug 08:00 Sat 160 23 Aug 08:15 Sat 100 23 Aug 09:00 Sat 50 23 Aug 10:00 Sat 200 23 Aug 08:00 Sat 100 23 Aug 10:00 Sat ROA 10000 400 23 Aug 05:30 Sat 400 23 Aug 05:30 Sat ROA 25000 200 30 Aug 08:00 Sat 160 30 Aug 08:15 Sat

Philip Whiteman, 2 Drayton Terrace Drayton Belbroughton, Stourbridge DY9 0BW

Gladestry, W of Kington Elan & Ystwyth BR 208km 3750m AAA3.75 £5.00 YH C BD P R T 150 5/8 12.5-25kph Gladestry, W of Kington Radnor Roundabout BP 104km 1826m AAA1.75 £5.00 YH C BD P R T 150 5/8 12.5-25kph Gladestry, W of Kington Gladestry Trot BP £5.00 YH C BD P R T 150 5/8 10-20kph Gladestry, W of Kington Tregaron Dragon BR 209km 4800m AAA4.75 £5.00 YH C BD P R T 150 5/8 12.5-25kph Gladestry, W of Kington Llandovery Discovery BP 3250m AAA3.25 £5.00 YH C L P R T 150 8/16 12.5-25kph Gladestry, W of Kington Gladestry Gallop BP 107km 1625m AAA1.75 £5.00 YH C BD P R T 150 5/8 12.5-25kph CTC Cymru rossjeal@gladestry.com Ross Jeal, Monymusk  Meadow Vale  Gladestry  Kington  Powys  HR5 3PR Musselburgh The Crystal Run BP 1600m AAA1.5 £5.00 F L P R 12.5-25kph Audax Ecosse martinfoley@btinternet.com Martin Foley, 78 Denholm Road  Musselburgh  East Lothian    EH21 6TU Shere, Guildford Tour of the Hills BP 115km 2300m AAA2.25 £8.00 F L P R T 225 15-30kph West Surrey CTC 01483 810028 dggray7@hotmail.com Don Gray, Greenleas  Beech Lane    Normandy  Surrey  GU3 2JH Marple West Peak Grimpeur BP 103km 2400m AAA2.5 £5.00 P R T 60 (16/8) 12.5-25kph Peak Audax davecatlow@PeakAudax.co.uk David Catlow, 9 Friars Close  Rainow    Macclesfield    SK10 5UQ Mildenhall Cycling Rally Mildenhall Rally Roving 300 BR 312km £5.00 CPT (16/08) 15-30kph Mildenhall Cycling Rally Mildenhall Rally Randonnee BR 206km £5.00 CPTS (16/8) 15-30kph Mildenhall Cycling Rally Mildenhall Rally 100 miler BP 161km £5.00 CPTS (16/8) 15-30kph Mildenhall Cycling Rally Mildenhall Rally Brevet BP 105km £5.00 CPTS (16/8) 12-30kph Mildenhall Cycling Rally Mildenhall Rally Brief Brevet BP £5.00 CPTS 16/8 10-25kph CTC Suffolk Andy Terry, The Nook  Colchester Road    Great Bromley  Essex  CO7 7TN Newtonmore Rothes Reccie BR 2347m £3 CPT 15-30kph Newtonmore Grantown Gallop BP 104km 992m £2.00 C YH L P R T 10-20kph CTC Highland biker_carroll@hotmail.com Steve Carroll, Creag Charrach  Rockfield    Tain  Ross-shire  IV20 1RF Sowerby Bridge, West Yorkshire The Old 240 BRM 407km 6400m AAA6.5 £5.00 C F L P R T 15-30kph Sowerby Bridge, West Yorkshire Not Quite The Spurn Head 400 BRM 403km 2450m £5.00 C L P R T 15-30kph CTC West Yorkshire 01422 832 853 chris.crossland@halifaxctc.org.uk Chris Crossland, 14 Stanley St. West  Sowerby Bridge  W. Yorks    HX6 1EF Bangor, North Wales Sych it and Sea (Gwynedd Traverse) BR 210km 2850m AAA2.75 £5 L P R T 15-30kph Holyhead CC j.h.sharp@bangor.ac.uk Jasmine Sharp, 409a Crafnant  Ffriddoedd Road    Bangor  Gwynedd  LL57 2GX Dore, Sheffield Amber and Green BP £5 L P R T 14.3-30kph

www.aukweb.net

100 30 Aug 09:00 Sat 100 31 Aug 09:00 Sun ROA 2000 400 06 Sep 10:30 Sat 200 06 Sep 08:00 Sat ROA 25000 100 07 Sep 09:00 Sun 200 07 Sep 07:45 Sun 150 07 Sep 07:45 Sun 100 07 Sep 10:00 Sun ROA 10000 200 13 Sep 07:30 Sat ROA 5000 200 13 Sep 07:00 Sat ROA 4000 600 13 Sep 06:00 Sat 200 13 Sep 08:00 Sat 150 13 Sep 08:30 Sat 100 13 Sep 09:30 Sat 100 13 Sep 10:00 Sat 200 13 Sep 08:30 Sat 110 13 Sep 09:00 Sat 51 13 Sep 09:30 Sat 110 14 Sep 09:30 Sun Updated ROA 2000 200 14 Sep 08:00 Sun 160 20 Sep 08:00 Sat 110 20 Sep 08:30 Sat 53 20 Sep 09:00 Sat

Dore, Sheffield An Amber Gambol BP £5 L P R T 12-25kph Sheffield District CTC 0114 255 0907 bigT.ridinghigh@gmail.com Tony Gore, 8 Ladysmith Avenue      Sheffield    S7 1SF Merthyr Tydfil Dic Penderyn BP 1900m AAA2 £4.50 P R T 12-30kph Merthyr CC 01685 373 758 adrianmcd2010@talktalk.net Adrian McDonald, 2 Brunswick St  Merthyr Tydfil  Mid Glam    CF47 8SB Stonehaven Old Military Roads BRM 6000m AAA6 £6 X P L R T (25) 15-30kph None Stephen Reed, CAIRNBANNO  34 Dunnottar Avenue    STONEHAVEN    AB39 2JJ Tewkesbury Mr. Pickwick goes to Hay in a day BR 205km 1900m £4.00 c f l p r t nm 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Hampton Hill, SW London London Sightseer BP £5.00 C L P T NM 10-20kph Hounslow & Dist. Whs 020 8287 3244 billcarnaby@blueyonder.co.uk Bill Carnaby, 225 High Street  Hampton Hill  Middlesex    TW12 1NP Lymington New Forest On and Off Shore BR 202km 2150m £17.00 L P R T 100 (3/9) Ferry 15-30kph Lymington New Forest and Isle of Wight Century BP £17.00 L P R T 100 (30/8) Ferry 15-30kph Lymington New Forest and Coast BP 102km £6.00 C L P R T 100 (3/9) 10-20kph John Ward 01590 671 205 cyclingnewforest@gmail.com John Ward, 34 Avenue Road  Lymington  Hants    SO41 9GJ Chepstow Castle Border Castles Randonnee BR 3000m AAA3 £2.00 YHXPRT(14/9) 15-30kph Bristol DA Nik Peregrine, 46 Bridge Street      Chepstow    NP16 5EY Coryton, NW Cardiff Ferryside Fish Foray BR 225km £8.00 YH L R P T 50 15-30kph Cardiff Byways CC evansrichardd@googlemail.com Richard Evans, 73 Conway Road      Cardiff    CF11 9NW Great Dunmow The Flatlands BRM 606km £6 X A(1) CLPRTM (06/09)(50) 15-30kph Flitchbikes CC tom.deakins@btinternet.com Thomas Deakins, 31 The Causeway      Great Dunmow  Essex  CM6 2AA Richmond, N Yorks Dales Dales Tour Plus BR 3150m AAA3.25 £6.00 C F L P R T 14.4-30kph VC167 07887628513 david.atkinson577@virgin.net David Atkinson, 4 Borrowby Avenue      Northallerton  North Yorkshire  DL6 1AL Richmond, N Yorks Dave’s Dales Tour 160KM BP 2500m AAA2.5 £5.50 C F L P R T 12-30kph Richmond, N Yorks Dave’s Mini Dales Tour 100KM BP 1900m AAA2 £5.50 C F L P R T 10-20kph Richmond, N Yorks Lucia’s Vale of York Meander 100KM BP £5.50 C F L P R T 10-20kph VC167 078887628513 david.atkinson577@virgin.net David Atkinson, 4 Borrowby Avenue      Northallerton  North Yorkshire  DL6 1AL Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH Wem, we get there BR 208km 1400m £7.00 X P R 50 (31/8) 15-30kph Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH Charnwood Challenge BP 111km 1094m £7.00 P R T 50 (31/8) 12.5-30kph Tamworth, Pretty Pigs PH National Forest 50 BP 400m £6.00 P R T 50 (31/8) 10-20kph Geoff Cleaver audaxgeoff@gmail.com Geoffrey Cleaver, 43 Goodere Dr  Polesworth Tamworth  Staffordshire  B78 1BY Ludford, NE of Lincoln Lincolnshire Wolds BP £5.00 F P R T 15-30kph CTC Lincolnshire timnewbery@hotmail.com Tim Newbery, 7a Linden Walk      Louth    LN11 9HT Musselburgh The Erit Lass BR 3000m AAA3 £7.00 F L P R T 15-30kph Audax Ecosse martinfoley@btinternet.com Martin Foley, 78 Denholm Road  Musselburgh  East Lothian    EH21 6TU Husbands Bosworth Welland Wonder 160 BP 1675m £5.00 LPRT 15-30kph Husbands Bosworth Welland Wonder 100 BP 116km 1350m £5.00 LPRT 12-24kph Husbands Bosworth Welland Wonder 50 BP 525m £5.00 LPRT 12-24kph Welland Valley CC 01858545376

ROA 2000

Mike Vybiral, Logan Cottage  Grange Lane  East Langton  Market Harborough LE16 7TF

100 20 Sep 10:15 Sat

Rodborough, Stroud BP 106km 2150m AAA2.25 £5 L P R S T (60) 12.5-25kph Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

Pedersen 100

65


Calendar Events 100 20 Sep 10:00 Sat 200 21 Sep 08:00 Sun 130 21 Sep 09:00 Sun 50 21 Sep 10:00 Sun ROA 5000 200 27 Sep 08:00 Sat 100 27 Sep 9::00 Sat 100 27 Sep 09:00 Sat 200 28 Sep 07:30 Sun 100 04 Oct 09:00 Sat ROA 4000 200 04 Oct 08:10 Sat 200 04 Oct 08:00 Sat 100 04 Oct 08:30 Sat 110 05 Oct 09:00 Sun 200 05 Oct 08:00 Sun ROA 10000 100 05 Oct 09:00 Sun 50 05 Oct 10:00 Sun ROA 25000 100 12 Oct 09:00 Sun

Rodborough, Stroud Budding 100 BP 105km 1650m AAA1.5 £5 L P R S T (60) 12.5-25kph Dursley RC 01453 762235 james.reynolds@lein-ad.com James Reynolds, Ambleside  The Butts  Rodborough  Stroud  GL5 3UG Old Ma’s Tattenhall, Cheshire Pistyll Packing Momma BR 209km 3400m AAA3.5 £5.00 P R 50 T L (16/09) 15-30kph Old Ma’s Tattenhall, Cheshire Momma’s Mountain Views BP 137km 2000m AAA2 £5.00 P R 50 T L (16/09) 12.5-25kph Old Ma’s Tattenhall, Cheshire Momma’s Leafy Lanes BP £5.00 P R 50 T L (16/09) 10-20kph Chester & N Wales CTC dmanu@outlook.com David Matthews, Hill View Cott  Cross Lanes  Oscroft  Tarvin  Cheshire  CH3 8NG Broken Cross, nr Macclesfield Venetian Nights BR 210km 2750m AAA2.25 [2333m] £8.00 F L P R T 14.3-25kph Peak Audax perrin_john@sky.com John Perrin, 20 Princes Way      Macclesfield  Cheshire  SK11 8UB Coryton, NW Cardiff Trefil Travail BP 105km 2270m AAA2.25 £8.00 YH L P R T 50 12-24kph Cardiff Byways CC 02920633970 A.H.Mackay@open.ac.uk Hugh Mackay, 131 Stanwell Road      Penarth    CF64 3LL Sonning Common, near Reading Henley Hilly Hundred BP 1660m AAA1.75 £5 FLPRT 12-30kph CTC Reading DA brianperry_3@hotmail.co.uk Brian Perry, 16 Rowland Close      Wallingford  Oxon  OX10 8LA Pendleton, Lancashire Last Chance Dales Dance 200 BRM 3300m AAA3.25 [3000m] £5.00 L P R T 15-30kph Burnley Sportiv burnleysportiv@yahoo.com Andy Corless, 31 Castlerigg Drive  Ightenhill    Burnley  Lancashire  BB12 8AT Bristol Tasty Cheddar BP 101km 1510m AAA1 £4.00 P YH 12.5-30kph Bristol DA 0117 925 5217 joe.prosser@blueyonder.co.uk Joe Prosser, 8 Portland Court  Cumberland Close  Bristol    BS1 6XB Chalfont St Peter The Less Anfractuous BR 207km 2400m £6.00 L P R T M 75 15-30kph Chalfont St Peter The AAAnfractuous BR 207km 2900m AAA3 £6.00 L P R T M 75 15-30kph Chalfont St Peter The Nyctophobic BP 109km 1400m £6 L P R T M 75 12.5-30kph Willesden CC paudax@gmail.com Paul Stewart, 25 Devonshire Gardens  Chiswick  London    W4 3TN Blaxhall, Suffolk The Suffolk Byways BP 117km 620m £5.00 YH C L P R T (120) 15-30kph CTC Suffolk suffolkcyclist@gmail.com Paul Bass, 21 Thomas Close  Ixworth    Bury St Edmunds    IP31 2UQ Galashiels Etal-u-Can BRM 204km 2379m £5.00 BPX 15-30kph Audax Ecosse 01896 758 181 pedaller1@sky.com Lucy McTaggart, 30 Victoria St.  Galashiels  Scottish Borders    TD1 1HL Hebden Bridge Season of Mists BP 2555m AAA2.5 £4.00 L R T YH 12-24kph Hebden Bridge Mellow Fruitfulness BP 1200m AAA1.25 £3.50 L R T YH 8-20kph CTC West Yorkshire 01422 832 853 chris.crossland@halifaxctc.org.uk Chris Crossland, 14 Stanley St. West  Sowerby Bridge  W. Yorks    HX6 1EF Abergavenny Marches Grimpeur BP 1950m AAA2 £5.00 YH F P L T 15-25kph Abergavenny RC waville@yahoo.com

Jonathan Saville, 9 Trehonddu  Llanvihangel Crucorney Abergavenny Monmouthshire NP7 8DG

200 12 Oct 08:00 Sun 170 12 Oct 08:30 Sun 100 12 Oct 10:00 Sun 200 18 Oct 08:00 Sat 130 18 Oct 08:30 Sat 60 18 Oct 09:00 Sat 200 18 Oct 07:30 Sat ROA 25000

Congleton Rugby Club Horseshoe Pass BR 210km £5.00 P R (60) 15-30kph Congleton Rugby Club Chirk Aqueduct BP 175km £5.00 P R (60) 15-30kph Congleton CC dhurst085@aol.com Denise Hurst, 10 Firwood Road      Biddulph  Staffordshire  ST8 7ED Wigginton, N of York Gerry’s Autumn Brevet BP 101km 942m £3.00 L P R T 12-25kph North Yorks DA 01904 795 695 gerry.boswell@hotmail.co.uk Gerry Boswell, 5 Invicta Court  Acomb  York    YO24 3NL Corwen, N. Wales The Clwydian BR 212km 3200m AAA3.25 [3488m] £5.00 P R T 50 15-30kph Corwen, N. Wales The Clwyd Gate BP 138km 2250m AAA2.25 £5.00 P R T 50 12.5-25kph Corwen, N. Wales ‘The Bala mini- Bash’ BP £5.00 P R T 50 12.5-25kph Chester & N. Wales CTC 01745 560892 vickypayne8@hotmail.com Vicky Payne, Bryn Celyn  Penyffordd    Holywell  Flintshire  CH8 9HH Tewkesbury Mr. Pickwick’s Autumnal Outing BR 206km 2350m £4.00 c l p r t nm 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ

66

Arrivée February 2014 No. 123

150 18 Oct 08:15 Sat 200 19 Oct 08:00 Sun 160 19 Oct 09:00 Sun 100 26 Oct 08:00 Sun 100 26 Oct 09:00 Sun ROA 3000 100 26 Oct 10:00 Sun ROA 10000 200 01 Nov 07:30 Sat 200 07 Nov Thu Fri or Sat 200 08 Nov Sat Sun Mon ROA 25000 200 08 Nov 07:00 Sat ROA 25000 100 09 Nov 09:00 Sun 200 09 Nov 08:00 Sun 160 09 Nov 08:30 Sun 200 06 Dec 07:00 Sat ROA 25000 50 07 Dec 10:00 Sun

Trowell, West of Nottingham An Autumn day out. BP 153km 1135m £6.00p L P R T(80) 15-30kph Nottinghamshire CTC 0115 932 9978 Mark Chambers, 62 Queens Avenue  Hallam Fields  Ilkeston  Derbys  DE7 4DJ Carlton Colville,Lowestoft, Suffolk The Silly Suffolk BR £5.00 FRTP 15-30kph Carlton Colville,Lowestoft, Suffolk The Silly Suffolk BP £5.00 FRTP 15-30kph Velo Club Baracchi johntommo6@btinternet.com John Thompson, 136 Dell Road  Oulton Broad    Lowestoft  Suffolk  NR33 9NT Bovey Tracey The Dartmoor Devil @ 8 BP 104km 2500m AAA2.5 £8.00 F P R T 125 (23/10) 12.5-25kph Bovey Tracey The Dartmoor Devil @ 9 BP 104km 2500m AAA2.5 £8.00 F P R T 125 (23/10) 12.5-25kph CTC Devon 01626 833 749 kevin.hindstreet@btinternet.com Kevin Presland, Hind Street House  Hind Street  Bovey Tracey  Devon  TQ13 9HT Galashiels Ride of the Valkyries BP 106km 1200m [1517m] £7.00 LPRTS 12-30kph Audax Ecosse 01896 758 181 pedaller1@sky.com Lucy McTaggart, 30 Victoria St.  Galashiels  Scottish Borders    TD1 1HL Cholsey, E of Didcot Upper Thames BR 212km 1900m [1943m] £6.00 L P R T M 15-30kph Thames Valley Audax 01491 651 284 philipmdyson@btinternet.com Phil Dyson, 25 Papist Way  Cholsey  Wallingford  Oxon  OX10 9LL Dinner Darts To the AUK Annual Dinner BR £5 14.3-30kph After Dinner Darts From the AUK Annual Dinner BR £5 14.3-30kph AUK sheila@aukadia.net Sheila Simpson, 33 Hawk Green Road, Marple SK6 7HR Tewkesbury Mr. Pickwick’s Cymraeg Cyrch BR 209km 2200m £4.00 c p r t nm 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Carlton Colville,nr Lowestoft, Suffolk The Waveney Wander BP £5.00 LPRT 15-30kph Velo Club Baracchi johntommo6@btinternet.com John Thompson, 136 Dell Road  Oulton Broad    Lowestoft  Suffolk  NR33 9NT Cheadle, Stockport Eureka! BR 210km 800m £6 .00 P R T M 60 15-30kph Cheadle, Stockport Cheshire Safari BP 570m £6.00 P R T M 60 12.5-25kph Peak Audax hamhort84@talktalk.net Peter Hammond, 3 Dorac Avenue  Heald Green  Cheadle  Stockport SK8 3NZ Tewkesbury Kings, Castles, Priests & Churches. BR 202km 2550m AAA1.75 [1800m] £4.00 f l p r t nm 100 15-25kph BlackSheep CC 01684 292 390 ybgirkram@talktalk.net Mark Rigby, 16 Battle Road  Tewkesbury Park  Tewkesbury    GL20 5TZ Carharrack, Cornwall Ed’s Mince Pie & Mulled Wine 50 BP £3.50 F L P R T (85) 10-25kph Audax Kernow 01326 373421 angells@talktalk.net Eddie Angell, 14 Belhay      Penryn  Cornwall  TR10 8DF ~~~~~~~~~

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Prologue - London-Edinburgh-London 2013 Photo: Ivo Miesen Overleaf, Manche to Med 1,000 km BP - In the Lot valley Photo: Sheila Simpson


Arrivee 123 feb2014  
Arrivee 123 feb2014  

2014 February edition of Arrivee the magazine of Audax United Kingdom

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