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Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

Mon. & Tues., February 10 & 11, 2014 Auburn University Student Center 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. - Rooms 2222 and 2223

• Track One: Outreach Scholarship in Action • Track Two: Funding Strategies for Outreach Scholarship Success • Track Three: Engagement Boundary Spanning

featuring:

Robert Gipe

Humanities and arts-community engaged scholar with extensive engagement experience who teaches at Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

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Dear symposium participants, Welcome to our sixth Outreach Scholarship Symposium. Based on the success of our past symposia, we have decided to expand our program by integrating sessions on funding and support for engagement. This allows us to move to a more integrated focus on outreach best practices expressed through an offering of plenary sessions, full individual concurrent sessions, symposia and poster presentations. This will also allow you to attend a variety of popular and helpful sessions, as well as hear from colleagues regarding their initiatives and the scholarly contributions deriving from their engagement. I am very pleased to welcome Mr. Robert Gipe to Auburn University to deliver our keynote address on the advancing focus of enhancing public engagement. Mr. Gipe is a humanities and artscommunity engaged scholar with extensive engagement experience who teaches at Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College. I am also looking forward to the involvement of Dr. Francesca Adler-Bader, the 2013 recipient of the Outreach Award for Excellence; Dr. James Barth, Lowder Eminent Scholar in Finance and Senior Finance Fellow with the Milken Institute; and the other symposium presenters who have built amazing careers grounded in engagement and the production of outreach scholarship. This year’s program demonstrates that Auburn University is at the forefront of the discussion on faculty engagement throughout the academy. I hope you find the symposium informative and I encourage you to take full advantage of the opportunity to network with some of America’s finest outreach scholars – right here at Auburn University! Best regards,

Royrickers Cook, Ph.D. Assistant Vice President for University Outreach Auburn University


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Agenda at-a-Glance

Monday, February 10, 2014 8:00 – 9:00 Registration Check-in 9:00 – 9:20 Welcome and Opening Remarks 9:20 – 10:20 Plenary A 10:30 – 11:00 Poster Presentation and Networking Break 11:10 – 12:20 Breakout Session I 12:20 – 1:45 Engagement Keynote Luncheon 1:45 – 2:45 Breakout Session II 3:00 Adjourn

Tuesday, February 11, 2014 8:00 – 9:00 Registration Check-in 9:00 – 9:20 Opening Remarks 9:20 – 10:20 Plenary B 10:30 – 11:00 Poster Presentation and Networking Break 11:10 – 12:20 Breakout Session III 12:20 – 1:45 Outreach Scholars Luncheon 1:45 – 2:45 Breakout Session IV 3:00 Adjourn

Symposium FYI: • Concurrent, Symposia and Poster session abstracts for tracks 1 and 3 can be found on pages 13 through 25 of the program. • Participants are strongly encouraged to complete individual presentation evaluations, as well as an evaluation of the overall symposium. • Participants are encouraged to utilize their own laptops, iPADs, Tablets, e-readers and other electronic devices to connect. Internet access will be available via AU WIFI. Speakers or sound amplification for any video or audio clips will be available in the presentation rooms. • PowerPoint slide handouts may be provided for each session, but will be distributed to participants at the discretion of the presenter(s). • Carbon note pads are provided for information sharing and networking purposes • Please recycle name badges at the registration desk.


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Venue Map and Orientation

SYMPOSIUM

HERE

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Registration Check in on both days ~ Pre-function Lobby of rooms 2222 and 2223 ~ Welcome and Opening Remarks on both days Plenary A and B Poster Session and Networking Breaks ~ Rooms 2222 and 2223 ~ Breakout Session 1, II, III and IV ~ Rooms 2216, 2218, 2225, 2227, and 2310 ~

Use this QR Code to evaluate individual sessions and the symposium overall. (paper evaluations will be available for individual sessions)

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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Keynote Speaker

Robert Gipe Director, Executive Producer, Educator, Author, and Engaged Scholar Robert Gipe is the director of the Appalachian Program at Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College in Harlan County, Kentucky. Since 1997, he has coordinated community-based arts programming for the college. He is the executive producer of the Higher Ground series of community performances, which bring community residents together across the divides of race, class, age, and county section to create theater out of local music and oral histories celebrating community strength and exploring challenges facing community residents such as drug abuse, racism, land use, and the uncertain future of the community. Gipe teaches Appalachian Studies courses, helped catalyze the college’s Honors program, coordinated the production of public artworks throughout Harlan County, and has in the past taught art marketing, English, and American Studies classes for Southeast. He is a faculty coordinator for the Crawdad student arts series, the coordinator of Southeast’s participation in the Appalachian Teaching Project, and is a prime mover behind the Creative Development Center concept for using arts and arts education as a tool for community and economic development in the Southeast service area. The community-based art projects Gipe has catalyzed have been the subject of studies published by the Oxford University Press, University of Illinois Press, and Houghton-Mifflin. Gipe has written successful grant proposals to ArtPlace America, the Appalachian Regional Commission, the Steele-Reese Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the U.S. Department of Education’s GEARUP program, among others. He is the former director of Educational Services at Appalshop, a media arts center in Whitesburg, Kentucky, and a scout for the Annenberg Rural Challenge, a philanthropic project for connecting rural K-12 curriculum to community cultural assets. Gipe grew up in Kingsport, Tennessee, received his bachelors degree in English from Wake Forest University and his masters degree in American Studies from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His fiction has appeared in Appalachian Heritage, and the online journal Still. His first novel, Trampoline, is forthcoming from the Ohio University Press.


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

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AGENDA Monday, February 10, 2014, AU Student Union Rooms 2222 and 2223 8:00 – 9:00

Registration Check-in

9:00 – 9:20

Welcome and Opening Remarks

9:20 – 10:20 Plenary A: How Human Capital and Outreach make life better in Alabama and beyond James R. Barth Lowder Eminent Scholar in Finance, Raymond J. Harbert College of Business Senior Finance Fellow, Milken Institute

10:30 – 11:00 Poster Session and Networking Break - Abstracts found on pages 22-24 11:10 – 12:20 Breakout Session I Track One - Outreach Scholarship in Action: Concurrent Session Room 2216: Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Selection Assistance for Medicare Beneficiaries in Alabama Salisa C. Westrick, Joshua C Hollingsworth, Robyn James, and Dawn Glascock Harrison School of Pharmacy and Alabama Department of Senior Services Room 2218: Macon a Movable Feast: A Celebration of Food and Health in Macon County Alabama Norbert Wilson, Devin Walker, Jocelyn Zanzot, Michelle Worosz, and Claire Zizza College of Agriculture, College of Architecture, Design and Construction, and College of Human Sciences Track Two - Outreach Scholarship Funding Strategies: Concurrent Session Room 2225: The Basics of Proposal Writing Juanita Winegar Contracts & Grants Specialist III, Alabama Cooperative Extension System Room 2227 Competitive Outreach Scholarship Intramural Grant Program Chippewa Thomas University Outreach and College of Education


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

Track Three - Engagement Boundary Spanning: Symposia Session Room 2310 Developing Global Citizens through German Language and Culture Traci O’Brien and Iulia Pittman College of Liberal Whole School Sustainability: From Recycling to Gardens Tania Wolverton, Sean Forbes and Lisa Kensler College of Education How good Outreach leads to good applied Research and Public Policy Bill Molnar Center for Governmental Services, Auburn University Outreach 12:20 – 1:30 Engagement Keynote Luncheon– Rooms 2222 and 2223 The Door Between Us: A perspective on Scholarship from a Coal Mining County Mr. Robert Gipe What is it like to be studied? How does being the object of others’ studies affect one’s own scholarship? As higher education has become more accessible, and the tools of scholarship become more widely distributed, how do we identify scholars, and how do scholars identify themselves? Why commit acts of scholarship? We will examine these and other questions through the lens of life in one Appalachian coalfield county. 1:45 – 2:45

Breakout Session II

Track One - Outreach Scholarship in Action: Concurrent Session Room 2216: Improving E-Pharmacy Literacy among Seniors through Intelligent Agent Technology Wi-Suk Kwon and Veena Chattaraman College of Human Sciences Room 2218: Resilience 101: The Ability to Bounce Back Ivan Watts, Cheryl Seals, Garnetta Lovett (ChiChi), Jared Russell and Tanja Matthews College of Education, Athletic Department, College of Engineering, College of Liberal Arts and the Auburn Black Caucus


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Advancing Transformative Engagement

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Track Two - Outreach Scholarship Funding Strategies: Concurrent Session Room 2225 The Nuts and Bolts of Sponsored Programs Tony Ventimiglia, Associate Director, Education & Communication Office of Sponsored Programs Track Three - Engagement Boundary Spanning: Symposia Session Room 2227: AU: TIPSS –Enhancing Outreach with Technology Constance Hendricks, Sola Popoola, and Christopher Wilburn School of Nursing, Tuskegee University, and School of Kinesiology Long Distance Management of Equine Laminitis: Where there’s a will, there’s a way Debra Taylor College of Veterinary Medicine Think Globally, So Act Globally Desmond W. Delk School of Kinesiology Room 2310: Providing On-going Professional Development to Multiple Stakeholder Groups Karen Rabren and Courtney Dotson College of Education Faculty Service as a Court-Appointed Monitor in a Federal Employment Discrimination Case William I. Sauser College of Business Scholarship in Action: Communities, Leaders, and Citizens Barbara A. Baker, Giovanna Summerfield, and Kathleen Hale College of Liberal Arts 3:00

Adjourn


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

AGENDA Tuesday, February 11, 2014, AU Student Union Rooms 2222 and 2223 8:00 – 9:00

Registration Check-in

9:00 – 9:20

Opening Remarks

9:20 – 10:20 Plenary B: What’s Love Got to Do with It? An Engaged Scholarship Approach to Promoting Child, Youth, and Adult Well-Being in Alabama Francesca Adler-Baeder 2013 Excellence in Faculty Outreach Award Recipient College of Human Sciences

10:30 – 11:00 Poster Session and Networking Break- Abstracts found on pages 23-25 11:10 – 12:20 Breakout Session III Track One - Outreach Scholarship in Action: Concurrent Session Room 2216: Alabama Possible: University-Community Partnerships have the Power to Reduce Poverty Kristine Scott Alabama Poverty Project Room 2218: Bridging a Curriculum Gap in Prisoner Education Kyes Stevens, Alan Wilson, Doug Goodwin, and Aubrey Beal College of Human Sciences, College of Agriculture, and College of Sciences and Mathematics Track Two - Outreach Scholarship Funding Strategies: Concurrent Session Room 2225 Online Tools to Find Funding for Outreach Scholarship Rodney J. Greer, Director, Research Program Development and Grants College of Education


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

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Track Three - Engagement Boundary Spanning: Symposia Session Room 2227 Fifteen years of Outreach activity and related Scientific Research at Wetumpka’s Meteorite Impact Crater, Elmore County, Alabama David T. King, Jr. College of Sciences and Mathematics Generous Intergenerational Interaction with Older Adults Carderius Fowler, Dymond Callen, and Mitisha Hill Tuskegee University, Department of Nursing Halftime Heroes: Coaching Beyond the X’s and O’s Laney C. Payne College of Liberal Arts Room 2310 Understanding the Global Black Belt Region: An Agribusiness Analysis Derrick Robinson College of Agriculture Reaching Out for Better Diabetes Health: Diabetes Education in Tuskegee, Alabama Jan Kavookjian Harrison School of Pharmacy 12:20 – 1:30 Outreach Scholars Luncheon – Rooms 2222 and 2223 Recognition of the Competitive Outreach Scholarship Grant Recipients 1:45 – 2:45

Breakout Session IV

Track One - Outreach Scholarship in Action: Concurrent Session Room 2216: Effectiveness of a MyPlate Social Marketing Campaign for Family Child Care Providers Enrolled in the Family Child Care Partnerships Program in Alabama Onikia Brown and Ellaine Miller College of Human Sciences Room 2218: Positive Behavior Supports for Diverse Students in Physical Education Vanessa Hinton, Alice Buchanan, Valerie Lee, and Margaret Flores College of Education and School of Kinesiology


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

Track Two - Outreach Scholarship Funding Strategies: Concurrent Session Room 2225 Post-Award Management of Sponsored Projects Larry Hankins and Gina Bailey Contracts and Grants Accounting Track Three - Engagement Boundary Spanning: Symposia Session Room 2227 Cherokee-West Colbert County Strategic Planning Project Danny B. McWilliams, Jr. Alabama Cooperative Extension System

HEAD START ON Healthy Start by Kindergarten Kathleen Tajeu and Kathleen Sharp Alabama Cooperative Extension System

Room 2310: The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: A University-Community Partnership Sweta Byahut College of Architecture, Design and Construction The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: Landscape Architecture Studio Engagement Charlene LeBleu College of Architecture, Design and Construction The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: Historic Preservation Planning Engagement Rebecca Retzlaff College of Architecture, Design and Construction The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: Urban Economics and Real Estate Principles Engagement Jay Mittal College of Architecture, Design and Construction 3:00

Adjourn


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts Concurrent Sessions

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50 Minute Presentations

Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Selection Assistance for Medicare Beneficiaries in Alabama Breakout Session I – page 7 Salisa C. Westrick, Joshua C Hollingsworth, Robyn James, and Dawn Glascock Harrison School of Pharmacy and Alabama Department of Senior Services The implementation of Medicare Part D has offered Medicare beneficiaries better access to prescription drug insurance. Because the online tool used to compare prescription drug plans is complicated to use, assistance to help them choose appropriate plans is needed. This collaborative project between Harrison School of Pharmacy and the State Health Insurance & Assistance Program a) developed an on-line training to certify pharmacy students as SHIP counselors, b) offered 17 enrollment events in 10 counties, and c) developed a website containing demonstration videos and materials to increase beneficiaries’ knowledge about prescription drug plans. Macon a Movable Feast: A Celebration of Food and Health in Macon County, Alabama Breakout Session I – page 7 Norbert Wilson, Devin Walker, Jocelyn Zanzot, Michelle Worosz, and Claire Zizza College of Agriculture, College of Architecture, Design and Construction, and College of Human Sciences Macon a Movable Feast: A Celebration of Food and Health in Macon County Alabama is a community-based effort to understand food needs in Macon County, AL. Our efforts bring fact finding and community building through two activities: a Community Food Security Assessment and the Mobile Studio. A Community Food Security Assessment for Macon County, Alabama is being conducted to identify and understand issues of food availability and access, especially among rural and low-income individuals. The Mobile Studio is series of interactive sessions and educational workshops that celebrate food through community dinners and storytelling that includes mapping, photography, and image-making. Improving E-Pharmacy Literacy among Seniors through Intelligent Agent Technology Breakout Session II – page 8 Wi-Suk Kwon and Veena Chattaraman College of Human Sciences E-pharmacies are an e-health tool that offers access to health information and medication management services. However, age-based digital divides exists due to seniors’ low Internet competence. Intelligent agents, or animated embodiments in computer interfaces that respond to users, can provide critical technological aids that enhance the usability of e-pharmacies among seniors. In collaboration with a local pharmacy and local agencies serving seniors in Alabama, this project implements an integrative approach to design and develop intelligent agents with cognitive aids addressing seniors’ challenges to effective use of e-pharmacies. This project aims to benefit seniors by improving their e-pharmacy literacy.


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts

Concurrent Sessions

50 Minute Presentations

Resilience 101: The Ability to Bounce Back Breakout Session II – page 8 Ivan Watts, Cheryl Seals, Garnetta Lovett (ChiChi), Jared Russell and Tanja Matthews College of Education, Athletic Department, College of Engineering, College of Liberal Arts and the Auburn Black Caucus Resilience has been referred to as the personal qualities and skills that allow for an individual’s healthy/ successful functioning or adaptation within the context of significant adversity or disruptive life event. Resilience may be an important factor in explaining why some individuals cope with traumatic circumstances more successfully than other. This panel will provide evidence through personal struggles and academic literature that resilience, the ability to ‘bounce back’ is crucial in navigating through a University in the southeast. Alabama Possible: University-Community Partnerships have the Power to Reduce Poverty Breakout Session III – page 10 Kristine Scott Alabama Poverty Project Alabama is the nation’s fifth poorest state. The Alabama Poverty Project (APP) brings together higher education institutions, faith communities, and individuals to create poverty awareness and effectively address its underlying causes. Session attendees will learn about poverty’s causes and impacts, explore Auburn’s partnership with APP, and envision utilizing transformational engagement. Bridging a Curriculum Gap in Prisoner Education Breakout Session III – page 10 Kyes Stevens, Alan Wilson, Doug Goodwin, and Aubrey Beal College of Human Sciences, College of Agriculture, and College of Sciences and Mathematics This presentation will provide a synopsis of a pilot project to bring increased opportunities in science and mathematics into the Alabama Prison Arts + Education Project through developing partnerships across colleges at Auburn University.


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts Concurrent Sessions

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50 Minute Presentations

Effectiveness of a MyPlate Social Marketing Campaign for Family Child Care Providers Enrolled in the Family Child Care Partnerships Program in Alabama Breakout Session IV – page 11 Onikia Brown and Ellaine Miller College of Human Sciences The CDC reports that approximately 1/3 of American children are obese or overweight before their 5th birthday (http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/PedNSSFactSheet.pdf). Public and private child care providers have access to a number of educational, training, and professional development opportunities; however, Family Child Care (FCC) providers often miss out on these same opportunities. The objective of this initiative was to develop and pilot high quality training, and education of the USDA’s nutrition guide (MyPlate) to Family Child Care providers who are currently enrolled in the Family Child Care Partnerships program and supported by the Alabama Family Child Care Association. Positive Behavior Supports for Diverse Students in Physical Education Breakout Session IV – page 11 Vanessa Hinton, Alice Buchanan, Valerie Lee, and Margaret Flores College of Education and School of Kinesiology Physical education teachers provide instruction to very large and diverse groups of students. To meet this challenge, positive behavior supports (PBS) enable s educators to tailor instruction and behavior management that meet a variety of needs. A conceptual model of tiered support is discussed along with research on how to meet behavioral needs of all students (Buchanan, Hinton, & Rudisill, 2013; Dauenhauer, 2012; Stephens, Silliman-French, Kinnison, & French, 2010). Collaboration among special education and kinesiology professionals, research on PBS in physical education, and strategies to reach diverse groups will be presented.


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts

Symposia Sessions

15 Minute Presentations

Developing Global Citizens through German Language and Culture Breakout Session I – page 8 Traci O’Brien and Iulia Pittman College of Liberal Arts This presentation showcases a collaborative project between the German section at AU and the Auburn Public Library. Upper-level German students become teachers in the community during spring 2014. The program, held at the library, consists of student-led events (overseen by two faculty members) and includes the teaching of fairy tales, mini lessons of German, the viewing and discussion of a popular German film, and a trivia night. The program is open to speakers and non-speakers of German. This project promotes German language and culture, teaches the local community about multiculturalism and the close relationship between language and culture. Whole School Sustainability: From Recycling to Gardens Breakout Session I – page 8 Tania Wolverton, Sean Forbes and Lisa Kensler College of Education Whole school sustainability (green schools) is a growing international trend among K-12 schools. These school communities are engaging with the broader sustainability movement and working to create healthier, higher performing school systems. This presentation will highlight sustainability initiatives taking place here in Alabama public schools. The work began in 2012 with an Auburn University Outreach Scholarship Grant and a pilot garden program. The work has expanded from there. We have supported sustainability initiatives in seven schools and three school districts within Alabama. Nearly 700 students have participated in this energy conservation, recycling, school food, and/or garden programming. How good Outreach leads to good applied Research and Public Policy Breakout Session I – page 8 Bill Molnar Center for Governmental Services, Auburn University Outreach The Presenter led a team that conducted over 10 local government fiscal impact assessments in South Carolina between 2005 and 2008. The applied research provided invaluable information to local governments who then changed land use, fiscal and public services policies. The research also added to the body of knowledge in the public finance arena. One community conducted an assessment after a deliberative dialogue community meeting on sprawl (outreach/public service activity).


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts Symposia Sessions

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15 Minute Presentations

AU: TIPSS –Enhancing Outreach with Technology Breakout Session II – page 9 Constance Hendricks, Sola Popoola, and Christopher Wilburn School of Nursing, Tuskegee University, and School of Kinesiology Funding from the Auburn University Office of Outreach was used to upgrade and expand an ongoing five year community collaborations. Project Auburn University: Taking “It” to the People Southern Style (AU:TIPSS) was designed to provide state of the science Health Promotion self-care messages in a culturally relevant manner using translational research strategies to persons frequenting selected sites in area counties. Project AU: TIPSS provided each site with a 42 inch screen, mounting equipment and control box to continuously stream tailored health promotion messages so that persons frequenting the site might have the opportunity to gain information about keeping healthy. Long Distance Management of Equine Laminitis: Where there’s a will, there’s a way Breakout Session II – page 9 Debra Taylor College of Veterinary Medicine Equine laminitis is a life threatening condition of the horse. Extensive research efforts are ongoing to better understand the pathophysiology of this disease of the equine hoof. However, little scientific information exists regarding the stall side management of laminitis. Due to this lack of scientific information regarding management, veterinarians often recommend that these horses be humanely euthanized due to uncontrollable pain. Obviously, this leaves horse owners with a feeling of hopelessness. The Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine is giving hope to horse owners from around the United States who are struggling with this dreaded disease. Think Globally, So Act Globally Breakout Session II – page 9 Desmond W. Delk School of Kinesiology In the summer of 2013 a group of students from Auburn University’s College of Education embarked on a educational study abroad course to Lilongwe, Malawi. Inspired by the words of Robert Heinlein that “When one teaches, two learn,” the college students served as guest teachers for the Lumbadzi School District’s primary school, presented recognized best practices to the local teachers, tutored students at an orphanage, and shared ideas of enriching activities with the house mothers of the orphanage. Engagement is the great translator between groups of people; it is a mutually beneficial union that allows both parties to evolve.


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts

Symposia Sessions

15 Minute Presentations

Providing On-going Professional Development to Multiple Stakeholder Groups Breakout Session II – page 9 Karen Rabren and Courtney Dotson College of Education and the Auburn Transition Leadership Institute Training in Transition (TNT) is an ongoing, collaborative effort of the Auburn Transition Leadership Institute and the Alabama Department of Education. The mission and purpose of the TNT program is to increase transition stakeholders’ knowledge and motivation as well as develop positive attitudes on transition issues and practices. The intent of this program is that after completing the training, participants may positively impact further development and improvement of transition programs and services for youth and young adults with disabilities. Faculty Service as a Court-Appointed Monitor in a Federal Employment Discrimination Case Breakout Session II – page 9 William I. Sauser College of Business and the University Senate This presentation will summarize the outreach/consultation effort that led to my recognition with Auburn University’s 2013 External Consulting Award. Nearly 40 years ago now the Personnel Board of Jefferson County and the City of Birmingham entered into consent decrees in federal court admitting that their employment practices were discriminatory against blacks and women, and pledging to eliminate all vestiges of such discrimination. After many years of hard work, including five years of consulting on my part, the criteria were met and federal court supervision was lifted. Scholarship in Action: Communities, Leaders, and Citizens Breakout Session II – page 9 Barbara A. Baker, Giovanna Summerfield, and Kathleen Hale College of Liberal Arts This presentation reflects on the process undertaken to create Scholarship in Action: Communities, Leaders, and Citizens, published by Common Ground in 2013. The editors, three program directors within the College of Liberal Arts at Auburn, reached out to a set of faculty members to build new pedagogical content through purposeful attention to, respect for, and reciprocity with the communities that sustain them. The resulting essays representing nine separate disciplines cover myriad intersecting themes with engaged public scholarship. The collection serves as a model for faculty and administrators who intend to undertake community-engaged learning that brings scholarship into action.


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts Symposia Sessions

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15 Minute Presentations

Fifteen years of Outreach activity and related Scientific Research at Wetumpka’s Meteorite Impact Crater, Elmore County, Alabama Breakout Session III – page 11 David T. King, Jr. College of Sciences and Mathematics Since 1999, our research on the nature and origin of Alabama’s only meteorite crater (located at Wetumpka in Elmore County) has spawned considerable public interest and engagement. We have worked with Wetumpka community leaders for the past 15 years in (1) leading and developing community-based annual “crater tours” for hundreds of interested persons (including public school students), (2) helping to lay plans for a new interpretative center to be built on US 231 in Wetumpka, and (3) regularly speaking to local, civic, and school groups about the impact at Wetumpka, which was by far Alabama’s greatest natural disaster. Generous Intergenerational interaction with Older Adults Breakout Session III – page 11 Carderius Fowler, Dymond Callen, and Mitisha Hill Tuskegee University, Department of Nursing As we age, we encounter new challenges and social disputes. Individual and social contests generated by the aging population demand new innovations and a wide-range of approaches, as well as intergenerational relations. These approaches integrate community responses and empower health practices. Over the holiday season, the nursing students collected clothes and sock donations to shield the elderly population from the cold. This activity not only surprised the residents, but the staff as well. The center was impressed and grateful for the efforts and interaction provided by the nursing students. Halftime Heroes: Coaching Beyond the X’s and O’s Breakout Session III – page 11 Laney C. Payne College of Liberal Arts With over 40% of today’s youth growing up in fatherless homes across America, the idea of coaching life skills through sport is raised. Following empirical evidence and the case study of 3 high school football coaches in rural Alabama, Halftime Heroes aims to create a movement encouraging coaches and teachers alike to begin coaching beyond the X’s and O’s and start coaching a playbook for life.


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts

Symposia Sessions

15 Minute Presentations

Understanding the Global Black Belt Region: An Agribusiness Analysis Breakout Session III – page 11 Derrick Robinson College of Agriculture The Southern Black Belt region of the US is well documented for its fertile agricultural lands. The soil runs through 11 southern states. It has been described as a region historically home to the “richest soil and poorest people.” The area has been one of the most economically depressed regions in the US. However, agricultural producers do well in these areas. Interest has gathered to analyze other Black Belt areas as to identify the economic characteristics of Black Belt regions. Therefore, participation was taken to study agribusiness in a Black Belt region of Russia through Michurinsk Agrarian University. Reaching Out for Better Diabetes Health: Diabetes Education in Tuskegee, Alabama Breakout Session III – page 11 Jan Kavookjian Harrison School of Pharmacy Diabetes is highly prevalent in Macon, County Alabama (14.2 % compared to 11.1% for the State). The rural minority population in Tuskegee is at greater risk for diabetes and its complications, and is also challenged by limited access to accredited diabetes education. A collaboration from Auburn University School of Pharmacy faculty, Tuskegee University School of Nursing faculty, and the Diabetes and Nutrition Center (DANC) of EAMC was awarded a grant from the American Association of Diabetes Educators to take the accredited DANC education program directly into the Tuskegee community; two 10-week education classes were conducted through a church-based support group and a primary care practice. Clinical, knowledge, utilization, adherence, quality of life, depression, and satisfaction outcomes were assessed and compared among approximately 49 participants at baseline and after the class ended and will be reported.


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts Symposia Sessions

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15 Minute Presentations

Cherokee-West Colbert County Strategic Planning Project Breakout Session IV – page 12 Danny B. McWilliams, Jr. Alabama Cooperative Extension System This symposia describes how residents of Cherokee and Western Colbert County came together to discuss the key issues facing their community. The process involved developing a vision statement, identifying strengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities, selecting strategic issues and describing a plan of action. Under the leadership of Danny McWilliams, Colbert County Extension Coordinator, residents came together over several months to carry out this process. The Economic and Community Development Institute at Auburn University provided meeting facilitation and technical assistance. Participation was strong, with no session having less than 50 participants. The community is currently implementing this plan with considerable success. HEAD START ON Healthy Start by Kindergarten Breakout Session IV – page 12 Kathleen Tajeu and Kathleen Sharp Alabama Cooperative Extension System Head Start on Healthy Start by Kindergarten will share the successes and challenges of working with year around Head Start and migrant Head Start, in an obesity prevention project. The main project goal is obesity prevention in the children, their families and the staff involved in the program. The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: A University-Community Partnership Breakout Session IV – page 12 Sweta Byahut College of Architecture, Design and Construction The Peacock Place Revitalization project involves several faculty from various disciplines in the College of Architecture, Design, and Construction. The project encompasses Mobile Street, a historic street associated with the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955 and the Selma to Montgomery National Voters Rights March of 1965. The area was home to Rosa Parks, and the destination for her famous 1955 bus ride. It was the site of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s election as the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association. The project will redevelop six contiguous blocks around Mobile Street with sixty to eighty residential units, 100,000 square feet of retail/commercial space, office and residential loft units, and parks and green spaces. The project vision is to restore and revitalize the Mobile/ Mildred Street area while preserving the last miles of this historic trail. This presentation discusses the university-community partnership, the overall vision, and lessons learned from the outreach experience.


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts

Symposia Sessions

15 Minute Presentations

The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: Landscape Architecture Studio Engagement Breakout Session IV – page 12 Charlene LeBleu College of Architecture, Design and Construction This presentation discusses how a landscape architecture studio class participated in a comprehensive and longterm project to help revitalize the historic Peacock Place neighborhood in Montgomery, Alabama. In Spring 2012, Charlene LeBleu, ASLA, AICP, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture, engaged the LAND 5330/ 6330 Studio III to provide outreach assistance to this historically significant community revitalization project. The objective of the studio was to promote restoration and livability to this historic urban community that once was a thriving middle-class neighborhood devastated by the construction of two interstate highways, I-85 and I-65. The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: Historic Preservation Planning Engagement Breakout Session IV – page 12 Rebecca Retzlaff College of Architecture, Design and Construction This presentation discusses how historic preservation planning has been used to participate in a comprehensive and long-term university-community partnership project to revitalize the historic Peacock Place neighborhood in Montgomery, Alabama. In Fall 2012 students in Rebecca Retzlaff’s historic preservation planning class worked on a semester-long project to create historic preservation plans for the community. The plans included a community character analysis, comprehensive buildings and historic resources survey, data analysis, futures analysis, and strategies for protecting, preserving, and adaptively re-using historic resources in the community The Revitalization of Peacock Place, Montgomery, Alabama: Urban Economics and Real Estate Principles Engagement Breakout Session IV – page 12 Jay Mittal College of Architecture, Design and Construction The Peacock Community Revitalization Project (formerly called Renaissance Community) is a cooperative public and private community redevelopment project venture in the City of Montgomery, Alabama, aided by a university-community partnership that involves faculty from Auburn University, The City of Montgomery, and a group of private developers. The project involves a comprehensive and sustained effort with participants from the College of Architecture, Design, and Construction. This presentation will discuss two projects. First, a real estate principles outreach project, and second an urban economics project.


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts Poster Sessions

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30 Minute Presentations

Adapted Sports: Promoting and Atmosphere of Inclusion Jared Rehm and Tracy Donald Office of Accessibility The adapted sports program offers opportunities for competition and physical activity for Auburn’s students, faculty, staff and local community with disabilities. The program sponsors teams and less formal recreation. Currently, the wheelchair basketball team has a 13 person roster. The program sponsors wheelchair tennis and has purchased handcycles in an effort to expand the programming options. These opportunities are not limited to those with disabilities. Instead, everyone is encouraged to try these sports, creating an inclusive active environment. By reaching out in this way, people with and without disabilities come together and learn to focus on ability, not inability. Developing Career and College Competencies: Preparing At-Risk Students to be Successful in Career and College Opportunities Amanda Evans, Sarah Kitchens, Jamie Carney, and Simone May College of Education There has been an identified need to provide students from at-risk schools, based on economic variables and educational outcomes, with more intensive resources and support to be successful in obtaining a career and college level achievement (Byars-Winston & Fouad, 2006; Turner & Conkel, 2010). This Competitive Outreach Scholarship Grant focused on obtaining resources and funding needed to support a collaborative project with AuburnVoices and the Notasulga School District. The project served to provide training, education and mentoring to foster career and college exploration, development and achievement skills among at-risk High School and Middle School students. Intersection of Generations and Vocational interests of Male Prisoners Nicholas Derzis and Margaret Shippen College of Education This poster will detail the results of an outreach project that examines the generational differences relative to vocational interests and positive or negative career thinking of incarcerated males (n= over 50). The workforce currently has many different generations at work while each generation tends to have different work values. Vocational interests are measured using the Self-Directed Search and Career Thinking is measured using the Career Thoughts Inventory. Demographic information and other descriptive information will be discussed.


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts

Poster Sessions

30 Minute Presentations

The Auburn University Stream Team: Preparing the Next Generation of Water Scientists Michelle Cole School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences The AU Center for Forest Sustainability, along with collaborating departments have proposed to create the Auburn University Stream Team a group of faculty and experts interested in high school student outreach. We plan to engage students interested in careers in natural resources to participate in our program. The goals for this program are to 1. Increase awareness about urban streams to students and the public, 2. Expose students to potential careers in water and natural resources, and 3. Increase recruitment of students to Auburn University and its academic programs relevant to the management of natural resources. The Center for Forest Sustainability works in Integrated Research and Education and Outreach Michelle Cole School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences The CFS facilitates student education related to impacts of urban expansion on natural resources and human well-being. The Center has funded graduate and undergraduate students to conduct research covering a wide array of disciplines related to urban- rural interface issues. CFS affiliated faculty have also provided formal course instruction on a variety of topics pertaining to natural resources and urban expansion including human health ecology, hydrology, soils and biogeochemistry, water quality, and modeling. Our goal is to train future professionals capable of effectively managing complex socio-ecological problems at the urban-rural interface. We translate pertinent research into non-technical formats for widespread dissemination. We convey this information through a variety of venues including presentations, conferences, publications, workshops and consultations. Our goal is to transfer relevant research results to k-12 students, professional stakeholders, and the general public.


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Concurrent Symposia and Poster Session Abstracts Poster Sessions

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30 Minute Presentations

Use of Community-Based Workshops to Enhance Science Education Richard Whittington Tuskegee University The purpose of this project is to integrate science and photography in an exciting program that will impact youth, elderly, and many others in the community. Drawing from a population of current member and participants of the TUWLi, this integrated science and photography project will significantly impact the Macon County, linking young people with adults that demonstrate excellence in characteristics. Lectures and activities were developed to conduct 26 workshops per year. Workshops incorporating biology and photography were held in Macon County, resulting in 210 visits from adults and youths. There was a marked increase in post-test scores, demonstrating knowledge enhancement. Utilizing community and student organizations to promote Civic Engagement among College Students April Scott College of Education On July 16, three days after the Zimmerman verdict was announced, a diverse group of students gathered together on the campus of Auburn University for a candlelight vigil. This moment sparked, Voice for the Voiceless, a group dedicated to promoting civic engagement and educating students and the community about their roles in decision-making processes that directly affect them (i.e., elections, bills). This presentation will highlight student-led initiatives that promote civic engagement via collaborating with local community and church organizations. This presentation will also explore avenues to encourage students to become more involved in civic engagement and thereby closing the civic engagement gap.


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Competitive Outreach Scholarship Grant Recipients

DESIGNhabitat 5: Net Zero Ready Prototype Documentation Justin Miller and Robert Sproull College of Architecture, Design and Construction Improving Community Re-entry for Ex-Offenders by Partnering with the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles Melanie Iarussi and Peggy Shippen College of Education The Auburn University Stream Team: Preparing the Next Generation of Water Scientists Christopher J. Anderson, Eve Brantley, Michelle Cole and Eric Reutebuch School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Agriculture and AU Water Resource Center Strategic Community Revitalization Plan for Inner City Montgomery, AL--Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail along Oak, Jeff Davis, Holt, & Mobile Streets Jay Mittal, John J. Pittari, Sweta Byahut and Charlene Lebleu College of Architecture Design and Construction Mathematics for All: Making the Common Core Standards Accessible Margaret M. Flores, Vanessa Hinton, Megan Burton, and Michel Smith College of Education, and College of Science and Mathematics A Fit Force: Improving the physical readiness of citizen soldiers Danielle D. Wadsworth School of Kinesiology Development of a service learning course that will prepare veterinary students to plan, organize and carry-out public veterinary care to underserved communities Barbara W. Kemppainen, Dawn Boothe, Stephanie Ostrowski, John Schumacher, Julie Gard, and David Pugh College of Veterinary Medicine


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Competitive Outreach Scholarship Grant Review Committee

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Francesca Adler-Baeder Professor, Human Development and Family Studies and 2013 Faculty award recipient for Excellence in Outreach Barbara Baker Executive Director of the Women’s Leadership Institute, College of Liberal Arts Carla Jackson Bell Director of Multicultural Affairs, College of Architecture, Design and Construction Joe Hanna Associate Dean and Regions Bank Professor of Supply Chain Management, Raymond J. Harbert College of Business Shirley Scott Harris Director of the BellSouth Minority Engineering Program (BMEP), Samuel Ginn College of Engineering Jennifer Kerpelman Associate Dean, College of Human Sciences Ed Loewenstein Associate Dean, School of Forestry Paul Patterson Associate Dean, College of Agriculture David Riese Associate Dean, School of Pharmacy Karen Rogers Associate Dean, College of Architecture, Design and Construction Chris Rodgers Associate Dean, College of Science and Mathematics Peggy Shippen Associate Professor, College of Education Cheryl Seals Associate Professor, Samuel Ginn College of Engineering Giovanna Summerfield Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts Chippewa M. Thomas Director of Faculty Engagement, University Outreach


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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Outreach Scholarship Symposium Program Committee Carla Jackson Bell Director, Multicultural Affairs, College of Architecture, Design and Construction Elizabeth Hickman Director of the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative (AMSTI), College of Education and College of Science and Mathematics 2012 Engagement Scholarship Consortium Poster Award Recipient Jared Russell Director of Student Development, College of Education Mark Wilson Director of Civic Learning Initiatives, College of Liberal Arts Chippewa Thomas Director of Faculty Engagement, University Outreach

Ex-officio Gail Gauntt Executive Support Specialist Karen Rankin Information Technology Specialist VI, Office of Public Service Katey Nelson IT Specialist II, Office of Public Service Janie Echols-Brown Outreach Specialist III - Design, Office of Public Service Elizabeth Haeussler Executive Assistant/Business Manager Xuejiao “Joy� Zhao, Ebony Craig, Tanja Matthews, Amy Chitwood, Shovan Mishra, Kara White, and Leonard D. Towns Outreach Graduate Assistants


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Notes

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2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

Use this QR Code to evaluate individual sessions and the symposium overall.

SAVE THE DATE! Seventh Annual Auburn University Outreach Scholarship Symposium ~ February 23-25, 2015 Auburn University Student Center


2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium:

Advancing Transformative Engagement

http://www.auburn.edu/outreach/facultyengagement/symposium Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer.

2014 Outreach Scholarship Symposium  

Advancing Transformative Engagement