Page 1

Keystone volume ix, 2012

Can you dig it? New Kinesiology building represents one of college’s many highlights

International | Connecting with Korean-born students page pg 12 Scholarships | Plentiful opportunities pg 24 Leadership | King, Austin set standard pgs 50, 56

mag azine


In this issue E D U C AT I ON E X T R A

3 On the Honor Roll Magazine recognizes online programs

4 Building for the future Kinesiology research, outreach to receive boost from new facility

page 24

Student Ambassadors offer more than friendly faces

I NTE R N AT I ON A L

12 Connecting point Program helps local educators meet needs of growing population of Korean-born students S t u d e n t S u cc e s s

16 Healing hands Graduate athletic trainers help Tuscaloosa residents pick up pieces after storm R ESE A R C H A N D OUT R E A C H

26 Internal affairs

On the Cov er: Auburn University broke ground on a 58,000-square foot Kinesiology building in September 2011. The facility, scheduled to be completed in early 2013, will offer state-of-theart laboratory and office space.

Keystone

Connect with us at education.auburn.edu/alumni/groups

mag a zi n e

The Keystone is an annual publication of the Auburn University College of Education, produced and distributed to alumni and friends of the college through the generous contributions of private donors.

Send address changes to eduinfo@auburn.edu or by mail to the attention of Troy Johnson.

D e a n | Dr. Betty Lou Whitford

Auburn University College of Education Communications and Marketing 3084 Haley Center Auburn, Alabama 36849-5218 334.844.4468 education.auburn.edu eduinfo@auburn.edu

D ir e c t o r o f C o m m u n icat i o n s a n d m ark e t i n g | Troy Johnson Layo u t, D e s ig n a n d P h o t o graph y | Amanda J. Earnest C o n t rib u t i n g W ri t e r | Brooke Bonner, Roy Summerford and Marylyn Turnipseed Thanks to the Auburn Office of Communications and Marketing for contributing content. Additional photography and illustrations by Alabama State Department of Education, Associated Press, Auburn Athletics, AU Photographic Services, Bruce Dupree, Flip Flop Foto, FLORIDA TODAY, Infinity Architecture, National Science Foundation, Village Photographers and the U.S. Department of Defense.

Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer. ©2012, Auburn University College of Education

New research center investigates traffic patterns on human body’s highway

31 On a mission

page 8

Faculty members honored for teaching, research excellence

Faculty member takes lead in discussing important educational issues Alumni

Ev e ry i s s u e 2 Education Extra 10 International 14 Around Auburn 16 Student Success

34 Around the College

50 Royal treatment

40 Giving

56 General excellence

38 College Knowledge

King ’50 offers wisdom as Keystone Leader

54 National Advisory

Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 earns Auburn University’s Lifetime Achievement Award

56 Alumni

67 Marital bliss

24 Scholarship and

26 Research

68 Alumni Notes

Awards Ceremonies and Outreach

Council

Former Student Ambassador’s wedding offers blanket invitation to Auburn Family Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

3


In this issue E D U C AT I ON E X T R A

3 On the Honor Roll Magazine recognizes online programs

4 Building for the future Kinesiology research, outreach to receive boost from new facility

page 24

Student Ambassadors offer more than friendly faces

I NTE R N AT I ON A L

12 Connecting point Program helps local educators meet needs of growing population of Korean-born students S t u d e n t S u cc e s s

16 Healing hands Graduate athletic trainers help Tuscaloosa residents pick up pieces after storm R ESE A R C H A N D OUT R E A C H

26 Internal affairs

On the Cov er: Auburn University broke ground on a 58,000-square foot Kinesiology building in September 2011. The facility, scheduled to be completed in early 2013, will offer state-of-theart laboratory and office space.

Keystone

Connect with us at education.auburn.edu/alumni/groups

mag a zi n e

The Keystone is an annual publication of the Auburn University College of Education, produced and distributed to alumni and friends of the college through the generous contributions of private donors.

Send address changes to eduinfo@auburn.edu or by mail to the attention of Troy Johnson.

D e a n | Dr. Betty Lou Whitford

Auburn University College of Education Communications and Marketing 3084 Haley Center Auburn, Alabama 36849-5218 334.844.4468 education.auburn.edu eduinfo@auburn.edu

D ir e c t o r o f C o m m u n icat i o n s a n d m ark e t i n g | Troy Johnson Layo u t, D e s ig n a n d P h o t o graph y | Amanda J. Earnest C o n t rib u t i n g W ri t e r | Brooke Bonner, Roy Summerford and Marylyn Turnipseed Thanks to the Auburn Office of Communications and Marketing for contributing content. Additional photography and illustrations by Alabama State Department of Education, Associated Press, Auburn Athletics, AU Photographic Services, Bruce Dupree, Flip Flop Foto, FLORIDA TODAY, Infinity Architecture, National Science Foundation, Village Photographers and the U.S. Department of Defense.

Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer. ©2012, Auburn University College of Education

New research center investigates traffic patterns on human body’s highway

31 On a mission

page 8

Faculty members honored for teaching, research excellence

Faculty member takes lead in discussing important educational issues Alumni

Ev e ry i s s u e 2 Education Extra 10 International 14 Around Auburn 16 Student Success

34 Around the College

50 Royal treatment

40 Giving

56 General excellence

38 College Knowledge

King ’50 offers wisdom as Keystone Leader

54 National Advisory

Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 earns Auburn University’s Lifetime Achievement Award

56 Alumni

67 Marital bliss

24 Scholarship and

26 Research

68 Alumni Notes

Awards Ceremonies and Outreach

Council

Former Student Ambassador’s wedding offers blanket invitation to Auburn Family Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

3


From the Dean Bett y Lou WhitFord

Dean & Wayne T. Smith Distinguished Professor Auburn University College of Education

Dear Alumni and Friends: During my almost two years as dean of the College of Education, I have developed an appreciation for the ways in which ever-changing technology has enabled the “Auburn Family” to remain connected. We still believe in and set ourselves apart through the application of the “human touch” described by George Petrie in The Auburn Creed. Even as we become more reliant on portable technology, we realize social media can never truly replace face-to-face social interaction. Our university and our college thrive on a unique sense of community, whether it comes in the form of a “War Eagle!” in a crowded airport or conversation over plates of barbecue at a football tailgate party. Innovations such as Facebook will never adequately replace face-to-face interaction, but one can’t help but marvel at the ways in which technology continues to change the way we communicate and even learn. Consider how the College of Education’s social media status update would read: In the last year, we have broken ground on a new Kinesiology building, enhanced our reputation as a leader in distance education, expanded our scholarship offerings, made education more accessible to adults in the Auburn community, opened a new research center, assisted local schools in meeting the needs of a growing student population, led efforts to address school bullying and curriculum improvement, strengthened graduate student recruitment efforts, and helped our neighbors heal after devastating tornadoes. We have celebrated the accomplishments of our graduates, including Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 being confirmed as vice chief of staff of the U.S. Army, Tommy Bice ’77 being selected as Alabama’s superintendent of education, Larry DiChiara ’81 earning state superintendent of the year honors, and Megan Good Tucker ’04 receiving recognition from the White House. We hope you’re proud of these accomplishments, and we certainly encourage you to text, post, and share them with friends and members of our university and college families. You’re welcome to try “Tweeting” our list as well, if you can figure out a way to condense it to 140 characters or less. However you choose to communicate with your Auburn Family, we are confident our lengthy list of recent accomplishments deserves a huge “War Eagle!”

College of Education faculty member awarded for recruitment efforts Jared Russell, the College of Education’s interim director of student development and an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, has been honored by a pair of organizations for his student recruitment efforts. The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance selected Russell for its Social Justice and Diversity Young Professional Award. Russell also earned the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools’ Award for Excellence and Innovation in Graduate Admissions. Russell’s recruitment quest has brought students from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including Spelman, Morehouse, Albany State and Fort Valley State, to Auburn’s campus. The students visit with Kinesiology faculty and College of Education administrators and are informed of graduate school opportunities. “Many of the students that attend these colleges want to go to medical school or PT (physical therapy) school and I am able to expose them to the opportunities that Auburn has to offer,” Russell said. Russell also initiated the college’s Summer Bridge-Future Graduate Scholars Program. The program provides intensive academic and research experience for prospective graduate students and aids the transition of junior- and senior-level undergraduates from traditionally underrepresented groups into Kinesiology graduate programs. Russell’s efforts have been recognized for assisting in adding diversity to the college’s graduate student body and emphasizing appreciation of all ethnic backgrounds. “Recruiting is all about establishing relationships,” Russell said. “Offering support to students and making them feel comfortable is key to the recruitment process.”

4

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

Online graduate programs earn high honor from magazine When it comes to serving the needs of students who have career and family obligations, the College of Education finds itself at the head of the class. U.S.News & World Report recently identified the college’s online graduate degree program as one of the best in the nation. The magazine named the college to the Honor Roll in its first-ever Top Online Education Program ranking. Auburn’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering was the only other campus unit to earn similar recognition. U.S.News & World Report did not provide overall numerical rankings for colleges and schools named to its Honor Roll, but it did evaluate programs in four different categories. Programs named to the Honor Roll placed in the top third of at least three of the magazine’s four categories. In all, 171 online education degree programs were evaluated. In order to be considered in the survey, degree programs had to offer at least 80 percent of their course content online. “We’re especially excited about this recognition given the fact that it’s the first time U.S.News & World Report has evaluated the nation’s top online education programs,” said College of Education Dean and Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor Betty Lou Whitford. “In looking through the data provided to us by U.S.News & World Report, one item in particular stood out to me.

“While the Honor Roll does not rank the institutions, our college did have the fifth-highest score in the category of teaching practices and student engagement. We’re quite proud of this since both components are at the core of what we do. We pride ourselves on our ability to prepare our graduates for an ever-changing and increasingly technology-driven world.” The survey results reaffirm the commitment to distance education and graduate program growth that Auburn University has outlined in its Strategic Plan. The college currently offers online master’s degree options in agriscience education, business/marketing education, elementary education, French education, Spanish education, music education, rehabilitation counseling, collaborative teacher special education and early childhood special education. In U.S.News & World Report’s annual survey of graduate programs, the College of Education remained the top-ranked college or school of education – public or private – in Alabama. The college earned an overall ranking of 77th out of 280 universities surveyed. Auburn received particularly high marks in a survey of school superintendents, earning an average score of 4.0 on a 5.0 scale. Auburn’s rehabilitation counseling graduate program retained the No. 17 ranking in the survey’s Health Disciplines category.

Panel discussion draws on faculty, alumni expertise Two College of Education faculty and one of its graduates shared their insights on the educational achievement gap during a February 2012 panel discussion aimed at building community awareness. The discussion, sponsored by the Student Government Association in partnership with the College of Education and Division of Student Affairs, brought together educational experts, students, faculty, staff and community members. The education gap refers to the performance disparity of student groups defined by gender, race and socioeconomic status in such areas as standardized test scores, dropout rates, college completion rates, course selections and grade point averages. According to the U.S. Department of Education, the achievement gap between minority and majority students ranges from 20 to 30 points in all subject matter areas and across all K-12 grade levels. Cynthia Reed, director of the Truman Pierce Institute and Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck endowed professor for educational leadership, and Marilyn Strutchens, co-director of Transforming

East Alabama Mathematics (TEAM-Math) and Mildred Cheshire Fraley distinguished professor, represented the College of Education on the panel. Reed is the president-elect of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA), while Strutchens serves as president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE). The panel also included Alabama State Superintendent of Education Tommy Bice, a 1977 graduate of the college, and two Auburn University alums – Lauren Hayes, advocacy director for Tennessee Charter Schools, and Alisha Walker, a Teach for America core member. “Education is a civil right,” Reed said. “It serves as a gateway to the opportunities one will have throughout their lifetime. Yet, there are huge inequities in the types of opportunities available to students and citizens in our state and in our country.” Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

5


From the Dean Bett y Lou WhitFord

Dean & Wayne T. Smith Distinguished Professor Auburn University College of Education

Dear Alumni and Friends: During my almost two years as dean of the College of Education, I have developed an appreciation for the ways in which ever-changing technology has enabled the “Auburn Family” to remain connected. We still believe in and set ourselves apart through the application of the “human touch” described by George Petrie in The Auburn Creed. Even as we become more reliant on portable technology, we realize social media can never truly replace face-to-face social interaction. Our university and our college thrive on a unique sense of community, whether it comes in the form of a “War Eagle!” in a crowded airport or conversation over plates of barbecue at a football tailgate party. Innovations such as Facebook will never adequately replace face-to-face interaction, but one can’t help but marvel at the ways in which technology continues to change the way we communicate and even learn. Consider how the College of Education’s social media status update would read: In the last year, we have broken ground on a new Kinesiology building, enhanced our reputation as a leader in distance education, expanded our scholarship offerings, made education more accessible to adults in the Auburn community, opened a new research center, assisted local schools in meeting the needs of a growing student population, led efforts to address school bullying and curriculum improvement, strengthened graduate student recruitment efforts, and helped our neighbors heal after devastating tornadoes. We have celebrated the accomplishments of our graduates, including Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 being confirmed as vice chief of staff of the U.S. Army, Tommy Bice ’77 being selected as Alabama’s superintendent of education, Larry DiChiara ’81 earning state superintendent of the year honors, and Megan Good Tucker ’04 receiving recognition from the White House. We hope you’re proud of these accomplishments, and we certainly encourage you to text, post, and share them with friends and members of our university and college families. You’re welcome to try “Tweeting” our list as well, if you can figure out a way to condense it to 140 characters or less. However you choose to communicate with your Auburn Family, we are confident our lengthy list of recent accomplishments deserves a huge “War Eagle!”

College of Education faculty member awarded for recruitment efforts Jared Russell, the College of Education’s interim director of student development and an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, has been honored by a pair of organizations for his student recruitment efforts. The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance selected Russell for its Social Justice and Diversity Young Professional Award. Russell also earned the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools’ Award for Excellence and Innovation in Graduate Admissions. Russell’s recruitment quest has brought students from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including Spelman, Morehouse, Albany State and Fort Valley State, to Auburn’s campus. The students visit with Kinesiology faculty and College of Education administrators and are informed of graduate school opportunities. “Many of the students that attend these colleges want to go to medical school or PT (physical therapy) school and I am able to expose them to the opportunities that Auburn has to offer,” Russell said. Russell also initiated the college’s Summer Bridge-Future Graduate Scholars Program. The program provides intensive academic and research experience for prospective graduate students and aids the transition of junior- and senior-level undergraduates from traditionally underrepresented groups into Kinesiology graduate programs. Russell’s efforts have been recognized for assisting in adding diversity to the college’s graduate student body and emphasizing appreciation of all ethnic backgrounds. “Recruiting is all about establishing relationships,” Russell said. “Offering support to students and making them feel comfortable is key to the recruitment process.”

4

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

Online graduate programs earn high honor from magazine When it comes to serving the needs of students who have career and family obligations, the College of Education finds itself at the head of the class. U.S.News & World Report recently identified the college’s online graduate degree program as one of the best in the nation. The magazine named the college to the Honor Roll in its first-ever Top Online Education Program ranking. Auburn’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering was the only other campus unit to earn similar recognition. U.S.News & World Report did not provide overall numerical rankings for colleges and schools named to its Honor Roll, but it did evaluate programs in four different categories. Programs named to the Honor Roll placed in the top third of at least three of the magazine’s four categories. In all, 171 online education degree programs were evaluated. In order to be considered in the survey, degree programs had to offer at least 80 percent of their course content online. “We’re especially excited about this recognition given the fact that it’s the first time U.S.News & World Report has evaluated the nation’s top online education programs,” said College of Education Dean and Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor Betty Lou Whitford. “In looking through the data provided to us by U.S.News & World Report, one item in particular stood out to me.

“While the Honor Roll does not rank the institutions, our college did have the fifth-highest score in the category of teaching practices and student engagement. We’re quite proud of this since both components are at the core of what we do. We pride ourselves on our ability to prepare our graduates for an ever-changing and increasingly technology-driven world.” The survey results reaffirm the commitment to distance education and graduate program growth that Auburn University has outlined in its Strategic Plan. The college currently offers online master’s degree options in agriscience education, business/marketing education, elementary education, French education, Spanish education, music education, rehabilitation counseling, collaborative teacher special education and early childhood special education. In U.S.News & World Report’s annual survey of graduate programs, the College of Education remained the top-ranked college or school of education – public or private – in Alabama. The college earned an overall ranking of 77th out of 280 universities surveyed. Auburn received particularly high marks in a survey of school superintendents, earning an average score of 4.0 on a 5.0 scale. Auburn’s rehabilitation counseling graduate program retained the No. 17 ranking in the survey’s Health Disciplines category.

Panel discussion draws on faculty, alumni expertise Two College of Education faculty and one of its graduates shared their insights on the educational achievement gap during a February 2012 panel discussion aimed at building community awareness. The discussion, sponsored by the Student Government Association in partnership with the College of Education and Division of Student Affairs, brought together educational experts, students, faculty, staff and community members. The education gap refers to the performance disparity of student groups defined by gender, race and socioeconomic status in such areas as standardized test scores, dropout rates, college completion rates, course selections and grade point averages. According to the U.S. Department of Education, the achievement gap between minority and majority students ranges from 20 to 30 points in all subject matter areas and across all K-12 grade levels. Cynthia Reed, director of the Truman Pierce Institute and Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck endowed professor for educational leadership, and Marilyn Strutchens, co-director of Transforming

East Alabama Mathematics (TEAM-Math) and Mildred Cheshire Fraley distinguished professor, represented the College of Education on the panel. Reed is the president-elect of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA), while Strutchens serves as president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE). The panel also included Alabama State Superintendent of Education Tommy Bice, a 1977 graduate of the college, and two Auburn University alums – Lauren Hayes, advocacy director for Tennessee Charter Schools, and Alisha Walker, a Teach for America core member. “Education is a civil right,” Reed said. “It serves as a gateway to the opportunities one will have throughout their lifetime. Yet, there are huge inequities in the types of opportunities available to students and citizens in our state and in our country.” Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

5


renderings: Infinity Architecture

for excellence New Kinesiology building holds promise of bright future

B

etween persistent attacks from various insects and a temperamental electrical system, faculty members in the Department of Kinesiology all have plenty of stories to tell about the quirky facility they have called home for so long. The wrecking ball will eventually consume the now 43-year-old Beard-Eaves-Memorial Coliseum, but it won’t obliterate memories of a place exercise physiology associate professor John Quindry described as the “dirty box” housing cutting-edge research laboratories. Please pardon Quindry if he doesn’t observe a moment of silence once the coliseum is reduced to rubble, but his introduction to the place wasn’t especially pleasurable. During his first semester at Auburn, he learned that local storms and even the operation of popcorn machines during basketball games could put his lab experiments in jeopardy. “In one instance of a late-night planned power outage, I spent the night at the foot of my freezer to ensure that the device remained operational on the questionable backup

6

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

power system,” said Quindry, director of the Cardioprotection Research Lab. Fortunately, faculty members won’t lose any sleep over the condition of their facilities anymore. In September 2011, Auburn University broke ground on a Kinesiology building that will offer nearly 58,000 square feet of research and office space. Located on Wire Road, adjacent to the university tennis courts, the new building will house laboratories conducting a broad range of research relating to human movement, health and performance. The facility, designed by Infinity Architecture of Montgomery, is scheduled to be completed in early 2013. Mary Rudisill, head of the Department of Kinesiology and Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor of motor behavior, said the new building is designed to meet the varied interests and needs of faculty and students in exercise science, health promotion and physical education teacher education. “We specialize in performance-based types of activities – how an athlete moves while performing,’’ Rudisill said, “but

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

7


renderings: Infinity Architecture

for excellence New Kinesiology building holds promise of bright future

B

etween persistent attacks from various insects and a temperamental electrical system, faculty members in the Department of Kinesiology all have plenty of stories to tell about the quirky facility they have called home for so long. The wrecking ball will eventually consume the now 43-year-old Beard-Eaves-Memorial Coliseum, but it won’t obliterate memories of a place exercise physiology associate professor John Quindry described as the “dirty box” housing cutting-edge research laboratories. Please pardon Quindry if he doesn’t observe a moment of silence once the coliseum is reduced to rubble, but his introduction to the place wasn’t especially pleasurable. During his first semester at Auburn, he learned that local storms and even the operation of popcorn machines during basketball games could put his lab experiments in jeopardy. “In one instance of a late-night planned power outage, I spent the night at the foot of my freezer to ensure that the device remained operational on the questionable backup

6

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

power system,” said Quindry, director of the Cardioprotection Research Lab. Fortunately, faculty members won’t lose any sleep over the condition of their facilities anymore. In September 2011, Auburn University broke ground on a Kinesiology building that will offer nearly 58,000 square feet of research and office space. Located on Wire Road, adjacent to the university tennis courts, the new building will house laboratories conducting a broad range of research relating to human movement, health and performance. The facility, designed by Infinity Architecture of Montgomery, is scheduled to be completed in early 2013. Mary Rudisill, head of the Department of Kinesiology and Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor of motor behavior, said the new building is designed to meet the varied interests and needs of faculty and students in exercise science, health promotion and physical education teacher education. “We specialize in performance-based types of activities – how an athlete moves while performing,’’ Rudisill said, “but

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

7


They were actually enlivened by a small mouse that ran through the classroom, dodging students until finding shelter in a computer station. Russell said the new facility will prove invaluable in helping recruit graduate students and boosting faculty productivity.

we also have a real health-related end with fitness activities, getting people involved in being more physically active on a daily basis.’’

positive learning and research environment.’’

Jared Russell, interim director of student development for the College of Education and assistant professor of pedagogy in the department, The department’s signature mark depicts a has probably looked at artist runner, swimmer and cyclist renderings of the new building (or wheelchair athlete) in “The new facility is the every day since they were first motion, above the wording culmination of success on unveiled. The drawing also “Movement. Health. Perreminds him of what he will several levels, and is due to formance.’’ Rudisill said the be missing once he takes up department’s long-anticipated the efforts of faculty residence in a new office. He move from Beard-Eaves to the past and present.” won’t be bracing himself for new building will do wonders John quindry a surprise visit by a raccoon for its long-term health and Associate professor of exercise physiology thundering through the crawl performance. The Department space overhead or sweeping of Kinesiology earned a No. 22 ranking in the National Academy of Kinesiology’s away swarms of potato bugs. most recent survey of doctoral programs. Rudisill “We had potato bugs, the green lady bugs said the new facility should help the department that come out when it gets warm,” Russell said. improve its national standing and its ability to re- “When it would get warm, they’d start dropcruit and retain top-quality faculty and students. ping out of the ceiling. I got to the point where I “We’re growing,’’ Rudisill said. “We’ve got a lot of great things happening.’’ The promise of a new building has created a buzz among Kinesiology students. Efforts to preserve trees displaced by the Kinesiology building construction led to a number being transplanted.

8

Keystone

“I am ecstatic for the students who will have access to this wonderful opportunity,’’ said Ragan Hart, an exercise science major from Cologne, Va. “The new building will provide a thriving and

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

stopped spraying. I’d just scoop them up.” Alice Buchanan, associate professor and physical education internship coordinator, recalls one occasion during a class when she heard an audible gasp from her class a moment after she turned away during a lecture. “I thought, wow, I didn’t know I, or this material, was that compelling,” she said.

“Anytime you get a new building, you get more interest,” he said. “Along with the new building, we have an opportunity to expand our services to the community and Auburn University. The more good people, the more resources, the more productivity, the more it helps with grants and research.” The first floor of the new three-level facility will house space for the department’s biomechanics and motor behavior laboratories. The motor behavior lab, which focuses a significant portion of its research on physical activity in children, will open onto a green space for outdoor activity. The second floor will house epidemiology and exercise behavior labs, as well as the department’s TigerFit program, which provides health screenings and fitness assessments. The third floor will feature controlled-access space for muscle physiology, cardioprotection, neuromechanics, sports optimization and thermal labs. The department also uses space in the university’s MRI Research Center for work relating to gait and posture analysis, post-surgery performance and rehabilitation, exercise prescription and adherence, sports performance testing and assessment and sports psychology. The department’s Warrior Research Center, which focuses on helping the U.S. Armed Forces improve the physical and technical abilities of soldiers, also utilizes the MRI Research Center.

professor of exercise physiology. Preparations for the new facility also involved some knowhow unique to Auburn University. Construction on the site, formerly occupied by the Fisheries Annex, would have resulted in the destruction of eight large trees, including six Burr oaks, one Nuttall oak and one Winged elm. Auburn Facilities Management began making preparations in December 2011 to remove the trees in order to preserve and relocate them. The Nuttall Oak and its root ball, which weighs more than 100,000 pounds, was the largest tree ever transplanted on campus.

Auburn Trustee Virginia Thompson, Kinesiology Department Head Mary Rudisill, Dean Betty Lou Whitford, Aubie, student Ragan Hart, Trustee Sarah Newton ’74 and Auburn President Jay Gogue prepare to dig into the construction project.

Two of the Burr oaks and the Winged elm were moved to locations near Wire Road, while the Nuttall oak can be found along Heisman Drive. At 30 to 40 years of age, many of the trees were nearly as old, if not older, than as the coliseum that the new Kinesiology building will replace. “The new facility is the culmination of success on several levels, and is due to the efforts of faculty past and present,” Quindry said. “I think it is important for newer faculty like me, students, and the AU community to recognize that the new building is a tangible acknowledgement of many decades of hard work which predates many of us who will benefit directly from the new space.”

The Motor Development Lab and other facilities in the building will offer flexible space.

“We’re going to be able to do experiments that other people cannot do,’’ said David Pascoe, director of the Thermal and Infrared Lab and a Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

9


They were actually enlivened by a small mouse that ran through the classroom, dodging students until finding shelter in a computer station. Russell said the new facility will prove invaluable in helping recruit graduate students and boosting faculty productivity.

we also have a real health-related end with fitness activities, getting people involved in being more physically active on a daily basis.’’

positive learning and research environment.’’

Jared Russell, interim director of student development for the College of Education and assistant professor of pedagogy in the department, The department’s signature mark depicts a has probably looked at artist runner, swimmer and cyclist renderings of the new building (or wheelchair athlete) in “The new facility is the every day since they were first motion, above the wording culmination of success on unveiled. The drawing also “Movement. Health. Perreminds him of what he will several levels, and is due to formance.’’ Rudisill said the be missing once he takes up department’s long-anticipated the efforts of faculty residence in a new office. He move from Beard-Eaves to the past and present.” won’t be bracing himself for new building will do wonders John quindry a surprise visit by a raccoon for its long-term health and Associate professor of exercise physiology thundering through the crawl performance. The Department space overhead or sweeping of Kinesiology earned a No. 22 ranking in the National Academy of Kinesiology’s away swarms of potato bugs. most recent survey of doctoral programs. Rudisill “We had potato bugs, the green lady bugs said the new facility should help the department that come out when it gets warm,” Russell said. improve its national standing and its ability to re- “When it would get warm, they’d start dropcruit and retain top-quality faculty and students. ping out of the ceiling. I got to the point where I “We’re growing,’’ Rudisill said. “We’ve got a lot of great things happening.’’ The promise of a new building has created a buzz among Kinesiology students. Efforts to preserve trees displaced by the Kinesiology building construction led to a number being transplanted.

8

Keystone

“I am ecstatic for the students who will have access to this wonderful opportunity,’’ said Ragan Hart, an exercise science major from Cologne, Va. “The new building will provide a thriving and

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

stopped spraying. I’d just scoop them up.” Alice Buchanan, associate professor and physical education internship coordinator, recalls one occasion during a class when she heard an audible gasp from her class a moment after she turned away during a lecture. “I thought, wow, I didn’t know I, or this material, was that compelling,” she said.

“Anytime you get a new building, you get more interest,” he said. “Along with the new building, we have an opportunity to expand our services to the community and Auburn University. The more good people, the more resources, the more productivity, the more it helps with grants and research.” The first floor of the new three-level facility will house space for the department’s biomechanics and motor behavior laboratories. The motor behavior lab, which focuses a significant portion of its research on physical activity in children, will open onto a green space for outdoor activity. The second floor will house epidemiology and exercise behavior labs, as well as the department’s TigerFit program, which provides health screenings and fitness assessments. The third floor will feature controlled-access space for muscle physiology, cardioprotection, neuromechanics, sports optimization and thermal labs. The department also uses space in the university’s MRI Research Center for work relating to gait and posture analysis, post-surgery performance and rehabilitation, exercise prescription and adherence, sports performance testing and assessment and sports psychology. The department’s Warrior Research Center, which focuses on helping the U.S. Armed Forces improve the physical and technical abilities of soldiers, also utilizes the MRI Research Center.

professor of exercise physiology. Preparations for the new facility also involved some knowhow unique to Auburn University. Construction on the site, formerly occupied by the Fisheries Annex, would have resulted in the destruction of eight large trees, including six Burr oaks, one Nuttall oak and one Winged elm. Auburn Facilities Management began making preparations in December 2011 to remove the trees in order to preserve and relocate them. The Nuttall Oak and its root ball, which weighs more than 100,000 pounds, was the largest tree ever transplanted on campus.

Auburn Trustee Virginia Thompson, Kinesiology Department Head Mary Rudisill, Dean Betty Lou Whitford, Aubie, student Ragan Hart, Trustee Sarah Newton ’74 and Auburn President Jay Gogue prepare to dig into the construction project.

Two of the Burr oaks and the Winged elm were moved to locations near Wire Road, while the Nuttall oak can be found along Heisman Drive. At 30 to 40 years of age, many of the trees were nearly as old, if not older, than as the coliseum that the new Kinesiology building will replace. “The new facility is the culmination of success on several levels, and is due to the efforts of faculty past and present,” Quindry said. “I think it is important for newer faculty like me, students, and the AU community to recognize that the new building is a tangible acknowledgement of many decades of hard work which predates many of us who will benefit directly from the new space.”

The Motor Development Lab and other facilities in the building will offer flexible space.

“We’re going to be able to do experiments that other people cannot do,’’ said David Pascoe, director of the Thermal and Infrared Lab and a Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished

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Pipes, Dagley earn APA honors Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling faculty members Randolph Pipes and John Dagley were each selected for prestigious roles with divisions of the American Psychological Association. Pipes, professor and director of training in the counseling psychology program, was selected as a fellow of the Society of Counseling Psychology (Division 17 of the APA). Dagley, associate professor of counseling psychology, was elected to the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy’s executive board. With more than 154,000 members, the APA represents the world’s largest association of psychologists. Pipes, whose specialties include ethics, professional issues in counseling psychology, and bias and error in judgment, has served on the Auburn faculty for more than 30 years. He will give his fellow’s address at the 2012 APA annual meeting, which will be held in August in Orlando, Fla. Dagley, a member of the Auburn faculty since 2003, previously served as an officer for the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy. During his time at Auburn, he has served as an acting department head, a member of the graduate faculty and as director of the counseling psychology program.

Weimar receives surprise from graduate students Wendi Weimar attended Auburn’s Graduate Student Awards program in April 2011 with the expectation of celebrating her students’ achievements. Instead, Weimar wound up being one of the guests of honor. Weimar, an associate professor and director of the Biomechanics Laboratory in the Department of Kinesiology, was more than a little surprised to be called to the podium to receive Auburn University’s Graduate Mentor Award. Candidates for the award, presented by the Graduate Student Council, are nominated by students. Weimar’s students were particularly adept at keeping her nomination a secret. “I had no idea that I was even considered, but I was over the moon,” said

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Awards are nothing new to Weimar, who was selected for the College of Education’s Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award in 2009. But none has been as meaningful to her as the most recent one. “What an honor to be appreciated by the people who are directly affected by my work as a teacher/mentor,” Weimar said. “I once heard that Isaac Newton said, ‘If I can see further than anyone else, it is only because I am standing on the shoulders of giants.’ Well, I always wanted to be the shoulders that my students stood upon to see further than I.” Weimar said she considers herself fortunate to work with such a dynamic group of students. “My students are enthusiastic, erudite, fascinating, fascinated, curious people who keep my mind open and growing,” she said.

EFLT faculty member recognized for excellence in teaching undergraduates Jung Won Hur, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, earned one of three Alumni Undergraduate Teaching Excellence Awards presented during Auburn University’s sixth annual Faculty Awards Celebrating Excellence Ceremony in October 2011. Candidates for the award are nominated by department heads, deans, alumni and students and are ultimately selected by a committee comprised of retired faculty. The awards program, held at The Hotel at

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Weimar, who earned her doctorate from Auburn in 1999.

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Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center, recognized the outstanding academic achievements of 20 faculty members. Hur, who joined the College of Education faculty in 2007, specializes in educational media and focuses much of her instruction on the integration of technology into curriculum, instructional design and development, learning theory and development of multimedia. Her research interests include technology integration in K-12 classrooms, supporting teacher professional development online, and the use of emerging technology to assist English language learners’ language proficiency.

Two organizations pay tribute to Kochan’s mentorship abilities Over the course of her career, Frances Kochan has touched countless lives while advising student groups, serving on dissertation committees and counseling junior faculty members on the promotion and tenure process. Since joining the College of Education faculty in 1994, her door has always remained open to students and colleagues in search of encouragement and guidance. It didn’t matter if that door led to the Dean’s Office or to her present location on the fourth floor of Haley Center. “Her door was always open to us – even if we didn’t have an appointment,” educational psychology doctoral candidate Jennifer Wells wrote in nominating Kochan

Kinesiology offers new undergraduate option

for the Jay D. Scribner Mentoring Award presented by the University Council for Educational Administration. Kochan earned the award, named for University of Texas professor Jay D. Scribner, in fall 2011 for her ability to reach across lines of race, gender and class in nurturing scholars from backgrounds underrepresented in educational fields. Kochan also earned the Southern Regional Council on Educational Administration’s Jack Greer Lifetime Contribution Award. The award, named for the late former Georgia State University faculty member Jack Greer, pays tribute to individuals for their career accomplishments and service to the SRCEA.

Those skills are serving her well as Auburn University’s director of faculty engagement in the Office of the Vice President for University Outreach. Thomas, an associate professor of community agency counseling in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, and Counseling, began her new role in May 2011. She said she considers it her primary focus “to be the faculty voice for university outreach.” Thomas joined the Auburn faculty in 2005 and served as coordinator of the community agency counseling master’s degree

The College of Education now boasts 24 undergraduate degree options with the addition of the fitness, conditioning and performance option in the Department of Kinesiology. The new degree option, which was approved by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, made its debut in January 2012. “This degree option was crafted to fill a void,” said Mary Rudisill, head of the Department of Kinesiology and Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor of motor behavior. “We needed a new program to serve students in this area.” The degree is housed within the department’s physical activity and health program, formerly known as health promotion. Students who major in fitness, conditioning and performance will learn about injury prevention and performance optimization in athletic settings and everyday living contexts. They will gain an understanding of the scientific foundations of coaching, health and fitness practices and will learn how to apply technology and assessment tools related to those disciplines.

Thomas settles into role as university’s director of faculty engagement Having studied and taught clinical mental health counseling, Chippewa Thomas developed an understanding and appreciation for what it means to be a good listener and to empower others.

Auburn University students interested in becoming coaches, personal trainers, strength and conditioning specialists or fitness directors can now take advantage of a new degree field offering the necessary professional preparation.

program. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Tuskegee University and completed two degrees in Auburn’s College of Education – a master’s in community agency counseling and a doctorate in counselor education and supervision. As director of faculty engagement, Thomas ensures faculty members have detailed and accurate information regarding outreach requirements as part of the tenure and promotion process. She also works to develop incentives designed to increase Auburn’s outreach initiatives and shares information about collaborative projects with the university’s leadership team.

Graduates will receive the necessary training to prepare for careers in fitness, recreation, sport, rehabilitation, business and military settings. Some of the job functions for fitness, conditioning and performance graduates include fitness screening, strength and conditioning training, weight loss programming, stress management, sport optimization, performance and technique analysis, exercise prescription, fitness and conditioning consultation and personal training. “There are a lot of job opportunities in health-related fields,” Rudisill said.

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Pipes, Dagley earn APA honors Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling faculty members Randolph Pipes and John Dagley were each selected for prestigious roles with divisions of the American Psychological Association. Pipes, professor and director of training in the counseling psychology program, was selected as a fellow of the Society of Counseling Psychology (Division 17 of the APA). Dagley, associate professor of counseling psychology, was elected to the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy’s executive board. With more than 154,000 members, the APA represents the world’s largest association of psychologists. Pipes, whose specialties include ethics, professional issues in counseling psychology, and bias and error in judgment, has served on the Auburn faculty for more than 30 years. He will give his fellow’s address at the 2012 APA annual meeting, which will be held in August in Orlando, Fla. Dagley, a member of the Auburn faculty since 2003, previously served as an officer for the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy. During his time at Auburn, he has served as an acting department head, a member of the graduate faculty and as director of the counseling psychology program.

Weimar receives surprise from graduate students Wendi Weimar attended Auburn’s Graduate Student Awards program in April 2011 with the expectation of celebrating her students’ achievements. Instead, Weimar wound up being one of the guests of honor. Weimar, an associate professor and director of the Biomechanics Laboratory in the Department of Kinesiology, was more than a little surprised to be called to the podium to receive Auburn University’s Graduate Mentor Award. Candidates for the award, presented by the Graduate Student Council, are nominated by students. Weimar’s students were particularly adept at keeping her nomination a secret. “I had no idea that I was even considered, but I was over the moon,” said

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Awards are nothing new to Weimar, who was selected for the College of Education’s Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award in 2009. But none has been as meaningful to her as the most recent one. “What an honor to be appreciated by the people who are directly affected by my work as a teacher/mentor,” Weimar said. “I once heard that Isaac Newton said, ‘If I can see further than anyone else, it is only because I am standing on the shoulders of giants.’ Well, I always wanted to be the shoulders that my students stood upon to see further than I.” Weimar said she considers herself fortunate to work with such a dynamic group of students. “My students are enthusiastic, erudite, fascinating, fascinated, curious people who keep my mind open and growing,” she said.

EFLT faculty member recognized for excellence in teaching undergraduates Jung Won Hur, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, earned one of three Alumni Undergraduate Teaching Excellence Awards presented during Auburn University’s sixth annual Faculty Awards Celebrating Excellence Ceremony in October 2011. Candidates for the award are nominated by department heads, deans, alumni and students and are ultimately selected by a committee comprised of retired faculty. The awards program, held at The Hotel at

10

Weimar, who earned her doctorate from Auburn in 1999.

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center, recognized the outstanding academic achievements of 20 faculty members. Hur, who joined the College of Education faculty in 2007, specializes in educational media and focuses much of her instruction on the integration of technology into curriculum, instructional design and development, learning theory and development of multimedia. Her research interests include technology integration in K-12 classrooms, supporting teacher professional development online, and the use of emerging technology to assist English language learners’ language proficiency.

Two organizations pay tribute to Kochan’s mentorship abilities Over the course of her career, Frances Kochan has touched countless lives while advising student groups, serving on dissertation committees and counseling junior faculty members on the promotion and tenure process. Since joining the College of Education faculty in 1994, her door has always remained open to students and colleagues in search of encouragement and guidance. It didn’t matter if that door led to the Dean’s Office or to her present location on the fourth floor of Haley Center. “Her door was always open to us – even if we didn’t have an appointment,” educational psychology doctoral candidate Jennifer Wells wrote in nominating Kochan

Kinesiology offers new undergraduate option

for the Jay D. Scribner Mentoring Award presented by the University Council for Educational Administration. Kochan earned the award, named for University of Texas professor Jay D. Scribner, in fall 2011 for her ability to reach across lines of race, gender and class in nurturing scholars from backgrounds underrepresented in educational fields. Kochan also earned the Southern Regional Council on Educational Administration’s Jack Greer Lifetime Contribution Award. The award, named for the late former Georgia State University faculty member Jack Greer, pays tribute to individuals for their career accomplishments and service to the SRCEA.

Those skills are serving her well as Auburn University’s director of faculty engagement in the Office of the Vice President for University Outreach. Thomas, an associate professor of community agency counseling in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, and Counseling, began her new role in May 2011. She said she considers it her primary focus “to be the faculty voice for university outreach.” Thomas joined the Auburn faculty in 2005 and served as coordinator of the community agency counseling master’s degree

The College of Education now boasts 24 undergraduate degree options with the addition of the fitness, conditioning and performance option in the Department of Kinesiology. The new degree option, which was approved by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, made its debut in January 2012. “This degree option was crafted to fill a void,” said Mary Rudisill, head of the Department of Kinesiology and Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor of motor behavior. “We needed a new program to serve students in this area.” The degree is housed within the department’s physical activity and health program, formerly known as health promotion. Students who major in fitness, conditioning and performance will learn about injury prevention and performance optimization in athletic settings and everyday living contexts. They will gain an understanding of the scientific foundations of coaching, health and fitness practices and will learn how to apply technology and assessment tools related to those disciplines.

Thomas settles into role as university’s director of faculty engagement Having studied and taught clinical mental health counseling, Chippewa Thomas developed an understanding and appreciation for what it means to be a good listener and to empower others.

Auburn University students interested in becoming coaches, personal trainers, strength and conditioning specialists or fitness directors can now take advantage of a new degree field offering the necessary professional preparation.

program. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Tuskegee University and completed two degrees in Auburn’s College of Education – a master’s in community agency counseling and a doctorate in counselor education and supervision. As director of faculty engagement, Thomas ensures faculty members have detailed and accurate information regarding outreach requirements as part of the tenure and promotion process. She also works to develop incentives designed to increase Auburn’s outreach initiatives and shares information about collaborative projects with the university’s leadership team.

Graduates will receive the necessary training to prepare for careers in fitness, recreation, sport, rehabilitation, business and military settings. Some of the job functions for fitness, conditioning and performance graduates include fitness screening, strength and conditioning training, weight loss programming, stress management, sport optimization, performance and technique analysis, exercise prescription, fitness and conditioning consultation and personal training. “There are a lot of job opportunities in health-related fields,” Rudisill said.

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Greece marks start of Warner’s globe-trotting Elementary education graduate now teaching in Qatar

C

hildren from across the globe

fill Morgan Warner’s first grade classroom. It is the first day of school and the excitement of children’s voices fills the hallways of Pinewood International American School in Thessaloniki, Greece. The atmosphere of the school is warm and welcoming. There are no overhead projectors, no smart boards, no clickers and no Apple computers. Each room is colorful and contains one computer and one telephone. A “Welcome” poster written in the home languages of all of Warner’s students greets visitors. One language was noticeably missing from the poster, a language that was not the home language of any of her students — English.

Warner summed up life in Greece in one word — relaxing. Her experience immersed her deep into the Greek lifestyle and allowed her to interact with students from different cultures on a daily basis.

Morgan Warner ’11 gained valuable experience interning at Pinewood International American School in Thessaloniki, Greece.

Warner, an elementary education graduate, said she has always been interested in overseas work. Her decision to teach abroad became solidified when news of her family’s transfer overseas came. Her father’s company placed him in Doha, Qatar, a ways away from her native home in Houston, Texas. “Since my parents sold our house in Texas, I thought, why not now go overseas?” she said. “Not being tied down to a particular place helps when traveling opportunities arise.” Pinewood International American School is a private school in Thessaloniki, Greece, with an Americanbased curriculum. There are 187 students in grades pre-K through 12. A handful of students are children of famous athletes, while others have parents who work in high-profile settings, including consulates. At the elementary level, the students are immersed in English.

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“It was a blast and the students seemed to really enjoy the music. I was asked ‘What is figgy pudding?’ and ‘What is a one-horse open sleigh?’ It was priceless,” she said. When not busy with school, Warner explored Greece and Europe by traveling to various cities, including Athens, Vergina and even Rome, Italy.

Simple questions such as, “What is your favorite color?” or “What did you bring for lunch today?” became very difficult for Warner to ask. “I felt as though I was playing a game of charades to get the students to do a simple worksheet,” said Warner, who graduated in fall 2011 after completing her teaching internship abroad.

teach students in the subject area.

At the upper level, the school offers a full International Baccalaureate Program. Warner’s days began at 6 a.m., when she would catch the bus with her students to school. The rides were an hour-long each day, which gave her the opportunity to talk and bond with them. “Initially this sounded very daunting but it was actually a very special part of my day,” she said. Aiding the non-native English speakers in a 1-on-1 fashion, large group instruction and oral discussion were a few responsibilities she had. One surprising task she was given was in regard to music. Due to budget cuts, the school had to get rid of its music program. Being the only teacher who had any experience working with music, she began working with students on the school’s semester play, “A Peter Pan Christmas,” which included various Christmas carols and songs from the original Peter Pan. Having been a piccolo player in Auburn’s marching band and having completed a music education course, she felt prepared to

After completing her time in Greece, she decided to continue her overseas experience in Qatar. She found herself missing her family and wanting to be as close to them as possible. She loves working overseas but hopes to return to American soil in a few years. “Looking back at this experience, I have taken away a different set of eyes I see the world through,” she said. “My philosophy and faith have remained sturdy but my ability to connect and relate to other people has grown tremendously.” Warner is currently a substitute teacher at The American School of Doha and is continuing to learn about the culture in Qatar. She is also working on her master’s degree in children’s literature via an online program. “These experiences remind me how precious people and relationships are, and how we must use the time we are given to enjoy every opportunity,” Warner said. “We must consider Dr. Seuss and his comment in my favorite children’s book, ‘Oh the Places You’ll Go’ — ‘Your mountain is waiting so get on your way.’” ON THE WEB: Read about Morgan Warner’s internship experience on her blog, ‘Going Greek’ at speakingingreek.blogspot.com

Trip to China opens door for possible partnerships During a summer 2011 trip to China focused on promoting cultural understanding and examining the potential for partnerships, Sheri Downer and Nancy Barry received insight into the nation’s educational values and practices. “The value of education in that culture is just tremendous,” said Barry, professor of music education in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. “There is huge respect for education as a way of elevating one’s status and assuring one’s future.”

to Auburn University and to perhaps create opportunities for university students and faculty to visit China. Both were part of an American educational delegation organized by the Confucius Institute at Troy University and the school’s College of Education. The group’s 10-day trip included visits to the cities of Beijing, Qinhuangdao, Guangzhou and Shenzhen and to university, elementary school, middle school and high school sites. The Confucius Institute at Troy University is tied into a global network of more than 204 sites in 50 countries, which promotes Chinese language and culture. It offers Chinese language training for community members and teachers and facilitates educational exchange, research partnerships and cooperation between American and Chinese educational and governmental entities.

Confucius, the thinker and social philosopher who defined the Spring and Autumn periods of Chinese history, displayed his deep respect for wisdom and knowledge in many of his aphorisms. These days, China’s efforts to elevate itself as a superpower and assure its future start in highlycompetitive classrooms, where make-or-break standardized testing ultimately determines which students continue their educations in university settings. “They said about 1 million students go on in education after testing every year,’’ said Downer, head of the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology. “And, of that, about 100,000 go to foreign universities.” Barry and Downer traveled to China in the hopes of luring a few of those students

The trip taken by Barry and Downer outlined other ways in which faculty and students might increase the “development of international skill’’ outlined in the university’s Strategic Plan. Barry and Downer shared their experiences with university administrators, including Andrew Gillespie, assistant provost for international programs, in the hopes that research, internship and exchange opportunities can be developed.

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Greece marks start of Warner’s globe-trotting Elementary education graduate now teaching in Qatar

C

hildren from across the globe

fill Morgan Warner’s first grade classroom. It is the first day of school and the excitement of children’s voices fills the hallways of Pinewood International American School in Thessaloniki, Greece. The atmosphere of the school is warm and welcoming. There are no overhead projectors, no smart boards, no clickers and no Apple computers. Each room is colorful and contains one computer and one telephone. A “Welcome” poster written in the home languages of all of Warner’s students greets visitors. One language was noticeably missing from the poster, a language that was not the home language of any of her students — English.

Warner summed up life in Greece in one word — relaxing. Her experience immersed her deep into the Greek lifestyle and allowed her to interact with students from different cultures on a daily basis.

Morgan Warner ’11 gained valuable experience interning at Pinewood International American School in Thessaloniki, Greece.

Warner, an elementary education graduate, said she has always been interested in overseas work. Her decision to teach abroad became solidified when news of her family’s transfer overseas came. Her father’s company placed him in Doha, Qatar, a ways away from her native home in Houston, Texas. “Since my parents sold our house in Texas, I thought, why not now go overseas?” she said. “Not being tied down to a particular place helps when traveling opportunities arise.” Pinewood International American School is a private school in Thessaloniki, Greece, with an Americanbased curriculum. There are 187 students in grades pre-K through 12. A handful of students are children of famous athletes, while others have parents who work in high-profile settings, including consulates. At the elementary level, the students are immersed in English.

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Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

“It was a blast and the students seemed to really enjoy the music. I was asked ‘What is figgy pudding?’ and ‘What is a one-horse open sleigh?’ It was priceless,” she said. When not busy with school, Warner explored Greece and Europe by traveling to various cities, including Athens, Vergina and even Rome, Italy.

Simple questions such as, “What is your favorite color?” or “What did you bring for lunch today?” became very difficult for Warner to ask. “I felt as though I was playing a game of charades to get the students to do a simple worksheet,” said Warner, who graduated in fall 2011 after completing her teaching internship abroad.

teach students in the subject area.

At the upper level, the school offers a full International Baccalaureate Program. Warner’s days began at 6 a.m., when she would catch the bus with her students to school. The rides were an hour-long each day, which gave her the opportunity to talk and bond with them. “Initially this sounded very daunting but it was actually a very special part of my day,” she said. Aiding the non-native English speakers in a 1-on-1 fashion, large group instruction and oral discussion were a few responsibilities she had. One surprising task she was given was in regard to music. Due to budget cuts, the school had to get rid of its music program. Being the only teacher who had any experience working with music, she began working with students on the school’s semester play, “A Peter Pan Christmas,” which included various Christmas carols and songs from the original Peter Pan. Having been a piccolo player in Auburn’s marching band and having completed a music education course, she felt prepared to

After completing her time in Greece, she decided to continue her overseas experience in Qatar. She found herself missing her family and wanting to be as close to them as possible. She loves working overseas but hopes to return to American soil in a few years. “Looking back at this experience, I have taken away a different set of eyes I see the world through,” she said. “My philosophy and faith have remained sturdy but my ability to connect and relate to other people has grown tremendously.” Warner is currently a substitute teacher at The American School of Doha and is continuing to learn about the culture in Qatar. She is also working on her master’s degree in children’s literature via an online program. “These experiences remind me how precious people and relationships are, and how we must use the time we are given to enjoy every opportunity,” Warner said. “We must consider Dr. Seuss and his comment in my favorite children’s book, ‘Oh the Places You’ll Go’ — ‘Your mountain is waiting so get on your way.’” ON THE WEB: Read about Morgan Warner’s internship experience on her blog, ‘Going Greek’ at speakingingreek.blogspot.com

Trip to China opens door for possible partnerships During a summer 2011 trip to China focused on promoting cultural understanding and examining the potential for partnerships, Sheri Downer and Nancy Barry received insight into the nation’s educational values and practices. “The value of education in that culture is just tremendous,” said Barry, professor of music education in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. “There is huge respect for education as a way of elevating one’s status and assuring one’s future.”

to Auburn University and to perhaps create opportunities for university students and faculty to visit China. Both were part of an American educational delegation organized by the Confucius Institute at Troy University and the school’s College of Education. The group’s 10-day trip included visits to the cities of Beijing, Qinhuangdao, Guangzhou and Shenzhen and to university, elementary school, middle school and high school sites. The Confucius Institute at Troy University is tied into a global network of more than 204 sites in 50 countries, which promotes Chinese language and culture. It offers Chinese language training for community members and teachers and facilitates educational exchange, research partnerships and cooperation between American and Chinese educational and governmental entities.

Confucius, the thinker and social philosopher who defined the Spring and Autumn periods of Chinese history, displayed his deep respect for wisdom and knowledge in many of his aphorisms. These days, China’s efforts to elevate itself as a superpower and assure its future start in highlycompetitive classrooms, where make-or-break standardized testing ultimately determines which students continue their educations in university settings. “They said about 1 million students go on in education after testing every year,’’ said Downer, head of the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology. “And, of that, about 100,000 go to foreign universities.” Barry and Downer traveled to China in the hopes of luring a few of those students

The trip taken by Barry and Downer outlined other ways in which faculty and students might increase the “development of international skill’’ outlined in the university’s Strategic Plan. Barry and Downer shared their experiences with university administrators, including Andrew Gillespie, assistant provost for international programs, in the hopes that research, internship and exchange opportunities can be developed.

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Creating cross-cultural connections

Students, faculty enjoy Aussie adventure James Kaminsky and Ellen Reames take the concept of global learning quite seriously.

Corporate-funded program helps educators reach growing student population

dinator for Auburn City Schools, was among the 14 educators who traveled to Korea in 2011 through the program. She said her experience, which included visits to K-12 schools and two universities, proved invaluable in understanding the needs of students from other cultures. During the 201112 school year, more than 700 students enrolled in Auburn City Schools reported speaking languages other than English. ACS students speak 48 different languages in all, with Korean (321 students), Spanish (112) and Chinese (74) being the most common.

A

ll along the Interstate 85 corridor,

from Montgomery to West Point, Ga., factories large and small dot the landscape and form the driveshaft of the Korean automotive industry and its efforts to win over American consumers. As the manufacturing capability of automakers Kia and Hyundai has grown, so too has the presence of parts suppliers. In addition to making pretty much everything but the tires on new sedans and SUVs, these support businesses have also helped change the face of schools in the region. Following parents who have accepted management and manufacturing jobs, Korean-born children have arrived in East Alabama and West Georgia with the expectation to adjust to a new language, a new culture and an unfamiliar school environment. The College of Education and AJIN USA, a Chambers County-based metal stamping company that supplies parts for Kia and Hyundai, and its parent company, JOON, LLC, have worked together to help local educators better serve this grow-

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ing student population. For the second consecutive year, a gift from AJIN USA will provide support for the Global Initiative in Education Project. The company has provided more than $120,000 in support of the program. AJIN USA President Jung Ho Sea and AJIN plant manager David Wilkerson hosted a contingent of College of Education faculty and regional school partners for a check presentation ceremony in fall 2011. This year, from May 30 to June 14, 12 teachers and seven Auburn University graduate students will travel to Korea to learn about the country’s culture and educational system in an effort to bridge communications gaps with Korean-born students attending school in Auburn, Opelika and Lee County. Karen Snyder, federal programs coor-

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“I think the one thing that I take away and that our teachers take away and that I would like to say thank you for is the genuine opportunity to learn in the midst of what you’re learning about,” Snyder said. “It was a very profound, life-changing experience for us.” Suhyun Suh, project co-director and coordinator of the school counseling master’s program in the College of Education, said educators receive unique insight through their immersion in Korean culture. In addition to visiting cultural landmarks like the Korean Demilitarized Zone and taking a side trip to Shanghai, teachers learn how

So seriously, in fact, that they were willing to lead a cohort of educational leadership graduate students on a 9,000-plus mile journey from Auburn to Sydney, Australia last summer.

Educators from Alabama visit with counterparts from Ewha Kindergarden and Ewha Woman’s University. Ewha faculty member Insoo Oh (right) visited Auburn University with a group of students in winter 2012.

to better relate to students who may not yet be proficient in English or who may not understand American cultural norms. “They experienced what it was like to be in a country without the ability to communicate at all,” Suh said. “They have realized what it is like for Korean students in the classroom.” And they learn how much of a life change Korean-born students are in for when they come to East Alabama. In Seoul, for instance, a young student becomes accustomed to riding the subway to school without an adult chaperone. Children often arrive at school as early as 6:30 a.m., and study quietly until class begins. Callie Merrill Counts ’02, a two-time College of Education graduate and an ESL teacher at Yarbrough and Wrights Mill Road Elementary Schools in Auburn, said the Global Initiative in Education Project has provided valuable important development and helped her build relationships with Korean parents. This year, Counts has seen an increase in the amount of Korean parents volunteering at her schools. “At the beginning of the school year, we have to meet with every parent who has a child in our ESL program,” Counts said. “In most of the meetings, the [Korean] parents would mention something about us having gone to Korea or ask how we liked Seoul. It was a good conversation starter for us.”

Snyder said the Global Initiative in Education Project provides benefits beyond helping students acclimate to a new language and school setting and helping parents connect with educators. The educators who traveled to Korea last year and those who will make the trip this year have each established themselves as a cultural “go-to person” in their respective schools, Snyder said. These cultural experts will become even more important if recent demographic and business shifts continue. Andy Gillespie, Auburn University’s assistant provost for international programs, called the establishment of the Global Initiative in Education Project a “visionary act” for good reason. U.S. Census Bureau statistics show that Lee County, Alabama’s Korean population has grown from 312 in 2000 to more than 1,300 in 2010.

Kaminsky, a Mildred Cheshire Fraley distinguished professor and foundations program coordinator in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, and Reames, assistant professor and educational leadership program coordinator, are more than willing to do it all over again in June. Students who make the excursion, “International Experience: Australia,” will immerse themselves in Australia’s educational system and culture during a three-week stay. Last year, the trip included stops at the Northern Sydney Regional Central Office, the New South Wales Department of Education and Communities, public elementary and Aboriginal schools, an alternative school and the University of New South Wales. “There was not a single person who was not a happy camper,” Reames said. The latter statement is particularly impressive given the fact that the travel itinerary could include camping. Kaminsky, a lecturer at the University of New England in New South Wales, Australia, from 1974-89, enjoys taking his students on hikes in the Blue Mountains and introducing them to the splendor of the Sydney Opera House and Bondi Beach.

AJIN President Jung Ho Sea, Gyeongsangbuk-Do Province Superintendent of Education Yung-Woo Lee, Dean Betty Lou Whitford and Assistant Provost Andrew Gillespie

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i n t e r n at i o n a l

Creating cross-cultural connections

Students, faculty enjoy Aussie adventure James Kaminsky and Ellen Reames take the concept of global learning quite seriously.

Corporate-funded program helps educators reach growing student population

dinator for Auburn City Schools, was among the 14 educators who traveled to Korea in 2011 through the program. She said her experience, which included visits to K-12 schools and two universities, proved invaluable in understanding the needs of students from other cultures. During the 201112 school year, more than 700 students enrolled in Auburn City Schools reported speaking languages other than English. ACS students speak 48 different languages in all, with Korean (321 students), Spanish (112) and Chinese (74) being the most common.

A

ll along the Interstate 85 corridor,

from Montgomery to West Point, Ga., factories large and small dot the landscape and form the driveshaft of the Korean automotive industry and its efforts to win over American consumers. As the manufacturing capability of automakers Kia and Hyundai has grown, so too has the presence of parts suppliers. In addition to making pretty much everything but the tires on new sedans and SUVs, these support businesses have also helped change the face of schools in the region. Following parents who have accepted management and manufacturing jobs, Korean-born children have arrived in East Alabama and West Georgia with the expectation to adjust to a new language, a new culture and an unfamiliar school environment. The College of Education and AJIN USA, a Chambers County-based metal stamping company that supplies parts for Kia and Hyundai, and its parent company, JOON, LLC, have worked together to help local educators better serve this grow-

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ing student population. For the second consecutive year, a gift from AJIN USA will provide support for the Global Initiative in Education Project. The company has provided more than $120,000 in support of the program. AJIN USA President Jung Ho Sea and AJIN plant manager David Wilkerson hosted a contingent of College of Education faculty and regional school partners for a check presentation ceremony in fall 2011. This year, from May 30 to June 14, 12 teachers and seven Auburn University graduate students will travel to Korea to learn about the country’s culture and educational system in an effort to bridge communications gaps with Korean-born students attending school in Auburn, Opelika and Lee County. Karen Snyder, federal programs coor-

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“I think the one thing that I take away and that our teachers take away and that I would like to say thank you for is the genuine opportunity to learn in the midst of what you’re learning about,” Snyder said. “It was a very profound, life-changing experience for us.” Suhyun Suh, project co-director and coordinator of the school counseling master’s program in the College of Education, said educators receive unique insight through their immersion in Korean culture. In addition to visiting cultural landmarks like the Korean Demilitarized Zone and taking a side trip to Shanghai, teachers learn how

So seriously, in fact, that they were willing to lead a cohort of educational leadership graduate students on a 9,000-plus mile journey from Auburn to Sydney, Australia last summer.

Educators from Alabama visit with counterparts from Ewha Kindergarden and Ewha Woman’s University. Ewha faculty member Insoo Oh (right) visited Auburn University with a group of students in winter 2012.

to better relate to students who may not yet be proficient in English or who may not understand American cultural norms. “They experienced what it was like to be in a country without the ability to communicate at all,” Suh said. “They have realized what it is like for Korean students in the classroom.” And they learn how much of a life change Korean-born students are in for when they come to East Alabama. In Seoul, for instance, a young student becomes accustomed to riding the subway to school without an adult chaperone. Children often arrive at school as early as 6:30 a.m., and study quietly until class begins. Callie Merrill Counts ’02, a two-time College of Education graduate and an ESL teacher at Yarbrough and Wrights Mill Road Elementary Schools in Auburn, said the Global Initiative in Education Project has provided valuable important development and helped her build relationships with Korean parents. This year, Counts has seen an increase in the amount of Korean parents volunteering at her schools. “At the beginning of the school year, we have to meet with every parent who has a child in our ESL program,” Counts said. “In most of the meetings, the [Korean] parents would mention something about us having gone to Korea or ask how we liked Seoul. It was a good conversation starter for us.”

Snyder said the Global Initiative in Education Project provides benefits beyond helping students acclimate to a new language and school setting and helping parents connect with educators. The educators who traveled to Korea last year and those who will make the trip this year have each established themselves as a cultural “go-to person” in their respective schools, Snyder said. These cultural experts will become even more important if recent demographic and business shifts continue. Andy Gillespie, Auburn University’s assistant provost for international programs, called the establishment of the Global Initiative in Education Project a “visionary act” for good reason. U.S. Census Bureau statistics show that Lee County, Alabama’s Korean population has grown from 312 in 2000 to more than 1,300 in 2010.

Kaminsky, a Mildred Cheshire Fraley distinguished professor and foundations program coordinator in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, and Reames, assistant professor and educational leadership program coordinator, are more than willing to do it all over again in June. Students who make the excursion, “International Experience: Australia,” will immerse themselves in Australia’s educational system and culture during a three-week stay. Last year, the trip included stops at the Northern Sydney Regional Central Office, the New South Wales Department of Education and Communities, public elementary and Aboriginal schools, an alternative school and the University of New South Wales. “There was not a single person who was not a happy camper,” Reames said. The latter statement is particularly impressive given the fact that the travel itinerary could include camping. Kaminsky, a lecturer at the University of New England in New South Wales, Australia, from 1974-89, enjoys taking his students on hikes in the Blue Mountains and introducing them to the splendor of the Sydney Opera House and Bondi Beach.

AJIN President Jung Ho Sea, Gyeongsangbuk-Do Province Superintendent of Education Yung-Woo Lee, Dean Betty Lou Whitford and Assistant Provost Andrew Gillespie

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15


JAY GOGUE ’69, ’71

President, Auburn University

Today’s Auburn students are more mobile and technologically savvy. They embrace digital learning tools that enhance student performance and deliver innovative content anywhere, anytime. U.S. News & World Report, in its first ranking of top online programs, rated Auburn highly, specifically naming courses in education and engineering to its honor roll. Using technology to improve educational outcomes at Auburn is nothing new, and we are always looking for ways to enhance our current practices. For example, Auburn is implementing a new web-based program, DegreeWorks, to help students stay on track with their individual academic plans. The program will also serve our academic advisors, giving them the ability to certify degrees, as well as benefitting this institution with improved retention and transfer recruitment. The program will assist students in “what if ” scenarios; a student in any major will now have the resources to check DegreeWorks to determine which additional courses would be required to change to a different major.

Liberal Arts graduate contributes ‘golden’ performance Liberal Arts graduate Octavia Spencer joined an elite group of Alabamians while earning an assortment of acting honors for her performance in “The Help.” Spencer, a Montgomery native, sparkled in her role as the sassy maid Minny Jackson. She earned an Oscar, a Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award for best supporting actress. She became the second Alabama-born actress to win an Academy Award and the first since Birmingham’s Louise Fletcher earned one in 1976 for her work in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

In the summer and fall of 2011, Auburn enrolled 181 new scholars, which is a 35 percent increase over last year’s number of 134. Auburn’s 181 National Merit Scholars are from 23 states and are enrolled in all of the university’s 10 undergraduate colleges and schools. Auburn also enrolled a record 45 National Achievement Scholars from 19 states, an 80 percent increase over last year. The students are enrolled in five of Auburn’s undergraduate colleges and schools. It is truly rewarding to realize that so many academically talented students recognize Auburn’s commitment to quality education, faculty, and programs and seek to become a part of our growing family. War Eagle!

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A little more than a year after helping the football team celebrate its first Bowl Championship Series national title, Aubie left his paw prints on another piece of championship hardware in January 2012. Aubie won the Universal Cheerleaders Association National Championship for an unprecedented seventh time during its competition in Orlando, Fla. “Aubie continues to set the example for the model mascot program in the country,” said Corey Edwards, director of the Office of Student Involvement. “The competition is based around the production of a skit. Although there are rules for the number and size of props being used as well as a strict time requirement, it is completely up in the air after that.” Aubie’s previous national championships were earned in 1991, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2003 and 2006. The

Continuing in the area of academics, I have a few other items I would like to bring to your attention. In the recently released 2010-2011 National Merit Scholarship Corporation Annual Report, Auburn ranked second nationally out of 145 public institutions in the enrollment of National Merit Scholars. Auburn is first in the Southeastern Conference among public institutions and second, behind Vanderbilt, among all Southeastern Conference institutions. Auburn ranked ninth overall out of the 359 institutions where these scholars are enrolled, with Chicago, USC, Harvard, Northwestern, Vanderbilt, Washington-St. Louis, Oklahoma and Yale ranked higher.

Aubie claims seventh national mascot championship whiskered wonder has finished second on five occasions and placed third three times. According to the Universal Cheerleaders Association website, categories the mascots could be judged on in the first round of scoring were overall character development, game situations, crowd involvement, cheer and band integration, community service, non-sporting events and the overall impression. Scoring well in these categories sent the mascots on to a second round. Aubie placed first in the video portion of the competition which sent him to Disney World to compete for the title. In the second round, Aubie competed against nine other mascots in his division. He was judged on categories such as crowd appeal and interaction, creativity, animation and enthusiasm, prop usage and, again, overall impression.

photos: Rebekah Noel

From the President

New trees recommended as replacements for poisoned oaks Octavia Spencer and Meryl Streep pose at the Governors Ball following the 84th Academy Awards. Associated Press

National Merit Scholars flocking to Auburn Auburn University is ranked second nationally out of 145 public institutions in the enrollment of National Merit Scholars, the university’s Office of Enrollment Services recently reported. The rankings are included in the recently released 2010-2011 National Merit Scholarship Corporation Annual Report. Auburn is first in the Southeastern Conference among public institutions and second, behind Vanderbilt, among all Southeastern Conference institutions. Auburn ranked ninth overall out of the 359 institutions where these scholars are enrolled, with Chicago, USC, Harvard, Northwestern, Vanderbilt, Washington-St. Louis, Oklahoma and Yale ranked higher. Only Oklahoma was ranked above Auburn among all public institutions.

Auburn University President Jay Gogue has accepted a committee’s recommendation that the poisoned Toomer’s Oaks be replaced with one or two large, live trees. The Future of Rolling Toomer’s Corner committee voted unanimously in January 2012 to suggest the oaks be replaced with large, live trees. The poisoned oaks are still living, but are expected to die. They will not be removed as long as they are living and are expected to be rolled for at least one more football season. The Toomer’s

Corner committee is considering possible alternatives to rolling Toomer’s Corner during the eventual transition process of replacing the oaks since it will take three to five years for new trees to successfully establish roots. Auburn University solicited fans and alumni for suggestions in December 2011 on what to do to preserve the game day tradition of celebrating victories at Toomer’s Corner.

It was discovered in late 2010 that the oaks were poisoned with Spike 80 DF after a caller using the name “Al from Dadeville” called into a nationally syndicated sports talk show and admitted to the crime. The university immediately set up a Trees Task Force to see if the popular landmark could be saved. Originally believed to be nearly 130 years old, the Toomer’s live oaks were recently judged to be around 70 years old after a group of Auburn faculty combed through photo archives. It is believed the oaks were planted no earlier than 1937. ON THE WEB: ocm.auburn.edu/news/oaks_updates.html

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17


JAY GOGUE ’69, ’71

President, Auburn University

Today’s Auburn students are more mobile and technologically savvy. They embrace digital learning tools that enhance student performance and deliver innovative content anywhere, anytime. U.S. News & World Report, in its first ranking of top online programs, rated Auburn highly, specifically naming courses in education and engineering to its honor roll. Using technology to improve educational outcomes at Auburn is nothing new, and we are always looking for ways to enhance our current practices. For example, Auburn is implementing a new web-based program, DegreeWorks, to help students stay on track with their individual academic plans. The program will also serve our academic advisors, giving them the ability to certify degrees, as well as benefitting this institution with improved retention and transfer recruitment. The program will assist students in “what if ” scenarios; a student in any major will now have the resources to check DegreeWorks to determine which additional courses would be required to change to a different major.

Liberal Arts graduate contributes ‘golden’ performance Liberal Arts graduate Octavia Spencer joined an elite group of Alabamians while earning an assortment of acting honors for her performance in “The Help.” Spencer, a Montgomery native, sparkled in her role as the sassy maid Minny Jackson. She earned an Oscar, a Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award for best supporting actress. She became the second Alabama-born actress to win an Academy Award and the first since Birmingham’s Louise Fletcher earned one in 1976 for her work in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

In the summer and fall of 2011, Auburn enrolled 181 new scholars, which is a 35 percent increase over last year’s number of 134. Auburn’s 181 National Merit Scholars are from 23 states and are enrolled in all of the university’s 10 undergraduate colleges and schools. Auburn also enrolled a record 45 National Achievement Scholars from 19 states, an 80 percent increase over last year. The students are enrolled in five of Auburn’s undergraduate colleges and schools. It is truly rewarding to realize that so many academically talented students recognize Auburn’s commitment to quality education, faculty, and programs and seek to become a part of our growing family. War Eagle!

16

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A little more than a year after helping the football team celebrate its first Bowl Championship Series national title, Aubie left his paw prints on another piece of championship hardware in January 2012. Aubie won the Universal Cheerleaders Association National Championship for an unprecedented seventh time during its competition in Orlando, Fla. “Aubie continues to set the example for the model mascot program in the country,” said Corey Edwards, director of the Office of Student Involvement. “The competition is based around the production of a skit. Although there are rules for the number and size of props being used as well as a strict time requirement, it is completely up in the air after that.” Aubie’s previous national championships were earned in 1991, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2003 and 2006. The

Continuing in the area of academics, I have a few other items I would like to bring to your attention. In the recently released 2010-2011 National Merit Scholarship Corporation Annual Report, Auburn ranked second nationally out of 145 public institutions in the enrollment of National Merit Scholars. Auburn is first in the Southeastern Conference among public institutions and second, behind Vanderbilt, among all Southeastern Conference institutions. Auburn ranked ninth overall out of the 359 institutions where these scholars are enrolled, with Chicago, USC, Harvard, Northwestern, Vanderbilt, Washington-St. Louis, Oklahoma and Yale ranked higher.

Aubie claims seventh national mascot championship whiskered wonder has finished second on five occasions and placed third three times. According to the Universal Cheerleaders Association website, categories the mascots could be judged on in the first round of scoring were overall character development, game situations, crowd involvement, cheer and band integration, community service, non-sporting events and the overall impression. Scoring well in these categories sent the mascots on to a second round. Aubie placed first in the video portion of the competition which sent him to Disney World to compete for the title. In the second round, Aubie competed against nine other mascots in his division. He was judged on categories such as crowd appeal and interaction, creativity, animation and enthusiasm, prop usage and, again, overall impression.

photos: Rebekah Noel

From the President

New trees recommended as replacements for poisoned oaks Octavia Spencer and Meryl Streep pose at the Governors Ball following the 84th Academy Awards. Associated Press

National Merit Scholars flocking to Auburn Auburn University is ranked second nationally out of 145 public institutions in the enrollment of National Merit Scholars, the university’s Office of Enrollment Services recently reported. The rankings are included in the recently released 2010-2011 National Merit Scholarship Corporation Annual Report. Auburn is first in the Southeastern Conference among public institutions and second, behind Vanderbilt, among all Southeastern Conference institutions. Auburn ranked ninth overall out of the 359 institutions where these scholars are enrolled, with Chicago, USC, Harvard, Northwestern, Vanderbilt, Washington-St. Louis, Oklahoma and Yale ranked higher. Only Oklahoma was ranked above Auburn among all public institutions.

Auburn University President Jay Gogue has accepted a committee’s recommendation that the poisoned Toomer’s Oaks be replaced with one or two large, live trees. The Future of Rolling Toomer’s Corner committee voted unanimously in January 2012 to suggest the oaks be replaced with large, live trees. The poisoned oaks are still living, but are expected to die. They will not be removed as long as they are living and are expected to be rolled for at least one more football season. The Toomer’s

Corner committee is considering possible alternatives to rolling Toomer’s Corner during the eventual transition process of replacing the oaks since it will take three to five years for new trees to successfully establish roots. Auburn University solicited fans and alumni for suggestions in December 2011 on what to do to preserve the game day tradition of celebrating victories at Toomer’s Corner.

It was discovered in late 2010 that the oaks were poisoned with Spike 80 DF after a caller using the name “Al from Dadeville” called into a nationally syndicated sports talk show and admitted to the crime. The university immediately set up a Trees Task Force to see if the popular landmark could be saved. Originally believed to be nearly 130 years old, the Toomer’s live oaks were recently judged to be around 70 years old after a group of Auburn faculty combed through photo archives. It is believed the oaks were planted no earlier than 1937. ON THE WEB: ocm.auburn.edu/news/oaks_updates.html

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s t u d e n t s u cc e s s

Auburn’s graduate athletic trainers help with tornado recovery

They walked through ravaged neighborhoods, checking on residents engaged in the long clean-up process, and witnessed uplifting scenes that were in stark contrast to their barren backdrop.

L

ess than a week after a tor-

nado cleaved a 1-mile-wide path of devastation through the middle of Tuscaloosa, Ala., in April 2011, Auburn University College of Education graduate students Stasia Burroughs, Michael Hickey, Amanda Pizzi and Eileen Strube found themselves at the intersection of heartache and healing. The four members of Auburn’s post-certification Warrior Athletic Training Program have worked in high-pressure situations and treated all manner of injuries. But even with their ample experience as emergency responders, they were still shocked by what they saw after driving from Auburn to Tuscaloosa to serve as Red Cross volunteers.

“The most powerful things we saw were in the people,” Burroughs said. even after having arisen at 2 a.m. and working their usual pre-sunrise shifts at Fort Benning. “Truthfully, it never occurred to me not to go and help others,” said Pizzi, a Galena, Ohio, native. “The nature of our job puts us in situations where we need to act fast, be in control and calm people down.”

They found themselves traveling through a landscape brutally reshaped by winds that peaked at nearly 190 mph. They rode through streets where houses had been flattened, where trees had been snapped like toothpicks, where neighborhoods were reduced to indistinguishable piles of rubble. They saw snapshots of lives interrupted — a child’s doll atop a pile of bricks and splintered wood; a house with only its living room intact, the family photos hanging undisturbed by the force of nature that roared down the street. They encountered people whose only worldly possessions consisted of the clothing on their backs. They met people who were thankful to simply be alive, like the elderly woman who crawled out from beneath the remains of her home or the 20-something man who walked away with a

18

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concussion and bruised collar bone despite being thrown from his house by the wind. “I grew up in Ohio where we have tornadoes, so I’ve seen a house here or there that was destroyed, but this was such a larger scale,’’ said Burroughs, a Kent, Ohio, native who completed a master’s degree in exercise science in May 2011. “The areas destroyed looked so ‘open’ because there are no buildings.” After Burroughs, Hickey, Pizzi and Strube saw the news footage of the destruction left by the tornado on April 27, they decided to head to Tuscaloosa the next day and contribute the skills they honed as members of the Department of Kinesiology’s Warrior Athletic Training Program. Students in the program work to treat and prevent injuries to soldiers in the U.S. Army’s 192d Infantry Brigade at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. As members of a service profession, athletic trainers are conditioned to care for anyone in need of assistance.

They didn’t hesitate to go to Tuscaloosa,

Pizzi, Burroughs and Strube spent a Thursday working at a community centerturned-Red Cross shelter. Hickey joined the group on the following Sunday in helping set up a medical clinic in a command center established in a shopping center parking lot, just off the corridor of destruction on University Boulevard. While the students volunteered their triage and medical skills, most of their first volunteer shift consisted of providing emotional comfort to the distraught, of displaying the “human touch’’ outlined in The Auburn Creed. They organized clothing for distribution, helped storm victims obtain supplies and played with children looking for a momentary escape. On their return trip, the students performed a variety of tasks, monitoring blood pressure, dressing wounds, treating concussions and providing tetanus shots. “I know I’m not an ER physician, or a trauma nurse, surgeon or paramedic,” said Hickey, a Green Bay, Wisc., native. “But I felt that if we could at least take smaller cases off of their hands, we would be making it easier on them.”

“Besides the obvious disbelief that a 30-second tornado could produce, I was moved by how upbeat the residents were,” added Pizzi. “Children were smiling and laughing as they were climbing over the fallen trees. Families were sitting outside with smiles on their faces because they had survived. Everyone was so appreciative of the simple act of asking how they were, and so many people came together to help.” The outpouring continued, from Auburn University’s own relief efforts to the Toomer’s for Tuscaloosa Facebook group. Based on what the Auburn students experienced, the residents of Tuscaloosa are resilient and full of resolve. “At times, you lost sight of who was there helping and who was from there, because so many people from there were helping each other,” Hickey said.

American Kinesiology Association honors Auburn students Three Department of Kinesiology students and one recent graduate earned awards from the American Kinesiology Association in 2011. Meredith Bailey, a senior health promotion major, earned the AKA National Undergraduate Scholar award. Bailey, who plans to pursue a career in physical therapy, was also one of 13 Auburn University students to receive the President’s Award. Mary Sandage, a doctoral candidate, and Jared Rehm, a doctoral candidate in exercise science, were named the AKA National Graduate Scholar. In 2010, Sandage received one of Auburn University’s Outstanding Graduate Student Awards and also received the G. Dennis Wilson Endowed Graduate Award in the Department of Kinesiology. She also earned a competitive postdoctoral fellowship grant from the National Institute of Health for her study of clinical treatment for voice disorders. Rehm has worked to develop wheelchair sports opportunities for Auburn University students through an assistantship with the Office of Accessbility.

It is the sort of ethos that guides Burroughs, Hickey, Pizzi, Strube and their colleagues on a daily basis. “We live to help people,” Burroughs said. “It’s exactly who we are.”

Gordon Fisher ’09, who earned a doctorate in exercise physiology from Auburn, earned the AKA Student Writing Award. Fisher earned a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Alabama-Birmingham.

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s t u d e n t s u cc e s s

Auburn’s graduate athletic trainers help with tornado recovery

They walked through ravaged neighborhoods, checking on residents engaged in the long clean-up process, and witnessed uplifting scenes that were in stark contrast to their barren backdrop.

L

ess than a week after a tor-

nado cleaved a 1-mile-wide path of devastation through the middle of Tuscaloosa, Ala., in April 2011, Auburn University College of Education graduate students Stasia Burroughs, Michael Hickey, Amanda Pizzi and Eileen Strube found themselves at the intersection of heartache and healing. The four members of Auburn’s post-certification Warrior Athletic Training Program have worked in high-pressure situations and treated all manner of injuries. But even with their ample experience as emergency responders, they were still shocked by what they saw after driving from Auburn to Tuscaloosa to serve as Red Cross volunteers.

“The most powerful things we saw were in the people,” Burroughs said. even after having arisen at 2 a.m. and working their usual pre-sunrise shifts at Fort Benning. “Truthfully, it never occurred to me not to go and help others,” said Pizzi, a Galena, Ohio, native. “The nature of our job puts us in situations where we need to act fast, be in control and calm people down.”

They found themselves traveling through a landscape brutally reshaped by winds that peaked at nearly 190 mph. They rode through streets where houses had been flattened, where trees had been snapped like toothpicks, where neighborhoods were reduced to indistinguishable piles of rubble. They saw snapshots of lives interrupted — a child’s doll atop a pile of bricks and splintered wood; a house with only its living room intact, the family photos hanging undisturbed by the force of nature that roared down the street. They encountered people whose only worldly possessions consisted of the clothing on their backs. They met people who were thankful to simply be alive, like the elderly woman who crawled out from beneath the remains of her home or the 20-something man who walked away with a

18

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Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

concussion and bruised collar bone despite being thrown from his house by the wind. “I grew up in Ohio where we have tornadoes, so I’ve seen a house here or there that was destroyed, but this was such a larger scale,’’ said Burroughs, a Kent, Ohio, native who completed a master’s degree in exercise science in May 2011. “The areas destroyed looked so ‘open’ because there are no buildings.” After Burroughs, Hickey, Pizzi and Strube saw the news footage of the destruction left by the tornado on April 27, they decided to head to Tuscaloosa the next day and contribute the skills they honed as members of the Department of Kinesiology’s Warrior Athletic Training Program. Students in the program work to treat and prevent injuries to soldiers in the U.S. Army’s 192d Infantry Brigade at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. As members of a service profession, athletic trainers are conditioned to care for anyone in need of assistance.

They didn’t hesitate to go to Tuscaloosa,

Pizzi, Burroughs and Strube spent a Thursday working at a community centerturned-Red Cross shelter. Hickey joined the group on the following Sunday in helping set up a medical clinic in a command center established in a shopping center parking lot, just off the corridor of destruction on University Boulevard. While the students volunteered their triage and medical skills, most of their first volunteer shift consisted of providing emotional comfort to the distraught, of displaying the “human touch’’ outlined in The Auburn Creed. They organized clothing for distribution, helped storm victims obtain supplies and played with children looking for a momentary escape. On their return trip, the students performed a variety of tasks, monitoring blood pressure, dressing wounds, treating concussions and providing tetanus shots. “I know I’m not an ER physician, or a trauma nurse, surgeon or paramedic,” said Hickey, a Green Bay, Wisc., native. “But I felt that if we could at least take smaller cases off of their hands, we would be making it easier on them.”

“Besides the obvious disbelief that a 30-second tornado could produce, I was moved by how upbeat the residents were,” added Pizzi. “Children were smiling and laughing as they were climbing over the fallen trees. Families were sitting outside with smiles on their faces because they had survived. Everyone was so appreciative of the simple act of asking how they were, and so many people came together to help.” The outpouring continued, from Auburn University’s own relief efforts to the Toomer’s for Tuscaloosa Facebook group. Based on what the Auburn students experienced, the residents of Tuscaloosa are resilient and full of resolve. “At times, you lost sight of who was there helping and who was from there, because so many people from there were helping each other,” Hickey said.

American Kinesiology Association honors Auburn students Three Department of Kinesiology students and one recent graduate earned awards from the American Kinesiology Association in 2011. Meredith Bailey, a senior health promotion major, earned the AKA National Undergraduate Scholar award. Bailey, who plans to pursue a career in physical therapy, was also one of 13 Auburn University students to receive the President’s Award. Mary Sandage, a doctoral candidate, and Jared Rehm, a doctoral candidate in exercise science, were named the AKA National Graduate Scholar. In 2010, Sandage received one of Auburn University’s Outstanding Graduate Student Awards and also received the G. Dennis Wilson Endowed Graduate Award in the Department of Kinesiology. She also earned a competitive postdoctoral fellowship grant from the National Institute of Health for her study of clinical treatment for voice disorders. Rehm has worked to develop wheelchair sports opportunities for Auburn University students through an assistantship with the Office of Accessbility.

It is the sort of ethos that guides Burroughs, Hickey, Pizzi, Strube and their colleagues on a daily basis. “We live to help people,” Burroughs said. “It’s exactly who we are.”

Gordon Fisher ’09, who earned a doctorate in exercise physiology from Auburn, earned the AKA Student Writing Award. Fisher earned a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Alabama-Birmingham.

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19


s t u d e n t s u cc e s s

Hyon “John” Park, a graduate student in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching, aspires to be the sort of science teacher who changes the lives of his students. He’s well on his way to achieving his goal after earning the Robert Noyce Scholarship for science and math teachers. Auburn University’s Noyce Scholarship Program provides support for undergraduate and graduate students from science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) backgrounds who are interested in becoming K-12 mathematics and science teachers. The Noyce program is supported by the National Science Foundation and named after the co-founder of Intel. “I am very grateful to have been selected for this award,” said Park, who was selected through a highly competitive screening process. Park, a Fort Myers, Fla., native, expects to complete a master’s degree in science education in fall 2012. Noyce Scholarship recipients must commit to teaching science or mathematics for two years in a critical needs school – a school that has a high attrition rate for science and math teachers or that has a significant number of students on the reduced or free lunch program. Park said he looks forward to teaching chemistry or physics after graduation. “My career ambition is to become a science teacher either at the middle or high school level,” Park said. “I would like to devote my career in becoming the best teacher I can be in helping students learn science and in helping them succeed for the future.”

20

Keystone

Grad student helps bring wheelchair basketball tourney to campus

Phi Kappa Phi recognizes 60 students for excellence Phi Kappa Phi welcomed 60 College of Education students to its ranks in 2011.

Jared Rehm played for the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater’s wheelchair basketball team during his days as an undergraduate student. Since arriving at Auburn for graduate school, the exercise science doctoral candidate has done his part to ensure that the sport gains momentum on this campus.

Founded in 1897, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest, largest and most selective multi-disciplinary honor society. Memberships are extended by invitation-only to the top 5 percent of graduating seniors and graduate students and the top 7.5 percent of juniors. Faculty,

Rehm and Nathan Waters, a disability specialist in Auburn’s Office of Accessibility who earned a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from the college, have played a pivotal role in growing Auburn University’s Adaptive Recreation and Sports Program. The duo helped bring the first-ever Auburn Wheelchair Basketball Invitational to life in March 2012. The tournament, co-hosted by the Office of Accessibility and the Department of Kinesiology, featured three games at Auburn Arena.

J u niors photo: Holly Thornton

Park earns Noyce Scholarship

ON THE WEB: Learn more about Auburn University’s adaptive sports program at www.auburn.edu/adaptivesports

Two doctoral candidates named Clark Scholars Two doctoral candidates in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology — Maysaa Barakat and Christie Broom — were recognized as David L. Clark Scholars by the University Council for Educational Administration. The selection process is highly competitive and includes doctoral students from universities in the United States, Canada and beyond. The Clark Scholars program recognizes outstanding doctoral candidates in educational leadership programs who are interested in pursuing research-intensive careers. Barakat, who

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

earned a master’s degree in administration of supervision and curriculum from Auburn in 2010, has focused her doctoral work on principal preparation programs and cultural competence preparation. Broom, a science teacher at Alexander City Middle School, is working on a doctorate in educational leadership and technology. Her dissertation will focus on teacher-student relationship quality with an emphasis on the trust level between ADD/ADHD students and their teachers.

Kathryn C. Albright Matthew C. Cameron Jake W. Carzoli Emily A. Crane Kaitlyn Crow Abigail L. Cutchen Gloria Fuller Lydia M. Hinshaw Sarah A. Houghton Ashley N. Hurst Alexandra J. Lancaster Cassidy A. Lewis Laura M. McLean Rachel L. Miller Kasey M. Norton Lauren Owens Kristina M. Passi Kelly K. Rainer Angelyn R. Traylor Jaclyn M. Waitz Mary Kathryn Wheeler

Pi Lambda Theta awards grant to Kinesiology doctoral student

staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction may also qualify. The Auburn University chapter was established in 1914 and initiates more than 400 students annually. Phi Kappa Phi promotes the pursuit of excellence in all fields of higher education, recognizes outstanding achievement by students, faculty and others through various awards and engages the community of scholars in service to others.

Stephanie M. Williams Kristen Woods

Amanda K. Talley Sarah M. Taylor G ra duate S tu dent s

SENI OR S Michelle E. Abernathy Cameron L. Barnes Maranda A. Brown Britney T. Cain Jessica L. Chrabaszcz Jennifer L. Dutton Erin R. Edwards TaSheika R. Gibbs Nia L. Glaze Heidi T. Goertzen Kacey E. Orred Grand Rebekah A. Griffin Lindsay A. Jones Carl Morgan Lenz Julia E. Lightsey Amanda R. Pizzi Betty J. Schiffer Victorie N. Smith

Rachel H. Baker James R. Beitzel Ashley M. Boothe Kristy M. Butler Ian R. Campbell Kenneth E. Games Cam A. Hamilton Theresa Jones Neil G. Kelly Kayleigh E. Lacava Adrienne J. Mills Denise S. Peppers Kristin D. Phillips Shelley B. Searcy Danielle J. Smith Katherine L. Taylor Lisa A. Williams-Gallacher

Education students named to Who’s Who recognition list Eight College of Education students were among the Auburn undergraduate and graduate students recommended by the Dean of Students office for inclusion in the 2011-2012 edition of Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities. Nominations are made by institutions based on such factors as grade point average, leadership and participation in campus and community activities.

Rebekah Beason Senior, Early Childhood Education

Caitlin Howell Junior, English Language Arts Education

Vanessa Dantin Senior Exercise Science

Shannon O’Kelley Senior Health Promotion

Michel Fields Junior Elementary Education

Allison Pendleton Junior, Early Childhood Education

Ragan Hart Senior Exercise Science

Kylie R. Shields Senior Health Promotion

Pi Lambda Theta, an international education honor society and professional association, awarded a research grant to Kinesiology doctoral candidate Sam Logan in 2011. Logan earned a $2,487 grant in support of his project studying the effects of physical education instructional climates on elementary school students’ physical activity and motor skill learning. “Essentially, most physical activity interventions have only focused on increasing physical activity levels during the intervention setting – in the classroom or during physical education class,” said Logan, whose research focuses on exercise science. “The purpose of this study is to provide an intervention that is grounded in motivation theory and increases children’s motivation to participate in physical activity not only during the intervention, but also outside of the school setting.” Logan, a native of North East, Md., serves as a Student Ambassador for the College of Education.

Gessner selected for master class Harris Gessner, a senior vocal music education major, earned an invitation to help conduct a master class for the 2012 American Choral Directors Association Southern Division conference in February. The conference was held in Winston-Salem, N.C. Gessner was one of three undergraduate students who worked with nationallyrenowned conductor Hilary Apfelstadt and the ACDA Southern Division Collegiate Honor Choir. The ACDA southern division draws members from 11 states.

Keystone

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s t u d e n t s u cc e s s

Hyon “John” Park, a graduate student in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching, aspires to be the sort of science teacher who changes the lives of his students. He’s well on his way to achieving his goal after earning the Robert Noyce Scholarship for science and math teachers. Auburn University’s Noyce Scholarship Program provides support for undergraduate and graduate students from science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) backgrounds who are interested in becoming K-12 mathematics and science teachers. The Noyce program is supported by the National Science Foundation and named after the co-founder of Intel. “I am very grateful to have been selected for this award,” said Park, who was selected through a highly competitive screening process. Park, a Fort Myers, Fla., native, expects to complete a master’s degree in science education in fall 2012. Noyce Scholarship recipients must commit to teaching science or mathematics for two years in a critical needs school – a school that has a high attrition rate for science and math teachers or that has a significant number of students on the reduced or free lunch program. Park said he looks forward to teaching chemistry or physics after graduation. “My career ambition is to become a science teacher either at the middle or high school level,” Park said. “I would like to devote my career in becoming the best teacher I can be in helping students learn science and in helping them succeed for the future.”

20

Keystone

Grad student helps bring wheelchair basketball tourney to campus

Phi Kappa Phi recognizes 60 students for excellence Phi Kappa Phi welcomed 60 College of Education students to its ranks in 2011.

Jared Rehm played for the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater’s wheelchair basketball team during his days as an undergraduate student. Since arriving at Auburn for graduate school, the exercise science doctoral candidate has done his part to ensure that the sport gains momentum on this campus.

Founded in 1897, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest, largest and most selective multi-disciplinary honor society. Memberships are extended by invitation-only to the top 5 percent of graduating seniors and graduate students and the top 7.5 percent of juniors. Faculty,

Rehm and Nathan Waters, a disability specialist in Auburn’s Office of Accessibility who earned a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from the college, have played a pivotal role in growing Auburn University’s Adaptive Recreation and Sports Program. The duo helped bring the first-ever Auburn Wheelchair Basketball Invitational to life in March 2012. The tournament, co-hosted by the Office of Accessibility and the Department of Kinesiology, featured three games at Auburn Arena.

J u niors photo: Holly Thornton

Park earns Noyce Scholarship

ON THE WEB: Learn more about Auburn University’s adaptive sports program at www.auburn.edu/adaptivesports

Two doctoral candidates named Clark Scholars Two doctoral candidates in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology — Maysaa Barakat and Christie Broom — were recognized as David L. Clark Scholars by the University Council for Educational Administration. The selection process is highly competitive and includes doctoral students from universities in the United States, Canada and beyond. The Clark Scholars program recognizes outstanding doctoral candidates in educational leadership programs who are interested in pursuing research-intensive careers. Barakat, who

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

earned a master’s degree in administration of supervision and curriculum from Auburn in 2010, has focused her doctoral work on principal preparation programs and cultural competence preparation. Broom, a science teacher at Alexander City Middle School, is working on a doctorate in educational leadership and technology. Her dissertation will focus on teacher-student relationship quality with an emphasis on the trust level between ADD/ADHD students and their teachers.

Kathryn C. Albright Matthew C. Cameron Jake W. Carzoli Emily A. Crane Kaitlyn Crow Abigail L. Cutchen Gloria Fuller Lydia M. Hinshaw Sarah A. Houghton Ashley N. Hurst Alexandra J. Lancaster Cassidy A. Lewis Laura M. McLean Rachel L. Miller Kasey M. Norton Lauren Owens Kristina M. Passi Kelly K. Rainer Angelyn R. Traylor Jaclyn M. Waitz Mary Kathryn Wheeler

Pi Lambda Theta awards grant to Kinesiology doctoral student

staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction may also qualify. The Auburn University chapter was established in 1914 and initiates more than 400 students annually. Phi Kappa Phi promotes the pursuit of excellence in all fields of higher education, recognizes outstanding achievement by students, faculty and others through various awards and engages the community of scholars in service to others.

Stephanie M. Williams Kristen Woods

Amanda K. Talley Sarah M. Taylor G ra duate S tu dent s

SENI OR S Michelle E. Abernathy Cameron L. Barnes Maranda A. Brown Britney T. Cain Jessica L. Chrabaszcz Jennifer L. Dutton Erin R. Edwards TaSheika R. Gibbs Nia L. Glaze Heidi T. Goertzen Kacey E. Orred Grand Rebekah A. Griffin Lindsay A. Jones Carl Morgan Lenz Julia E. Lightsey Amanda R. Pizzi Betty J. Schiffer Victorie N. Smith

Rachel H. Baker James R. Beitzel Ashley M. Boothe Kristy M. Butler Ian R. Campbell Kenneth E. Games Cam A. Hamilton Theresa Jones Neil G. Kelly Kayleigh E. Lacava Adrienne J. Mills Denise S. Peppers Kristin D. Phillips Shelley B. Searcy Danielle J. Smith Katherine L. Taylor Lisa A. Williams-Gallacher

Education students named to Who’s Who recognition list Eight College of Education students were among the Auburn undergraduate and graduate students recommended by the Dean of Students office for inclusion in the 2011-2012 edition of Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities. Nominations are made by institutions based on such factors as grade point average, leadership and participation in campus and community activities.

Rebekah Beason Senior, Early Childhood Education

Caitlin Howell Junior, English Language Arts Education

Vanessa Dantin Senior Exercise Science

Shannon O’Kelley Senior Health Promotion

Michel Fields Junior Elementary Education

Allison Pendleton Junior, Early Childhood Education

Ragan Hart Senior Exercise Science

Kylie R. Shields Senior Health Promotion

Pi Lambda Theta, an international education honor society and professional association, awarded a research grant to Kinesiology doctoral candidate Sam Logan in 2011. Logan earned a $2,487 grant in support of his project studying the effects of physical education instructional climates on elementary school students’ physical activity and motor skill learning. “Essentially, most physical activity interventions have only focused on increasing physical activity levels during the intervention setting – in the classroom or during physical education class,” said Logan, whose research focuses on exercise science. “The purpose of this study is to provide an intervention that is grounded in motivation theory and increases children’s motivation to participate in physical activity not only during the intervention, but also outside of the school setting.” Logan, a native of North East, Md., serves as a Student Ambassador for the College of Education.

Gessner selected for master class Harris Gessner, a senior vocal music education major, earned an invitation to help conduct a master class for the 2012 American Choral Directors Association Southern Division conference in February. The conference was held in Winston-Salem, N.C. Gessner was one of three undergraduate students who worked with nationallyrenowned conductor Hilary Apfelstadt and the ACDA Southern Division Collegiate Honor Choir. The ACDA southern division draws members from 11 states.

Keystone

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s t u d e n t s u cc e s s

Student marshals known for overall excellence Each semester, college administrators select a student to carry the College of Education banner ahead of their graduating peers at the start of commencement ceremonies. Here’s a look at the students who earned the honor in 2011:

A M A N D A “ M A N DY ” ENN I S ’ 11 Ennis, a secondary chemistry education major from Tallassee, Ala., graduated in fall 2011. In addition to being a member of the Honors College, she participated in undergraduate research and earned the American Chemical Society Hach Foundation Scholarship for Chemistry Education. Ennis served in various leadership roles with Phi Sigma Pi national honors fraternity, chairing the Big Brother/Little Brother committee and the Alumni Relations committee.

J E R EMY C O A N ’ 11 Coan, an agriscience education major from Leighton, Ala., graduated in summer 2011 and accepted a position as an eighth grade agriscience teacher at Smiths Station Junior High School. During his time at Auburn, Coan was involved with the collegiate Future Farmers of America (FFA) program and was a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Tau Sigma, an honor society for transfer students.

B ETTY J E A NE S C H I F F E R ’ 11 Schiffer, a collaborative special education major from Opelika, Ala., graduated in spring 2011. She served as a therapeutic campus counselor for Auburn Parks and Recreation and was a member of Tau Sigma. She was also a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars and the Dean’s List. Her future goals include completing a master’s degree in collaborative special education, with an emphasis on transition, and eventually pursuing a doctorate in special education.

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Hart earns President’s Award Ragan Hart, a senior exercise science major, has been selected as the College of Education recipient for the President’s Award. The award recognizes one graduate student in each Auburn University school or college who has completed at least three semesters at Auburn with a minimum grade point average of 3.4 and who possesses outstanding qualities of leadership, citizenship, character and professional ability.

College of Veterinary Medicine, where she participates in genetics research delving into the effects of niacin on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) to better understand inflammatory effects contributing to insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. “I have a particular interest in better understanding complex diseases by delving deeper into the roots and determinants of obesity-related diseases, particularly Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and accompanying health issues,” said, Hart, a native of Cologne, Va.

Hart will be recognized at the annual President’s Luncheon in April. In addition to receiving the President’s Award, Hart also earned a $1,000 scholarship from The James W. Samford, Jr. Foundation.

Hart also serves as student associate editor for the Auburn Journal of Undergraduate Scholarship. She also engages in community volunteer work through the Jean Dean Reading is Fundamental distribution center in Opelika.

Hart has been actively involved in undergraduate research and also serves as a College of Education Student Ambassador. She currently works in the university’s

After completing her bachelor’s degree, Hart plans to pursue graduate studies in genetic epidemiology and contribute to the field of public health genetics.

CATTS Program preparing transition specialists Addie Littrell has contemplated a professional future that includes counseling children in hospitals, but her involvement as a student in the Collaborative Approach to Training Transition Specialists (CATTS) Program has unveiled an assortment of possibilities. “This has definitely given me a new perspective as far as research,” said Littrell, a 2009 human sciences graduate from Decatur, Ala., and first-year CATTS Scholar. “I appreciate it more and realize the importance of it. I want to teach, but have thought about coming back at a later date for a doctorate.”

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

The CATTS Program exposes master’s students to research-based practices that help young people with disabilities achieve their goals relative to employment, education, recreation and daily living. Christina Adams, CATTS Program manager and doctoral candidate, said scholars benefit from field-based projects, as well as practica and internship experiences that allow them to work with students with disabilities as well as local education agencies. CATTS Scholars hosted a Community Transition Expo in October 2011 that brought more than 300 area students to the Auburn University campus.

Student Council promotes camaraderie, outreach In addition to being governed by students, the College of Education Student Council encourages them to become involved in college activities. The organization creates connections between students and the College of Education, promotes membership with all student organizations within the college and works on creating new and improving existing outreach and service projects.

Derzis earns ACCESS Award

During the 2011-12 academic year, the group has worked to raise money to send third-graders from Loachapoka Elementary School to Disney World. ON THE WEB: Learn more about the College of Education’s Student Council at education.auburn.edu/studentcouncil

Auburn University’s Office of Accessbility honored graduate student Nick Derzis with one of its 2011 ACCESS Awards. Derzis is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling. He earned his master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from Auburn. The ACCESS Awards are presented to faculty and staff members who “go above and beyond” to assist Auburn students with disabilities. Candidates for the awards are nominated by students.

Bradford, Washington earn professional distinctions Dori Dobbs President Senior, English Language Arts Education

Kristen Ferrell Assistant Activites Chair Senior, English Language Arts Education

Martha Emanuel Assistant Service Project Chair Junior, Early Childhood Education

Nicole Lawyer Vice President Junior Elementary Education

Kasey Kaschak Assistant Activites Chair Senior, Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Kate Patrick Assistant Service Project Chair Sophomore Pre-Elementary Education

Brittney Holmes Secretary Senior Mathematics Education

Morgan Deason Publicity Chair Junior Elementary Education

Tawana Fuller Camp War Eagle Senior Pre-Early Childhood Education

Lucy Mosley Activites Chair Senior, English Lanuage Arts Education

Sydney Miller Service Project Chair Senior, English Language Arts Education

Sarah Card War on Hunger Representative Junior Pre-Early Childhood Education

Two doctoral candidates in the administration of supervision and curriculum program in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology have recently earned professional honors. Quebe Bradford recently earned 2012 Teacher of the Year honors from Montgomery Public Schools. Bradford teaches ninth grade English/Language Arts at Jeff Davis High School. She recently published the teen fiction novel “In the Absence of My Father,” which was included on the 2011 holiday must-reads list by the Montgomery City-County Library. Kimberly Washington, the principal at Jackson-Steele Elementary School in Lowndes County, shared in the Points of Light Award presented to her school by the Blue Ribbon School Commission and also earned WSFA TV’s “Making a Difference Award.”

Keystone

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23


s t u d e n t s u cc e s s

Student marshals known for overall excellence Each semester, college administrators select a student to carry the College of Education banner ahead of their graduating peers at the start of commencement ceremonies. Here’s a look at the students who earned the honor in 2011:

A M A N D A “ M A N DY ” ENN I S ’ 11 Ennis, a secondary chemistry education major from Tallassee, Ala., graduated in fall 2011. In addition to being a member of the Honors College, she participated in undergraduate research and earned the American Chemical Society Hach Foundation Scholarship for Chemistry Education. Ennis served in various leadership roles with Phi Sigma Pi national honors fraternity, chairing the Big Brother/Little Brother committee and the Alumni Relations committee.

J E R EMY C O A N ’ 11 Coan, an agriscience education major from Leighton, Ala., graduated in summer 2011 and accepted a position as an eighth grade agriscience teacher at Smiths Station Junior High School. During his time at Auburn, Coan was involved with the collegiate Future Farmers of America (FFA) program and was a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Tau Sigma, an honor society for transfer students.

B ETTY J E A NE S C H I F F E R ’ 11 Schiffer, a collaborative special education major from Opelika, Ala., graduated in spring 2011. She served as a therapeutic campus counselor for Auburn Parks and Recreation and was a member of Tau Sigma. She was also a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars and the Dean’s List. Her future goals include completing a master’s degree in collaborative special education, with an emphasis on transition, and eventually pursuing a doctorate in special education.

22

Keystone

Hart earns President’s Award Ragan Hart, a senior exercise science major, has been selected as the College of Education recipient for the President’s Award. The award recognizes one graduate student in each Auburn University school or college who has completed at least three semesters at Auburn with a minimum grade point average of 3.4 and who possesses outstanding qualities of leadership, citizenship, character and professional ability.

College of Veterinary Medicine, where she participates in genetics research delving into the effects of niacin on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) to better understand inflammatory effects contributing to insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. “I have a particular interest in better understanding complex diseases by delving deeper into the roots and determinants of obesity-related diseases, particularly Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and accompanying health issues,” said, Hart, a native of Cologne, Va.

Hart will be recognized at the annual President’s Luncheon in April. In addition to receiving the President’s Award, Hart also earned a $1,000 scholarship from The James W. Samford, Jr. Foundation.

Hart also serves as student associate editor for the Auburn Journal of Undergraduate Scholarship. She also engages in community volunteer work through the Jean Dean Reading is Fundamental distribution center in Opelika.

Hart has been actively involved in undergraduate research and also serves as a College of Education Student Ambassador. She currently works in the university’s

After completing her bachelor’s degree, Hart plans to pursue graduate studies in genetic epidemiology and contribute to the field of public health genetics.

CATTS Program preparing transition specialists Addie Littrell has contemplated a professional future that includes counseling children in hospitals, but her involvement as a student in the Collaborative Approach to Training Transition Specialists (CATTS) Program has unveiled an assortment of possibilities. “This has definitely given me a new perspective as far as research,” said Littrell, a 2009 human sciences graduate from Decatur, Ala., and first-year CATTS Scholar. “I appreciate it more and realize the importance of it. I want to teach, but have thought about coming back at a later date for a doctorate.”

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

The CATTS Program exposes master’s students to research-based practices that help young people with disabilities achieve their goals relative to employment, education, recreation and daily living. Christina Adams, CATTS Program manager and doctoral candidate, said scholars benefit from field-based projects, as well as practica and internship experiences that allow them to work with students with disabilities as well as local education agencies. CATTS Scholars hosted a Community Transition Expo in October 2011 that brought more than 300 area students to the Auburn University campus.

Student Council promotes camaraderie, outreach In addition to being governed by students, the College of Education Student Council encourages them to become involved in college activities. The organization creates connections between students and the College of Education, promotes membership with all student organizations within the college and works on creating new and improving existing outreach and service projects.

Derzis earns ACCESS Award

During the 2011-12 academic year, the group has worked to raise money to send third-graders from Loachapoka Elementary School to Disney World. ON THE WEB: Learn more about the College of Education’s Student Council at education.auburn.edu/studentcouncil

Auburn University’s Office of Accessbility honored graduate student Nick Derzis with one of its 2011 ACCESS Awards. Derzis is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling. He earned his master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from Auburn. The ACCESS Awards are presented to faculty and staff members who “go above and beyond” to assist Auburn students with disabilities. Candidates for the awards are nominated by students.

Bradford, Washington earn professional distinctions Dori Dobbs President Senior, English Language Arts Education

Kristen Ferrell Assistant Activites Chair Senior, English Language Arts Education

Martha Emanuel Assistant Service Project Chair Junior, Early Childhood Education

Nicole Lawyer Vice President Junior Elementary Education

Kasey Kaschak Assistant Activites Chair Senior, Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Kate Patrick Assistant Service Project Chair Sophomore Pre-Elementary Education

Brittney Holmes Secretary Senior Mathematics Education

Morgan Deason Publicity Chair Junior Elementary Education

Tawana Fuller Camp War Eagle Senior Pre-Early Childhood Education

Lucy Mosley Activites Chair Senior, English Lanuage Arts Education

Sydney Miller Service Project Chair Senior, English Language Arts Education

Sarah Card War on Hunger Representative Junior Pre-Early Childhood Education

Two doctoral candidates in the administration of supervision and curriculum program in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology have recently earned professional honors. Quebe Bradford recently earned 2012 Teacher of the Year honors from Montgomery Public Schools. Bradford teaches ninth grade English/Language Arts at Jeff Davis High School. She recently published the teen fiction novel “In the Absence of My Father,” which was included on the 2011 holiday must-reads list by the Montgomery City-County Library. Kimberly Washington, the principal at Jackson-Steele Elementary School in Lowndes County, shared in the Points of Light Award presented to her school by the Blue Ribbon School Commission and also earned WSFA TV’s “Making a Difference Award.”

Keystone

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s t u d e n t A m ba s s ad o r s

Getting to know the

Ambassadors 1 What are some of your long-term goals?

1

2

4

“I would like to pursue a master’s degree, and become a middle school or high school special education teacher, and I also have a strong interest in coaching football, having volunteered with the Boaz Middle School football program.” Matt Pendergrass Junior, Boaz, Ala. Collaborative Teacher Special Education

2 Why did you choose to attend Auburn? “I was offered an academic scholarship, and although the University of Georgia was closer to home and my first consideration, the decision to attend Auburn because of the scholarship is one that I am very happy that I made, and I have no regrets! ”

3 6 5

Caitlin Sheridan Sophomore, Roswell, Ga. Secondary English Education

The Student Ambassadors help represent the college, serving as hosts and hostesses to alumni, donors, prospective students and other guests. The 2011-2012 ambassadors are led by president Mary Kathryn Wheeler, a junior elementary education major. Here’s a closer look at some of the members:

24

Keystone

3 What do you see as some of the challenges or obstacles within school systems? “I believe one challenge is that children need more positive male role models, particularly in underserved and depressed populations. My research focus going forward in my career will be on elementary aged kids, and younger.” Sam Logan Doctoral candidate, North East, Md. Kinesiology/Exercise Science

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

4 What distinguishes the College of Education from others in the Southeast? “The math education program at Auburn is fantastic. The instruction is thorough, and I have learned very effective ways to teach math.”

Amanda Bearden Senior, Elementary Education Pelham, Ala.

Rebekah Beason Senior, Early Childhood Education Russellville, Ala.

Mary Haley Byrne Junior, Early Childhood Education Mountain Brook, Ala.

Hilary Collins Sophomore, English Language Arts Education Alpharetta, Ga.

Bradley Cox Senior Agriscience Education Arab, Ala.

Emily Crane Senior Elementary Education Franklin, Tenn.

Abigail Cutchen Senior Elementary Education Birmingham, Ala

Trishia Daniel Sophomore Elementary Education Alpharetta, Ga.

Catherine Edwards Sophomore, Elementary Education Birmingham, Ala.

Michel Fields Junior Elementary Education Hartselle, Ala.

Rachel Glenn Junior Music Education Hillsboro, Ala.

Chelsey Greene Junior Elementary Education Wedowee, Ala.

Kimberly Hardin Doctoral student Collaborative Teacher Special Education Mobile, Ala

Ragan Hart Senior Exercise Science Cologne, Va.

Sarah Houghton Senior Elementary Education Alpharetta, Ga.

Hadley Hyche Sophomore Spanish Education Montgomery, Ala.

Mollie Kindahl Senior Elementary Education Florence, Ala.

Sam Logan Doctoral student Exercise Science North East, Md.

Ashley Loyd Junior, English Language Arts Education Loganville, Ga.

Laura McLean Lucy Mosley Senior Senior, English Language Elementary Education Arts Education Montevallo, Ala. Daphne, Ala.

Rebecca Oswell Senior Special Education Birmingham, Ala.

Matt Pendergrass Junior, Collaborative Teacher Special Education Boaz, Ala.

Meg Reaves Senior Elementary Education Guntersville, Ala.

Susie Rutherford Junior Mathematics Education Auburn, Ala.

Caitlin Sheridan Sophomore, English Language Arts Education Roswell, Ga.

Brittany Smith Senior Elementary Education Dothan, Ala.

Susie Rutherford Senior, Auburn, Ala. Secondary Math Education

5 How important are scholarship opportunities created by donors? “It helps my parents out a great deal. College of Education scholarships are great and go above and beyond the general University scholarships. Having the support from the specific college helps students like myself to stay motivated, and gives them incentive to continue their pursuit of becoming an educator. ” Mary Kathryn Wheeler Junior, Phenix City, Ala. Elementary Education

Caitlin Steeb Junior Elementary Education Walnut Creek, Ca.

6 What are some of your future plans? “After finishing my Ph.D. here at Auburn in educational psychology, I would like to teach somewhere at the college level. I have an open mind as to where I will go, but am happy to be here at Auburn finishing up my post-graduate studies.” Kimberly Hardin Doctoral Student, Mobile, Ala. Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Learn more about the college’s Student Ambassadors at: education.auburn.edu/ambassadors Allison Thomas Sophomore Mathematics Education Birmingham, Ala.

Vishaka Uluwita Master’s student Collaborative Teacher Special Education Tuskegee, Ala.

Trent Wells Junior Agricscience Education Jasper, Ala.

Mary Kathryn Wheeler President Junior Elementary Education Phenix City, Ala.

Keystone

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s t u d e n t A m ba s s ad o r s

Getting to know the

Ambassadors 1 What are some of your long-term goals?

1

2

4

“I would like to pursue a master’s degree, and become a middle school or high school special education teacher, and I also have a strong interest in coaching football, having volunteered with the Boaz Middle School football program.” Matt Pendergrass Junior, Boaz, Ala. Collaborative Teacher Special Education

2 Why did you choose to attend Auburn? “I was offered an academic scholarship, and although the University of Georgia was closer to home and my first consideration, the decision to attend Auburn because of the scholarship is one that I am very happy that I made, and I have no regrets! ”

3 6 5

Caitlin Sheridan Sophomore, Roswell, Ga. Secondary English Education

The Student Ambassadors help represent the college, serving as hosts and hostesses to alumni, donors, prospective students and other guests. The 2011-2012 ambassadors are led by president Mary Kathryn Wheeler, a junior elementary education major. Here’s a closer look at some of the members:

24

Keystone

3 What do you see as some of the challenges or obstacles within school systems? “I believe one challenge is that children need more positive male role models, particularly in underserved and depressed populations. My research focus going forward in my career will be on elementary aged kids, and younger.” Sam Logan Doctoral candidate, North East, Md. Kinesiology/Exercise Science

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

4 What distinguishes the College of Education from others in the Southeast? “The math education program at Auburn is fantastic. The instruction is thorough, and I have learned very effective ways to teach math.”

Amanda Bearden Senior, Elementary Education Pelham, Ala.

Rebekah Beason Senior, Early Childhood Education Russellville, Ala.

Mary Haley Byrne Junior, Early Childhood Education Mountain Brook, Ala.

Hilary Collins Sophomore, English Language Arts Education Alpharetta, Ga.

Bradley Cox Senior Agriscience Education Arab, Ala.

Emily Crane Senior Elementary Education Franklin, Tenn.

Abigail Cutchen Senior Elementary Education Birmingham, Ala

Trishia Daniel Sophomore Elementary Education Alpharetta, Ga.

Catherine Edwards Sophomore, Elementary Education Birmingham, Ala.

Michel Fields Junior Elementary Education Hartselle, Ala.

Rachel Glenn Junior Music Education Hillsboro, Ala.

Chelsey Greene Junior Elementary Education Wedowee, Ala.

Kimberly Hardin Doctoral student Collaborative Teacher Special Education Mobile, Ala

Ragan Hart Senior Exercise Science Cologne, Va.

Sarah Houghton Senior Elementary Education Alpharetta, Ga.

Hadley Hyche Sophomore Spanish Education Montgomery, Ala.

Mollie Kindahl Senior Elementary Education Florence, Ala.

Sam Logan Doctoral student Exercise Science North East, Md.

Ashley Loyd Junior, English Language Arts Education Loganville, Ga.

Laura McLean Lucy Mosley Senior Senior, English Language Elementary Education Arts Education Montevallo, Ala. Daphne, Ala.

Rebecca Oswell Senior Special Education Birmingham, Ala.

Matt Pendergrass Junior, Collaborative Teacher Special Education Boaz, Ala.

Meg Reaves Senior Elementary Education Guntersville, Ala.

Susie Rutherford Junior Mathematics Education Auburn, Ala.

Caitlin Sheridan Sophomore, English Language Arts Education Roswell, Ga.

Brittany Smith Senior Elementary Education Dothan, Ala.

Susie Rutherford Senior, Auburn, Ala. Secondary Math Education

5 How important are scholarship opportunities created by donors? “It helps my parents out a great deal. College of Education scholarships are great and go above and beyond the general University scholarships. Having the support from the specific college helps students like myself to stay motivated, and gives them incentive to continue their pursuit of becoming an educator. ” Mary Kathryn Wheeler Junior, Phenix City, Ala. Elementary Education

Caitlin Steeb Junior Elementary Education Walnut Creek, Ca.

6 What are some of your future plans? “After finishing my Ph.D. here at Auburn in educational psychology, I would like to teach somewhere at the college level. I have an open mind as to where I will go, but am happy to be here at Auburn finishing up my post-graduate studies.” Kimberly Hardin Doctoral Student, Mobile, Ala. Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Learn more about the college’s Student Ambassadors at: education.auburn.edu/ambassadors Allison Thomas Sophomore Mathematics Education Birmingham, Ala.

Vishaka Uluwita Master’s student Collaborative Teacher Special Education Tuskegee, Ala.

Trent Wells Junior Agricscience Education Jasper, Ala.

Mary Kathryn Wheeler President Junior Elementary Education Phenix City, Ala.

Keystone

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25


Ceremonies

College’s 10th annual Scholarship Ceremony celebrates student achievement K

evin bell didn’t spend time dwelling on what he couldn’t do.

It’s true that Freiderich’s ataxia, the genetic disease he was diagnosed with at age 7, gradually stole his ability to move, see and hear. It did not, however, dim Bell’s enthusiasm for learning. “He soaked up everything he could about any subject,” said Debbie Allen, Bell’s mother. “If he saw it, if he heard it, if he read it, it never left his brain. It was there forever. You did not want to play Jeopardy against him.” Bell, who passed away in 2010 at the age of 29, desperately wanted to ignite a similar sense of curiosity and wonder in others. He enrolled at Auburn University as a 17-yearold and graduated two years later with a 3.77 grade point average and a degree in psychology. He completed a second degree in Spanish two years later and worked as a substitute teacher in Auburn City Schools until his condition worsened. “He was determined to do everything he could while he could,” said Allen, who spoke during the College of Education’s 10th Annual Scholarship Ceremony held in August 2011 at The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center. Bell wanted to inspire others to do the same. His autobiography, published in

2009, carries the title, “I Do What I Can.” Allen and Andy LaMar ’74, who spoke on behalf of scholarship donors during the ceremony, are among the many generous supporters of the College of Education who are doing everything they can to create opportunities for students. Allen, a former business education student, and LaMar, a two-time College of Education graduate, are board members of The Kevin Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund. They proudly watched as an annual scholarship was presented for the first time in Bell’s name. Thanks to the generosity of its donors and its collection of annual scholarships and enduring endowments, the College of Education provided 153 undergraduate and graduate awards worth $310,000. It marked the fifth consecutive year that the college provided scholarship aid in excess of $200,000.

“Anytime I enter a classroom, my

26

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Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

2 0 12 Awa r d R e c i p i e n t s Photos will be available after April 25 at www.flickr.com/aucollegeofeducation.

2011 S t u d e n t Awa r d R e c i p i e n t s Outstanding Undergraduate Student (CURR)

Outstanding Graduate Student (CURR)

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (EFLT)

Outstanding Graduate Student (EFLT)

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (CURR) Kevin “Trent” Wells Agriscience Education Outstanding Graduate Student (CURR) Leanne Lloyd Early Childhood Education

Barbara Jane Hall Elementary Education

Stephen Pruitt General Science Education

David Rocker Adult Education

Michelle de Freitas Library Media

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (KINE)

Outstanding Graduate Student (KINE)

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (SERC)

Outstanding Graduate Student (SERC)

head is spinning with ideas for a classroom of my own someday,” Fields said. “Being a part of the Auburn family is a privilege. And because of your support, we’re able to experience it to the fullest.”

Meredith Bailey Exercise Science

Lindsey Miller Exercise Physiology

Betty Schiffer Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Holly Brigman Rehabilitation

2011 Fa c u lt y a n d S taff Awa r d R e c i p i e n t s

In sharing the parental perspective with more than 500 scholarship ceremony guests, David Dobbs discussed the future promise held by the students in attendance.

Jung Won Hur Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Undergraduate Faculty Teaching Award EFLT

“These scholarships are so important,” said Dobbs, whose daughter, Dori, earned the Marsha Lynn Burns Burney Endowed Scholarship. “These young men and women see that if they put in the effort and put in the time, that they can achieve anything.”

Outstanding Graduate Student (EFLT) Heather Horn Administration of Higher Education Outstanding Undergraduate Student (KINE) Ragan Hart Exercise Science

Debbie Allen (left), Andy LaMar ’74 and Pam LaMar ’73 visit after the college’s annual ceremony in August 2011.

Several awards were presented for the first time, including The Frank and Warrene Bolen Barbaree Endowed Scholarship, The Kevin Bell Memorial Annual Scholarship, The Bruce Wayne Mazey Endowed Scholarship and The Dr. Dorcus Scroggins Saunders Annual Scholarship. Michel Fields, a junior from Hartselle, Ala., and the recipient of the College of Education Student Council Annual Scholarship, said donor generosity has enabled her to pursue her passion of becoming an elementary school teacher.

30th Spring Awards

Jamie Carney Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Graduate Faculty Teaching Award SERC

Paris Strom Outstanding Faculty Award for Research EFLT

Rodney Greer Deborah Morowski Joanne Merritt Outstanding Faculty Outstanding Staff Award Outstanding Staff Award Administrative/ Office Administration Early Career Award Professional DEAN CURR DEAN

Cynthia Reed Outstanding Faculty Award for Outreach EFLT/TPI

Jim Witte Faculty Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity EFLT

Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Undergraduate Faculty Teaching Award Octavia Tripp CURR Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Graduate Faculty Teaching Award John Dagley SERC Outstanding Faculty Award for Research Margaret Ross EFLT Outstanding Faculty Award for Outreach JoEllen Sefton KINE

Outstanding Graduate Student (KINE) Samuel Logan Kinesiology

Outstanding Faculty Early Career Award Joni Lakin EFLT

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (SERC) Jessica Harris, Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Outstanding Staff Award Administrative/Professional Amanda Earnest LRC

Outstanding Graduate Student (SERC) Kathryn McKenzie Tweedy Rehabilitation Counseling

Asim Ali Staff Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity LRC

Keystone

Outstanding Staff Award Office Administration Quin Allen CURR Faculty Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity Not available at press time Staff Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity Not available at press time

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

27


Ceremonies

College’s 10th annual Scholarship Ceremony celebrates student achievement K

evin bell didn’t spend time dwelling on what he couldn’t do.

It’s true that Freiderich’s ataxia, the genetic disease he was diagnosed with at age 7, gradually stole his ability to move, see and hear. It did not, however, dim Bell’s enthusiasm for learning. “He soaked up everything he could about any subject,” said Debbie Allen, Bell’s mother. “If he saw it, if he heard it, if he read it, it never left his brain. It was there forever. You did not want to play Jeopardy against him.” Bell, who passed away in 2010 at the age of 29, desperately wanted to ignite a similar sense of curiosity and wonder in others. He enrolled at Auburn University as a 17-yearold and graduated two years later with a 3.77 grade point average and a degree in psychology. He completed a second degree in Spanish two years later and worked as a substitute teacher in Auburn City Schools until his condition worsened. “He was determined to do everything he could while he could,” said Allen, who spoke during the College of Education’s 10th Annual Scholarship Ceremony held in August 2011 at The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center. Bell wanted to inspire others to do the same. His autobiography, published in

2009, carries the title, “I Do What I Can.” Allen and Andy LaMar ’74, who spoke on behalf of scholarship donors during the ceremony, are among the many generous supporters of the College of Education who are doing everything they can to create opportunities for students. Allen, a former business education student, and LaMar, a two-time College of Education graduate, are board members of The Kevin Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund. They proudly watched as an annual scholarship was presented for the first time in Bell’s name. Thanks to the generosity of its donors and its collection of annual scholarships and enduring endowments, the College of Education provided 153 undergraduate and graduate awards worth $310,000. It marked the fifth consecutive year that the college provided scholarship aid in excess of $200,000.

“Anytime I enter a classroom, my

26

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

2 0 12 Awa r d R e c i p i e n t s Photos will be available after April 25 at www.flickr.com/aucollegeofeducation.

2011 S t u d e n t Awa r d R e c i p i e n t s Outstanding Undergraduate Student (CURR)

Outstanding Graduate Student (CURR)

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (EFLT)

Outstanding Graduate Student (EFLT)

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (CURR) Kevin “Trent” Wells Agriscience Education Outstanding Graduate Student (CURR) Leanne Lloyd Early Childhood Education

Barbara Jane Hall Elementary Education

Stephen Pruitt General Science Education

David Rocker Adult Education

Michelle de Freitas Library Media

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (KINE)

Outstanding Graduate Student (KINE)

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (SERC)

Outstanding Graduate Student (SERC)

head is spinning with ideas for a classroom of my own someday,” Fields said. “Being a part of the Auburn family is a privilege. And because of your support, we’re able to experience it to the fullest.”

Meredith Bailey Exercise Science

Lindsey Miller Exercise Physiology

Betty Schiffer Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Holly Brigman Rehabilitation

2011 Fa c u lt y a n d S taff Awa r d R e c i p i e n t s

In sharing the parental perspective with more than 500 scholarship ceremony guests, David Dobbs discussed the future promise held by the students in attendance.

Jung Won Hur Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Undergraduate Faculty Teaching Award EFLT

“These scholarships are so important,” said Dobbs, whose daughter, Dori, earned the Marsha Lynn Burns Burney Endowed Scholarship. “These young men and women see that if they put in the effort and put in the time, that they can achieve anything.”

Outstanding Graduate Student (EFLT) Heather Horn Administration of Higher Education Outstanding Undergraduate Student (KINE) Ragan Hart Exercise Science

Debbie Allen (left), Andy LaMar ’74 and Pam LaMar ’73 visit after the college’s annual ceremony in August 2011.

Several awards were presented for the first time, including The Frank and Warrene Bolen Barbaree Endowed Scholarship, The Kevin Bell Memorial Annual Scholarship, The Bruce Wayne Mazey Endowed Scholarship and The Dr. Dorcus Scroggins Saunders Annual Scholarship. Michel Fields, a junior from Hartselle, Ala., and the recipient of the College of Education Student Council Annual Scholarship, said donor generosity has enabled her to pursue her passion of becoming an elementary school teacher.

30th Spring Awards

Jamie Carney Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Graduate Faculty Teaching Award SERC

Paris Strom Outstanding Faculty Award for Research EFLT

Rodney Greer Deborah Morowski Joanne Merritt Outstanding Faculty Outstanding Staff Award Outstanding Staff Award Administrative/ Office Administration Early Career Award Professional DEAN CURR DEAN

Cynthia Reed Outstanding Faculty Award for Outreach EFLT/TPI

Jim Witte Faculty Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity EFLT

Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Undergraduate Faculty Teaching Award Octavia Tripp CURR Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Graduate Faculty Teaching Award John Dagley SERC Outstanding Faculty Award for Research Margaret Ross EFLT Outstanding Faculty Award for Outreach JoEllen Sefton KINE

Outstanding Graduate Student (KINE) Samuel Logan Kinesiology

Outstanding Faculty Early Career Award Joni Lakin EFLT

Outstanding Undergraduate Student (SERC) Jessica Harris, Collaborative Teacher Special Education

Outstanding Staff Award Administrative/Professional Amanda Earnest LRC

Outstanding Graduate Student (SERC) Kathryn McKenzie Tweedy Rehabilitation Counseling

Asim Ali Staff Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity LRC

Keystone

Outstanding Staff Award Office Administration Quin Allen CURR Faculty Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity Not available at press time Staff Award for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity Not available at press time

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

27


Gut feelings New Gastrointestinal Research Center explores human body’s highway

T

he gastrointestinal tract will never win any beauty contests.

And, despite actress Jamie Lee Curtis’ earnest commercial attempts to preach the virtues of yogurt as a remedy for digestive dysfunction, the gastrointestinal tract rarely receives a purposeful introduction into everyday conversation. When the gastrointestinal tract does become a topic for discussion, it tends to be spoken of in conspiratorial whispers. Or, worse yet, it serves as a punch line and punching bag for comedians plumbing the depths for cheap laughter. “We’re more aware of muscles, nerves and the ‘sexier’ organs,” said David Pascoe, Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished professor of exercise physiology and director of the Thermal Lab in the College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. “The gut is just there. We forget that it is maybe the glue. None of the other organs can exist without it.”

illustration: Bruce Dupree

From its beginning to its end, from the mouth to the exit portal we don’t dare discuss in polite company, the human gastrointestinal tract stretches anywhere from 20 to 30 feet and includes the esophagus, stomach and small and large intestines. You might wonder why Pascoe and some of his colleagues would be interested in talking about the body’s equivalent of plumbing fixtures, but his research interest was piqued by the fact that it’s the body’s only internal and

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

29


Gut feelings New Gastrointestinal Research Center explores human body’s highway

T

he gastrointestinal tract will never win any beauty contests.

And, despite actress Jamie Lee Curtis’ earnest commercial attempts to preach the virtues of yogurt as a remedy for digestive dysfunction, the gastrointestinal tract rarely receives a purposeful introduction into everyday conversation. When the gastrointestinal tract does become a topic for discussion, it tends to be spoken of in conspiratorial whispers. Or, worse yet, it serves as a punch line and punching bag for comedians plumbing the depths for cheap laughter. “We’re more aware of muscles, nerves and the ‘sexier’ organs,” said David Pascoe, Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished professor of exercise physiology and director of the Thermal Lab in the College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. “The gut is just there. We forget that it is maybe the glue. None of the other organs can exist without it.”

illustration: Bruce Dupree

From its beginning to its end, from the mouth to the exit portal we don’t dare discuss in polite company, the human gastrointestinal tract stretches anywhere from 20 to 30 feet and includes the esophagus, stomach and small and large intestines. You might wonder why Pascoe and some of his colleagues would be interested in talking about the body’s equivalent of plumbing fixtures, but his research interest was piqued by the fact that it’s the body’s only internal and

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

29


Gut Feelings

external organ and serves as a delivery mechanism for hydration, nutrition and medication.

“The gut is just there. We forget that it is maybe the glue. None of the other organs can exist without it.” David Pascoe Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished professor of exercise physiology and director of the Thermal Lab

“When the gut isn’t happy, we’re not happy,” he said. “It’s the largest immune organ in the body.” Pascoe and other researchers in the Department of Kinesiology and Auburn’s College of Veterinary Medicine are now investigating the ways in which this vital system can be kept healthy and happy. Auburn University approved the establishment of the Gastrointestinal Research Center within the Department of Kinesiology, which opened in January. The center will focus on improving understanding of the structures, mechanisms, functions and dysfunctions of the gastrointestinal tract in animals and humans. Impairments of the system can have repercussions in such areas as digestion and nutrition, growth and development, temperature regulation and hydration. “We started working together about a year ago,” said Department of Kinesiology head Mary Rudisill, a Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor of motor behavior. “We realized how much exercise and dehydration and a variety of other factors within our world can impact gastrointestinal health.”

Collaborative effort

Veterinary Medicine faculty member Vitaly Vodyanoy invented a microscope capable of providing detailed imagery of changes in the intestines.

30

Keystone

The center will bring together faculty members with impressive backgrounds. In addition to Rudisill and Pascoe, a nationally-known researcher in the field of temperature regulation, the center will also draw on the expertise of College of Veterinary Medicine faculty members Timothy Moore, Vitaly Vodyanoy and Iryna Sorokulova. Moore, whose background is in microbiology and the administration of military chemical weapons

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

labs, serves as the director of program development for research in Veterinary Medicine. Vodyanoy specializes in high-resolution imagery, probiotics, biophysics, histology and cell membrane function. Sorokulova is an internationally-recognized expert on probiotics. Vodyanoy, the 2005 recipient of Auburn University’s Creative Research Award, has worked to develop an advanced microscopy technique that features increased resolution and a dual mode fluorescence imaging capability.

G AS T R OIN T E S T IN AL

GA S T RO IN T ES T IN A L

Research Center

Research Center

Timothy moore

Vitaly Vodyanoy

Vodyanoy’s invention, the CytoViva Microscope, enables Iryna Sorokulova the identification of viruses and observation of interactions between labeled and unlabeled nanoparticles. By using this tool, researchers are able to observe living cells in the fine, vivid detail traditionally reserved for electromicroscopes. “The Vitaly microscopic imagery provides our researchers the ability to visualize structural changes related to gut function and relate them to both biochemical markers,” Pascoe explained. “Unlike other microscopes with this magnification ability, the Vitaly scope does not require slide preparations that can distort or create artifact to the specimen, and it allows us to investigate live cells from gut samples.” Stress has been shown to have a central and peripheral nervous system effect, promoting not only psychological illness, but also influencing diseases within the intestines. This is where Sorokulova’s work comes into play.

nal Reflux Disease “It was shown that the main target of stress is G AS T(GERD), R OINInflammatory T E S T IN ALBowel Disease (IBD), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), the gastrointestinal tract and gut microflora,” SoResearch Center and ulcerative colitis are among the most comrokulova said. “Beneficial probiotic bacteria have mon and problematic. been shown to enhance gastrointestinal barrier function and dampen inflammation in several “We’re looking for ways to prevent, treat and immune mediated diseases, thereby conferring a recover from issues related to gastrointestinal health benefit on the host. Our approach involves health,” Rudisill said. “We see potential in many the use of the beneficial areas. This research team Bacillus strain to prevent and has some expertise that no Approximately 70 million treat the undesirable effects one else in the country can Americans are affected by of stress.” offer. We have the exper-

C as tin g a wide net

gastrointestinal diseases. According to the American College of Gastroenterology, these diseases are responsible for hospitalizing more Americans than any other single group of health disorders.

Some areas of research interest include hydration as it relates to athletic and military performance, medical care, Celiac disease, probiotics and product efficacy. Pascoe and Rudisill said some of the center’s research will investigate the possible relationship between gastrointestinal dysfunction and sleep disorders, autism spectrum disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Graduate students will gain experience assisting faculty members in lab settings. The Gastrointestinal Research Center explores such Research Center components as hydration levels and their effect on athletic performance.

GA S T RO IN T ES T IN A L

tise, the know-how and the university support to find the answers to questions that we have about gastrointestinal health.”

Pascoe has a gut feeling that the more the center researchers learn, the more they may be able to change the way people think and talk about all matters related to gastrointestinal health. “It’s not the most attractive organ,” he said, “but maybe it’s time we invite it to the prom.”

According to the American College of Gastroenterology, gastrointestinal diseases are responsible for the hospitalization of more Americans than any other solitary group of health disorders. In all, approximately 70 million Americans are affected by gastrointestinal diseases. Colon and esophageal cancer, Crohn’s disease, GastrointestiKeystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

31


Gut Feelings

external organ and serves as a delivery mechanism for hydration, nutrition and medication.

“The gut is just there. We forget that it is maybe the glue. None of the other organs can exist without it.” David Pascoe Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished professor of exercise physiology and director of the Thermal Lab

“When the gut isn’t happy, we’re not happy,” he said. “It’s the largest immune organ in the body.” Pascoe and other researchers in the Department of Kinesiology and Auburn’s College of Veterinary Medicine are now investigating the ways in which this vital system can be kept healthy and happy. Auburn University approved the establishment of the Gastrointestinal Research Center within the Department of Kinesiology, which opened in January. The center will focus on improving understanding of the structures, mechanisms, functions and dysfunctions of the gastrointestinal tract in animals and humans. Impairments of the system can have repercussions in such areas as digestion and nutrition, growth and development, temperature regulation and hydration. “We started working together about a year ago,” said Department of Kinesiology head Mary Rudisill, a Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor of motor behavior. “We realized how much exercise and dehydration and a variety of other factors within our world can impact gastrointestinal health.”

Collaborative effort

Veterinary Medicine faculty member Vitaly Vodyanoy invented a microscope capable of providing detailed imagery of changes in the intestines.

30

Keystone

The center will bring together faculty members with impressive backgrounds. In addition to Rudisill and Pascoe, a nationally-known researcher in the field of temperature regulation, the center will also draw on the expertise of College of Veterinary Medicine faculty members Timothy Moore, Vitaly Vodyanoy and Iryna Sorokulova. Moore, whose background is in microbiology and the administration of military chemical weapons

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

labs, serves as the director of program development for research in Veterinary Medicine. Vodyanoy specializes in high-resolution imagery, probiotics, biophysics, histology and cell membrane function. Sorokulova is an internationally-recognized expert on probiotics. Vodyanoy, the 2005 recipient of Auburn University’s Creative Research Award, has worked to develop an advanced microscopy technique that features increased resolution and a dual mode fluorescence imaging capability.

G AS T R OIN T E S T IN AL

GA S T RO IN T ES T IN A L

Research Center

Research Center

Timothy moore

Vitaly Vodyanoy

Vodyanoy’s invention, the CytoViva Microscope, enables Iryna Sorokulova the identification of viruses and observation of interactions between labeled and unlabeled nanoparticles. By using this tool, researchers are able to observe living cells in the fine, vivid detail traditionally reserved for electromicroscopes. “The Vitaly microscopic imagery provides our researchers the ability to visualize structural changes related to gut function and relate them to both biochemical markers,” Pascoe explained. “Unlike other microscopes with this magnification ability, the Vitaly scope does not require slide preparations that can distort or create artifact to the specimen, and it allows us to investigate live cells from gut samples.” Stress has been shown to have a central and peripheral nervous system effect, promoting not only psychological illness, but also influencing diseases within the intestines. This is where Sorokulova’s work comes into play.

nal Reflux Disease “It was shown that the main target of stress is G AS T(GERD), R OINInflammatory T E S T IN ALBowel Disease (IBD), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), the gastrointestinal tract and gut microflora,” SoResearch Center and ulcerative colitis are among the most comrokulova said. “Beneficial probiotic bacteria have mon and problematic. been shown to enhance gastrointestinal barrier function and dampen inflammation in several “We’re looking for ways to prevent, treat and immune mediated diseases, thereby conferring a recover from issues related to gastrointestinal health benefit on the host. Our approach involves health,” Rudisill said. “We see potential in many the use of the beneficial areas. This research team Bacillus strain to prevent and has some expertise that no Approximately 70 million treat the undesirable effects one else in the country can Americans are affected by of stress.” offer. We have the exper-

C as tin g a wide net

gastrointestinal diseases. According to the American College of Gastroenterology, these diseases are responsible for hospitalizing more Americans than any other single group of health disorders.

Some areas of research interest include hydration as it relates to athletic and military performance, medical care, Celiac disease, probiotics and product efficacy. Pascoe and Rudisill said some of the center’s research will investigate the possible relationship between gastrointestinal dysfunction and sleep disorders, autism spectrum disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Graduate students will gain experience assisting faculty members in lab settings. The Gastrointestinal Research Center explores such Research Center components as hydration levels and their effect on athletic performance.

GA S T RO IN T ES T IN A L

tise, the know-how and the university support to find the answers to questions that we have about gastrointestinal health.”

Pascoe has a gut feeling that the more the center researchers learn, the more they may be able to change the way people think and talk about all matters related to gastrointestinal health. “It’s not the most attractive organ,” he said, “but maybe it’s time we invite it to the prom.”

According to the American College of Gastroenterology, gastrointestinal diseases are responsible for the hospitalization of more Americans than any other solitary group of health disorders. In all, approximately 70 million Americans are affected by gastrointestinal diseases. Colon and esophageal cancer, Crohn’s disease, GastrointestiKeystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

31


r e s e arch a n d o u t r e ach

TEAM-Math helping students build stronger core of knowledge A $13,000 gift from BBVA Compass Bank to the Auburn University Foundation provided support for TEAM-Math (Transforming East Alabama Mathematics) and the East Alabama Regional Inservice Center (EARIC) to conduct a thorough evaluation of curriculum materials used by schools in the region. The review focused on how effectively textbook materials correspond with the Alabama College and Career Ready Standards, based on the Common Core State Standards Initiative. TEAM-Math, a partnership involving Auburn University, Tuskegee University, businesses and K-12 educators, focuses its efforts on mathematics education in 14 local and regional school districts. Alabama is among the 45 states that have adopted the Common Core State Standards, which outline the skills and knowledge students are expected to acquire in grades K-12. Marilyn Strutchens, TEAM-Math co-director and Mildred Cheshire Fraley distinguished professor and program coordinator of secondary mathematics education in the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching, said mathematics classes incorporating the new Common Core State Standards provide ready-made opportunities for students to develop the sort of critical thinking skills that will determine success in the workplace. “Often times, the things we do in mathematics class that are related to critical thinking spill over into the real world,” said Strutchens, who serves as president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators. “Businesses do not just want [to hire] students who can compute. They want students who can analyze situations, students who can determine where problems are and think about

A B OUT C OMMON C O R E STATE STA N D A R D S • Common Core State Standards provide a framework for what students are expected to learn in mathematics and English language arts. • The standards were developed in a state-led collaboration involving teachers, school administrators and educational experts. • Alabama adopted Common Core State Standards in November 2010. • All but five U.S. states (Alaska, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas and Virginia) have adopted Common Core State Standards

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how to fix them. If they never get the opportunity to experience those situations on a daily basis, when they get into the workforce they’re not going to be ready to handle those problems.” Strutchens and TEAM-Math co-director Gary Martin, an Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck endowed professor of secondary mathematics education, have helped guide the dialogue on how to most effectively prepare students to meet those challenges. In spring 2011, Strutchens, as president of the AMTE, and representatives of seven other organizations formed the Mathematics Common Core Coalition (MCCC). The MCCC works to provide expertise and advice on issues related to the effective implementation of the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics. Martin’s extensive publication record includes co-authorship of “Making It Happen: A Guide to Interpreting and Implementing Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.” “The Common Core Standards advocate for students to think about mathematics and how it can be used to model real world situations and to use their analytical skills to determine what variables they need to take into consideration,” Strutchens said. The joint curriculum analysis performed by TEAM-Math and EARIC involved more than 50 teachers from 13 partner school districts served by the inservice center. The analysis was based on tools created by the Curriculum Materials Analysis Project, which was funded by Texas Instruments, the Council of Chief State School Officers and The Brookhill Foundation. Strutchens and Martin both served on the team that developed the tools, which are designed to assess whether materials fully support the Common Core State Standards. “Having curriculum materials that match the goals of the Common Core State Standards is an important ingredient in helping teachers to provide their students with appropriate experiences,” Martin said. “The materials need to provide engaging tasks that help students to actually do mathematics, as described in the document’s Standards for Mathematics Practice, not just observe what their teachers do.

“You don’t become a violinist by listening to violin music.”

ON THE WEB: Read the findings of the curriculum analysis project at www.team-math.net/CAP2012/

Professorship honors Reed’s ability to lead the way in research, outreach A

s director of Auburn University’s

Truman Pierce Institute, Cindy Reed has made it her mission to help school systems and educators identify ways to better serve their students and communities. That passion for improving teaching, learning, and leadership made Reed an ideal fit for the first Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck Endowed Professorship for Educational Leadership. Reed, a professor of educational leadership in the College of Education’s Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, earned the designation in fall 2011. The professorship was established in 2007 by College of Education alumni Dr. Gerald and Mrs. Emily Leischuck, both of whom are 1964 graduates of the university. The award is especially meaningful to Reed given the Leischucks’ respective legacies at Auburn University. “I am truly honored to be selected for the first Gerald and Emily Leischuck endowed professorship in educational leadership,” Reed said. “This honor is especially meaningful to me for two reasons. First, it is named after two people for whom I have the greatest respect because of their selfless service to Auburn University. “Second, I am humbled because the endowed professorship is intended to recognize educators who are well respected in their field.”

Dr. Leischuck served in a variety of capacities during his 35year career at Auburn, retiring as secretary of the Board of Trustees. Mrs. Leischuck’s 21-year career at the university included appointments in Student Affairs and as assistant to the president, a position from which she retired in 1995. Reed said she is thankful for the support provided by Dr. and Mrs. Leischuck, as well as the university. “To have my work in Alabama and beyond recognized in this way is a major capstone in my career,” she said. “I am very grateful to the Leischucks, to those who served on the selection committee, and to Auburn University for providing me with so many opportunities to address educational needs throughout our state, the region and beyond.” Reed, who joined the Auburn faculty in 1997, serves on a variety of state-level educational task forces, commissions and committees. As director of the Truman Pierce Institute, a research and outreach center of the College of Education which marks its 30th anniversary in 2012, she oversees research and programs related to educational reform and leadership development. Reed is also well-respected at the national level. In November 2011, the University Council for Educational Administration elected Reed as its president-elect. She will be installed as the organization’s 52nd president in November

2012, becoming the third Auburn faculty member to achieve the distinction. Former College of Education Deans Truman Pierce and Frances Kochan each previously served as presidents of the organization, which is now an international consortium of top higher education institutions with high quality educational leadership preparation programs. Additionally, Reed has played a pivotal role in creating dialogue and encouraging collaboration between school systems and state and community entities. In July, as part of her 2011 Presidential Administrative CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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TEAM-Math helping students build stronger core of knowledge A $13,000 gift from BBVA Compass Bank to the Auburn University Foundation provided support for TEAM-Math (Transforming East Alabama Mathematics) and the East Alabama Regional Inservice Center (EARIC) to conduct a thorough evaluation of curriculum materials used by schools in the region. The review focused on how effectively textbook materials correspond with the Alabama College and Career Ready Standards, based on the Common Core State Standards Initiative. TEAM-Math, a partnership involving Auburn University, Tuskegee University, businesses and K-12 educators, focuses its efforts on mathematics education in 14 local and regional school districts. Alabama is among the 45 states that have adopted the Common Core State Standards, which outline the skills and knowledge students are expected to acquire in grades K-12. Marilyn Strutchens, TEAM-Math co-director and Mildred Cheshire Fraley distinguished professor and program coordinator of secondary mathematics education in the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching, said mathematics classes incorporating the new Common Core State Standards provide ready-made opportunities for students to develop the sort of critical thinking skills that will determine success in the workplace. “Often times, the things we do in mathematics class that are related to critical thinking spill over into the real world,” said Strutchens, who serves as president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators. “Businesses do not just want [to hire] students who can compute. They want students who can analyze situations, students who can determine where problems are and think about

A B OUT C OMMON C O R E STATE STA N D A R D S • Common Core State Standards provide a framework for what students are expected to learn in mathematics and English language arts. • The standards were developed in a state-led collaboration involving teachers, school administrators and educational experts. • Alabama adopted Common Core State Standards in November 2010. • All but five U.S. states (Alaska, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas and Virginia) have adopted Common Core State Standards

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how to fix them. If they never get the opportunity to experience those situations on a daily basis, when they get into the workforce they’re not going to be ready to handle those problems.” Strutchens and TEAM-Math co-director Gary Martin, an Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck endowed professor of secondary mathematics education, have helped guide the dialogue on how to most effectively prepare students to meet those challenges. In spring 2011, Strutchens, as president of the AMTE, and representatives of seven other organizations formed the Mathematics Common Core Coalition (MCCC). The MCCC works to provide expertise and advice on issues related to the effective implementation of the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics. Martin’s extensive publication record includes co-authorship of “Making It Happen: A Guide to Interpreting and Implementing Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.” “The Common Core Standards advocate for students to think about mathematics and how it can be used to model real world situations and to use their analytical skills to determine what variables they need to take into consideration,” Strutchens said. The joint curriculum analysis performed by TEAM-Math and EARIC involved more than 50 teachers from 13 partner school districts served by the inservice center. The analysis was based on tools created by the Curriculum Materials Analysis Project, which was funded by Texas Instruments, the Council of Chief State School Officers and The Brookhill Foundation. Strutchens and Martin both served on the team that developed the tools, which are designed to assess whether materials fully support the Common Core State Standards. “Having curriculum materials that match the goals of the Common Core State Standards is an important ingredient in helping teachers to provide their students with appropriate experiences,” Martin said. “The materials need to provide engaging tasks that help students to actually do mathematics, as described in the document’s Standards for Mathematics Practice, not just observe what their teachers do.

“You don’t become a violinist by listening to violin music.”

ON THE WEB: Read the findings of the curriculum analysis project at www.team-math.net/CAP2012/

Professorship honors Reed’s ability to lead the way in research, outreach A

s director of Auburn University’s

Truman Pierce Institute, Cindy Reed has made it her mission to help school systems and educators identify ways to better serve their students and communities. That passion for improving teaching, learning, and leadership made Reed an ideal fit for the first Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck Endowed Professorship for Educational Leadership. Reed, a professor of educational leadership in the College of Education’s Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, earned the designation in fall 2011. The professorship was established in 2007 by College of Education alumni Dr. Gerald and Mrs. Emily Leischuck, both of whom are 1964 graduates of the university. The award is especially meaningful to Reed given the Leischucks’ respective legacies at Auburn University. “I am truly honored to be selected for the first Gerald and Emily Leischuck endowed professorship in educational leadership,” Reed said. “This honor is especially meaningful to me for two reasons. First, it is named after two people for whom I have the greatest respect because of their selfless service to Auburn University. “Second, I am humbled because the endowed professorship is intended to recognize educators who are well respected in their field.”

Dr. Leischuck served in a variety of capacities during his 35year career at Auburn, retiring as secretary of the Board of Trustees. Mrs. Leischuck’s 21-year career at the university included appointments in Student Affairs and as assistant to the president, a position from which she retired in 1995. Reed said she is thankful for the support provided by Dr. and Mrs. Leischuck, as well as the university. “To have my work in Alabama and beyond recognized in this way is a major capstone in my career,” she said. “I am very grateful to the Leischucks, to those who served on the selection committee, and to Auburn University for providing me with so many opportunities to address educational needs throughout our state, the region and beyond.” Reed, who joined the Auburn faculty in 1997, serves on a variety of state-level educational task forces, commissions and committees. As director of the Truman Pierce Institute, a research and outreach center of the College of Education which marks its 30th anniversary in 2012, she oversees research and programs related to educational reform and leadership development. Reed is also well-respected at the national level. In November 2011, the University Council for Educational Administration elected Reed as its president-elect. She will be installed as the organization’s 52nd president in November

2012, becoming the third Auburn faculty member to achieve the distinction. Former College of Education Deans Truman Pierce and Frances Kochan each previously served as presidents of the organization, which is now an international consortium of top higher education institutions with high quality educational leadership preparation programs. Additionally, Reed has played a pivotal role in creating dialogue and encouraging collaboration between school systems and state and community entities. In July, as part of her 2011 Presidential Administrative CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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Fellowship, Reed hosted more than 50 Alabama teachers, administrators, policymakers, business owners and community leaders for an education summit aimed at encouraging collaboration to address the state’s most pressing education issues. The summit, entitled “Developing Collaborations to Address Educational Issues for a Better Alabama,” focused on the creation and enhancement of networks designed to identify and address educational issues central to the future of the state and nation. “I had to propose a special project when I applied for the fellowship and that created an opportunity to take a risk and do something on a larger scale,” she said. “It was something I had wanted to do for years.”

Joint GED venture provides opportunity for university staff members

EFLT faculty members gauging success of science education efforts

A partnership between Auburn University and Southern Union State Community College will create educational and employment opportunities for city residents and university staff members who currently lack high school diplomas.

Faculty members in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology will gather data to help determine the success of a project aimed at improving the science education performance of middle school students in Alabama’s Black Belt region.

Auburn University opened a Graduate Equivalency Diploma program in November 2011. The free program, which provides training for students on a first-come, first-serve basis, is housed in Wallace Center.

Auburn Assistant Vice President for University Outreach Royrickers Cook, Dean Betty Lou Whitford, Southern Union Director of Adult Education Derika Griffin, Southern Union Dean of Technical Education and Workforce Development Darin Baldwin, Southern Union President Amelia Pearson, EFLT Department Head Sheri Downer, Auburn Veterans and Transfer Student Resource Center Coordinator Johnny Green and associate professor Jim Witte celebrate the opening of the GED Center.

Reed also took a lead role in developing the Anti-Bullying Summit co-hosted by Auburn University’s Office of Professional and Continuing Education and the Truman Pierce Institute in June 2011. Plans for a second Anti-Bullying Summit to be held in the summer of 2012 are underway. The topic is especially relevant for teachers, parents and children given increased availability of and access to portable technology and social media tools. In 2010 alone, at least 14 cases of student suicide were linked to bullying. A U.S. Department of Education report released that year revealed that approximately 160,000 children a day stay at home from school because they are afraid of being bullied physically, verbally, emotionally or sexually.

James Witte, associate professor and adult and higher education program coordinator in the College of Education, said the GED program will make a profound difference in the lives of those who choose to enter it. While Auburn’s unemployment rate is low (7.9 percent in September 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Labor) in comparison to other state communities, Witte said many individuals with jobs may be “under-employed” as the result of not having obtained a high school diploma.

“Bullying has these consequences that play out in so many different ways,’’ Reed said. “As adults, we need to step in and create protective environments and school policies.’’

Witte said the program makes educational opportunities more accessible for local residents and university staff members.

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“It’s an opportunity to develop a stronger workforce and, for those who choose, provide the gateway into further skill training at Southern Union, the opportunity to pursue higher education, or just to complete a high school education as a matter of self-improvement,” Witte said.

“There’s no public transportation from Auburn to Southern Union,” Witte said. “Many people who may be without a car or who walk to campus to work will be able to

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

take advantage of this opportunity.” Evening courses will be taught each Thursday by Southern Union staff member Georgia Love, who graduated from Auburn with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in collaborative teacher education. Coursework will be tailored to each student based on the results of aptitude tests. Sheri Downer, head of the College of Education’s Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology described Auburn’s role in the venture as “teaching the teachers how to effectively teach GED content to students.” According to a U.S. Census community survey conducted from 2005-09, 92.8 percent of the Auburn residents ages 25 and over have a high school degree or above. However, the lifetime earning potential of those individuals who fall into the 7.2-percent of have-nots is far lower. The National Center for Education Statistics reported that the average median income for individuals ages 18-67 who had not completed high school was approximately $23,000 in 2008, compared to $42,000 for individuals in the same age range who possessed at least a high school diploma or GED.

Boosted by a $9.9 million National Science Foundation grant awarded in Fall 2011, the NanoBio Science Partnership for the Alabama Black Belt Region will develop nanobioscience-based curriculum models to help teachers make science courses more engaging and effective for students. Tuskegee University is leading the project, which includes Auburn University, Alabama State University, the University of Alabama, the University of Alabama-Birmingham, and Shelton State, Wallace State, Wallace StateSelma, Enterprise and Central Alabama Community Colleges as partners. The project will be implemented in Barbour, Bullock, Dallas, Lee, Lowndes, Macon, Montgomery, Perry and Selma County schools. Four faculty members from the College of Education will collect information to help assess the overall success of the curriculum models. Betsy Ross, Jill Salisbury-Glennon, David Shannon and Joni Lakin received a sub-award of $875,000 to support their efforts over a 5-year period. “We’re responsible for the evaluation,” said Ross, director of the evaluation project and professor of educational research methodology and analysis. “We’re trying to look at teacher development and student and teacher attitudes.”

Four faculty members earn COE Seed Grants

Shannon is a Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished professor, Salisbury-Glennon is an associate professor and Lakin is a newlyappointed assistant professor. Ross, Shannon and Lakin specialize in measurement, evaluation and statistics, while Salisbury-Glennon specializes in learning and development. Ross said graduate students from the department will also be able to gain research experience through the project.

P OOL I N G R ESOU R C ES The NanoBio Science Partnership for the Alabama Black Belt Region involves faculty at Auburn, Tuskegee, Alabama State, Alabama, UAB, Shelton State, Wallace State, Wallace State-Selma, Enterprise and Central Alabama Community College.

The NanoBio Science Partnership addresses critical needs in sixth- to eighthgrade science education in the state’s Black Belt, a region often characterized as being educationally and economically disadvantaged. The project provides for professional development for public school science education teachers in the region and will emphasize inquiry-based methods as well as 3-D simulations. Data on teacher and student performance will be collected and analyzed through qualitative and quantitative methods.

The college’s Scholarship and Innovation Committee awarded seed grants in support of three research projects in the 2011-12 academic year – one assessing the effectiveness of web-based educational activities, one evaluating the exercise habits of working women, and another exploring the connection between physical activity and sleep on the health of children from rural areas. Christal Pritchett, assistant professor of business/marketing education, and Leane Skinner, associate professor and program coordinator of business/marketing education, received funding for their project, “Implementation of the NBC Learn Program in a Contextual Learning Environment.” NBC Learn, the education arm of NBC News, is making historic film and video archive material available to teachers, students, schools, and universities. Their study focuses on the implementation of the program in two local high schools. Danielle Wadsworth, assistant professor of health promotion, and graduate student Nancy Gell received support for their project, “Geospatial Assessment of the Built Environment: Timing and Location of Physical Activity in Working Age Women.” The goals of the study include obtaining data that improves understanding of the factors promoting or obstructing physical activity participation among women. Wadsworth and Gell will identify where employed women exercise, including home and work locations, private facilities, and parks, using GPS data and accelerometry. Leah Robinson, assistant professor of motor behavior, earned funding for “Exploring the Relationship of Physical Activity and Sleep Duration on Weight Status and Cardiovascular Health in Children from a Rural Community.” Much of Robinson’s research focuses on pediatric motor development and health.

More than 10,000 students and 80 educators will be involved in the project.

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r e s e arch a n d o u t r e ach ‘REED’ CONTINUED

Fellowship, Reed hosted more than 50 Alabama teachers, administrators, policymakers, business owners and community leaders for an education summit aimed at encouraging collaboration to address the state’s most pressing education issues. The summit, entitled “Developing Collaborations to Address Educational Issues for a Better Alabama,” focused on the creation and enhancement of networks designed to identify and address educational issues central to the future of the state and nation. “I had to propose a special project when I applied for the fellowship and that created an opportunity to take a risk and do something on a larger scale,” she said. “It was something I had wanted to do for years.”

Joint GED venture provides opportunity for university staff members

EFLT faculty members gauging success of science education efforts

A partnership between Auburn University and Southern Union State Community College will create educational and employment opportunities for city residents and university staff members who currently lack high school diplomas.

Faculty members in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology will gather data to help determine the success of a project aimed at improving the science education performance of middle school students in Alabama’s Black Belt region.

Auburn University opened a Graduate Equivalency Diploma program in November 2011. The free program, which provides training for students on a first-come, first-serve basis, is housed in Wallace Center.

Auburn Assistant Vice President for University Outreach Royrickers Cook, Dean Betty Lou Whitford, Southern Union Director of Adult Education Derika Griffin, Southern Union Dean of Technical Education and Workforce Development Darin Baldwin, Southern Union President Amelia Pearson, EFLT Department Head Sheri Downer, Auburn Veterans and Transfer Student Resource Center Coordinator Johnny Green and associate professor Jim Witte celebrate the opening of the GED Center.

Reed also took a lead role in developing the Anti-Bullying Summit co-hosted by Auburn University’s Office of Professional and Continuing Education and the Truman Pierce Institute in June 2011. Plans for a second Anti-Bullying Summit to be held in the summer of 2012 are underway. The topic is especially relevant for teachers, parents and children given increased availability of and access to portable technology and social media tools. In 2010 alone, at least 14 cases of student suicide were linked to bullying. A U.S. Department of Education report released that year revealed that approximately 160,000 children a day stay at home from school because they are afraid of being bullied physically, verbally, emotionally or sexually.

James Witte, associate professor and adult and higher education program coordinator in the College of Education, said the GED program will make a profound difference in the lives of those who choose to enter it. While Auburn’s unemployment rate is low (7.9 percent in September 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Labor) in comparison to other state communities, Witte said many individuals with jobs may be “under-employed” as the result of not having obtained a high school diploma.

“Bullying has these consequences that play out in so many different ways,’’ Reed said. “As adults, we need to step in and create protective environments and school policies.’’

Witte said the program makes educational opportunities more accessible for local residents and university staff members.

34

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“It’s an opportunity to develop a stronger workforce and, for those who choose, provide the gateway into further skill training at Southern Union, the opportunity to pursue higher education, or just to complete a high school education as a matter of self-improvement,” Witte said.

“There’s no public transportation from Auburn to Southern Union,” Witte said. “Many people who may be without a car or who walk to campus to work will be able to

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

take advantage of this opportunity.” Evening courses will be taught each Thursday by Southern Union staff member Georgia Love, who graduated from Auburn with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in collaborative teacher education. Coursework will be tailored to each student based on the results of aptitude tests. Sheri Downer, head of the College of Education’s Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology described Auburn’s role in the venture as “teaching the teachers how to effectively teach GED content to students.” According to a U.S. Census community survey conducted from 2005-09, 92.8 percent of the Auburn residents ages 25 and over have a high school degree or above. However, the lifetime earning potential of those individuals who fall into the 7.2-percent of have-nots is far lower. The National Center for Education Statistics reported that the average median income for individuals ages 18-67 who had not completed high school was approximately $23,000 in 2008, compared to $42,000 for individuals in the same age range who possessed at least a high school diploma or GED.

Boosted by a $9.9 million National Science Foundation grant awarded in Fall 2011, the NanoBio Science Partnership for the Alabama Black Belt Region will develop nanobioscience-based curriculum models to help teachers make science courses more engaging and effective for students. Tuskegee University is leading the project, which includes Auburn University, Alabama State University, the University of Alabama, the University of Alabama-Birmingham, and Shelton State, Wallace State, Wallace StateSelma, Enterprise and Central Alabama Community Colleges as partners. The project will be implemented in Barbour, Bullock, Dallas, Lee, Lowndes, Macon, Montgomery, Perry and Selma County schools. Four faculty members from the College of Education will collect information to help assess the overall success of the curriculum models. Betsy Ross, Jill Salisbury-Glennon, David Shannon and Joni Lakin received a sub-award of $875,000 to support their efforts over a 5-year period. “We’re responsible for the evaluation,” said Ross, director of the evaluation project and professor of educational research methodology and analysis. “We’re trying to look at teacher development and student and teacher attitudes.”

Four faculty members earn COE Seed Grants

Shannon is a Humana-Germany-Sherman distinguished professor, Salisbury-Glennon is an associate professor and Lakin is a newlyappointed assistant professor. Ross, Shannon and Lakin specialize in measurement, evaluation and statistics, while Salisbury-Glennon specializes in learning and development. Ross said graduate students from the department will also be able to gain research experience through the project.

P OOL I N G R ESOU R C ES The NanoBio Science Partnership for the Alabama Black Belt Region involves faculty at Auburn, Tuskegee, Alabama State, Alabama, UAB, Shelton State, Wallace State, Wallace State-Selma, Enterprise and Central Alabama Community College.

The NanoBio Science Partnership addresses critical needs in sixth- to eighthgrade science education in the state’s Black Belt, a region often characterized as being educationally and economically disadvantaged. The project provides for professional development for public school science education teachers in the region and will emphasize inquiry-based methods as well as 3-D simulations. Data on teacher and student performance will be collected and analyzed through qualitative and quantitative methods.

The college’s Scholarship and Innovation Committee awarded seed grants in support of three research projects in the 2011-12 academic year – one assessing the effectiveness of web-based educational activities, one evaluating the exercise habits of working women, and another exploring the connection between physical activity and sleep on the health of children from rural areas. Christal Pritchett, assistant professor of business/marketing education, and Leane Skinner, associate professor and program coordinator of business/marketing education, received funding for their project, “Implementation of the NBC Learn Program in a Contextual Learning Environment.” NBC Learn, the education arm of NBC News, is making historic film and video archive material available to teachers, students, schools, and universities. Their study focuses on the implementation of the program in two local high schools. Danielle Wadsworth, assistant professor of health promotion, and graduate student Nancy Gell received support for their project, “Geospatial Assessment of the Built Environment: Timing and Location of Physical Activity in Working Age Women.” The goals of the study include obtaining data that improves understanding of the factors promoting or obstructing physical activity participation among women. Wadsworth and Gell will identify where employed women exercise, including home and work locations, private facilities, and parks, using GPS data and accelerometry. Leah Robinson, assistant professor of motor behavior, earned funding for “Exploring the Relationship of Physical Activity and Sleep Duration on Weight Status and Cardiovascular Health in Children from a Rural Community.” Much of Robinson’s research focuses on pediatric motor development and health.

More than 10,000 students and 80 educators will be involved in the project.

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Around the college SE R C

SE R C

E F LT

CURR

Kluck helps inspire discussion

Transition Conference continues tradition of attracting top speakers

Kensler selected for ‘Green Schools’ evaluation team

Whyte presents work at Oxford

Associate professor Annette Kluck helped facilitate the screening and discussion of a documentary examining the ways in which the media’s misrepresentations of women have led to their lack of representation in positions of influence and power. Two screenings of Miss Representation, a documentary by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, were offered in January 2012. The film, which debuted at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and aired on the Oprah Winfrey Network, includes interviews with prominent politicians, journalists, entertainers and activists like Condoleeza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Katie Couric, Margaret Cho and Gloria Steinem.

E F LT

Witte delivers keynote address to electrical workers’ organization James Witte shared his insights on the role of professional educators as the keynote speaker for the National Training Institute of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW). The University of Michigan hosted the 21st annual event, which drew more than 1,500 IBEW members. The IBEW is the world’s largest international electrical trade union.

The 22nd Alabama Transition Conference continued its tradition of attracting nationally-recognized speakers to address topics relevant to helping students bridge the gap, or “transition” from high school to post-secondary employment opportunities. The Auburn Transition Leadership Institute, a research and outreach center in the college, hosted more than 600 attendees at the conference from March 5-6 in Opelika, Ala. The 2012 conference offered 55 concurrent sessions, eight workshops, seven poster sessions and a State Fair for parents, students, educators, policymakers, service providers and business representatives. Karen Rabren, director of the Auburn Transition Leadership Institute, said the conference is designed to allow students to network while providing them with necessary resources. “We want to give students an imaginary bridge of support to help them discover their own strengths and abilities while preparing them for the workforce,” Rabren said.

More than 50 faculty members, professors of education at colleges and universities around the country, shared their expertise at the National Training Institute. Witte said they help electrical industry trainers learn how to teach technical content to apprentices from across the country.

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Other speakers included Paul Bates of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, who conducted workshops on engaging students in person-centered planning, and Carol Schall of Virginia Commonwealth University, who led workshops discussing how positive behavior supports and how multi-component behavior intervention plans can help students learn to manage their behavior and find success in life after high school. The conference also featured Alabama Superintendent of Education Thomas Bice, Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services Commissioner Cary Boswell and Alabama Department of Mental Health Commissioner Zelia Bahugh.

Witte, the coordinator of adult and higher education in the College of Education, discussed the roles educators from university and college settings play in curriculum development, training and education in the electrical industry.

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The U.S. Green Building Council’s Green Schools Fellowship program selected Lisa Kensler, assistant professor of educational leadership, as an external evaluator.

The Alabama Transition Conference featured several nationally renowned experts, including keynote speaker Shari Rusch. Rusch, from Sumner, Wash., knows firsthand what it means to grow up with a disability and shared her triumph in becoming a successful writer and educator.

ATL I pr o vid e s i n s igh t The Auburn Transition Leadership Institute’s research provides valuable information for Alabama policymakers in understanding the needs of youth and young adults with disabilities. Consider some of the highlights of ATLI’s 2011 research: • ATLI shared results of the Alabama Parent Survey with the Special Education Services Division of the Alabama State Department of Education. The survey provided feedback from 5,332 parents, 75 percent of whom agreed or strongly agreed that schools have attempted to involve parents of students with disabilities. • ATLI’s Post-School Outcomes survey data revealed that 14 percent of young adults with disabilities (144 of 1,046 survey participants) were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school. • An additional 32 percent of the Post-School Outcomes survey participants reported being “competitively employed.” Eighteen percent of respondents were either enrolled in other postsecondary education or training program or engaged in “non-competitive” employment within one year of finishing high school.

Kensler and colleague Cynthia Uline, a professor of educational leadership at San Diego State University, have worked to assess the first year of the program’s efforts to promote sustainability and “greening” in school districts.

The Green Schools Fellowship program began placing full-time sustainability officers in school districts across the country in July 2011. These experts work with school district leaders to implement environmentally conscious practices. This involves educating students and staff about sustainability, improving recycling efforts, monitoring energy usage and exploring ways to limit consumption of it, providing environmental curriculum resources, formulating indoor air quality policies and practices, revising maintenance and transportation contracts and establishing school garden programs.

K I NE

SE R C

Quindry honored by alma mater

ALATEC earns regional recognition

John Quindry, associate professor and director of the Cardioprotection Laboratory, has been recognized by his alma mater for his strong research record. Quindry was selected for Illinois State University’s 2011 College of Applied Science and Technology Academy of Achievement. Quindry, who earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Illinois State, was one of seven alums selected for inclusion. A member of the Auburn faculty since January 2009, Quindry has established himself as a leading researcher in the realm of heart attack survival.

Alyson Whyte, associate professor of English education, shared some of her work with an international audience at England’s University of Oxford. Whyte presented her paper, “Optimistic Transgressing: Alabama Rural Writing Partners’ First Year,” at the Oxford Round Table on School Reform Strategies. Her work explores and reflects on the development and emerging ethos of the Alabama Rural Writing Partners, which pairs Auburn University students as writing partners with rural youth, families and schools. The program began during the 2010-2011 academic year. Whyte’s presentation involved the assertion of strength-based approaches to school and university partnerships and the roles university faculty members play in relation to partner schools. The Alabama Rural Writing Partners program serves multiple functions. In addition to strengthening the writing of seventh to 12th-grade students at partner schools Loachapoka and Notasulga, it enables College of Education students to receive training as future secondary school teachers.

The Alabama Assistive Technology Expo and Conference (ALATEC), a program co-hosted by the Center for Disability Research and Service and the Office of Professional and Continuing Education, received recognition from a regional education organization.

DEAN

Dean dishes with faculty and staff

ALATEC earned the Program for Special Populations Award presented by the Southern Region of the University Professional and Continuing Education Association. ALATEC offers networking and learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities and those who serve them. The conference showcases the newest forms of assistive technology, as well as the practices and services available to individuals with disabilities who are seeking increased access to education, employment, housing, transportation, healthcare and recreation.

In an effort to connect with faculty and staff and exchange ideas on a number of topics related to the college, Dean Betty Lou Whitford has been participating in a regular series of monthly luncheons called “Dine and Discuss with the Dean.” The lunch sessions, facilitated by the college’s Faculty and Governance committee, began in January 2012 and also include guest speakers and opportunities for professional development. Whitford also shares information with faculty and staff on a monthly basis through an internal electronic newsletter, “From the Dean’s Desk.”

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Around the college SE R C

SE R C

E F LT

CURR

Kluck helps inspire discussion

Transition Conference continues tradition of attracting top speakers

Kensler selected for ‘Green Schools’ evaluation team

Whyte presents work at Oxford

Associate professor Annette Kluck helped facilitate the screening and discussion of a documentary examining the ways in which the media’s misrepresentations of women have led to their lack of representation in positions of influence and power. Two screenings of Miss Representation, a documentary by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, were offered in January 2012. The film, which debuted at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and aired on the Oprah Winfrey Network, includes interviews with prominent politicians, journalists, entertainers and activists like Condoleeza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Katie Couric, Margaret Cho and Gloria Steinem.

E F LT

Witte delivers keynote address to electrical workers’ organization James Witte shared his insights on the role of professional educators as the keynote speaker for the National Training Institute of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW). The University of Michigan hosted the 21st annual event, which drew more than 1,500 IBEW members. The IBEW is the world’s largest international electrical trade union.

The 22nd Alabama Transition Conference continued its tradition of attracting nationally-recognized speakers to address topics relevant to helping students bridge the gap, or “transition” from high school to post-secondary employment opportunities. The Auburn Transition Leadership Institute, a research and outreach center in the college, hosted more than 600 attendees at the conference from March 5-6 in Opelika, Ala. The 2012 conference offered 55 concurrent sessions, eight workshops, seven poster sessions and a State Fair for parents, students, educators, policymakers, service providers and business representatives. Karen Rabren, director of the Auburn Transition Leadership Institute, said the conference is designed to allow students to network while providing them with necessary resources. “We want to give students an imaginary bridge of support to help them discover their own strengths and abilities while preparing them for the workforce,” Rabren said.

More than 50 faculty members, professors of education at colleges and universities around the country, shared their expertise at the National Training Institute. Witte said they help electrical industry trainers learn how to teach technical content to apprentices from across the country.

36

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Other speakers included Paul Bates of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, who conducted workshops on engaging students in person-centered planning, and Carol Schall of Virginia Commonwealth University, who led workshops discussing how positive behavior supports and how multi-component behavior intervention plans can help students learn to manage their behavior and find success in life after high school. The conference also featured Alabama Superintendent of Education Thomas Bice, Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services Commissioner Cary Boswell and Alabama Department of Mental Health Commissioner Zelia Bahugh.

Witte, the coordinator of adult and higher education in the College of Education, discussed the roles educators from university and college settings play in curriculum development, training and education in the electrical industry.

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

The U.S. Green Building Council’s Green Schools Fellowship program selected Lisa Kensler, assistant professor of educational leadership, as an external evaluator.

The Alabama Transition Conference featured several nationally renowned experts, including keynote speaker Shari Rusch. Rusch, from Sumner, Wash., knows firsthand what it means to grow up with a disability and shared her triumph in becoming a successful writer and educator.

ATL I pr o vid e s i n s igh t The Auburn Transition Leadership Institute’s research provides valuable information for Alabama policymakers in understanding the needs of youth and young adults with disabilities. Consider some of the highlights of ATLI’s 2011 research: • ATLI shared results of the Alabama Parent Survey with the Special Education Services Division of the Alabama State Department of Education. The survey provided feedback from 5,332 parents, 75 percent of whom agreed or strongly agreed that schools have attempted to involve parents of students with disabilities. • ATLI’s Post-School Outcomes survey data revealed that 14 percent of young adults with disabilities (144 of 1,046 survey participants) were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school. • An additional 32 percent of the Post-School Outcomes survey participants reported being “competitively employed.” Eighteen percent of respondents were either enrolled in other postsecondary education or training program or engaged in “non-competitive” employment within one year of finishing high school.

Kensler and colleague Cynthia Uline, a professor of educational leadership at San Diego State University, have worked to assess the first year of the program’s efforts to promote sustainability and “greening” in school districts.

The Green Schools Fellowship program began placing full-time sustainability officers in school districts across the country in July 2011. These experts work with school district leaders to implement environmentally conscious practices. This involves educating students and staff about sustainability, improving recycling efforts, monitoring energy usage and exploring ways to limit consumption of it, providing environmental curriculum resources, formulating indoor air quality policies and practices, revising maintenance and transportation contracts and establishing school garden programs.

K I NE

SE R C

Quindry honored by alma mater

ALATEC earns regional recognition

John Quindry, associate professor and director of the Cardioprotection Laboratory, has been recognized by his alma mater for his strong research record. Quindry was selected for Illinois State University’s 2011 College of Applied Science and Technology Academy of Achievement. Quindry, who earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Illinois State, was one of seven alums selected for inclusion. A member of the Auburn faculty since January 2009, Quindry has established himself as a leading researcher in the realm of heart attack survival.

Alyson Whyte, associate professor of English education, shared some of her work with an international audience at England’s University of Oxford. Whyte presented her paper, “Optimistic Transgressing: Alabama Rural Writing Partners’ First Year,” at the Oxford Round Table on School Reform Strategies. Her work explores and reflects on the development and emerging ethos of the Alabama Rural Writing Partners, which pairs Auburn University students as writing partners with rural youth, families and schools. The program began during the 2010-2011 academic year. Whyte’s presentation involved the assertion of strength-based approaches to school and university partnerships and the roles university faculty members play in relation to partner schools. The Alabama Rural Writing Partners program serves multiple functions. In addition to strengthening the writing of seventh to 12th-grade students at partner schools Loachapoka and Notasulga, it enables College of Education students to receive training as future secondary school teachers.

The Alabama Assistive Technology Expo and Conference (ALATEC), a program co-hosted by the Center for Disability Research and Service and the Office of Professional and Continuing Education, received recognition from a regional education organization.

DEAN

Dean dishes with faculty and staff

ALATEC earned the Program for Special Populations Award presented by the Southern Region of the University Professional and Continuing Education Association. ALATEC offers networking and learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities and those who serve them. The conference showcases the newest forms of assistive technology, as well as the practices and services available to individuals with disabilities who are seeking increased access to education, employment, housing, transportation, healthcare and recreation.

In an effort to connect with faculty and staff and exchange ideas on a number of topics related to the college, Dean Betty Lou Whitford has been participating in a regular series of monthly luncheons called “Dine and Discuss with the Dean.” The lunch sessions, facilitated by the college’s Faculty and Governance committee, began in January 2012 and also include guest speakers and opportunities for professional development. Whitford also shares information with faculty and staff on a monthly basis through an internal electronic newsletter, “From the Dean’s Desk.”

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Around the college CURR

N e w fac u lt y a n d s taff

ABEA conference comes to campus The business/marketing education program hosted the 47th Annual Alabama Business Education Association (ABEA) conference in January 2012. The event draws business education teachers from across Alabama. The keynote speaker was Dwionne R. Freeman, a 2004 graduate of Auburn’s business/marketing education program. Freeman was named the 2011 New Teacher of the Year by the Georgia Business Education Association and served as president of the organization. Other attendees included Dawn Morrison of the Alabama State Department of Education and Madge Gregg, 2011 president of the National Business Education Association (NBEA). The conference offered workshops on the use of technology in business classrooms to reach English as a Second Language and struggling learners, the empowerment of students through financial literacy, NBC Learn, the integration of Web 2.0 technology into classrooms, webpage design, Microsoft Word 2010, and the use of electronic portfolios for standards-based assessment.

Megan Burton Assistant Professor Curriculum and Teaching

Vanessa Hinton Visiting Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

Youngstown State honors Carney

Melanie Iarussi Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

Amanda Evans Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

Jessica Garrett Administrative Support Associate I - Academic Learning Resources Center

Mark Keehn Alfreda Jackson Administrative Support Information Technology Specialist IV Associate I - Academic Learning Special Education, Resources Center Rehabilitation and Counseling

TPI

Buckhalt speaks at NIH workshop

TPI celebrates anniversary

Joseph Buckhalt, Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling, spoke at a National Institutes of Health workshop on the subject of sleep disorders in September 2011. Buckhalt, the college’s director of training for school psychology, was an invited speaker for the for the event, “Reducing Health Disparities: The Role of Sleep Deficiency and Sleep Disorders.’’ The workshop provided a forum for sharing and summarizing recent research, identifying critical gaps in knowledge and developing priorities for NIH funding initiatives. Buckhalt spoke on the subject of “Trajectories of Sleep and Child Development Outcomes in Cognitive, Emotional, and Health Domains.’’ His session was based on the findings of NIH-funded projects for

Heidi Kluess Assistant Professor Kinesiology

SE R C

April Colley Advisor I, Academic Professional Education Services

SE R C

Joni Lakin Assistant Professor Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Jill Meyer Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

John Schissler Specialist I, Contracts and Grants Office of Research and Innovation

Carney, a 1987 graduate, completed her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in community counseling before earning her doctorate from Ohio University. Her research interests include attitudinal research and training and evaluating methods of counselor education. At Auburn, Carney has advised the Chi Sigma Iota chapter, as well as AuburnVoices.

38

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Linda Searby Assistant Professor Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Myra Thomas Administrator II, Outreach Programs Auburn Transition Leadership Institute

Stephanie Thompson Coordinator III, Student Services Professional Education Services

Antoinette Wilson Administrator I, Academic Programs Center for Disability Research and Service

NOT P I C TU R E D Glenda Hill Administrative Support Assistant I - Academic Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

In 1982, Alabama’s governor and Auburn University’s president signed a charter outlining the institute’s commitment to improving schools and communities through research and the creation of partnerships.

Buckhalt and El-Sheikh also received a grant from the Society for Research in Child Development to host a study group on sleep and child development. A forum held in April 2012 brought 30 American and international scholars to campus to discuss the health disparities that exist in such areas as sleep disorders, cardiovascular disease, obesity and metabolic disorders.

E F LT

Publications aplenty for Groccia James Groccia, director of the Biggio Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning and associate professor of higher education, had an especially prolific

Jamie Carney, professor and coordinator of counselor education and supervision, has earned an Outstanding Alumnus Award from Youngstown State University’s Beeghly College of Education. The college recognized outstanding graduates from each of its departments in conjunction with its 40-year anniversary.

The Truman Pierce Institute, a research and outreach unit dedicated to the study and improvement and teaching, learning and leadership, celebrated its 30th anniversary in April 2012.

which he and Mona El-Sheikh in Auburn University’s College of Human Sciences served as co-investigators. In their NIHand National Science Foundation-funded projects, the pair followed several cohorts of children from Opelika and Lee County Schools beginning with their second grade years. They expect to follow them at least through junior high school to learn more about the relationships that may exist between their sleep habits, family stress, emotional regulation, cognitive function, anxiety and academic performance.

year as an author. He was the primary author or co-author on four books that were published in the fall of 2011. Groccia’s publications include first authorship of “The Handbook of College and University Teaching: A Global Perspective,” and “The First-Year Seminar:

Designing, Implementing, and Assessing Courses to Support Student Learning and Success: Volume II – Instructor Training and Development.” He also contributed to “Evidence-based Teaching: New Directions in Teaching and Learning, Vol. 128” and “To Improve the Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, Volume 30.” In fall 2011, Groccia spent the semester at the University of Tartu in Estonia as a Fulbright Scholar. In June 2012, Groccia and the Biggio Center will welcome 30 faculty from King Saud University in Saudi Arabia for a Summer Teaching Institute.

Named after Truman M. Pierce, who served as the College of Education’s dean for two decades, the institute has worked to meet the educational needs of the state and region on a variety of fronts by addressing such topics as dropout prevention, school bullying, student achievement, community economic development, leadership training and the strengthening of community learning centers.

CURR

Mathematics education faculty involved in partnership Marilyn Strutchens and Gary Martin, codirectors of TEAM-Math (Transforming East Alabama Mathematics) were among a group of scholars invited to help construct “guiding principles” for mathematics teacher education programs as a means of ensuring students are prepared to excel in college and on the job market. Strutchens and Martin are members of the Mathematics Teacher Education Partnership. Strutchens and Martin participated in the partnership conference in March 2012 in Atlanta. The conference, initiated by the Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative (SMTI) of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU), also enabled research teams to gather information about improvement efforts. Memberships of the partnership will continue working in groups in the coming years and will also have the opportunity to participate in national meetings.

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39


Around the college CURR

N e w fac u lt y a n d s taff

ABEA conference comes to campus The business/marketing education program hosted the 47th Annual Alabama Business Education Association (ABEA) conference in January 2012. The event draws business education teachers from across Alabama. The keynote speaker was Dwionne R. Freeman, a 2004 graduate of Auburn’s business/marketing education program. Freeman was named the 2011 New Teacher of the Year by the Georgia Business Education Association and served as president of the organization. Other attendees included Dawn Morrison of the Alabama State Department of Education and Madge Gregg, 2011 president of the National Business Education Association (NBEA). The conference offered workshops on the use of technology in business classrooms to reach English as a Second Language and struggling learners, the empowerment of students through financial literacy, NBC Learn, the integration of Web 2.0 technology into classrooms, webpage design, Microsoft Word 2010, and the use of electronic portfolios for standards-based assessment.

Megan Burton Assistant Professor Curriculum and Teaching

Vanessa Hinton Visiting Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

Youngstown State honors Carney

Melanie Iarussi Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

Amanda Evans Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

Jessica Garrett Administrative Support Associate I - Academic Learning Resources Center

Mark Keehn Alfreda Jackson Administrative Support Information Technology Specialist IV Associate I - Academic Learning Special Education, Resources Center Rehabilitation and Counseling

TPI

Buckhalt speaks at NIH workshop

TPI celebrates anniversary

Joseph Buckhalt, Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling, spoke at a National Institutes of Health workshop on the subject of sleep disorders in September 2011. Buckhalt, the college’s director of training for school psychology, was an invited speaker for the for the event, “Reducing Health Disparities: The Role of Sleep Deficiency and Sleep Disorders.’’ The workshop provided a forum for sharing and summarizing recent research, identifying critical gaps in knowledge and developing priorities for NIH funding initiatives. Buckhalt spoke on the subject of “Trajectories of Sleep and Child Development Outcomes in Cognitive, Emotional, and Health Domains.’’ His session was based on the findings of NIH-funded projects for

Heidi Kluess Assistant Professor Kinesiology

SE R C

April Colley Advisor I, Academic Professional Education Services

SE R C

Joni Lakin Assistant Professor Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Jill Meyer Assistant Professor Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling

John Schissler Specialist I, Contracts and Grants Office of Research and Innovation

Carney, a 1987 graduate, completed her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in community counseling before earning her doctorate from Ohio University. Her research interests include attitudinal research and training and evaluating methods of counselor education. At Auburn, Carney has advised the Chi Sigma Iota chapter, as well as AuburnVoices.

38

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Linda Searby Assistant Professor Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Myra Thomas Administrator II, Outreach Programs Auburn Transition Leadership Institute

Stephanie Thompson Coordinator III, Student Services Professional Education Services

Antoinette Wilson Administrator I, Academic Programs Center for Disability Research and Service

NOT P I C TU R E D Glenda Hill Administrative Support Assistant I - Academic Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

In 1982, Alabama’s governor and Auburn University’s president signed a charter outlining the institute’s commitment to improving schools and communities through research and the creation of partnerships.

Buckhalt and El-Sheikh also received a grant from the Society for Research in Child Development to host a study group on sleep and child development. A forum held in April 2012 brought 30 American and international scholars to campus to discuss the health disparities that exist in such areas as sleep disorders, cardiovascular disease, obesity and metabolic disorders.

E F LT

Publications aplenty for Groccia James Groccia, director of the Biggio Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning and associate professor of higher education, had an especially prolific

Jamie Carney, professor and coordinator of counselor education and supervision, has earned an Outstanding Alumnus Award from Youngstown State University’s Beeghly College of Education. The college recognized outstanding graduates from each of its departments in conjunction with its 40-year anniversary.

The Truman Pierce Institute, a research and outreach unit dedicated to the study and improvement and teaching, learning and leadership, celebrated its 30th anniversary in April 2012.

which he and Mona El-Sheikh in Auburn University’s College of Human Sciences served as co-investigators. In their NIHand National Science Foundation-funded projects, the pair followed several cohorts of children from Opelika and Lee County Schools beginning with their second grade years. They expect to follow them at least through junior high school to learn more about the relationships that may exist between their sleep habits, family stress, emotional regulation, cognitive function, anxiety and academic performance.

year as an author. He was the primary author or co-author on four books that were published in the fall of 2011. Groccia’s publications include first authorship of “The Handbook of College and University Teaching: A Global Perspective,” and “The First-Year Seminar:

Designing, Implementing, and Assessing Courses to Support Student Learning and Success: Volume II – Instructor Training and Development.” He also contributed to “Evidence-based Teaching: New Directions in Teaching and Learning, Vol. 128” and “To Improve the Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, Volume 30.” In fall 2011, Groccia spent the semester at the University of Tartu in Estonia as a Fulbright Scholar. In June 2012, Groccia and the Biggio Center will welcome 30 faculty from King Saud University in Saudi Arabia for a Summer Teaching Institute.

Named after Truman M. Pierce, who served as the College of Education’s dean for two decades, the institute has worked to meet the educational needs of the state and region on a variety of fronts by addressing such topics as dropout prevention, school bullying, student achievement, community economic development, leadership training and the strengthening of community learning centers.

CURR

Mathematics education faculty involved in partnership Marilyn Strutchens and Gary Martin, codirectors of TEAM-Math (Transforming East Alabama Mathematics) were among a group of scholars invited to help construct “guiding principles” for mathematics teacher education programs as a means of ensuring students are prepared to excel in college and on the job market. Strutchens and Martin are members of the Mathematics Teacher Education Partnership. Strutchens and Martin participated in the partnership conference in March 2012 in Atlanta. The conference, initiated by the Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative (SMTI) of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU), also enabled research teams to gather information about improvement efforts. Memberships of the partnership will continue working in groups in the coming years and will also have the opportunity to participate in national meetings.

Keystone

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39


College

12.5% corporations

Knowledge 2010-2011 academic year

Most-Popular Undergraduate Majors

College Private Funding Calendar Year 2011

elementary education, exercise science, early childhood education, general social science education, and English language arts education

The College of Education thanks its alumni and friends for their support in 2011 and their continued assistance in helping to build a better future for all.

13.0% foundations

Donor Categories

Most-Popular Graduate Majors

percent of overall giving

administration of higher education, exercise science, adult education, collaborative teacher special education, and administration of elementary and secondary education

28%

72%

of College of education students are male

of College of education students are FEmale

$6.87

74.5% Individuals

0.6% foundations

1.1% corporations

million dollars raised in external granT funding

98.3% Individuals

$1,088,557

2% education specialist 25% senior

13% freshman

14% sophomore

by classification

The college awarded 724 degrees in 2010-11.

450

million dollars received in donor funds

percent of total donors

400

350

14% doctoral

300

16% junior

250

0.3% faculty support 230

16% master’s

500

420

student enrollment

Degrees conferred

Donor Categories

0.5% capital support

39.4% programmAtic support

4% instructor 200

22% assistant professor 43% associate professor

150

Active Endowed and Annual Funds

100

faculty

29

50

45

by level

From which scholarships and graduate awards were made: 50 undergraduate

donor fund designations percent of overall giving

59.8% student support

15 graduate

0

31% full professor

d un

40

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er

’s i s t al te ua ter ial tor d s a a ec c gr m sp do

Keystone

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41


College

12.5% corporations

Knowledge 2010-2011 academic year

Most-Popular Undergraduate Majors

College Private Funding Calendar Year 2011

elementary education, exercise science, early childhood education, general social science education, and English language arts education

The College of Education thanks its alumni and friends for their support in 2011 and their continued assistance in helping to build a better future for all.

13.0% foundations

Donor Categories

Most-Popular Graduate Majors

percent of overall giving

administration of higher education, exercise science, adult education, collaborative teacher special education, and administration of elementary and secondary education

28%

72%

of College of education students are male

of College of education students are FEmale

$6.87

74.5% Individuals

0.6% foundations

1.1% corporations

million dollars raised in external granT funding

98.3% Individuals

$1,088,557

2% education specialist 25% senior

13% freshman

14% sophomore

by classification

The college awarded 724 degrees in 2010-11.

450

million dollars received in donor funds

percent of total donors

400

350

14% doctoral

300

16% junior

250

0.3% faculty support 230

16% master’s

500

420

student enrollment

Degrees conferred

Donor Categories

0.5% capital support

39.4% programmAtic support

4% instructor 200

22% assistant professor 43% associate professor

150

Active Endowed and Annual Funds

100

faculty

29

50

45

by level

From which scholarships and graduate awards were made: 50 undergraduate

donor fund designations percent of overall giving

59.8% student support

15 graduate

0

31% full professor

d un

40

Keystone

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er

’s i s t al te ua ter ial tor d s a a ec c gr m sp do

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givi n g

Pate family’s gift inspired by generosity of long-time coach and his wife More than 40 years ago, coach Wayne Pope and his wife, Charmian, performed a rescue mission of sorts. They saw potential in a teenager who had quit school six weeks shy of completing the eighth grade. They begged and pleaded with him to return to school, to persevere and pull through. They encouraged him to use his athletic and academic ability to escape the poverty of his rural upbringing. Daniel Pate ’66 never forgot what the Popes did for him, what opportunities their simple act of caring created. Had it not been for them, Pate would not have graduated from Conecuh County High School in Castleberry, Ala., and wouldn’t have earned a basketball scholarship to Snead Junior College. He wouldn’t have found his way to Auburn or developed a passion for educating others. Pate, who graduated from Auburn with a degree in mathematics education, taught physics and geometry at Lee High School in Huntsville before working for such companies as Boeing, Computer Science Corporation, System Development Corporation and Science Application International Company.

of Coach Pope, who coached basketball at Conecuh County High School from 1958-71 and served as principal. “His wife, Charmian, and daughter, Vicki, treated me like a member of their family.” Coach Pope, who passed away in 1996, served as superintendent of Conecuh County Schools from 1976-88.

Burney family gift creates opportunities for Education students Many residents of Valley, Ala., simply knew Samuel Marion Burney as “The Colonel.”

And for good reason.

Burney earned the rank and served with distinction during his more than 30 years with the U.S. Army. He served as a combat engineer with Gen. George Patton’s Third Army during World War II and earned the Bronze Star, among numerous other accolades. Burney’s commitment to his country was also matched by his passion for education. He graduated from Auburn University in 1941 with a degree in mechanical engineering, a source of pride for his family given the timing of his arrival on campus.

Pate and his wife, Marcia, From left: Marcia Pate, Daniel Pate, Charmian Pope, Jennings Fussell and Vicki Fussell. identified an appropriate way to say thank you by endowing The Coach Wayne and Charmian Pope Distinguished Endowed Scholarship.

“My father finished here at Auburn right after the Great Depression,” said Samuel Burney Jr., a retired Army lieutenant colonel. “If you grew up in Valley, Ala., back then, chances were that you were going to grow up and work in a mill. He used the ROTC as the primary source of funds to get through school.”

Presented for the first time in 2010, the scholarship covers full tuition for one or two years for College of Education students from either Conecuh or Escambia County.

Col. Burney passed away in September 2010, at the age of 92, but he left his family with a special set of instructions. He asked that a portion of his estate be used to support the Marsha Lynn Burns Burney Endowed Scholarship presented by Auburn University’s College of Education. The scholarship, started in 1992, honors outstanding English education students.

“I am so thankful that we knew each other as coach and player, teacher and student, best friends and fishing partners,” Pate said

The Marsha Lynn Burns Burney Endowed Scholarship honors the wife of Lt. Rick Burney, one of Col. Burney’s eight grandchildren. Mrs. Burney, who passed away in 1992, excelled as a scholar, an athlete and a leader. She displayed her passion for education while providing swimming lessons as a teenager at the Auburn City Pool and serving as chaplain of the Kadettes as an Auburn University student. The Burney family’s gift stems, in part, from Col. Burney’s affection for his granddaughter-in-law, who benefitted from the generosity of donors while attending Converse College in Spartanburg, S.C., and Auburn University. “When Marsha was a student here, she earned her way through school with scholarships, grants and working a couple of jobs,” Sam Burney Jr. said. “When she passed away, her husband – my son – decided that [starting a scholarship in her name] would be an appropriate way to honor her and remember her.”

‘Surprise’ scholarship gift turns tables on Manleys

Col. Burney’s three children – Sam Jr., Sue Farrell and Cynthia Moline – presented a $100,000 donation to the college in August 2011, just before its 10th Annual Scholarship Ceremony.

Neither Jim nor Harriett Manley graduated from the College of Education, but that hasn’t stopped them from making gifts in support of its students and faculty.

“A couple of years ago, he discussed what he wanted to do when he passed away,” Sue Farrell said. “Giving to the scholarship was one of them.”

Mr. Manley, a 1960 College of Business graduate, and Mrs. Manley, a former educator in DeKalb County, Ga., established the Lucy B. Pittman Endowment for Scholarships in the college in 2004 and are also members of the college’s Patrons of the KeystoneDean’s Circle. Mr. Manley also served on the college’s National Advisory Council for 11 years, including six as chair of the group.

Johns’ gift provides resources for critical needs areas of teaching

In 2011, family members surprised the Manleys by establishing a scholarship in their honor. The Harriett Elder and James Autrey Manley Endowed Scholarship Award in the College of Education will provide four-year renewable scholarships for incoming freshmen based on grade point average and standardized test scores.

son Jefferson (1992 Liberal Arts graduate), established the scholarship to honor their parents for their commitment to education and their support of Auburn University.

The Manleys’ daughters, Kimble Manley Eastman and Victoria Manley, made a special presentation during the August 2011 National Advisory Council meeting. Eastman earned a degree from the College of Education in 1985. The Manley children, including

Mrs. Manley’s family possesses a number of connections to the College of Education. Her mother — Anne Pittman Elder — graduated from the college in 1936. Her aunt, Lucy Bernice Pittman, completed her studies in the College of Education in 1938.

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Victoria Manley and Kimble Manley Eastman ’85 surprise their parents with a certificate commemorating an endowed scholarship in their name.

The college’s mathematics education and special education programs were able to obtain new technological tools with the help of a $10,000 gift from Ken Johns ’57 (see related story, page 69). His gift enabled the purchase of iPad2 devices to be used to address critical needs areas of teaching. Beginning in the summer of 2011, 20 iPad2s were distributed to mathematics education majors in an elementary math education technology course. Gary Martin, Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck Endowed Professor of secondary mathematics education, taught the course. His students used the devices to write and save notes, receive guided instruction, access

video-based lessons, and receive instantaneous feedback on practice questions. The devices also enabled preservice teachers to utilize a new method of curriculum delivery capable of creating an interactive and engaging environment for students. In addition to offering the opportunity to peruse digital textbooks, the iPad2 devices feature applications (apps) that allow teachers and students to tailor learning to meet individual needs. The iPad2s were also used in a secondary math technology course in fall 2011 and will also be incorporated in special education courses.

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givi n g

Pate family’s gift inspired by generosity of long-time coach and his wife More than 40 years ago, coach Wayne Pope and his wife, Charmian, performed a rescue mission of sorts. They saw potential in a teenager who had quit school six weeks shy of completing the eighth grade. They begged and pleaded with him to return to school, to persevere and pull through. They encouraged him to use his athletic and academic ability to escape the poverty of his rural upbringing. Daniel Pate ’66 never forgot what the Popes did for him, what opportunities their simple act of caring created. Had it not been for them, Pate would not have graduated from Conecuh County High School in Castleberry, Ala., and wouldn’t have earned a basketball scholarship to Snead Junior College. He wouldn’t have found his way to Auburn or developed a passion for educating others. Pate, who graduated from Auburn with a degree in mathematics education, taught physics and geometry at Lee High School in Huntsville before working for such companies as Boeing, Computer Science Corporation, System Development Corporation and Science Application International Company.

of Coach Pope, who coached basketball at Conecuh County High School from 1958-71 and served as principal. “His wife, Charmian, and daughter, Vicki, treated me like a member of their family.” Coach Pope, who passed away in 1996, served as superintendent of Conecuh County Schools from 1976-88.

Burney family gift creates opportunities for Education students Many residents of Valley, Ala., simply knew Samuel Marion Burney as “The Colonel.”

And for good reason.

Burney earned the rank and served with distinction during his more than 30 years with the U.S. Army. He served as a combat engineer with Gen. George Patton’s Third Army during World War II and earned the Bronze Star, among numerous other accolades. Burney’s commitment to his country was also matched by his passion for education. He graduated from Auburn University in 1941 with a degree in mechanical engineering, a source of pride for his family given the timing of his arrival on campus.

Pate and his wife, Marcia, From left: Marcia Pate, Daniel Pate, Charmian Pope, Jennings Fussell and Vicki Fussell. identified an appropriate way to say thank you by endowing The Coach Wayne and Charmian Pope Distinguished Endowed Scholarship.

“My father finished here at Auburn right after the Great Depression,” said Samuel Burney Jr., a retired Army lieutenant colonel. “If you grew up in Valley, Ala., back then, chances were that you were going to grow up and work in a mill. He used the ROTC as the primary source of funds to get through school.”

Presented for the first time in 2010, the scholarship covers full tuition for one or two years for College of Education students from either Conecuh or Escambia County.

Col. Burney passed away in September 2010, at the age of 92, but he left his family with a special set of instructions. He asked that a portion of his estate be used to support the Marsha Lynn Burns Burney Endowed Scholarship presented by Auburn University’s College of Education. The scholarship, started in 1992, honors outstanding English education students.

“I am so thankful that we knew each other as coach and player, teacher and student, best friends and fishing partners,” Pate said

The Marsha Lynn Burns Burney Endowed Scholarship honors the wife of Lt. Rick Burney, one of Col. Burney’s eight grandchildren. Mrs. Burney, who passed away in 1992, excelled as a scholar, an athlete and a leader. She displayed her passion for education while providing swimming lessons as a teenager at the Auburn City Pool and serving as chaplain of the Kadettes as an Auburn University student. The Burney family’s gift stems, in part, from Col. Burney’s affection for his granddaughter-in-law, who benefitted from the generosity of donors while attending Converse College in Spartanburg, S.C., and Auburn University. “When Marsha was a student here, she earned her way through school with scholarships, grants and working a couple of jobs,” Sam Burney Jr. said. “When she passed away, her husband – my son – decided that [starting a scholarship in her name] would be an appropriate way to honor her and remember her.”

‘Surprise’ scholarship gift turns tables on Manleys

Col. Burney’s three children – Sam Jr., Sue Farrell and Cynthia Moline – presented a $100,000 donation to the college in August 2011, just before its 10th Annual Scholarship Ceremony.

Neither Jim nor Harriett Manley graduated from the College of Education, but that hasn’t stopped them from making gifts in support of its students and faculty.

“A couple of years ago, he discussed what he wanted to do when he passed away,” Sue Farrell said. “Giving to the scholarship was one of them.”

Mr. Manley, a 1960 College of Business graduate, and Mrs. Manley, a former educator in DeKalb County, Ga., established the Lucy B. Pittman Endowment for Scholarships in the college in 2004 and are also members of the college’s Patrons of the KeystoneDean’s Circle. Mr. Manley also served on the college’s National Advisory Council for 11 years, including six as chair of the group.

Johns’ gift provides resources for critical needs areas of teaching

In 2011, family members surprised the Manleys by establishing a scholarship in their honor. The Harriett Elder and James Autrey Manley Endowed Scholarship Award in the College of Education will provide four-year renewable scholarships for incoming freshmen based on grade point average and standardized test scores.

son Jefferson (1992 Liberal Arts graduate), established the scholarship to honor their parents for their commitment to education and their support of Auburn University.

The Manleys’ daughters, Kimble Manley Eastman and Victoria Manley, made a special presentation during the August 2011 National Advisory Council meeting. Eastman earned a degree from the College of Education in 1985. The Manley children, including

Mrs. Manley’s family possesses a number of connections to the College of Education. Her mother — Anne Pittman Elder — graduated from the college in 1936. Her aunt, Lucy Bernice Pittman, completed her studies in the College of Education in 1938.

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Victoria Manley and Kimble Manley Eastman ’85 surprise their parents with a certificate commemorating an endowed scholarship in their name.

The college’s mathematics education and special education programs were able to obtain new technological tools with the help of a $10,000 gift from Ken Johns ’57 (see related story, page 69). His gift enabled the purchase of iPad2 devices to be used to address critical needs areas of teaching. Beginning in the summer of 2011, 20 iPad2s were distributed to mathematics education majors in an elementary math education technology course. Gary Martin, Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck Endowed Professor of secondary mathematics education, taught the course. His students used the devices to write and save notes, receive guided instruction, access

video-based lessons, and receive instantaneous feedback on practice questions. The devices also enabled preservice teachers to utilize a new method of curriculum delivery capable of creating an interactive and engaging environment for students. In addition to offering the opportunity to peruse digital textbooks, the iPad2 devices feature applications (apps) that allow teachers and students to tailor learning to meet individual needs. The iPad2s were also used in a secondary math technology course in fall 2011 and will also be incorporated in special education courses.

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Former band members honor Walls’ memory When Fritz Siler ’73 visited campus recently, he wore a gray Auburn Alumni sweatshirt that featured an orange and blue interlocking AU symbol. Had Siler not given in to his creative impulses while a member of the Auburn University marching band in the mid-1960s, the interlocking AU might not be seen today on sweatshirts, football helmets, pennants, flags and countless other pieces of officiallylicensed merchandise. Tired of painting a block letter “Bill persuaded students to “A” on the heads of bass drums become music teachers. He which, in the days before was a good mentor. He helped high-definition TV were often difficult to distinguish from the a lot of us realize we had capital As used by Arkansas, great potential to be happy Arizona and a certain other doing what he did.” university across the state, Siler Fritz siler ’73, retired music educator opted for a capital “AU” one day. Before long, the symbol caught the eye of other individuals on campus. As Inside the Auburn Tigers magazine detailed in its December 2011 issue, the interlocking AU caught the eye of thenfootball coach Ralph “Shug” Jordan, who emblazoned it on the side of his team’s helmets beginning in 1966.

versity. Siler made a contribution to the Bill “Doc” Walls Endowed Scholarship in the College of Education. Established in 2011 in memory of Bill “Doc” Walls by his friends and by his wife Kimberly, interim head of the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching, the scholarship provides support for undergraduate music education majors from Alabama who perform as wind, brass or percussion instrumentalists. The scholarship serves as a fitting tribute to Walls, who served as director of the Auburn University marching band from 1969-1991 and taught music to thousands of students as a faculty member.

“We just wanted to do something a little different,” said Siler, a retired music educator from Snellville, Ga., who completed a music education degree at Auburn in 1973 after a stint in the Army.

“Bill persuaded students to become Fritz Siler ’73 visits with Kimberly Walls, interim head of the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. music teachers,” said Siler who, before retiring, taught music at Shiloh Middle School in Gwinnett County, Ga. “He was a good mentor. He helped a lot of us realize we had great potential to be happy doing what he did.”

During his most recent visit to campus, Siler did so to pay tribute to a man who similarly left a remarkable imprint at the uni-

Siler said he remains close to a number of former bandmates because of the culture that existed.

Sch o l ar s hip s p o t l igh t Each year, we recognize the generosity of individuals and groups who provide support for our students through annual gifts and endowments on the pages of the Keystone. You can also learn more about our scholarships and the people who make them possible by visiting the Scholarship Spotlight section of our website at education.auburn.edu/giving/spotlight. We are proud to recognize the people who support our students through their contributions, as well as the individuals some have chosen to honor by establishing undergraduate and graduate awards. Please refer to our webpage to find profiles on scholarships and donors. The content will change periodically to salute the generosity of our supporters and highlight the opportunities they create for students.

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“It was a family,” he said.

They played as a family and they mourned as a family after Walls’ passing at the age of 77. Another former band member, Christian Walters ’91, summed up what Walls meant to so many in a November 2011 blog post entitled, “Rest in peace, or at least in tune.” “[Dr. Walls] was a hell of a director,” Walter wrote. “Not just on the podium, but in picking music that suited his musicians. … The music was impressive and challenging and when it came together, we felt like we’d accomplished something. That was only possible because of Dr. Walls.”

Spotlight: 2011 Summer Bridge-Future Barkley Foundation gift could make student recruitment a slam dunk Asherah Blount grew up in metro Atlanta and spent her first four years of college in Albany, Ga., but knew very little about the university she would eventually attend as a graduate student. “No one went to Auburn in my family,” said Blount, a doctoral candidate in motor development from Decatur, Ga. “I wasn’t familiar with the area aside from Tuskegee.”

J V u b v B

Blount hadn’t thought much at all about coming to Auburn, but Auburn came to her. Jared Russell, interim director of student development for the College of Education and associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology, has made it his mission to preach the virtues of the college’s graduate program experience to students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the region. He regularly visits and builds relationships with faculty members and prospective graduate students at Atlanta’s Morehouse College and Spelman College, as well as Albany State University and Fort Valley State University. Blount wound up at Auburn to earn her master’s degree in physical education pedagogy and pursue a doctorate partly because she saw one of Russell’s fliers on the Albany State campus. She liked what she saw and wanted to learn more.

“That’s how I met Dr. Russell,” she said.

The scope of Russell’s efforts to recruit outstanding graduate students to the college and the graduate programs in his own department now extends well beyond pieces of paper tacked to bulletin boards. A $25,000 gift from the Charles Barkley Foundation will help support the college’s Summer Bridge-Future Graduate Scholars Program. Created by Russell, the six-week program provides intensive academic and research experiences for prospective graduate students from HBCUs and aids the transition of junior- and seniorlevel undergraduates into Kinesiology graduate programs. The Charles Barkley Foundation represents the philanthropic side of former Auburn University basketball star Charles Barkley. Known as “Sir Charles” and “The Round Mound of Rebound” during his professional career, Barkley was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006. His NBA career included 11 All-Star Game appearances, two Olympic gold medals and a league

Morehouse College’s Jeff Clark and Albany State’s Valarie Lee use a high-speed camera to examine bat swing form, mechanics and velocity in the Department of Kinesiology’s Biomechanics Laboratory.

MVP trophy. He has since wound up in front of TV cameras in another capacity, as a TV commentator on the NBA. Russell said he has tried to bring energy, as a well as a personal Participants in the 2011 program outsidestudents. touch, to the process of piquing the interestgather of prospective of the Auburn University College of A graduate of Morehouse College, Russell wants today’s students to Architecture, Design and to Construction duringthan a what have a more seamless transition a graduate program and tour.Russell became the first African-American male hevisit encountered. to graduate from his doctoral program at the University of Georgia in 2002. He said students look for places where they feel as though they fit. “I got the big, green graduate school book,” Russell said. “I went to the adviser and they said, ‘Here’s the book, find a program.’ That’s one reason why I started doing this after getting out of graduate school. It’s all about exposure. Students may not know what we have to offer because they have no connection [to Auburn]. Their connections are with places like Tuskegee and Alabama State.” The Summer Bridge Program provides students with a glimpse of what awaits them should they decide to pursue master’s degrees and doctorates at Auburn. “It’s an opportunity for them to be on campus for a period of time, to get to know the faculty and resources,” Russell said. “It’s like recruiting a good athlete. You get them young, eighth or ninth grade, and give them an opportunity to be on campus. That’s what the Charles Barkley Foundation gift is for, to get students on campus and get them exposed to Auburn and the College of Education.”

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P C f th


givi n g

Former band members honor Walls’ memory When Fritz Siler ’73 visited campus recently, he wore a gray Auburn Alumni sweatshirt that featured an orange and blue interlocking AU symbol. Had Siler not given in to his creative impulses while a member of the Auburn University marching band in the mid-1960s, the interlocking AU might not be seen today on sweatshirts, football helmets, pennants, flags and countless other pieces of officiallylicensed merchandise. Tired of painting a block letter “Bill persuaded students to “A” on the heads of bass drums become music teachers. He which, in the days before was a good mentor. He helped high-definition TV were often difficult to distinguish from the a lot of us realize we had capital As used by Arkansas, great potential to be happy Arizona and a certain other doing what he did.” university across the state, Siler Fritz siler ’73, retired music educator opted for a capital “AU” one day. Before long, the symbol caught the eye of other individuals on campus. As Inside the Auburn Tigers magazine detailed in its December 2011 issue, the interlocking AU caught the eye of thenfootball coach Ralph “Shug” Jordan, who emblazoned it on the side of his team’s helmets beginning in 1966.

versity. Siler made a contribution to the Bill “Doc” Walls Endowed Scholarship in the College of Education. Established in 2011 in memory of Bill “Doc” Walls by his friends and by his wife Kimberly, interim head of the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching, the scholarship provides support for undergraduate music education majors from Alabama who perform as wind, brass or percussion instrumentalists. The scholarship serves as a fitting tribute to Walls, who served as director of the Auburn University marching band from 1969-1991 and taught music to thousands of students as a faculty member.

“We just wanted to do something a little different,” said Siler, a retired music educator from Snellville, Ga., who completed a music education degree at Auburn in 1973 after a stint in the Army.

“Bill persuaded students to become Fritz Siler ’73 visits with Kimberly Walls, interim head of the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. music teachers,” said Siler who, before retiring, taught music at Shiloh Middle School in Gwinnett County, Ga. “He was a good mentor. He helped a lot of us realize we had great potential to be happy doing what he did.”

During his most recent visit to campus, Siler did so to pay tribute to a man who similarly left a remarkable imprint at the uni-

Siler said he remains close to a number of former bandmates because of the culture that existed.

Sch o l ar s hip s p o t l igh t Each year, we recognize the generosity of individuals and groups who provide support for our students through annual gifts and endowments on the pages of the Keystone. You can also learn more about our scholarships and the people who make them possible by visiting the Scholarship Spotlight section of our website at education.auburn.edu/giving/spotlight. We are proud to recognize the people who support our students through their contributions, as well as the individuals some have chosen to honor by establishing undergraduate and graduate awards. Please refer to our webpage to find profiles on scholarships and donors. The content will change periodically to salute the generosity of our supporters and highlight the opportunities they create for students.

44

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Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

“It was a family,” he said.

They played as a family and they mourned as a family after Walls’ passing at the age of 77. Another former band member, Christian Walters ’91, summed up what Walls meant to so many in a November 2011 blog post entitled, “Rest in peace, or at least in tune.” “[Dr. Walls] was a hell of a director,” Walter wrote. “Not just on the podium, but in picking music that suited his musicians. … The music was impressive and challenging and when it came together, we felt like we’d accomplished something. That was only possible because of Dr. Walls.”

Spotlight: 2011 Summer Bridge-Future Barkley Foundation gift could make student recruitment a slam dunk Asherah Blount grew up in metro Atlanta and spent her first four years of college in Albany, Ga., but knew very little about the university she would eventually attend as a graduate student. “No one went to Auburn in my family,” said Blount, a doctoral candidate in motor development from Decatur, Ga. “I wasn’t familiar with the area aside from Tuskegee.”

J V u b v B

Blount hadn’t thought much at all about coming to Auburn, but Auburn came to her. Jared Russell, interim director of student development for the College of Education and associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology, has made it his mission to preach the virtues of the college’s graduate program experience to students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the region. He regularly visits and builds relationships with faculty members and prospective graduate students at Atlanta’s Morehouse College and Spelman College, as well as Albany State University and Fort Valley State University. Blount wound up at Auburn to earn her master’s degree in physical education pedagogy and pursue a doctorate partly because she saw one of Russell’s fliers on the Albany State campus. She liked what she saw and wanted to learn more.

“That’s how I met Dr. Russell,” she said.

The scope of Russell’s efforts to recruit outstanding graduate students to the college and the graduate programs in his own department now extends well beyond pieces of paper tacked to bulletin boards. A $25,000 gift from the Charles Barkley Foundation will help support the college’s Summer Bridge-Future Graduate Scholars Program. Created by Russell, the six-week program provides intensive academic and research experiences for prospective graduate students from HBCUs and aids the transition of junior- and seniorlevel undergraduates into Kinesiology graduate programs. The Charles Barkley Foundation represents the philanthropic side of former Auburn University basketball star Charles Barkley. Known as “Sir Charles” and “The Round Mound of Rebound” during his professional career, Barkley was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006. His NBA career included 11 All-Star Game appearances, two Olympic gold medals and a league

Morehouse College’s Jeff Clark and Albany State’s Valarie Lee use a high-speed camera to examine bat swing form, mechanics and velocity in the Department of Kinesiology’s Biomechanics Laboratory.

MVP trophy. He has since wound up in front of TV cameras in another capacity, as a TV commentator on the NBA. Russell said he has tried to bring energy, as a well as a personal Participants in the 2011 program outsidestudents. touch, to the process of piquing the interestgather of prospective of the Auburn University College of A graduate of Morehouse College, Russell wants today’s students to Architecture, Design and to Construction duringthan a what have a more seamless transition a graduate program and tour.Russell became the first African-American male hevisit encountered. to graduate from his doctoral program at the University of Georgia in 2002. He said students look for places where they feel as though they fit. “I got the big, green graduate school book,” Russell said. “I went to the adviser and they said, ‘Here’s the book, find a program.’ That’s one reason why I started doing this after getting out of graduate school. It’s all about exposure. Students may not know what we have to offer because they have no connection [to Auburn]. Their connections are with places like Tuskegee and Alabama State.” The Summer Bridge Program provides students with a glimpse of what awaits them should they decide to pursue master’s degrees and doctorates at Auburn. “It’s an opportunity for them to be on campus for a period of time, to get to know the faculty and resources,” Russell said. “It’s like recruiting a good athlete. You get them young, eighth or ninth grade, and give them an opportunity to be on campus. That’s what the Charles Barkley Foundation gift is for, to get students on campus and get them exposed to Auburn and the College of Education.”

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Ke y C ontributors Pillars of Tru s t r ec ognizing donor s who ha ve cont r ibut ed at lea s t $1,0 00 and mor e

Alabama Contract Sales, Inc Dr. & Mrs. Timothy Opal Alford 1915 DC Ms. Debbie Allen American Chemical Society 1915 Mr. & Mrs. John Howard Anderson AT&T Foundation 1915 Dr. Jim Bannon & Dr. Susan Bannon DC Mr. Charles W. Barkley 1915 Dr. Diane Ledbetter Barlow DC Dr. Mary Sue Barry Mr. & Mrs. Jere Locke Beasley The Kevin Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund 1915 Blue Cross/Blue Shield Dr. Amanda Branscombe DC Mr. & Mrs. Herman Broughton DC HR Mrs. Donna Burchfield DC Mr. & Mrs. Robert Burkholder Lt. Col. Samuel M. Burney Jr. 1915 Dr. Jane S. Cahaly DC Mrs. Nancy Tilden Campbell DC Mrs. Nancy C. Chancey 1915 DC Mrs. Terrell Smyth Cheney DC Mr. David Henry Clark DC Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Richardson Clegg Mrs. Wanda Freeman Coffman Mr. Terry Coggins & Dr. Jo Anne Coggins 1915 DC College of Education Student Council Dr. & Mrs. Eldridge Ruthven Collins DC Comer Foundation 1915 Compass Bank Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Cooper DC Mr. S Eugene Dekich Mr. & Mrs. Edward Demirjian Mr. H. Joe Denney DC Mr. & Mrs. Wesley Wilkerson Diehl Mr. & Mrs. J. David Dresher 1915

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Col. & Mrs. Charles William Eastman EB Sport Group 1915 Mr. & Mrs. David Stanley Elder 1915 DC Mr. & Mrs. A. Arnold Fagen 1915 Dr. & Mrs. Charles Edward Farmer Mrs. Susan M. Farrell 1915 Mrs. Connie Bomar Forester DC Mrs. Nancy Young Fortner 1915 E.L. Gibson Foundation 1915 Mr. & Mrs. Jack Goode DC Goodwyn Mills & Cawood Inc Mrs. Barbara Daughtry Gosser DC Mr. & Mrs. Roy Harrell 1915 Dr. Virginia Hayes DC HR Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Steve Hill Mr. & Mrs. David Emerson Housel 1915 DC HR Ms. Sarah Grace Hudspeth Mrs. Nancy F. Huey Dr. James Hutcheson & Dr. Carol Hutcheson 1915 DC HR Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Alan Jackson Dr. & Mrs. James Terry Jenkins DC Mrs. Laura C. Jinright Mr. & Mrs. R. Kenneth Johns 1915 DC Joon, LLC 1915 Mrs. Martha McQueen Kennedy DC Kenny Howard Athletic Training Fellowship 1915 Dr. Maxwell Clark King Mrs. Mina Propst Kirkley DC Drs. William & Fran Kochan 1915 DC HR Mr. Andrew Wilton Lamar III Mr. & Mrs. William Dupont Langley DC Dr. & Mrs. Charles Lowell Ledbetter HR Dr. & Mrs. Gerald Leischuck 1915 The Ligon Foundation 1915 Dr. José R. Llanes DC Mrs. Lucia Alston Logan Col William Long Jr. Dr. Cynthia Brackin Lumpkin DC

Maj. Gen.* & Mrs. Theodore Franklin Mallory DC Mr. & Mrs. James Autrey Manley 1915 DC Mr. Jefferson C. Manley Ms. Victoria Manley Dr. Mary Ellen Mazey Dr. Robert J. McAlindon Rev. & Mrs. Byron McEachern DC Dr. Emily A. Melvin HR Col. & Mrs. Hollis Messer DC Mr. Robert Lawrence Miller Mr. & Mrs. Walter Sammy Miller Dr. Imogene Mathison Mixson 1915 DC HR Mrs. Cynthia A. Moline 1915 Dr. Jane Barton Moore 1915 DC HR Mr. Edward F. Murray Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Byron Nelson DC Mr. & Mrs. Howard Nelson Dr. Joan Vignes Newman DC Dr. Douglas Lowry Nielsen 1915 Ms. Julie Rogers Nolen DC Dr. Harold Dean Patterson Sr. 1915 DC Mrs. Sue Atchison Pearson 1915 Dr. & Mrs. Richard Polmatier DC HR Ms. Elizabeth A. Ponder 1915 HR Mr. David Scott Poole Dr. Frances Skinner Reeves 1915 DC Mr. & Mrs. Edgar Reynolds Mr. & Mrs. John Reynolds Mr. Ken Ringer &  Dr. Joyce Ringer 1915 DC HR Mr. Kenneth B. Roy Jr. 1915 Mrs. Brenda Smith Sanborn DC Dr. & Mrs. Robert Ronald Saunders DC HR Drs. William & Lane Sauser DC Mr. & Mrs. Todd Anthony Schuster Dr. Debbie L. Shaw 1915 DC Mrs. Marcia Loftin Sheppard DC Mr. & Mrs. Albert James Smith 1915 Mr. Jerry Franklin Smith 1915 DC HR Dr. John Carlton Smith DC HR

member of the 1915 Society V1915 o l indicates u m e IaX , 2 012

The Auburn University College of Education expresses its gratitude to the many alumni, friends and organizations who are key contributors to the college and its mission. This support helps the college in building better futures for all through its academic, research and outreach initiatives. This list of contributors recognizes cumulative calendar year outright or planned gifts made to the College of Education during 2011.

Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Thomas Smith 1915 DC HR Mrs. Julia Huey Spano DC Drs. Ted & Shirley Spears DC St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church Mrs. Elizabeth Gregory St. Jean DC Dr. & Mrs. Barry Straus 1915 Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Newton Taylor DC Mrs. Carol Cherry Varner DC Mrs. Susan Carr Wadsworth Mr. William Forrest Walker Dr. Kimberly Curley Walls Mr. & Mrs. Charles Wear Jeanette S. Wenklar Trust Capt. Lila Lansing White 1915 Dr. Betty Louise Whitford DC Mr. Herman L. Wilkes Sr. DC Mr. Harry R. Wilkinson DC Mr. & Mrs. Robert Williams 1915 Mr. Mark Terrance Wilton 1915 DC HR Dr. Jim Witte & Dr. Maria Witte DC HR Ms. Leslie S. Woodson DC

P illars of Loyalt y r e co g n i z i n g d o n o r s w h o h a ve g i ve n $ 5 0 0 t o $ 9 9 9 Mr. William & Dr. Samera Baird Dr. Pat Harris Barnes Dr. Mary Jeanette Barton Dr. & Mrs. Robert John Beadles Dr. Jack E. Blackburn Blackburn Daniels O’Barr, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Preston Bolt Ms. Linda Louise Bomke Mr. & Mrs. David Bowen Dr. Richard E. Brogdon HR Mrs. Frances Wilson Burson DC Dr. Elizabeth S. Cheshire DC Mr. & Mrs. James Allen Cook Dr. & Dr. John Carl Dagley Mr. & Mrs. William Dixon Edmonds Engineering, Inc. Dr. & Mrs. Claude Lee Eilert HR Dr. William B. Fackler Jr. Mrs. Jennifer Smith Farley Ms. Leigh A. Forman

DC indicates a member of the Dean’s Circle

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Gaiser 1915 DC Mr. Robert Gannon HR Mr. & Mrs. Richard Green Mrs. Virginia Horn Derby Grimes Mr. James Ross Gurley Mr. & Mrs. William Forrester Ham Mrs. Dottie W. Hankins Mrs. Jimmie C. Hatcher Mrs. Mary Hunt Hayes Ms. Jean McIntyre Hicks HR Mrs. Anita Griffith Hill Mrs. Mary Mills Jurmain HR Mrs. Sarah Petit Kerrick Mr. & Mrs. Michael Torace Kimberl Dr. Judith Nosty Lechner Dr. Eddie T. Lindsey Mr. Rodney Lon Long Mr. & Mrs. James Godfrey Lovell 1915 DC HR Mr. & Mrs. Robert Laird Mayo Drs. Randall & Nancy McDaniel Dr. C. William McKee Mrs. Paula Stapp McMillan Mr. & Mrs. Larry Gilbert Myers Ms. Luellen Nagle Mrs. Karen Stapp O’Brien Dr. Kevin Thomas O’Meara Mr. & Mrs. Donald Ray Parmer Dr. Karen Jackson Rabren Dr. & Mrs. Edward Ray Richardson Lt. Col. John Ross Jr. Dr. Paul G. Shoffeitt Dr. Suhyun Suh Mrs. Betty Gentry Taff Mr. & Mrs. Todd Pershing Thornell Mr. & Mrs. Angelo Tomasso 1915 Mrs. Jeanette Ingram Torbert Mrs. Rhonda Burks Van Zandt Dr. Susan K. Villaume Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Fredrick Wade Mr. & Mrs. Robert William Wellbaum Mr. Dwight L. Wiggins Jr. Dr. Jonnie W. Wilbanks HR Ms. Sue Ellen Owens Williams Ms. Jane Kerr Williamson Mrs. Edna Hulme Willis

HR indicates an Honor Roll donor or honoree

*deceased

Pillars of Hop e r ec o g ni zi n g do n o r s wh o ha ve g i ven $100 t o $499 Mr. Kenneth Ray Adams Mr. & Mrs. C Maitland Adams Dr. Jimmy L. Agan Rev. Walter M. Albritton Jr. Mrs. Julia Smith Alexander Mr. Clarence Terrell Alford Mrs. Leigh Cannon Allbrook Ms. Quintella McConnell Allen Mrs. Martha Harris Allison Ms. Barbara Daron Ammons Mrs. Tammy D. Anderson Mrs. Katherine Dixon Anglin Dr. Anne Lewis Angstrom Ms. Mary Ann Pugh Arant Mrs. Jovette Gonzalez Arbona Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wesley Archer Mrs. Margaret A. Armor Dr. & Mrs. Richard Crump Armstrong Mrs. Rebecca L. Armstrong Dr. Rosa M. Ashmon Dr. & Dr. James Serenous Austin Mrs. Carol Dent Auten Mrs. Linda Garrett Awbrey Ms. Janet Marie Ayers Mr. Cloyde Robert Bacon Dr. Sara Lynn Baird Mr. & Mrs. Barry Dale Ballard Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Lee Bankhead Dr. William Roy Barfield Mrs. Reanne Denise Barnes Mrs. Stacia M. Barnes Mr. William Lee Barnett Ms. Barbara Lazenby Barnett Dr. Nancy H. Barry Ms. Pat Bradley Barton Mrs. Cecily Reid Bates Mrs. Connie Tebo Baughman Mrs. Amanda S. Bazemore Mr. Timothy Mack Beasley CDR Earl Beatty Ms. Marian Collins Bentley Mrs. Barbara S. Berman Mr. David K. Blacklidge Mr. & Mrs. James Blackmon Ms. Rebecca Evans Blanton Lt. Col. Daniel Wilson Bloodworth Jr. Dr. William O’Neil Blow Dr. Susan R. Boes Mr. & Mrs. George Richard Bolling Mrs. Patricia Hughes Bolton Mrs. Joan H. Bomar Ms. Mildred Diane Boss Ms. Lena Mae Boswell Mr. Roger Wayne Bowen Mr. & Mrs. Bill Bracewell Ms. Sara Nettles Bradley

Mrs. Julee Jambon Brandt Mr. William E. Brannen Mrs. Peggy L. Branyon Mrs. Rebecca Gatewood Bray Mrs. Peggy Patrick Brewer Mrs. Joeva Nagle Briggs Mr. & Mrs. William Broadway Mr. James Wesley Brooks Mrs. Judilyn Brooks Dr. & Mrs. Donald Frank Brown Ms. Kelly Joyce Brown Mrs. Kathy Zeigler Bruce Mr. & Mrs. R. Bryant Mrs. Lucy E. Bumpers Mrs. Ashley Robinson Bunkley Dr. & Mrs. Ernest Burdette Mr. & Mrs. James Burleson Ms. Pamela C. Burnette Dr. Ray G. Burnham Mr. & Mrs. John Burns Mr. Daniel M. Bush Mrs. Shannon Knight Bush Dr. Elizabeth P. Buttimer Mrs. Rebecca Page Byard Mr. Dustin Ryan Byrd Ms. Melanie Ann Cadenhead Mr. Milton Fred Cadenhead Mrs. Anne Walters Cahalan Mr. Kermit Caldwell Mrs. Mona Murray Callahan Mrs. Donna McClung Camp Mrs. Carole McEachern Capps Mrs. Linda Mason Carleton Mrs. Molly M. Carmichael Mr. & Mrs. David William Carmon Dr. Jamie Carney Dr. Calvin Dale Carpenter Mrs. Deborah Hopkins Carter Ms. Alison Elizabeth Carter Mr. Edwin Joseph Carter Dr. & Mrs. Paul Lewis Cates Mrs. Margaret Greer Chambers Mrs. Gerrie Maria Chambliss Dr. Russell L. Chandler Ms. Charlene T. Chapman Mrs. Mary Morris Clackler Mrs. Julia Parker Clark Mr. & Mrs. Cliff Clegg Ms. Jo Ann Clelland Mrs. Bettye Anne Cleveland Mr. Dwight L. Cobb Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Cobb Dr. & Mrs. John Cochran Dr. Daniel Joseph Codespoti Mrs. Louise Jackson Cole Mr. Edwin Paul Collier Jr. Mrs. Traci Hydrick Collinworth Mr. & Mrs. Steven Craig Compton Mrs. Danny Sue Conner Mrs. Laura C. Conrad

Mr. & Mrs. James Conway Dr. Milton Olin Cook Mrs. Martha R. Cooper Mrs. Lettie Green Cornwell Mr. & Mrs. William Thomas Cottle Mrs. Lori Dammes Cowley Dr. Cynthia Ann Cox HR Dr. Franklin R. Croker Mrs. Dorothy Hackney Crook HR Mrs. Diane Myrick Cropp Ms. Jill T. Crow Mr. James Lloyd Crowe Mr. & Mrs. James Rudolph Culbreth Ms. Catherine V. Curry Mr. & Mrs. John Dabkowski Dadeville Animal Clinic PC Mrs. Beatrice Dominick Dallas Mr. Joseph Franklin Daniel Dr. Elizabeth Otto Daniell Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Larry Davis Mrs. Cindy L. Davis Mrs. Rochelle Morriss Davis Dr. Joseph J. Day Jr. Dr. Homer Alphonso Day Mrs. Marjorie Sellers Day Mrs. Ann Harris De Hart Ms. Jennifer Michelle Dean Mr. Dennis Lee Dean Ms. Christin Rae Deas Dr. & Mrs. Jon Dee Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Dignam Mrs. Patricia Stanfield Dimatteo Mr. Thomas R. Dixon Mrs. Faye Hicks Doane Ms. Marian Elisabeth Donohue Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Dooley Mrs. Almena Fletcher Doss Mrs. Sherida Hooke Downer Ms. Kathryn R. Driscoll Ms. Jodi Silver Drummond Mrs. Juliet Ingram Dudley Mrs. Sheila R. Duffield Mr. & Mrs. Michael Howard Dugan Mr. & Mrs. Robert Waren Dumas Mrs. Betty Legg Dumas Mrs. Elise Petersen Dunbar Dr. Patricia Lenora Duttera Dr. Glenda F. Earwood LCDR & Mrs. William Arthur Ebbs Mrs. Kristen Wright Edenfield Ms. Anne Elizabeth Edwards Lt. Col. Gregory Edwards Mrs. Barbara Ham Eilers Mrs. Dina Phillips Elder Ms. Andrea Jade Elliott Mr. M. J. Ennis Jr. Mrs. Jodie Brantley Faith Mrs. Rebecca L. Farris Mrs. Faye M. Faulk

1915 indicates a member of the 1915 Society

Dr. Richard Featherston III Mr. & Mrs. Michael Feeney Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Fell Ms. Ann Marie Ferretti Dr. William Barnard Finney Mrs. Candace Leigh Fisher Mrs. Sandra McAlister Fisher Mr. & Mrs. Wiley McRae Fite Mr. John Arnold Fitzgerald Mr. Wade H. Fleming Mr. & Mrs. Paul Flowers 1915 Mrs. Betty Cynthia Flowers Mr. John Kenneth Focke Dr. Jenny G. Folsom Mrs. Laura Tyrrell Ford Mrs. Joanna Johnston Foster Ms. Laci Shaw Fralish Mr. & Mrs. Rex Frederick Mrs. Edith Young Fuller Mrs. Jenny Parker Fuqua Mr. Russell B. Gainous III Mrs. Melissa T. Gambill Mrs. Elizabeth H. Garrett Ms. Joyce L. Garrett Mr. Ronald L. Garrett Dr. Henry Victor Gaston Mrs. Sara Greeley Gerry Ms. Amy Lora Giddens Mr. John W. Gilbert Mr. Thomas A. Glanton Mrs. Linda Phillips Godwin Dr. John M. Goff Ms. Rebecca Nell Goggins Ms. Suzanne Golson Mr. Willis Marion Goolsby Mrs. Kathy Sudduth Graben Mrs. Doris Jones Graves Dr. & Mrs. Richard Graves Greater Birmingham Auburn Club Mrs. Anna Holmes Greene Mr. & Mrs. Walter Herbert Greene Mrs. Sue W. Gresham Lt. Col. & Mrs. Dennis Edward Griffin Ms. Carole S. Griffith Mrs. Mary Chambers Gross Mrs. Shelia Hudgins Guthrie Mrs. & Mr. Alisa Gyauch Mrs. Candis Hamilton Hacker Mr. & Mrs. Brian Hage Mr. George Stafford Hall Mrs. Ansley Virgina Hall Mrs. Elizabeth Wilkinson Hallock Mrs. Leigh Rivers Hamilton Mr. Lynwood Hector Hamilton Mr. Richard Robert Hamilton Dr. Jacqueline Terrill Harbison Mrs. Jennifer Sims Hardison Mr. Terry W. Harper Harris & Sons Inc

DC indicates a member of the Dean’s Circle

Ms. Cassidy M. Harrison Mrs. Brenda J. Hartshorn Dr. Amal Ghorayeb Hashimi Mrs. Susan Kotouch Hawk Mrs. Cynthia H. Haygood Mrs. Theresa Defargee Haynes Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Heisler Mr. Michael B. Hellebrand Ms. Ann Wynell Helms Mr. & Mrs. James Preston Henderson Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Henderson Dr. Mary Catherine Henderson Dr. Denisha L. Hendricks Mrs. Barbara Reed Hester Mrs. Margaret Leach Hester Capt & Mrs. William Harlan Hinson Dr. Nathan L. Hodges HR Mrs. Cathy H. Hoefert Mr. & Mrs. Roland Hoffman Ms. Leah Dawn Hoffman Ms. Karla Lea Hollis Ms. Susan Word Holman Mrs. Linda Wilson Holt Mrs. Nancy Pritchett Hood Mrs. Kathryn Sansocie Hoppe Mr. & Mrs. Frank Hopson Mr. William Patrick Horton Ms. Vicki Evans Hough Mr. Charles D. Hudson Jr. Mrs. Harriette H. Huggins Mrs. Ann C. Hughes Mrs. Betty T. Humphrey Dr. Jung Won Hur Mrs. Peggy Kling Iber Mr. & Mrs. Edwin Gene Ingram Ms. Beth Ellen Inman Mr. John R. Ireland Dr. Teresa Singletary Irvin Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Jackman Mrs. Suzanne Wiggins Jagar Mrs. Rebecca Tumlin Jarrett Mrs. Ann Lyle Jeffrey Mrs. Susan Shaw Jensen Mrs. Jill Zeigler Jernigan Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Johnson Col. & Mrs. David Scott Johnson Mrs. Sabra Ann Johnson Ms. Doris Jeanne Jones Mr. Kenneth Wade Jones Dr. & Mrs. Don Edward Jones Mrs. Mary Foshee Jones Mr. & Mrs. Charles Christopher Joseph Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kaiser Dr. Betty J. Kennedy Mr. & Mrs. James Thomas Kerr HR Mrs. Erwin D. Key DC Ms. Kate Kiefer 1915 Mrs. Catherine V. Killebrew Mr. & Mrs. Michael Kinard

HR indicates an Honor Roll donor or honoree

*deceased


201 1

Ke y C ontributors Pillars of Tru s t r ec ognizing donor s who ha ve cont r ibut ed at lea s t $1,0 00 and mor e

Alabama Contract Sales, Inc Dr. & Mrs. Timothy Opal Alford 1915 DC Ms. Debbie Allen American Chemical Society 1915 Mr. & Mrs. John Howard Anderson AT&T Foundation 1915 Dr. Jim Bannon & Dr. Susan Bannon DC Mr. Charles W. Barkley 1915 Dr. Diane Ledbetter Barlow DC Dr. Mary Sue Barry Mr. & Mrs. Jere Locke Beasley The Kevin Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund 1915 Blue Cross/Blue Shield Dr. Amanda Branscombe DC Mr. & Mrs. Herman Broughton DC HR Mrs. Donna Burchfield DC Mr. & Mrs. Robert Burkholder Lt. Col. Samuel M. Burney Jr. 1915 Dr. Jane S. Cahaly DC Mrs. Nancy Tilden Campbell DC Mrs. Nancy C. Chancey 1915 DC Mrs. Terrell Smyth Cheney DC Mr. David Henry Clark DC Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Richardson Clegg Mrs. Wanda Freeman Coffman Mr. Terry Coggins & Dr. Jo Anne Coggins 1915 DC College of Education Student Council Dr. & Mrs. Eldridge Ruthven Collins DC Comer Foundation 1915 Compass Bank Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Cooper DC Mr. S Eugene Dekich Mr. & Mrs. Edward Demirjian Mr. H. Joe Denney DC Mr. & Mrs. Wesley Wilkerson Diehl Mr. & Mrs. J. David Dresher 1915

46

Keystone

Col. & Mrs. Charles William Eastman EB Sport Group 1915 Mr. & Mrs. David Stanley Elder 1915 DC Mr. & Mrs. A. Arnold Fagen 1915 Dr. & Mrs. Charles Edward Farmer Mrs. Susan M. Farrell 1915 Mrs. Connie Bomar Forester DC Mrs. Nancy Young Fortner 1915 E.L. Gibson Foundation 1915 Mr. & Mrs. Jack Goode DC Goodwyn Mills & Cawood Inc Mrs. Barbara Daughtry Gosser DC Mr. & Mrs. Roy Harrell 1915 Dr. Virginia Hayes DC HR Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Steve Hill Mr. & Mrs. David Emerson Housel 1915 DC HR Ms. Sarah Grace Hudspeth Mrs. Nancy F. Huey Dr. James Hutcheson & Dr. Carol Hutcheson 1915 DC HR Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Alan Jackson Dr. & Mrs. James Terry Jenkins DC Mrs. Laura C. Jinright Mr. & Mrs. R. Kenneth Johns 1915 DC Joon, LLC 1915 Mrs. Martha McQueen Kennedy DC Kenny Howard Athletic Training Fellowship 1915 Dr. Maxwell Clark King Mrs. Mina Propst Kirkley DC Drs. William & Fran Kochan 1915 DC HR Mr. Andrew Wilton Lamar III Mr. & Mrs. William Dupont Langley DC Dr. & Mrs. Charles Lowell Ledbetter HR Dr. & Mrs. Gerald Leischuck 1915 The Ligon Foundation 1915 Dr. José R. Llanes DC Mrs. Lucia Alston Logan Col William Long Jr. Dr. Cynthia Brackin Lumpkin DC

Maj. Gen.* & Mrs. Theodore Franklin Mallory DC Mr. & Mrs. James Autrey Manley 1915 DC Mr. Jefferson C. Manley Ms. Victoria Manley Dr. Mary Ellen Mazey Dr. Robert J. McAlindon Rev. & Mrs. Byron McEachern DC Dr. Emily A. Melvin HR Col. & Mrs. Hollis Messer DC Mr. Robert Lawrence Miller Mr. & Mrs. Walter Sammy Miller Dr. Imogene Mathison Mixson 1915 DC HR Mrs. Cynthia A. Moline 1915 Dr. Jane Barton Moore 1915 DC HR Mr. Edward F. Murray Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Byron Nelson DC Mr. & Mrs. Howard Nelson Dr. Joan Vignes Newman DC Dr. Douglas Lowry Nielsen 1915 Ms. Julie Rogers Nolen DC Dr. Harold Dean Patterson Sr. 1915 DC Mrs. Sue Atchison Pearson 1915 Dr. & Mrs. Richard Polmatier DC HR Ms. Elizabeth A. Ponder 1915 HR Mr. David Scott Poole Dr. Frances Skinner Reeves 1915 DC Mr. & Mrs. Edgar Reynolds Mr. & Mrs. John Reynolds Mr. Ken Ringer &  Dr. Joyce Ringer 1915 DC HR Mr. Kenneth B. Roy Jr. 1915 Mrs. Brenda Smith Sanborn DC Dr. & Mrs. Robert Ronald Saunders DC HR Drs. William & Lane Sauser DC Mr. & Mrs. Todd Anthony Schuster Dr. Debbie L. Shaw 1915 DC Mrs. Marcia Loftin Sheppard DC Mr. & Mrs. Albert James Smith 1915 Mr. Jerry Franklin Smith 1915 DC HR Dr. John Carlton Smith DC HR

member of the 1915 Society V1915 o l indicates u m e IaX , 2 012

The Auburn University College of Education expresses its gratitude to the many alumni, friends and organizations who are key contributors to the college and its mission. This support helps the college in building better futures for all through its academic, research and outreach initiatives. This list of contributors recognizes cumulative calendar year outright or planned gifts made to the College of Education during 2011.

Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Thomas Smith 1915 DC HR Mrs. Julia Huey Spano DC Drs. Ted & Shirley Spears DC St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church Mrs. Elizabeth Gregory St. Jean DC Dr. & Mrs. Barry Straus 1915 Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Newton Taylor DC Mrs. Carol Cherry Varner DC Mrs. Susan Carr Wadsworth Mr. William Forrest Walker Dr. Kimberly Curley Walls Mr. & Mrs. Charles Wear Jeanette S. Wenklar Trust Capt. Lila Lansing White 1915 Dr. Betty Louise Whitford DC Mr. Herman L. Wilkes Sr. DC Mr. Harry R. Wilkinson DC Mr. & Mrs. Robert Williams 1915 Mr. Mark Terrance Wilton 1915 DC HR Dr. Jim Witte & Dr. Maria Witte DC HR Ms. Leslie S. Woodson DC

P illars of Loyalt y r e co g n i z i n g d o n o r s w h o h a ve g i ve n $ 5 0 0 t o $ 9 9 9 Mr. William & Dr. Samera Baird Dr. Pat Harris Barnes Dr. Mary Jeanette Barton Dr. & Mrs. Robert John Beadles Dr. Jack E. Blackburn Blackburn Daniels O’Barr, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Preston Bolt Ms. Linda Louise Bomke Mr. & Mrs. David Bowen Dr. Richard E. Brogdon HR Mrs. Frances Wilson Burson DC Dr. Elizabeth S. Cheshire DC Mr. & Mrs. James Allen Cook Dr. & Dr. John Carl Dagley Mr. & Mrs. William Dixon Edmonds Engineering, Inc. Dr. & Mrs. Claude Lee Eilert HR Dr. William B. Fackler Jr. Mrs. Jennifer Smith Farley Ms. Leigh A. Forman

DC indicates a member of the Dean’s Circle

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Gaiser 1915 DC Mr. Robert Gannon HR Mr. & Mrs. Richard Green Mrs. Virginia Horn Derby Grimes Mr. James Ross Gurley Mr. & Mrs. William Forrester Ham Mrs. Dottie W. Hankins Mrs. Jimmie C. Hatcher Mrs. Mary Hunt Hayes Ms. Jean McIntyre Hicks HR Mrs. Anita Griffith Hill Mrs. Mary Mills Jurmain HR Mrs. Sarah Petit Kerrick Mr. & Mrs. Michael Torace Kimberl Dr. Judith Nosty Lechner Dr. Eddie T. Lindsey Mr. Rodney Lon Long Mr. & Mrs. James Godfrey Lovell 1915 DC HR Mr. & Mrs. Robert Laird Mayo Drs. Randall & Nancy McDaniel Dr. C. William McKee Mrs. Paula Stapp McMillan Mr. & Mrs. Larry Gilbert Myers Ms. Luellen Nagle Mrs. Karen Stapp O’Brien Dr. Kevin Thomas O’Meara Mr. & Mrs. Donald Ray Parmer Dr. Karen Jackson Rabren Dr. & Mrs. Edward Ray Richardson Lt. Col. John Ross Jr. Dr. Paul G. Shoffeitt Dr. Suhyun Suh Mrs. Betty Gentry Taff Mr. & Mrs. Todd Pershing Thornell Mr. & Mrs. Angelo Tomasso 1915 Mrs. Jeanette Ingram Torbert Mrs. Rhonda Burks Van Zandt Dr. Susan K. Villaume Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Fredrick Wade Mr. & Mrs. Robert William Wellbaum Mr. Dwight L. Wiggins Jr. Dr. Jonnie W. Wilbanks HR Ms. Sue Ellen Owens Williams Ms. Jane Kerr Williamson Mrs. Edna Hulme Willis

HR indicates an Honor Roll donor or honoree

*deceased

Pillars of Hop e r ec o g ni zi n g do n o r s wh o ha ve g i ven $100 t o $499 Mr. Kenneth Ray Adams Mr. & Mrs. C Maitland Adams Dr. Jimmy L. Agan Rev. Walter M. Albritton Jr. Mrs. Julia Smith Alexander Mr. Clarence Terrell Alford Mrs. Leigh Cannon Allbrook Ms. Quintella McConnell Allen Mrs. Martha Harris Allison Ms. Barbara Daron Ammons Mrs. Tammy D. Anderson Mrs. Katherine Dixon Anglin Dr. Anne Lewis Angstrom Ms. Mary Ann Pugh Arant Mrs. Jovette Gonzalez Arbona Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wesley Archer Mrs. Margaret A. Armor Dr. & Mrs. Richard Crump Armstrong Mrs. Rebecca L. Armstrong Dr. Rosa M. Ashmon Dr. & Dr. James Serenous Austin Mrs. Carol Dent Auten Mrs. Linda Garrett Awbrey Ms. Janet Marie Ayers Mr. Cloyde Robert Bacon Dr. Sara Lynn Baird Mr. & Mrs. Barry Dale Ballard Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Lee Bankhead Dr. William Roy Barfield Mrs. Reanne Denise Barnes Mrs. Stacia M. Barnes Mr. William Lee Barnett Ms. Barbara Lazenby Barnett Dr. Nancy H. Barry Ms. Pat Bradley Barton Mrs. Cecily Reid Bates Mrs. Connie Tebo Baughman Mrs. Amanda S. Bazemore Mr. Timothy Mack Beasley CDR Earl Beatty Ms. Marian Collins Bentley Mrs. Barbara S. Berman Mr. David K. Blacklidge Mr. & Mrs. James Blackmon Ms. Rebecca Evans Blanton Lt. Col. Daniel Wilson Bloodworth Jr. Dr. William O’Neil Blow Dr. Susan R. Boes Mr. & Mrs. George Richard Bolling Mrs. Patricia Hughes Bolton Mrs. Joan H. Bomar Ms. Mildred Diane Boss Ms. Lena Mae Boswell Mr. Roger Wayne Bowen Mr. & Mrs. Bill Bracewell Ms. Sara Nettles Bradley

Mrs. Julee Jambon Brandt Mr. William E. Brannen Mrs. Peggy L. Branyon Mrs. Rebecca Gatewood Bray Mrs. Peggy Patrick Brewer Mrs. Joeva Nagle Briggs Mr. & Mrs. William Broadway Mr. James Wesley Brooks Mrs. Judilyn Brooks Dr. & Mrs. Donald Frank Brown Ms. Kelly Joyce Brown Mrs. Kathy Zeigler Bruce Mr. & Mrs. R. Bryant Mrs. Lucy E. Bumpers Mrs. Ashley Robinson Bunkley Dr. & Mrs. Ernest Burdette Mr. & Mrs. James Burleson Ms. Pamela C. Burnette Dr. Ray G. Burnham Mr. & Mrs. John Burns Mr. Daniel M. Bush Mrs. Shannon Knight Bush Dr. Elizabeth P. Buttimer Mrs. Rebecca Page Byard Mr. Dustin Ryan Byrd Ms. Melanie Ann Cadenhead Mr. Milton Fred Cadenhead Mrs. Anne Walters Cahalan Mr. Kermit Caldwell Mrs. Mona Murray Callahan Mrs. Donna McClung Camp Mrs. Carole McEachern Capps Mrs. Linda Mason Carleton Mrs. Molly M. Carmichael Mr. & Mrs. David William Carmon Dr. Jamie Carney Dr. Calvin Dale Carpenter Mrs. Deborah Hopkins Carter Ms. Alison Elizabeth Carter Mr. Edwin Joseph Carter Dr. & Mrs. Paul Lewis Cates Mrs. Margaret Greer Chambers Mrs. Gerrie Maria Chambliss Dr. Russell L. Chandler Ms. Charlene T. Chapman Mrs. Mary Morris Clackler Mrs. Julia Parker Clark Mr. & Mrs. Cliff Clegg Ms. Jo Ann Clelland Mrs. Bettye Anne Cleveland Mr. Dwight L. Cobb Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Cobb Dr. & Mrs. John Cochran Dr. Daniel Joseph Codespoti Mrs. Louise Jackson Cole Mr. Edwin Paul Collier Jr. Mrs. Traci Hydrick Collinworth Mr. & Mrs. Steven Craig Compton Mrs. Danny Sue Conner Mrs. Laura C. Conrad

Mr. & Mrs. James Conway Dr. Milton Olin Cook Mrs. Martha R. Cooper Mrs. Lettie Green Cornwell Mr. & Mrs. William Thomas Cottle Mrs. Lori Dammes Cowley Dr. Cynthia Ann Cox HR Dr. Franklin R. Croker Mrs. Dorothy Hackney Crook HR Mrs. Diane Myrick Cropp Ms. Jill T. Crow Mr. James Lloyd Crowe Mr. & Mrs. James Rudolph Culbreth Ms. Catherine V. Curry Mr. & Mrs. John Dabkowski Dadeville Animal Clinic PC Mrs. Beatrice Dominick Dallas Mr. Joseph Franklin Daniel Dr. Elizabeth Otto Daniell Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Larry Davis Mrs. Cindy L. Davis Mrs. Rochelle Morriss Davis Dr. Joseph J. Day Jr. Dr. Homer Alphonso Day Mrs. Marjorie Sellers Day Mrs. Ann Harris De Hart Ms. Jennifer Michelle Dean Mr. Dennis Lee Dean Ms. Christin Rae Deas Dr. & Mrs. Jon Dee Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Dignam Mrs. Patricia Stanfield Dimatteo Mr. Thomas R. Dixon Mrs. Faye Hicks Doane Ms. Marian Elisabeth Donohue Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Dooley Mrs. Almena Fletcher Doss Mrs. Sherida Hooke Downer Ms. Kathryn R. Driscoll Ms. Jodi Silver Drummond Mrs. Juliet Ingram Dudley Mrs. Sheila R. Duffield Mr. & Mrs. Michael Howard Dugan Mr. & Mrs. Robert Waren Dumas Mrs. Betty Legg Dumas Mrs. Elise Petersen Dunbar Dr. Patricia Lenora Duttera Dr. Glenda F. Earwood LCDR & Mrs. William Arthur Ebbs Mrs. Kristen Wright Edenfield Ms. Anne Elizabeth Edwards Lt. Col. Gregory Edwards Mrs. Barbara Ham Eilers Mrs. Dina Phillips Elder Ms. Andrea Jade Elliott Mr. M. J. Ennis Jr. Mrs. Jodie Brantley Faith Mrs. Rebecca L. Farris Mrs. Faye M. Faulk

1915 indicates a member of the 1915 Society

Dr. Richard Featherston III Mr. & Mrs. Michael Feeney Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Fell Ms. Ann Marie Ferretti Dr. William Barnard Finney Mrs. Candace Leigh Fisher Mrs. Sandra McAlister Fisher Mr. & Mrs. Wiley McRae Fite Mr. John Arnold Fitzgerald Mr. Wade H. Fleming Mr. & Mrs. Paul Flowers 1915 Mrs. Betty Cynthia Flowers Mr. John Kenneth Focke Dr. Jenny G. Folsom Mrs. Laura Tyrrell Ford Mrs. Joanna Johnston Foster Ms. Laci Shaw Fralish Mr. & Mrs. Rex Frederick Mrs. Edith Young Fuller Mrs. Jenny Parker Fuqua Mr. Russell B. Gainous III Mrs. Melissa T. Gambill Mrs. Elizabeth H. Garrett Ms. Joyce L. Garrett Mr. Ronald L. Garrett Dr. Henry Victor Gaston Mrs. Sara Greeley Gerry Ms. Amy Lora Giddens Mr. John W. Gilbert Mr. Thomas A. Glanton Mrs. Linda Phillips Godwin Dr. John M. Goff Ms. Rebecca Nell Goggins Ms. Suzanne Golson Mr. Willis Marion Goolsby Mrs. Kathy Sudduth Graben Mrs. Doris Jones Graves Dr. & Mrs. Richard Graves Greater Birmingham Auburn Club Mrs. Anna Holmes Greene Mr. & Mrs. Walter Herbert Greene Mrs. Sue W. Gresham Lt. Col. & Mrs. Dennis Edward Griffin Ms. Carole S. Griffith Mrs. Mary Chambers Gross Mrs. Shelia Hudgins Guthrie Mrs. & Mr. Alisa Gyauch Mrs. Candis Hamilton Hacker Mr. & Mrs. Brian Hage Mr. George Stafford Hall Mrs. Ansley Virgina Hall Mrs. Elizabeth Wilkinson Hallock Mrs. Leigh Rivers Hamilton Mr. Lynwood Hector Hamilton Mr. Richard Robert Hamilton Dr. Jacqueline Terrill Harbison Mrs. Jennifer Sims Hardison Mr. Terry W. Harper Harris & Sons Inc

DC indicates a member of the Dean’s Circle

Ms. Cassidy M. Harrison Mrs. Brenda J. Hartshorn Dr. Amal Ghorayeb Hashimi Mrs. Susan Kotouch Hawk Mrs. Cynthia H. Haygood Mrs. Theresa Defargee Haynes Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Heisler Mr. Michael B. Hellebrand Ms. Ann Wynell Helms Mr. & Mrs. James Preston Henderson Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Henderson Dr. Mary Catherine Henderson Dr. Denisha L. Hendricks Mrs. Barbara Reed Hester Mrs. Margaret Leach Hester Capt & Mrs. William Harlan Hinson Dr. Nathan L. Hodges HR Mrs. Cathy H. Hoefert Mr. & Mrs. Roland Hoffman Ms. Leah Dawn Hoffman Ms. Karla Lea Hollis Ms. Susan Word Holman Mrs. Linda Wilson Holt Mrs. Nancy Pritchett Hood Mrs. Kathryn Sansocie Hoppe Mr. & Mrs. Frank Hopson Mr. William Patrick Horton Ms. Vicki Evans Hough Mr. Charles D. Hudson Jr. Mrs. Harriette H. Huggins Mrs. Ann C. Hughes Mrs. Betty T. Humphrey Dr. Jung Won Hur Mrs. Peggy Kling Iber Mr. & Mrs. Edwin Gene Ingram Ms. Beth Ellen Inman Mr. John R. Ireland Dr. Teresa Singletary Irvin Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Jackman Mrs. Suzanne Wiggins Jagar Mrs. Rebecca Tumlin Jarrett Mrs. Ann Lyle Jeffrey Mrs. Susan Shaw Jensen Mrs. Jill Zeigler Jernigan Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Johnson Col. & Mrs. David Scott Johnson Mrs. Sabra Ann Johnson Ms. Doris Jeanne Jones Mr. Kenneth Wade Jones Dr. & Mrs. Don Edward Jones Mrs. Mary Foshee Jones Mr. & Mrs. Charles Christopher Joseph Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kaiser Dr. Betty J. Kennedy Mr. & Mrs. James Thomas Kerr HR Mrs. Erwin D. Key DC Ms. Kate Kiefer 1915 Mrs. Catherine V. Killebrew Mr. & Mrs. Michael Kinard

HR indicates an Honor Roll donor or honoree

*deceased


Mrs. Susan L. Kirkland Mrs. Catherine P. Kirkpatrick Mr. & Mrs. Timothy Lee Kline Dr. Annette S. Kluck Mrs. Lena Smith Knight Dr. Jane G. Knight Mrs. Kathy Twinem Krausse Dr. Jane Marie Kuehne Dr. John Stephen Kush Ms. Suzanne Lacey Mr. & Mrs. Lee LaFollette Dr. & Mrs. Donald Lambert 1915 Mrs. Tracy Leigh Lambert-Jack Mrs. Barbara Jean Lammon Mr. Stephen Paul Landram Dr. & Mrs. Todd Grimley LaRue Lt. Col. & Mrs. Edward Latham Mrs. Gail Cartledge Laye Mrs. Katherine F. Leaver Rev. & Mrs. Lowell Ledbetter Mr. Sam Fletcher Ledbetter Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Donald Ledford Ms. Wendy Thomason Leigh Mr. John Paul Leland Mrs. Martha P. Leonard Mr. & Mrs. James Ellis Lester Mrs. Carol Thompson Lewis Hon. Ted Little Ms. Renee Denise Lloyd Ms. Traci Louise Locke Mr. & Mrs. James Alton Lockett Mr. Jack Locklear Jr. Mrs. Susan Lockwood Mrs. Lela Melson Lofton Dr. Martha D. Long Mr. & Mrs. Dale Edward Looney Mrs. Joyce Hemphill Lott Ms. Ellen G. Lucy Mr. Robert O. Lynd Jr. Mrs. Sherry Nunn Manley Mr. & Mrs. Steve Leslie Mann Mrs. Hedy White Manry 1915 HR Mrs. Jennifer B. Marangos Mrs. Vicki Morgan Marley Mr. Bernard Thomas Martin Mr. & Mrs. William Mastin Mrs. Carolyn G. Mathews 1915 Ms. Judit Matuz Mr. & Mrs. Radford O’Neal Maze Mrs. Linda Kay P. McCartney Mrs. Marie Peeples McClure Mrs. Dannie Jones McClurg Dr. Theresa Marie McCormick Dr. William T. McCown III Mr. & Mrs. Gary Davis McCrory Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin McDaniel Mr. & Mrs. John McDevitt Mr. & Mrs. Young Mark McElreath Mrs. Suzanne Watson McGlothin Ms. Karen T. McIntosh

48

Keystone

Mrs. Anne Garrett McMahan Mr. Locklyn C. McMurphy Mrs. Virginia P. McPheeters Mr. & Mrs. W Warren McPhillips Mr. Clyde R. Meagher Jr. Mrs. Judith Newman Meydrech Mr. Roy Gene Mezick Mrs. Joanne Webb Michael Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Miller Mr. Chipley Shaun Miller Mrs. Constance Brow Miller Dr. & Mrs. Billy Royce Mills Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Freeman Mills Mr. Joseph Marvin Mims Rev. & Mrs. Donald Minton Mrs. Kathleen G. Mitchell Dr. Cordelia Baker Moffett Ms. Stacy Katherine Monroe Mrs. Deborah Horne Monroe Dr. Jemelene Chastain Moore Mrs. Virginia Morehead Rev. & Mrs. Robert Morgan Dr. Joseph Bruce Morton Dr. John H. Mosley Mrs. Karen H. Mullins Ms. Maria Lyn Munroe Mr. Michael Peeples Murphy Mrs. Nan Timmerman Nabors Mrs. Ann Cope Nahikian Dr. Charles James Nath III Dr. & Mrs. James Nave Mr. Harry Neff III Mrs. Brenda Bowen Neisler Dr. Susan Rhodes Nelson Mr. & Mrs. Michael Newton Mr. John David Nicholson Mr. & Mrs. Carl Adams Niven Mr. & Mrs. Fred Taylor Noggle Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Gunter Northrop Dr. Norma L. Norton Mr. Steve Nowlin Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Wayne Nutt Mr. & Mrs. Marvin Aubrey Odom Mr. Bob Osborne Mr. & Mrs. Simeon Pace Dr. Norman Lewis Padgett Mrs. Joan T. Palestini Mrs. Carla Lee Palmer Mrs. Emily Jones Parham Mrs. Amy Black Parker Mrs. Dorothy Crump Parker Mrs. Pamelia M. Parker Mr. & Mrs. Delford Lynn Parker Dr. Patsy Boyd Parker HR Ms. Lynn Parrish Mrs. Deborah Smith Pass Mr. Daniel Mose Pate 1915 Dr. Gordon D. Patterson Sr. Mrs. Carolyn G. Patterson Mrs. Susan McKay Peacock

Dr. Gwendolyn Smith Pearson Mrs. Virginia Boyd Pearson Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Peeples Mrs. Mary Frances Peery Dr. Karen Lee Pell Mrs. Gail Roberts Pellett Dr. Anne Rankin Penney Mr. Roderick Durand Perry Mrs. Leigh Farrar Pharr Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity Mr. Stephen Perry Phillips Mr. & Mrs. Jordan Eric Phillips Col & Mrs. Walton Phillips Mrs. Lisbeth Daniell Pierce Mr. James Edward Pierce Mrs. Amy Smart Place Mrs. Sherri Hill Plant Mr. Shawn Robert Plumb Ms. Amy Elizabeth Poole Mrs. Judy Terry Powell Mr. Donald B. Powers Jr. LtCol Jack W. Presson Mr. & Mrs. John Runnels Prewitt 1915 DC Mr. John David Puckett Mrs. Kathleen Joyner Pyron Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Grant Rains Mr. John Belton Ramage Mr. Alonza R. Ransom Mr. Andrew Ransome Dr. & Mrs. David Webster Rawson Dr. Cynthia J. Reed Dr. Janet Mills Reid Mr. Scott R. Renner Mrs. Susan Howes Retzlaff Dr. Douglas Wayne Reynolds Mrs. Flora Jane Rhodes Mrs. Traci Ellen Rigdon Mr. Jason C. Riley Mr. Raymond Edward Ringer Mrs. Patricia Farmer Robbins Mrs. Stephanie D. Roberts Mr. Jeremy Edward Roberts Dr. William Ladon Roberts Mrs. Lisa Paulk Roberts Mrs. Lillian Hussey Roberts Mrs. Shannon D. Robertson Mrs. Jeanne S. Robertson Mrs. Katie Jones Robertson Mrs. Patricia V. Robinson Mr. & Mrs. Paul Roche Ms. Tracy Yancey Rogers Dr. & Mrs. Wilmer Rogers Dr. Donald O. Rooks Mr. & Mrs. Glen Rose Mr. & Mrs. John Rote Mrs. Carolyn Roth Dr. Mark A. Rowicki Dr. Robert Ellis Rowsey HR Mrs. Elizabeth H. Russell 1915 DC

1915 indicates a member of the 1915 Society

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

Mrs. Janice Ham Saidla Mr. Robert L. Sanders Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Dale Sawyer Dr. Silvia Davis Scaife Mr. Roger P. Schad Drs. Eugene & Margaret Schaufler Ms. Betty Jeane Schiffer Mrs. Amy Sue Schmitt Mrs. Elizabeth Hardy Schmitt Mr. & Mrs. Bobby Scott Mrs. Judy Kell Scully Mr. Walter Justin Sealy Mrs. Martha Jones Senkbeil Ms. Kathryn Milner Shehane Mrs. Murbes Smith Shepherd Mrs. Elizabeth T. Sheppard Mr. Gordon Mack Sherman 1915 Mrs. Connie Lynn Shewchuk Ms. Mary A. Shirley Mrs. Kathleen B. Shivers Mrs. Michelle Makus Shory Dr. Lois Angela Silvernail Mrs. Mary Nash Simpson Mrs. Ann Blizzard Sims Mrs. Sara Chancey Sinquefield Dr. V. Shamim Sisson Mr. Wade Skidmore & Dr. Nell Skidmore Mr. & Mrs. Charles Eugene Skinner Mr. & Mrs. W. Reese Slaughter Mr. & Mrs. Kay Slayden Mr. Robert N. Smelley Mrs. Bonnie Lavonia Smith Dr. Mary Alice Smith Mrs. Emily Sellers Smith Mr. Joshua E. Smith Mrs. Ginger Jaye Smith Lt. Col. Joel Smith Mrs. Mariannie B. Smith Mrs. Mary Miller Smith Mrs. Susan C. Smith Mrs. Jacqueline Lee Sneed Mr. & Mrs. James Gregory Soyars Mr. & Mrs. Donald Clark Spain Mrs. Laura L. Spencer Mr. & Mrs. F. Russell Spicer Dr. Paul Michael St. Onge Mrs. Martha Bartlett Stamps Mrs. Gloria Cardwell Standard Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Richard Stanley Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Joseph Steele 1915 Mr. John Kenneth Stegall Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Stegner Ms. Susan Shahan Stelly Ms. Patricia Melonie Stephens Mr. & Mrs. Robert Stephenson Mrs. Dena Murphy Stephenson Mrs. Linda Long Stewart Mrs. Helen Leverette Stewart Mrs. RoseLyn G. Stone

DC indicates a member of the Dean’s Circle

Mrs. Cynthia Holloway Story Dr. Stephen Paul Stratton Mrs. Gladys K. Street Mrs. Jane Paxton Street Mrs. Kathleen G. Strickland Ms. Nell Whelan Stuart Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Joseph Sullivan Mr. Randall Harold Swann Ms. Julie Louise Swartz Mrs. Patricia H. Swecker Mrs. Ashley Hall Sykes Syrup Sopping Day at Loachapoka Inc Dr. & Mrs. T. Lavon Talley Mrs. Loren Waller Tanner Mrs. Selena Gaston Tapley Ms. Jan Tapley-Fortson Mr. Thomas Lee Tate Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Patrick Taylor Mrs. Gail Watford Taylor Ms. Sonja Kim Taylor Dr. John Waits Teel Mr. & Mrs. Richard Graham Tenhet Dr. Suzanne Tew-Washburn Mr. Calvin E. Thames Dr. Chippewa M. Thomas Mr. Foy Campbell Thompson Dr. Martha Williams Thompson Mrs. Anne Lees Thompson Mrs. Susan Elizabeth Tooley Mr. Charles S. Torbert Jr. Mrs. Mary Alice Townsend Dr. & Mrs. James Trott Mrs. Durelle Lamb Tuggle Mr. & Mrs. Michael Joseph Tullier HR Mr. William Turner Mrs. Jane Hall Turrentine 1915 Mr. & Mrs. David Edward Tuszynski Mrs. Cynthia Finch Tye University Agency Inc. Dr. Cynthia Girard Unwin Dr. Martha Hay Vardeman Mrs. Nancy Brown Veale Ms. Dorothea Gay Vela Dr. & Mrs. Johnnie Bedsole Vinson Mr. & Mrs. William Charles Wade Mrs. Carol Anthony Waggoner Mrs. Amy Dempsey Wagner Mrs. Tony Melinda K. Waid Mr. Roland Neal Walker Mr. Anthony Levis Walker Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy Walker Mrs. Bonnie W. Wall Ms. Jennifer Leigh Walz Ms. Nancy Wood Ward Mr. J. Ernest Warren Ms. Michele F. Waters Dr. Samuel William Watkins

HR indicates an Honor Roll donor or honoree

*deceased

Dr. Jacquelynn Wattenbarger Mrs. Marilyn A. Watts Dr. & Mrs. Harry Weaver Mrs. Giscene Rister Weaver Mrs. Patricia Grove Weaver Mr. & Mrs. Bobby Wayne Welch Maj & Mrs. Paul West Mrs. Barbara W. Whatley Dr. W. Mabrey Whetstone Jr. Ms. Nancy B. Whigham Mr. & Mrs. George Lamar White Ms. Barbara Brown White Mr. & Mrs. James Jerome White Ms. Marilyn L. Whitley Mr. & Mrs. Donald Earl Whitlock Mrs. Susan Dryden Whitson Mrs. Christine T. Wiggins Mrs. Lisa Upchurch Wiggins Mr. & Mrs. Brett Daniel Wilber Mr. & Mrs. Cecil Creighton Wilder Mr. & Mrs. J. Knox Williams 1915 Mr. James Frederick Williams Mr. & Mrs. James S. Williams Mr. & Mrs. Homer Williams Mr. & Mrs. R. Boyd Williamson Mrs. Vickie Mayton Wilson Mr. John Randall Wilson Mrs. Joy Daniel Wilson Mrs. Carolyn Sutton Wingard Mrs. Sabra Phillips Winkle Mrs. S. Lynn C. Wolfe Mrs. Evelyn Smith Wood Mr. Marvin R. Woodall III Mrs. Theles S. Woodfin Mr. Edison Woodie & Dr. Shirley Woodie Mr. & Mrs. L. Shelton Woodson Mrs. Emily Corcoran Woste Mrs. Beth Morgan Wright Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wyrick Ms. Alicia Jo Yarboro

1915

Mr. & Mrs. Cecil Meadows Yarbrough Mr. & Mrs. H. Andrew Young Mrs. Marie M. Zaminer

1915

Named for the year in which the Department of Education (now the College of Education) was established, the 1915 Society recognizes donors whose lifetime contributions and commitments to the college have reached a cumulative total of $25,000 or more (including outright gifts, pledges and planned gifts).

O u r ne w 1 9 1 5 soc i e t y h ono r ees calen dar year 2011

C o m m i t m en t recogn izin g don ors from $100,000 to $ 499, 999

AJIN, USA Kenny Howard Athletic Training Fellowship

F r i ends h i p recogn izin g don ors from $25,000 to $9 9, 999

The Kevin Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund Lt. Col. Samuel M. Burney, Jr. The Charles Barkley Foundation EB Sport Group

Susan M. Farrell R. Kenneth Johns ’57 and Barbara J. Johns ’55 Cynthia A. Moline Douglas L. Nielsen ’77 Kenneth B. Roy, Jr. ’50

E.L. Gibson Foundation A. Arnold Fagen ’50 and Emaleen S. Fagen ’50 Please visit education.auburn.edu/giving to view a full listing of members.

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

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Mrs. Susan L. Kirkland Mrs. Catherine P. Kirkpatrick Mr. & Mrs. Timothy Lee Kline Dr. Annette S. Kluck Mrs. Lena Smith Knight Dr. Jane G. Knight Mrs. Kathy Twinem Krausse Dr. Jane Marie Kuehne Dr. John Stephen Kush Ms. Suzanne Lacey Mr. & Mrs. Lee LaFollette Dr. & Mrs. Donald Lambert 1915 Mrs. Tracy Leigh Lambert-Jack Mrs. Barbara Jean Lammon Mr. Stephen Paul Landram Dr. & Mrs. Todd Grimley LaRue Lt. Col. & Mrs. Edward Latham Mrs. Gail Cartledge Laye Mrs. Katherine F. Leaver Rev. & Mrs. Lowell Ledbetter Mr. Sam Fletcher Ledbetter Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Donald Ledford Ms. Wendy Thomason Leigh Mr. John Paul Leland Mrs. Martha P. Leonard Mr. & Mrs. James Ellis Lester Mrs. Carol Thompson Lewis Hon. Ted Little Ms. Renee Denise Lloyd Ms. Traci Louise Locke Mr. & Mrs. James Alton Lockett Mr. Jack Locklear Jr. Mrs. Susan Lockwood Mrs. Lela Melson Lofton Dr. Martha D. Long Mr. & Mrs. Dale Edward Looney Mrs. Joyce Hemphill Lott Ms. Ellen G. Lucy Mr. Robert O. Lynd Jr. Mrs. Sherry Nunn Manley Mr. & Mrs. Steve Leslie Mann Mrs. Hedy White Manry 1915 HR Mrs. Jennifer B. Marangos Mrs. Vicki Morgan Marley Mr. Bernard Thomas Martin Mr. & Mrs. William Mastin Mrs. Carolyn G. Mathews 1915 Ms. Judit Matuz Mr. & Mrs. Radford O’Neal Maze Mrs. Linda Kay P. McCartney Mrs. Marie Peeples McClure Mrs. Dannie Jones McClurg Dr. Theresa Marie McCormick Dr. William T. McCown III Mr. & Mrs. Gary Davis McCrory Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin McDaniel Mr. & Mrs. John McDevitt Mr. & Mrs. Young Mark McElreath Mrs. Suzanne Watson McGlothin Ms. Karen T. McIntosh

48

Keystone

Mrs. Anne Garrett McMahan Mr. Locklyn C. McMurphy Mrs. Virginia P. McPheeters Mr. & Mrs. W Warren McPhillips Mr. Clyde R. Meagher Jr. Mrs. Judith Newman Meydrech Mr. Roy Gene Mezick Mrs. Joanne Webb Michael Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Miller Mr. Chipley Shaun Miller Mrs. Constance Brow Miller Dr. & Mrs. Billy Royce Mills Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Freeman Mills Mr. Joseph Marvin Mims Rev. & Mrs. Donald Minton Mrs. Kathleen G. Mitchell Dr. Cordelia Baker Moffett Ms. Stacy Katherine Monroe Mrs. Deborah Horne Monroe Dr. Jemelene Chastain Moore Mrs. Virginia Morehead Rev. & Mrs. Robert Morgan Dr. Joseph Bruce Morton Dr. John H. Mosley Mrs. Karen H. Mullins Ms. Maria Lyn Munroe Mr. Michael Peeples Murphy Mrs. Nan Timmerman Nabors Mrs. Ann Cope Nahikian Dr. Charles James Nath III Dr. & Mrs. James Nave Mr. Harry Neff III Mrs. Brenda Bowen Neisler Dr. Susan Rhodes Nelson Mr. & Mrs. Michael Newton Mr. John David Nicholson Mr. & Mrs. Carl Adams Niven Mr. & Mrs. Fred Taylor Noggle Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Gunter Northrop Dr. Norma L. Norton Mr. Steve Nowlin Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Wayne Nutt Mr. & Mrs. Marvin Aubrey Odom Mr. Bob Osborne Mr. & Mrs. Simeon Pace Dr. Norman Lewis Padgett Mrs. Joan T. Palestini Mrs. Carla Lee Palmer Mrs. Emily Jones Parham Mrs. Amy Black Parker Mrs. Dorothy Crump Parker Mrs. Pamelia M. Parker Mr. & Mrs. Delford Lynn Parker Dr. Patsy Boyd Parker HR Ms. Lynn Parrish Mrs. Deborah Smith Pass Mr. Daniel Mose Pate 1915 Dr. Gordon D. Patterson Sr. Mrs. Carolyn G. Patterson Mrs. Susan McKay Peacock

Dr. Gwendolyn Smith Pearson Mrs. Virginia Boyd Pearson Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Peeples Mrs. Mary Frances Peery Dr. Karen Lee Pell Mrs. Gail Roberts Pellett Dr. Anne Rankin Penney Mr. Roderick Durand Perry Mrs. Leigh Farrar Pharr Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity Mr. Stephen Perry Phillips Mr. & Mrs. Jordan Eric Phillips Col & Mrs. Walton Phillips Mrs. Lisbeth Daniell Pierce Mr. James Edward Pierce Mrs. Amy Smart Place Mrs. Sherri Hill Plant Mr. Shawn Robert Plumb Ms. Amy Elizabeth Poole Mrs. Judy Terry Powell Mr. Donald B. Powers Jr. LtCol Jack W. Presson Mr. & Mrs. John Runnels Prewitt 1915 DC Mr. John David Puckett Mrs. Kathleen Joyner Pyron Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Grant Rains Mr. John Belton Ramage Mr. Alonza R. Ransom Mr. Andrew Ransome Dr. & Mrs. David Webster Rawson Dr. Cynthia J. Reed Dr. Janet Mills Reid Mr. Scott R. Renner Mrs. Susan Howes Retzlaff Dr. Douglas Wayne Reynolds Mrs. Flora Jane Rhodes Mrs. Traci Ellen Rigdon Mr. Jason C. Riley Mr. Raymond Edward Ringer Mrs. Patricia Farmer Robbins Mrs. Stephanie D. Roberts Mr. Jeremy Edward Roberts Dr. William Ladon Roberts Mrs. Lisa Paulk Roberts Mrs. Lillian Hussey Roberts Mrs. Shannon D. Robertson Mrs. Jeanne S. Robertson Mrs. Katie Jones Robertson Mrs. Patricia V. Robinson Mr. & Mrs. Paul Roche Ms. Tracy Yancey Rogers Dr. & Mrs. Wilmer Rogers Dr. Donald O. Rooks Mr. & Mrs. Glen Rose Mr. & Mrs. John Rote Mrs. Carolyn Roth Dr. Mark A. Rowicki Dr. Robert Ellis Rowsey HR Mrs. Elizabeth H. Russell 1915 DC

1915 indicates a member of the 1915 Society

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

Mrs. Janice Ham Saidla Mr. Robert L. Sanders Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Dale Sawyer Dr. Silvia Davis Scaife Mr. Roger P. Schad Drs. Eugene & Margaret Schaufler Ms. Betty Jeane Schiffer Mrs. Amy Sue Schmitt Mrs. Elizabeth Hardy Schmitt Mr. & Mrs. Bobby Scott Mrs. Judy Kell Scully Mr. Walter Justin Sealy Mrs. Martha Jones Senkbeil Ms. Kathryn Milner Shehane Mrs. Murbes Smith Shepherd Mrs. Elizabeth T. Sheppard Mr. Gordon Mack Sherman 1915 Mrs. Connie Lynn Shewchuk Ms. Mary A. Shirley Mrs. Kathleen B. Shivers Mrs. Michelle Makus Shory Dr. Lois Angela Silvernail Mrs. Mary Nash Simpson Mrs. Ann Blizzard Sims Mrs. Sara Chancey Sinquefield Dr. V. Shamim Sisson Mr. Wade Skidmore & Dr. Nell Skidmore Mr. & Mrs. Charles Eugene Skinner Mr. & Mrs. W. Reese Slaughter Mr. & Mrs. Kay Slayden Mr. Robert N. Smelley Mrs. Bonnie Lavonia Smith Dr. Mary Alice Smith Mrs. Emily Sellers Smith Mr. Joshua E. Smith Mrs. Ginger Jaye Smith Lt. Col. Joel Smith Mrs. Mariannie B. Smith Mrs. Mary Miller Smith Mrs. Susan C. Smith Mrs. Jacqueline Lee Sneed Mr. & Mrs. James Gregory Soyars Mr. & Mrs. Donald Clark Spain Mrs. Laura L. Spencer Mr. & Mrs. F. Russell Spicer Dr. Paul Michael St. Onge Mrs. Martha Bartlett Stamps Mrs. Gloria Cardwell Standard Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Richard Stanley Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Joseph Steele 1915 Mr. John Kenneth Stegall Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Stegner Ms. Susan Shahan Stelly Ms. Patricia Melonie Stephens Mr. & Mrs. Robert Stephenson Mrs. Dena Murphy Stephenson Mrs. Linda Long Stewart Mrs. Helen Leverette Stewart Mrs. RoseLyn G. Stone

DC indicates a member of the Dean’s Circle

Mrs. Cynthia Holloway Story Dr. Stephen Paul Stratton Mrs. Gladys K. Street Mrs. Jane Paxton Street Mrs. Kathleen G. Strickland Ms. Nell Whelan Stuart Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Joseph Sullivan Mr. Randall Harold Swann Ms. Julie Louise Swartz Mrs. Patricia H. Swecker Mrs. Ashley Hall Sykes Syrup Sopping Day at Loachapoka Inc Dr. & Mrs. T. Lavon Talley Mrs. Loren Waller Tanner Mrs. Selena Gaston Tapley Ms. Jan Tapley-Fortson Mr. Thomas Lee Tate Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Patrick Taylor Mrs. Gail Watford Taylor Ms. Sonja Kim Taylor Dr. John Waits Teel Mr. & Mrs. Richard Graham Tenhet Dr. Suzanne Tew-Washburn Mr. Calvin E. Thames Dr. Chippewa M. Thomas Mr. Foy Campbell Thompson Dr. Martha Williams Thompson Mrs. Anne Lees Thompson Mrs. Susan Elizabeth Tooley Mr. Charles S. Torbert Jr. Mrs. Mary Alice Townsend Dr. & Mrs. James Trott Mrs. Durelle Lamb Tuggle Mr. & Mrs. Michael Joseph Tullier HR Mr. William Turner Mrs. Jane Hall Turrentine 1915 Mr. & Mrs. David Edward Tuszynski Mrs. Cynthia Finch Tye University Agency Inc. Dr. Cynthia Girard Unwin Dr. Martha Hay Vardeman Mrs. Nancy Brown Veale Ms. Dorothea Gay Vela Dr. & Mrs. Johnnie Bedsole Vinson Mr. & Mrs. William Charles Wade Mrs. Carol Anthony Waggoner Mrs. Amy Dempsey Wagner Mrs. Tony Melinda K. Waid Mr. Roland Neal Walker Mr. Anthony Levis Walker Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy Walker Mrs. Bonnie W. Wall Ms. Jennifer Leigh Walz Ms. Nancy Wood Ward Mr. J. Ernest Warren Ms. Michele F. Waters Dr. Samuel William Watkins

HR indicates an Honor Roll donor or honoree

*deceased

Dr. Jacquelynn Wattenbarger Mrs. Marilyn A. Watts Dr. & Mrs. Harry Weaver Mrs. Giscene Rister Weaver Mrs. Patricia Grove Weaver Mr. & Mrs. Bobby Wayne Welch Maj & Mrs. Paul West Mrs. Barbara W. Whatley Dr. W. Mabrey Whetstone Jr. Ms. Nancy B. Whigham Mr. & Mrs. George Lamar White Ms. Barbara Brown White Mr. & Mrs. James Jerome White Ms. Marilyn L. Whitley Mr. & Mrs. Donald Earl Whitlock Mrs. Susan Dryden Whitson Mrs. Christine T. Wiggins Mrs. Lisa Upchurch Wiggins Mr. & Mrs. Brett Daniel Wilber Mr. & Mrs. Cecil Creighton Wilder Mr. & Mrs. J. Knox Williams 1915 Mr. James Frederick Williams Mr. & Mrs. James S. Williams Mr. & Mrs. Homer Williams Mr. & Mrs. R. Boyd Williamson Mrs. Vickie Mayton Wilson Mr. John Randall Wilson Mrs. Joy Daniel Wilson Mrs. Carolyn Sutton Wingard Mrs. Sabra Phillips Winkle Mrs. S. Lynn C. Wolfe Mrs. Evelyn Smith Wood Mr. Marvin R. Woodall III Mrs. Theles S. Woodfin Mr. Edison Woodie & Dr. Shirley Woodie Mr. & Mrs. L. Shelton Woodson Mrs. Emily Corcoran Woste Mrs. Beth Morgan Wright Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wyrick Ms. Alicia Jo Yarboro

1915

Mr. & Mrs. Cecil Meadows Yarbrough Mr. & Mrs. H. Andrew Young Mrs. Marie M. Zaminer

1915

Named for the year in which the Department of Education (now the College of Education) was established, the 1915 Society recognizes donors whose lifetime contributions and commitments to the college have reached a cumulative total of $25,000 or more (including outright gifts, pledges and planned gifts).

O u r ne w 1 9 1 5 soc i e t y h ono r ees calen dar year 2011

C o m m i t m en t recogn izin g don ors from $100,000 to $ 499, 999

AJIN, USA Kenny Howard Athletic Training Fellowship

F r i ends h i p recogn izin g don ors from $25,000 to $9 9, 999

The Kevin Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund Lt. Col. Samuel M. Burney, Jr. The Charles Barkley Foundation EB Sport Group

Susan M. Farrell R. Kenneth Johns ’57 and Barbara J. Johns ’55 Cynthia A. Moline Douglas L. Nielsen ’77 Kenneth B. Roy, Jr. ’50

E.L. Gibson Foundation A. Arnold Fagen ’50 and Emaleen S. Fagen ’50 Please visit education.auburn.edu/giving to view a full listing of members.

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o u r ne w p a t r ons of t h e ke y s t one

Patrons of the Keystone believe that education is central to building a better future for all. Patrons of the Keystone demonstrate their support of the College of Education by committing a multi-year pledge of financial support to the Dean’s Circle Fund. Each year, donations to the Dean’s Circle Fund provide the resources necessary for the college to exceed current levels of excellence in advancing its tri-fold mission of academic instruction, research and outreach.

R S

N PAT R O

E

IO N

L

N’

S CIR

C

Ann R. Hill ’77 Joyce A. Horsley ’53

Dr. Jane S. Cahaly ’66

R ONO H E T H Dr. Charles L. Ledbetter, Jr.

Dr. Eldridge R. Collins ’62 and Mrs. Belva L. Collins ’67

’89 and Mrs. Kimberly R. Ledbetter ’87

Laura J. Cooper ’02

Dr. Cynthia B. Lumpkin ’66

David S. Elder ’77 and Judy K. Elder ’77

Herman L. Wilkes, Sr. ’63

Please visit education.auburn.edu/giving to view a full listing of members.

R OLL

O T HE H ON

R

R OLL

Th e r e ar e s e v e ra l s p e cia l o cca s i o n s a n d r e a s o n s to h o n o r a n e d u cato r / m e n to r i n yo u r l if e . To s ay “ t ha n k s ” to t hat s p e cia l p e r s o n , p l e a s e c o n tac t M o l ly McN u lt y at m o l ly. m c n u lt y@ au b u r n . e d u o r 33 4 . 8 4 4 . 5793 .

Cristen P. Herring

Honored by Family and Friends

Dr. Bettye Burkhalter

Honored by Dr. Jonnie Wilbanks

Dr. Andrew Weaver

Honored by Dr. Richard E. Brogdon

Dr. Jim Witte

Honored by Anonymous

Lois Inez McIntyre

Honored by Jean McIntyre Hicks

Dr. Dave Martin

Honored by Gray Broughton

Dr. Dennis Rygiel Honored by Mary Jurmain ’79 Please visit education.auburn.edu/giving to view a full listing of members.

TRONS

KE

LE

PA

has had on the youth of Alabama for

the College of Education Honor Roll

most of her life is my way of saying

is a delight. The many years I have

thanks from her students and our

Diane Barlow ’63

been an educator have been the most

family. Thanks to Auburn University’s

Patron of the Keystone Silver Spring, Maryland

rewarding years of my life.

College of Education for giving me the

C

C

PA

pat ro n s o f t h e k e y s to n e by c o m m i t t i n g a p l e dg e o f at l e a s t $1, 0 0 0 p e r y e ar f o r a m i n i m u m o f t hr e e c o n s e c u t iv e y e ar s .

to join as a patron of the ke ys tone or le arn more about the dean’ s circl e , pl e ase contac t molly mcnult y at m olly. mcnult y@ auburn . e du or 334. 8 4 4. 5793.

Dr. Patsy Boyd Parker ’70 Honor Roll honoree Opelika, Alabama

opportunity to recognize my wife in this manner.

Mr. William A. Parker Honor Roll donor Opelika, Alabama

PAT

NE

2 012

E

o lN u m e’ IS X, D E VA CIRCLE

Keystone

PA

50

she works has a special place in her

by having been named a member of

E

a l l a lu m n i a n d fri e n d s o f t h e c o l l e g e

profession. Each student with whom

in such a meaningful way. Being a

life. Honoring Pat for the impact she

the College can thrive and continue its transformational work.

o f e d u cat i o n ar e i n vi t e d to b e c o m e

and her teaching and counseling

grateful to Parker for recognizing me part of such a distinguished group

A

A

E

difference in our world. I don’t view my gifts to the college as giving N N implies aRcompleted two-way transaction; back because that rather I ’S CIR ’S CI view my gifts as giving forward into the open space of the future so that

and most

Pat loves her students

LE

DE

YSTON

YSTON

research and service. I support the college because it is making a real

I am honored

KE

TRONS

E

E

transform the lives of individuals through education and society through DE

I

TH TH F F O O believe in the Auburn College of Education and in its power to

E

D

A

calen dar year 2011

Jack A. Goode and Marjorie D. Goode ’82

Dr. Amanda Branscombe ’69

THE KE OF S

o u r ne w h ono r r oll i nd u c t ees

C. Warren Fleming ’43

Dr. Diane L. Barlow ’63

ONE

NE

T

Dr. Timothy O. Alford ’68 and Mrs. Freddie M. Alford ’73

ST

Y

TO

C

A

c al e nd ar ye ar 2 011

Y

IT

E

The Auburn University College of Education has established The Honor Roll — a permanent listing of individuals who have been recognized by current or former students, colleagues, family members or friends through a charitable contribution of $500. The Honor Roll is a fund created to commemorate the significant roles of educators in our lives and are used to provide student and faculty support.

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

51


o u r ne w p a t r ons of t h e ke y s t one

Patrons of the Keystone believe that education is central to building a better future for all. Patrons of the Keystone demonstrate their support of the College of Education by committing a multi-year pledge of financial support to the Dean’s Circle Fund. Each year, donations to the Dean’s Circle Fund provide the resources necessary for the college to exceed current levels of excellence in advancing its tri-fold mission of academic instruction, research and outreach.

R S

N PAT R O

E

IO N

L

N’

S CIR

C

Ann R. Hill ’77 Joyce A. Horsley ’53

Dr. Jane S. Cahaly ’66

R ONO H E T H Dr. Charles L. Ledbetter, Jr.

Dr. Eldridge R. Collins ’62 and Mrs. Belva L. Collins ’67

’89 and Mrs. Kimberly R. Ledbetter ’87

Laura J. Cooper ’02

Dr. Cynthia B. Lumpkin ’66

David S. Elder ’77 and Judy K. Elder ’77

Herman L. Wilkes, Sr. ’63

Please visit education.auburn.edu/giving to view a full listing of members.

R OLL

O T HE H ON

R

R OLL

Th e r e ar e s e v e ra l s p e cia l o cca s i o n s a n d r e a s o n s to h o n o r a n e d u cato r / m e n to r i n yo u r l if e . To s ay “ t ha n k s ” to t hat s p e cia l p e r s o n , p l e a s e c o n tac t M o l ly McN u lt y at m o l ly. m c n u lt y@ au b u r n . e d u o r 33 4 . 8 4 4 . 5793 .

Cristen P. Herring

Honored by Family and Friends

Dr. Bettye Burkhalter

Honored by Dr. Jonnie Wilbanks

Dr. Andrew Weaver

Honored by Dr. Richard E. Brogdon

Dr. Jim Witte

Honored by Anonymous

Lois Inez McIntyre

Honored by Jean McIntyre Hicks

Dr. Dave Martin

Honored by Gray Broughton

Dr. Dennis Rygiel Honored by Mary Jurmain ’79 Please visit education.auburn.edu/giving to view a full listing of members.

TRONS

KE

LE

PA

has had on the youth of Alabama for

the College of Education Honor Roll

most of her life is my way of saying

is a delight. The many years I have

thanks from her students and our

Diane Barlow ’63

been an educator have been the most

family. Thanks to Auburn University’s

Patron of the Keystone Silver Spring, Maryland

rewarding years of my life.

College of Education for giving me the

C

C

PA

pat ro n s o f t h e k e y s to n e by c o m m i t t i n g a p l e dg e o f at l e a s t $1, 0 0 0 p e r y e ar f o r a m i n i m u m o f t hr e e c o n s e c u t iv e y e ar s .

to join as a patron of the ke ys tone or le arn more about the dean’ s circl e , pl e ase contac t molly mcnult y at m olly. mcnult y@ auburn . e du or 334. 8 4 4. 5793.

Dr. Patsy Boyd Parker ’70 Honor Roll honoree Opelika, Alabama

opportunity to recognize my wife in this manner.

Mr. William A. Parker Honor Roll donor Opelika, Alabama

PAT

NE

2 012

E

o lN u m e’ IS X, D E VA CIRCLE

Keystone

PA

50

she works has a special place in her

by having been named a member of

E

a l l a lu m n i a n d fri e n d s o f t h e c o l l e g e

profession. Each student with whom

in such a meaningful way. Being a

life. Honoring Pat for the impact she

the College can thrive and continue its transformational work.

o f e d u cat i o n ar e i n vi t e d to b e c o m e

and her teaching and counseling

grateful to Parker for recognizing me part of such a distinguished group

A

A

E

difference in our world. I don’t view my gifts to the college as giving N N implies aRcompleted two-way transaction; back because that rather I ’S CIR ’S CI view my gifts as giving forward into the open space of the future so that

and most

Pat loves her students

LE

DE

YSTON

YSTON

research and service. I support the college because it is making a real

I am honored

KE

TRONS

E

E

transform the lives of individuals through education and society through DE

I

TH TH F F O O believe in the Auburn College of Education and in its power to

E

D

A

calen dar year 2011

Jack A. Goode and Marjorie D. Goode ’82

Dr. Amanda Branscombe ’69

THE KE OF S

o u r ne w h ono r r oll i nd u c t ees

C. Warren Fleming ’43

Dr. Diane L. Barlow ’63

ONE

NE

T

Dr. Timothy O. Alford ’68 and Mrs. Freddie M. Alford ’73

ST

Y

TO

C

A

c al e nd ar ye ar 2 011

Y

IT

E

The Auburn University College of Education has established The Honor Roll — a permanent listing of individuals who have been recognized by current or former students, colleagues, family members or friends through a charitable contribution of $500. The Honor Roll is a fund created to commemorate the significant roles of educators in our lives and are used to provide student and faculty support.

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for a day 2011 Keystone Leader believes in seizing moments

D

r . m a x w e l l k i n g ’50

didn’t consider the words of his college professor to be life-changing or role-defining immediately after hearing them. If anything, the statement made in a leadership course taken during his junior year at Auburn bewildered him. photo: FLORIDA TODAY

“In a sentence from a lecture, she said, ‘In the final analysis, students, the only way to lead is to lead,’” said King, a general education graduate. “I had this kooky feeling in my head, ‘What in the world did she mean?’” The more King thought about his teacher’s statement, the more he identified with the message. Those words influenced his actions as a classroom teacher, a principal, a soldier, a college president and a community philanthropist. King, who visited Auburn in November 2011 as the College of Education’s ninth Keystone Leader-in-Residence, expounded on his former professor’s statement of more than 60 years ago. “Do something with the information you have,” King said. “Get through the bureaucracy and the things that slow you down. When you see that something needs to be done, do it.” In King’s case, it meant seizing those moments in which a difference could be made in the lives of the students he served during his time as a high school educator and in 38 years as a junior college administrator. It meant thinking creatively and 52

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

acting courageously as the nation’s youngest college president at the age of 32 as the newly-formed Indian River Junior College took shape. It meant pushing for the desegregation of Florida’s junior colleges and creating new educational opportunities for minority students and women. It meant seeing the possibilities of evolving technology.

King had his pick of colleges as a senior at St. Lucie County High School in Fort Pierce, Fla. He happened to be a highly productive halfback on a successful football team and caught the attention of coaches at Florida, Georgia Tech and Duke. Auburn, then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute, also offered a scholarship. King hopped aboard a train for the first time in the summer of 1946.

Trained on the Plains

Despite growing up in humble surroundings, as one of eight children in a family that made the most of what it had,

On his first carry for the Auburn freshman team, King sustained a season-ending injury after being ridden down by

“That train ride sold me on Auburn,” he said.

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

53


for a day 2011 Keystone Leader believes in seizing moments

D

r . m a x w e l l k i n g ’50

didn’t consider the words of his college professor to be life-changing or role-defining immediately after hearing them. If anything, the statement made in a leadership course taken during his junior year at Auburn bewildered him. photo: FLORIDA TODAY

“In a sentence from a lecture, she said, ‘In the final analysis, students, the only way to lead is to lead,’” said King, a general education graduate. “I had this kooky feeling in my head, ‘What in the world did she mean?’” The more King thought about his teacher’s statement, the more he identified with the message. Those words influenced his actions as a classroom teacher, a principal, a soldier, a college president and a community philanthropist. King, who visited Auburn in November 2011 as the College of Education’s ninth Keystone Leader-in-Residence, expounded on his former professor’s statement of more than 60 years ago. “Do something with the information you have,” King said. “Get through the bureaucracy and the things that slow you down. When you see that something needs to be done, do it.” In King’s case, it meant seizing those moments in which a difference could be made in the lives of the students he served during his time as a high school educator and in 38 years as a junior college administrator. It meant thinking creatively and 52

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

acting courageously as the nation’s youngest college president at the age of 32 as the newly-formed Indian River Junior College took shape. It meant pushing for the desegregation of Florida’s junior colleges and creating new educational opportunities for minority students and women. It meant seeing the possibilities of evolving technology.

King had his pick of colleges as a senior at St. Lucie County High School in Fort Pierce, Fla. He happened to be a highly productive halfback on a successful football team and caught the attention of coaches at Florida, Georgia Tech and Duke. Auburn, then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute, also offered a scholarship. King hopped aboard a train for the first time in the summer of 1946.

Trained on the Plains

Despite growing up in humble surroundings, as one of eight children in a family that made the most of what it had,

On his first carry for the Auburn freshman team, King sustained a season-ending injury after being ridden down by

“That train ride sold me on Auburn,” he said.

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

53


K i n g f o r a D ay

About the Keystone Leader-in-Residence program The College of Education’s Keystone Leader-in-Residence program introduces students to successful leaders in education, government, human services, healthcare, and other fields. In addition to demonstrating the versatility of an education degree, the program enables honorees to share their personal and professional experiences with students, faculty, and staff in campus lecture, small group and classroom settings. 2011 Maxwell King ’50 former president of Indian River and Brevard Community Colleges 2010 Kenneth Johns ’57 founder of The Hampshire Management Group 2009 Brenda Smith Sanborn ’68 former executive with Pfizer Pharmaceuticals 2008 Rev. Chette Williams ’86 author and Auburn University football team chaplain 2007 Susan Dryden Whitson ’91 former press secretary for First Lady Laura Bush 2006 Kathy Langois Munro ’70 principal in San Diego-based BridgeWest LLC 2005 The Hon. Kay Ivey ’67 Alabama State Treasurer 2004 Gordon Sherman ’57 principal for Atlanta-based Lamon & Sherman Consulting LLC and retired Social Security administrator 2003 Wayne T. Smith ’68 chairman, president and CEO of Tennessee-based Community Health Systems

54

Keystone

tacklers. A severe knee injury before his sophomore season ended his football career, but the coaches kept him on scholarship as an assistant trainer and water boy.

When a search committee began looking for Indian River’s first president, it quickly focused on King.

“They could have let my scholarship go,” King said, “but they kept me. I will always remember the people who made that decision.”

Pio neerin g spirit

Comin g home King returned to Fort Pierce after graduating from Auburn and accepted a position as a middle school math and science teacher, as well as an assistant coach for the high school football and track teams. The students weren’t particularly excited by the prospect of one of their own leaving after King, a former ROTC student at Auburn, received a call to service from the Army in 1951. Before his deployment, students in his class staged a prank in which the local sheriff had the teacher “arrested” so he couldn’t leave. King served as a tank commander and met his eventual wife, Doris, while stationed in Texas. King continued his education after fulfilling his military obligation, earning a master’s degree and doctorate at the University of Florida. He returned to Fort Pierce, teaching and eventually becoming principal at Dan Carty High School. In 1957, King laid the groundwork for future career growth by attending the University of Texas’ post-doctoral program in junior college administration and learning from some of the nation’s foremost authorities on higher education management. This became especially important after King was asked to help determine whether a junior college was needed in St. Lucie County. King’s project, which outlined the educational and economic benefits of placing a junior college in the community, helped persuade the state to expand its system by creating Indian River, Brevard, Miami-Dade and Broward Junior Colleges.

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

When King began serving as president of Indian River in January 1960, he had just turned 32. He was the youngest junior college president ever appointed, a distinction that was lost on him at the time because he was busy searching for classroom space and preparing for an influx of 348 students. Fittingly, the school’s athletic mascot was – and remains – the Pioneers. Indian River, which hosted its first courses in elementary and high schools, now exists as a four-year state college with five campuses and a combined enrollment of more than 33,000. But Indian River’s present prosperity can be traced back to the energy and force of will exerted by King in the early days. King viewed junior colleges as havens of opportunity for students from middle- and lowincome families. He also believed in putting the “community” in community college by leading efforts to desegregate Florida’s system.

A new direction and a las tin g legacy In 1968, lured by the buzz surrounding nearby Kennedy Space Center and the growth potential of the institution, King left Indian River to become president of Brevard Community College in Cocoa Beach. “To serve the community which included the space program had a great appeal for me,” King recounted in “The Only Way to Lead: The Life and Times of Dr. Maxwell King,” written by Brevard colleague James Ross. “Having the allure of the space program, I felt, could allow us to make the college one of the very best in America as the space-age junior college. I also felt the space pro-

gram was going to be the reason other high-tech firms would locate in Brevard [County].” In his 30 years as president, King remained active in developing distance learning programs at his school, as well as at other institutions throughout the United States and South America. King also built close relationships with Kennedy Space Center and the major contractors for the space program. Brevard provided training for some of the space program’s welders and even offered Russian language training for astronauts involved in the Soyuz mission. King also pursued international educational opportunities and partnerships on behalf of Brevard and other junior colleges. In 1975, King was the lone junior college president among a group of university presidents invited to Europe through the Fulbright program. “We had great conferences,” he said. “We talked about how we were going to start an organization that would involve more of our students in international understanding, foreign exchange and so forth.”

I took him out to dinner and he said, ‘Mr. King, why don’t you have a big, fine performing arts center?’ I went to the county commission, went to the city, and they said, ‘Let’s study it.’” Having already seen countless examples of projects left undone by committee discussion, King visited a state senator and built support for the facility. A sign on Interstate 95 bears the name of the facility named in King’s honor.

“Most of the people’s names you see on I-95 are gone.” Dr. Maxwell King ’50, discussing an interstate sign advertising the Maxwell C. King Center for the Performing Arts of Brevard Community College

“Most of the people’s names you see on I-95 are gone,” he joked. King’s work as an educator, administrator and community advocate will long be remembered, however. Former Florida agriculture commissioner Doyle Conner provided an appropriate appraisal of King’s efforts during a 1989 celebration honoring his selection as the nation’s top education administrator by the American Association of University Administrators. “[His] accomplishments can all be characterized in four words – they improved people’s lives.”

When none of the other university presidents followed up within a year, King worked to establish Community Colleges for International Development. The CCIC, which offers faculty and student exchanges, eventually became a consortium of junior colleges. Now in its 36th year, the organization is based at Kirkwood Community College in Iowa. Once again, King demonstrated that there are times when the only way to lead is to simply take charge. King’s legacy can also be seen on Brevard’s Melbourne campus. The Maxwell C. King Center for the Performing Arts of Brevard Community College, a six-story, 100,000-squarefoot facility, opened in 1988. “We used to have a small auditorium on campus,” King said. “One year, we had Vincent Price and he gave a nice talk to about 400 people. Keystone

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K i n g f o r a D ay

About the Keystone Leader-in-Residence program The College of Education’s Keystone Leader-in-Residence program introduces students to successful leaders in education, government, human services, healthcare, and other fields. In addition to demonstrating the versatility of an education degree, the program enables honorees to share their personal and professional experiences with students, faculty, and staff in campus lecture, small group and classroom settings. 2011 Maxwell King ’50 former president of Indian River and Brevard Community Colleges 2010 Kenneth Johns ’57 founder of The Hampshire Management Group 2009 Brenda Smith Sanborn ’68 former executive with Pfizer Pharmaceuticals 2008 Rev. Chette Williams ’86 author and Auburn University football team chaplain 2007 Susan Dryden Whitson ’91 former press secretary for First Lady Laura Bush 2006 Kathy Langois Munro ’70 principal in San Diego-based BridgeWest LLC 2005 The Hon. Kay Ivey ’67 Alabama State Treasurer 2004 Gordon Sherman ’57 principal for Atlanta-based Lamon & Sherman Consulting LLC and retired Social Security administrator 2003 Wayne T. Smith ’68 chairman, president and CEO of Tennessee-based Community Health Systems

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tacklers. A severe knee injury before his sophomore season ended his football career, but the coaches kept him on scholarship as an assistant trainer and water boy.

When a search committee began looking for Indian River’s first president, it quickly focused on King.

“They could have let my scholarship go,” King said, “but they kept me. I will always remember the people who made that decision.”

Pio neerin g spirit

Comin g home King returned to Fort Pierce after graduating from Auburn and accepted a position as a middle school math and science teacher, as well as an assistant coach for the high school football and track teams. The students weren’t particularly excited by the prospect of one of their own leaving after King, a former ROTC student at Auburn, received a call to service from the Army in 1951. Before his deployment, students in his class staged a prank in which the local sheriff had the teacher “arrested” so he couldn’t leave. King served as a tank commander and met his eventual wife, Doris, while stationed in Texas. King continued his education after fulfilling his military obligation, earning a master’s degree and doctorate at the University of Florida. He returned to Fort Pierce, teaching and eventually becoming principal at Dan Carty High School. In 1957, King laid the groundwork for future career growth by attending the University of Texas’ post-doctoral program in junior college administration and learning from some of the nation’s foremost authorities on higher education management. This became especially important after King was asked to help determine whether a junior college was needed in St. Lucie County. King’s project, which outlined the educational and economic benefits of placing a junior college in the community, helped persuade the state to expand its system by creating Indian River, Brevard, Miami-Dade and Broward Junior Colleges.

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When King began serving as president of Indian River in January 1960, he had just turned 32. He was the youngest junior college president ever appointed, a distinction that was lost on him at the time because he was busy searching for classroom space and preparing for an influx of 348 students. Fittingly, the school’s athletic mascot was – and remains – the Pioneers. Indian River, which hosted its first courses in elementary and high schools, now exists as a four-year state college with five campuses and a combined enrollment of more than 33,000. But Indian River’s present prosperity can be traced back to the energy and force of will exerted by King in the early days. King viewed junior colleges as havens of opportunity for students from middle- and lowincome families. He also believed in putting the “community” in community college by leading efforts to desegregate Florida’s system.

A new direction and a las tin g legacy In 1968, lured by the buzz surrounding nearby Kennedy Space Center and the growth potential of the institution, King left Indian River to become president of Brevard Community College in Cocoa Beach. “To serve the community which included the space program had a great appeal for me,” King recounted in “The Only Way to Lead: The Life and Times of Dr. Maxwell King,” written by Brevard colleague James Ross. “Having the allure of the space program, I felt, could allow us to make the college one of the very best in America as the space-age junior college. I also felt the space pro-

gram was going to be the reason other high-tech firms would locate in Brevard [County].” In his 30 years as president, King remained active in developing distance learning programs at his school, as well as at other institutions throughout the United States and South America. King also built close relationships with Kennedy Space Center and the major contractors for the space program. Brevard provided training for some of the space program’s welders and even offered Russian language training for astronauts involved in the Soyuz mission. King also pursued international educational opportunities and partnerships on behalf of Brevard and other junior colleges. In 1975, King was the lone junior college president among a group of university presidents invited to Europe through the Fulbright program. “We had great conferences,” he said. “We talked about how we were going to start an organization that would involve more of our students in international understanding, foreign exchange and so forth.”

I took him out to dinner and he said, ‘Mr. King, why don’t you have a big, fine performing arts center?’ I went to the county commission, went to the city, and they said, ‘Let’s study it.’” Having already seen countless examples of projects left undone by committee discussion, King visited a state senator and built support for the facility. A sign on Interstate 95 bears the name of the facility named in King’s honor.

“Most of the people’s names you see on I-95 are gone.” Dr. Maxwell King ’50, discussing an interstate sign advertising the Maxwell C. King Center for the Performing Arts of Brevard Community College

“Most of the people’s names you see on I-95 are gone,” he joked. King’s work as an educator, administrator and community advocate will long be remembered, however. Former Florida agriculture commissioner Doyle Conner provided an appropriate appraisal of King’s efforts during a 1989 celebration honoring his selection as the nation’s top education administrator by the American Association of University Administrators. “[His] accomplishments can all be characterized in four words – they improved people’s lives.”

When none of the other university presidents followed up within a year, King worked to establish Community Colleges for International Development. The CCIC, which offers faculty and student exchanges, eventually became a consortium of junior colleges. Now in its 36th year, the organization is based at Kirkwood Community College in Iowa. Once again, King demonstrated that there are times when the only way to lead is to simply take charge. King’s legacy can also be seen on Brevard’s Melbourne campus. The Maxwell C. King Center for the Performing Arts of Brevard Community College, a six-story, 100,000-squarefoot facility, opened in 1988. “We used to have a small auditorium on campus,” King said. “One year, we had Vincent Price and he gave a nice talk to about 400 people. Keystone

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From the Chair Tom N. Taylor ’60

Chair, National Advisory Council Auburn University College of Education

I welcome this opportunity to share with the readers of the Keystone some of the highlights of the current projects and activities of the National Advisory Council (NAC). The NAC focuses on assisting the college’s dean, faculty, and staff in achieving goals related to excellence in teaching, cutting edge research, and meaningful outreach. Each member of the NAC serves on one of four major standing committees — Academic Affairs, Internal Relations, External Relations, and Development. Each committee sets goals and objectives that provide direction for the advisory council in these particular areas of service. The Academic Affairs Committee focuses on two primary functions — (1) promoting the participation of NAC members in the academic affairs of the college as volunteers in academic classes, seminars, workshops, and institutes, and (2) reviewing faculty mini-grant applications each year, and recommending the faculty members who are to be awarded the mini-grants. Each advisory council member makes an annual donation to a mini-grant fund to support faculty research efforts. Members of the Internal Relations Committee work with faculty members who are sponsors of student organizations to assist the organizations financially, and/or by volunteering to help the students achieve their project goals each year. The Internal Relations Committee solicits donations from former NAC members by naming those who contribute to a fund to assist the student organizations “sustaining members.” The Internal Relations Committee has had a major impact on the student group “Auburn Voices.” In a recent document, one of the student organization sponsors stated, “The National Advisory Council has been and continues to be one of the significant reasons Auburn Voices is so successful.” The External Relations Committee works to identify and highlight the achievements of alumni and friends of the College of Education. At the present time, the committee is working on proposing changes and/or additions to the College of Education’s current awards, focusing primarily on which awards are given, as well as the process for selecting and presenting the awards. The NAC Development Committee works directly with the college’s Development Staff in seeking financial gifts from alumni and friends. One of the current projects of the Development Committee is to encourage all members of the advisory council, as well as other alumni and friends of the college, to donate to the Dean’s Circle Fund, also known as the Patrons of the Keystone Fund.

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Six join NAC in 2011 The following individuals joined the college’s National Advisory Council in fall 2011: Laura Jenkins Cooper ’02, executive director of the Lee County Youth Development Center and a community affairs counseling graduate. Glenda Earwood ’74, executive director of Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society and two-time College of Education graduate (bachelor’s in secondary education, master’s in counselor education). Charles Farmer ’97, principal at Summit High School in Spring Hill, Tenn., and a two-time college graduate (bachelor’s in general social science education, doctorate in curriculum and teaching). Nancy Young Fortner ’71, retired K-12 educator, former president of the Auburn Alumni Association Board of Directors, and holder of a master’s degree in counselor education.

Dr. Tom N. Taylor ’60 Council Chair Retired superintendent Clinton, Miss.

Dr. Ron Saunders ’70 Chair, Academic Affairs Retired school superintendent Winder, Ga.

Dr. Tim Alford ’68 H. Gray Broughton ’05 Exec. director, CEO/Vocational Alabama Construction Rehabilitation Recruitment Inst. Counselor, Broughton Associates Inc. Pelham, Ala. Richmond, Va.

Sharon Rochambeau Lovell Chair, Development Former school board member, Vestavia Hills Vestavia Hills, Ala.

Kym Haas Prewitt ’86 Chair, External Relations Exec. director, Children’s Literacy Guild of Ala. Birmingham, Ala.

Susan McIntosh Housel ’73 Chair, Internal Relations Retired elementary educator Auburn, Ala.

James “Jim” Manley ’60 Immediate Past Chair Retired banker Decatur, Ga.

Donna Carpenter Burchfield ’71 Attorney and Community Volunteer Atlanta, Ga.

Laura J. Cooper ’02 Executive Director, Lee County Youth Development Center Auburn, Ala.

Dr. Glenda Earwood ’74 Executive Director, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society for First-Year Students Macon, Ga.

Dr. Charles Farmer ’97 Principal Summit High School Spring Hill, Tenn.

Nancy Young Fortner ’71 Retired educator and school counselor Brownsboro, Ala.

Denisha Hendricks ’01, director of athletics at Kentucky State University and a two-time College of Education graduate (master’s in higher education administration/sports management and doctorate in higher education administration). Chuck Ledbetter ’89, superintendent of Dublin (Ga.) City Schools and holder of a doctorate in educational leadership.

Dr. Nathan L. Dr. Denisha L. Hodges ’74 Hendricks ’01 Director of Athletics, President, Bowling Green Technical College Kentucky State University Bowling Green, Ky Frankfort, Ky.

Dr. Carol Edmundson Hutcheson ’69 Retired principal Columbus, Ga.

Dr. Charles Ledbetter ’89 Superintendent, Dublin (Ga.) City Schools Dublin, Ga.

Dr. Imogene Mathison Mixson ’63 Retired community college academic dean Ozark, Ala.

Dr. Byron B. Nelson Jr. ’57 Retired school superintendent Union Grove, Ala.

Dr. Harold Patterson ’54 Retired school superintendent Guntersville, Ala.

Roderick Perry ’95 Sr. Assoc. Athletic Director/Director of Administration, Wright State University Athletics Department Dayton, Ohio

Elizabeth Hunter “Libba” Russell ’64 Retired educator Columbus, Ga.

Beth Gregory St. Jean ’70 Supervisor, Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program (GATAPP) Marietta, Ga.

Dr. Paul St. Onge ’07 Research analyst, QinetiQ North America, U.S. Army Combat Readiness, Ft. Rucker Enterprise, Ala.

Dr. J. Carlton Smith ’67 Retired superintendent Vestavia Hills, Ala.

Dr. Shirley Kelley Spears ’71 Director, B.B. Comer Memorial Library Sylacauga, Ala.

Thomas Taylor ’97 Account Director, GMR Marketing Belmont, N.C.

Dr. W. Mabrey Whetstone Jr. ’73 Director, Special Education Services, Alabama Department of Education Titus, Ala.

Susan Dryden Whitson ’91 Former White House press secretary, Office of the First Lady Washington, Va.

Get involved in the NAC National Advisory Council membership is to College of Education graduates, as well as “friends” of the college who have contributed to its success through consistent service or financial support. Prospective council members may be nominated at any time by current council members, as well as college faculty and administrators. ON THE WEB: education.auburn.edu/alumni/nac

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57


From the Chair Tom N. Taylor ’60

Chair, National Advisory Council Auburn University College of Education

I welcome this opportunity to share with the readers of the Keystone some of the highlights of the current projects and activities of the National Advisory Council (NAC). The NAC focuses on assisting the college’s dean, faculty, and staff in achieving goals related to excellence in teaching, cutting edge research, and meaningful outreach. Each member of the NAC serves on one of four major standing committees — Academic Affairs, Internal Relations, External Relations, and Development. Each committee sets goals and objectives that provide direction for the advisory council in these particular areas of service. The Academic Affairs Committee focuses on two primary functions — (1) promoting the participation of NAC members in the academic affairs of the college as volunteers in academic classes, seminars, workshops, and institutes, and (2) reviewing faculty mini-grant applications each year, and recommending the faculty members who are to be awarded the mini-grants. Each advisory council member makes an annual donation to a mini-grant fund to support faculty research efforts. Members of the Internal Relations Committee work with faculty members who are sponsors of student organizations to assist the organizations financially, and/or by volunteering to help the students achieve their project goals each year. The Internal Relations Committee solicits donations from former NAC members by naming those who contribute to a fund to assist the student organizations “sustaining members.” The Internal Relations Committee has had a major impact on the student group “Auburn Voices.” In a recent document, one of the student organization sponsors stated, “The National Advisory Council has been and continues to be one of the significant reasons Auburn Voices is so successful.” The External Relations Committee works to identify and highlight the achievements of alumni and friends of the College of Education. At the present time, the committee is working on proposing changes and/or additions to the College of Education’s current awards, focusing primarily on which awards are given, as well as the process for selecting and presenting the awards. The NAC Development Committee works directly with the college’s Development Staff in seeking financial gifts from alumni and friends. One of the current projects of the Development Committee is to encourage all members of the advisory council, as well as other alumni and friends of the college, to donate to the Dean’s Circle Fund, also known as the Patrons of the Keystone Fund.

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Six join NAC in 2011 The following individuals joined the college’s National Advisory Council in fall 2011: Laura Jenkins Cooper ’02, executive director of the Lee County Youth Development Center and a community affairs counseling graduate. Glenda Earwood ’74, executive director of Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society and two-time College of Education graduate (bachelor’s in secondary education, master’s in counselor education). Charles Farmer ’97, principal at Summit High School in Spring Hill, Tenn., and a two-time college graduate (bachelor’s in general social science education, doctorate in curriculum and teaching). Nancy Young Fortner ’71, retired K-12 educator, former president of the Auburn Alumni Association Board of Directors, and holder of a master’s degree in counselor education.

Dr. Tom N. Taylor ’60 Council Chair Retired superintendent Clinton, Miss.

Dr. Ron Saunders ’70 Chair, Academic Affairs Retired school superintendent Winder, Ga.

Dr. Tim Alford ’68 H. Gray Broughton ’05 Exec. director, CEO/Vocational Alabama Construction Rehabilitation Recruitment Inst. Counselor, Broughton Associates Inc. Pelham, Ala. Richmond, Va.

Sharon Rochambeau Lovell Chair, Development Former school board member, Vestavia Hills Vestavia Hills, Ala.

Kym Haas Prewitt ’86 Chair, External Relations Exec. director, Children’s Literacy Guild of Ala. Birmingham, Ala.

Susan McIntosh Housel ’73 Chair, Internal Relations Retired elementary educator Auburn, Ala.

James “Jim” Manley ’60 Immediate Past Chair Retired banker Decatur, Ga.

Donna Carpenter Burchfield ’71 Attorney and Community Volunteer Atlanta, Ga.

Laura J. Cooper ’02 Executive Director, Lee County Youth Development Center Auburn, Ala.

Dr. Glenda Earwood ’74 Executive Director, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society for First-Year Students Macon, Ga.

Dr. Charles Farmer ’97 Principal Summit High School Spring Hill, Tenn.

Nancy Young Fortner ’71 Retired educator and school counselor Brownsboro, Ala.

Denisha Hendricks ’01, director of athletics at Kentucky State University and a two-time College of Education graduate (master’s in higher education administration/sports management and doctorate in higher education administration). Chuck Ledbetter ’89, superintendent of Dublin (Ga.) City Schools and holder of a doctorate in educational leadership.

Dr. Nathan L. Dr. Denisha L. Hodges ’74 Hendricks ’01 Director of Athletics, President, Bowling Green Technical College Kentucky State University Bowling Green, Ky Frankfort, Ky.

Dr. Carol Edmundson Hutcheson ’69 Retired principal Columbus, Ga.

Dr. Charles Ledbetter ’89 Superintendent, Dublin (Ga.) City Schools Dublin, Ga.

Dr. Imogene Mathison Mixson ’63 Retired community college academic dean Ozark, Ala.

Dr. Byron B. Nelson Jr. ’57 Retired school superintendent Union Grove, Ala.

Dr. Harold Patterson ’54 Retired school superintendent Guntersville, Ala.

Roderick Perry ’95 Sr. Assoc. Athletic Director/Director of Administration, Wright State University Athletics Department Dayton, Ohio

Elizabeth Hunter “Libba” Russell ’64 Retired educator Columbus, Ga.

Beth Gregory St. Jean ’70 Supervisor, Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program (GATAPP) Marietta, Ga.

Dr. Paul St. Onge ’07 Research analyst, QinetiQ North America, U.S. Army Combat Readiness, Ft. Rucker Enterprise, Ala.

Dr. J. Carlton Smith ’67 Retired superintendent Vestavia Hills, Ala.

Dr. Shirley Kelley Spears ’71 Director, B.B. Comer Memorial Library Sylacauga, Ala.

Thomas Taylor ’97 Account Director, GMR Marketing Belmont, N.C.

Dr. W. Mabrey Whetstone Jr. ’73 Director, Special Education Services, Alabama Department of Education Titus, Ala.

Susan Dryden Whitson ’91 Former White House press secretary, Office of the First Lady Washington, Va.

Get involved in the NAC National Advisory Council membership is to College of Education graduates, as well as “friends” of the college who have contributed to its success through consistent service or financial support. Prospective council members may be nominated at any time by current council members, as well as college faculty and administrators. ON THE WEB: education.auburn.edu/alumni/nac

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Soldier and A Statesman

Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 earns Lifetime Achievement Award by being ‘best of the best’

A

number of americans received their

first introduction to Gen. Lloyd Austin III from the pages of USA Today, where the headline above an April 2009 story described him as “A hero you should know.” Accompanying the article was a photo of Austin, then a lieutenant general, looking fit in his U.S. Army fatigues with American flag and Airborne patches on his right shoulder, towering over President Obama and Gen. David Petraeus in the scorching heat of an Iraqi summer. If Central Casting were asked to produce an individual embodying all of the qualities desired in a military leader, the end product would closely resemble the 58-year-old four-star general. At 6-foot-4 and 250 pounds, Austin still carries himself with the grace of a former high school basketball team captain whose rebounding prowess and propensity for doing the “dirty work” in the low post earned him enshrinement in the Thomasville, Ga., athletic hall of fame. That massive frame, coupled with a baritone voice, enables Austin to inspire or intimidate as needed. What ultimately sets Austin apart and enables him to win and maintain the respect of everyone from White House insiders to the troops he has led into combat is his combination of valor and values, his ability to carefully assess complex situations and find solutions. A 2008 profile in Newsweek described his style as “thoughtful but decisive,” which contradicts the Hollywood caricatures of generals as fire-breathing, profanity-spewing, posterior-kickers.

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“Leadership is a fascinating thing,” Austin said in a 2012 interview with Ebony magazine. “If you look at what the average American envisions the general to be, the commander to be, there’s this [George S.] Patton image. There’s this guy who is loud and forceful, the finger-in-the-chest kind of guy. That works well in the movies, but it won’t make a guy get up and charge a machine gun for you.” Those who have served with Austin in Afghanistan or Iraq can tell you he doesn’t have to be the finger-inthe-chest guy to motivate and make things happen. In all likelihood, he will be the man leading the charge to the machine gun nest.

AU ‘ through and through’ Austin, who took office as the 33rd vice chief of staff of the U.S. Army in January 2012, became the fifth College of Education graduate to earn a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Auburn Alumni Association. Austin, who earned a master’s degree in counselor education, was honored in along with retired U.S. Marine Corps Gen. James Livingston ’62, surgeon and researcher Kirby Isaac Bland ’64 and astronaut and aerospace engineer Jan Davis ’77. When Austin and his wife Charlene ’85, who also earned a master’s in counselor education from Auburn, returned to campus for the awards dinner in March, they took time to stroll through Haley Center and take in Samford Hall and Cater Lawn. Austin entered the counselor education program as the result of a partnership between Auburn and the U.S. Military

Associated Press

A

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Soldier and A Statesman

Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 earns Lifetime Achievement Award by being ‘best of the best’

A

number of americans received their

first introduction to Gen. Lloyd Austin III from the pages of USA Today, where the headline above an April 2009 story described him as “A hero you should know.” Accompanying the article was a photo of Austin, then a lieutenant general, looking fit in his U.S. Army fatigues with American flag and Airborne patches on his right shoulder, towering over President Obama and Gen. David Petraeus in the scorching heat of an Iraqi summer. If Central Casting were asked to produce an individual embodying all of the qualities desired in a military leader, the end product would closely resemble the 58-year-old four-star general. At 6-foot-4 and 250 pounds, Austin still carries himself with the grace of a former high school basketball team captain whose rebounding prowess and propensity for doing the “dirty work” in the low post earned him enshrinement in the Thomasville, Ga., athletic hall of fame. That massive frame, coupled with a baritone voice, enables Austin to inspire or intimidate as needed. What ultimately sets Austin apart and enables him to win and maintain the respect of everyone from White House insiders to the troops he has led into combat is his combination of valor and values, his ability to carefully assess complex situations and find solutions. A 2008 profile in Newsweek described his style as “thoughtful but decisive,” which contradicts the Hollywood caricatures of generals as fire-breathing, profanity-spewing, posterior-kickers.

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“Leadership is a fascinating thing,” Austin said in a 2012 interview with Ebony magazine. “If you look at what the average American envisions the general to be, the commander to be, there’s this [George S.] Patton image. There’s this guy who is loud and forceful, the finger-in-the-chest kind of guy. That works well in the movies, but it won’t make a guy get up and charge a machine gun for you.” Those who have served with Austin in Afghanistan or Iraq can tell you he doesn’t have to be the finger-inthe-chest guy to motivate and make things happen. In all likelihood, he will be the man leading the charge to the machine gun nest.

AU ‘ through and through’ Austin, who took office as the 33rd vice chief of staff of the U.S. Army in January 2012, became the fifth College of Education graduate to earn a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Auburn Alumni Association. Austin, who earned a master’s degree in counselor education, was honored in along with retired U.S. Marine Corps Gen. James Livingston ’62, surgeon and researcher Kirby Isaac Bland ’64 and astronaut and aerospace engineer Jan Davis ’77. When Austin and his wife Charlene ’85, who also earned a master’s in counselor education from Auburn, returned to campus for the awards dinner in March, they took time to stroll through Haley Center and take in Samford Hall and Cater Lawn. Austin entered the counselor education program as the result of a partnership between Auburn and the U.S. Military

Associated Press

A

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A s o l di e r a n d a S tat e s m a n

Academy. West Point graduates selected for service as tactical officers were eligible for specialized training in the areas of human development,

Auburn faculty that he was a leader among leaders. His subsequent accomplishments reinforce my memory of him as a uniquely gifted individu-

stan aimed at what he once described as “trying to work ourselves out of a job.” As the first African-American general to lead an entire war effort in a major theater of operation and the first African-American division commander to lead troops into combat, Austin’s approach broke the mold as much as his skin tone did. Leading up to Operation Iraqi Freedom I in 2003, Austin carefully studied the successes and failures of Operation Desert Storm to determine the best way to topple any resistance that lay in wait. Austin, a one-star general at the time, led the 3rd Infantry Division on a sweep from Kuwait into Baghdad, driving directly into the teeth of Saddam Hussein’s 40,000-member Fedayeen force. Rather than taking the traditional approach of many commanders who monitor battlefield operations from afar, Austin positioned himself at the point of the bayonet. During the capture of Baghdad, Austin was literally calling the shots while taking and returning fire from the enemy. Artillery explosions and machine gun fire provided the soundtrack as his column rolled into the city.

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey and Gen. Lloyd Austin stand for the National Anthem during a ceremony at Andrews Air Force Base signifying the formal end to the U.S. military mission in Iraq. Associated Press

“In the company of great leaders, Lloyd Austin is the ‘best of the best.’” Retired Adm. Mike Mullen former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

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leadership, personality theory and group dynamics. “He came home one day and asked, ‘What would you think about earning a master’s degree at Auburn University?’’’ Charlene Austin recalled. “I said, ‘Where’s that?’ He said, ‘It’s one of the best schools in the country.’” Austin was already on the fast track as a military leader, but also distinguished himself as a scholar in the graduate program. “He immediately established himself as a superior student with outstanding academic and leadership gifts,” Mark Meadows, emeritus professor and department head of counseling and counseling psychology in the College of Education, wrote of Austin in a Lifetime Achievement Award support letter. “It was quite obvious to our

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al with an uncommon depth of character.” Austin, a Mobile, Ala., native who grew up in Thomasville, Ga., continues to follow Auburn football from afar. Mrs. Austin, who has been active as an advocate for military families, said she and her husband gained “credibility and credentials” from their graduate work in the College of Education. “We’re Auburn through and through,” she said.

Seein g the battlefield clearly Before moving to the Pentagon as vice chief of staff of the U.S. Army, Austin served as commanding general of U.S. Forces in Iraq and held in a variety of other roles there and in Afghani-

“In order to command a fight, I had to see the battlefield,” he told Ebony. “[Desert Storm] moved so fast that it outran the ability of the command post to keep up. It was very easy for the command post to be irrelevant because of the fast pace. So one of my goals was to develop a command post that was mobile enough to be relevant to the fight and to be in the fight; to be far enough up front so I could see the battlefield and what was going on.”

to him and quickly mobilized a tactical operations center to gather intelligence, coordinate airstrikes and link Iraqi and American soldiers in combat, side-by-side, for the first time. His quick action came at a crucial juncture, tipping the balance in what had been a precarious situation and setting the tone for coalition forces to stabilize and pacify pockets of insurgence.

Former Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn III meets with then-Lt. Gen. Lloyd Austin at U.S. Forces-Iraq headquarters in Baghdad in 2010. Courtesy of U.S. Department of Defense

Retired Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Austin proved to be the right man for what was a “singularly challenging job” in a “defining time for both the nation of Iraq and the United States.” “In the company of great leaders, Lloyd Austin is the ‘best of the best,’” Mullen declared in a handwritten note that accompanied a letter of support written on behalf of Austin for the Lifetime Achievement Awards.

Vice President of Alumni Affairs Debbie Shaw ’84, Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 and Charlene Austin ’85 enjoy the festivities at the Lifetime Achievement Awards in March. Village Photographers of Auburn, AL

During his second deployment as an operational commander in 2008 in which he oversaw 150,000 U.S. and coalition forces, Austin played a crucial role in the Battle of Basra – the first significant campaign carried out by the new Iraqi Army. After Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki sent his soldiers after Shia militia without requesting U.S. assistance, Austin provided counsel Keystone

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Academy. West Point graduates selected for service as tactical officers were eligible for specialized training in the areas of human development,

Auburn faculty that he was a leader among leaders. His subsequent accomplishments reinforce my memory of him as a uniquely gifted individu-

stan aimed at what he once described as “trying to work ourselves out of a job.” As the first African-American general to lead an entire war effort in a major theater of operation and the first African-American division commander to lead troops into combat, Austin’s approach broke the mold as much as his skin tone did. Leading up to Operation Iraqi Freedom I in 2003, Austin carefully studied the successes and failures of Operation Desert Storm to determine the best way to topple any resistance that lay in wait. Austin, a one-star general at the time, led the 3rd Infantry Division on a sweep from Kuwait into Baghdad, driving directly into the teeth of Saddam Hussein’s 40,000-member Fedayeen force. Rather than taking the traditional approach of many commanders who monitor battlefield operations from afar, Austin positioned himself at the point of the bayonet. During the capture of Baghdad, Austin was literally calling the shots while taking and returning fire from the enemy. Artillery explosions and machine gun fire provided the soundtrack as his column rolled into the city.

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey and Gen. Lloyd Austin stand for the National Anthem during a ceremony at Andrews Air Force Base signifying the formal end to the U.S. military mission in Iraq. Associated Press

“In the company of great leaders, Lloyd Austin is the ‘best of the best.’” Retired Adm. Mike Mullen former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

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leadership, personality theory and group dynamics. “He came home one day and asked, ‘What would you think about earning a master’s degree at Auburn University?’’’ Charlene Austin recalled. “I said, ‘Where’s that?’ He said, ‘It’s one of the best schools in the country.’” Austin was already on the fast track as a military leader, but also distinguished himself as a scholar in the graduate program. “He immediately established himself as a superior student with outstanding academic and leadership gifts,” Mark Meadows, emeritus professor and department head of counseling and counseling psychology in the College of Education, wrote of Austin in a Lifetime Achievement Award support letter. “It was quite obvious to our

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al with an uncommon depth of character.” Austin, a Mobile, Ala., native who grew up in Thomasville, Ga., continues to follow Auburn football from afar. Mrs. Austin, who has been active as an advocate for military families, said she and her husband gained “credibility and credentials” from their graduate work in the College of Education. “We’re Auburn through and through,” she said.

Seein g the battlefield clearly Before moving to the Pentagon as vice chief of staff of the U.S. Army, Austin served as commanding general of U.S. Forces in Iraq and held in a variety of other roles there and in Afghani-

“In order to command a fight, I had to see the battlefield,” he told Ebony. “[Desert Storm] moved so fast that it outran the ability of the command post to keep up. It was very easy for the command post to be irrelevant because of the fast pace. So one of my goals was to develop a command post that was mobile enough to be relevant to the fight and to be in the fight; to be far enough up front so I could see the battlefield and what was going on.”

to him and quickly mobilized a tactical operations center to gather intelligence, coordinate airstrikes and link Iraqi and American soldiers in combat, side-by-side, for the first time. His quick action came at a crucial juncture, tipping the balance in what had been a precarious situation and setting the tone for coalition forces to stabilize and pacify pockets of insurgence.

Former Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn III meets with then-Lt. Gen. Lloyd Austin at U.S. Forces-Iraq headquarters in Baghdad in 2010. Courtesy of U.S. Department of Defense

Retired Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Austin proved to be the right man for what was a “singularly challenging job” in a “defining time for both the nation of Iraq and the United States.” “In the company of great leaders, Lloyd Austin is the ‘best of the best,’” Mullen declared in a handwritten note that accompanied a letter of support written on behalf of Austin for the Lifetime Achievement Awards.

Vice President of Alumni Affairs Debbie Shaw ’84, Gen. Lloyd Austin ’86 and Charlene Austin ’85 enjoy the festivities at the Lifetime Achievement Awards in March. Village Photographers of Auburn, AL

During his second deployment as an operational commander in 2008 in which he oversaw 150,000 U.S. and coalition forces, Austin played a crucial role in the Battle of Basra – the first significant campaign carried out by the new Iraqi Army. After Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki sent his soldiers after Shia militia without requesting U.S. assistance, Austin provided counsel Keystone

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The Auburn Alumni Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award honors recipients for outstanding achievements in their professional lives and recognizes their integrity and stature. Other College of Education graduates to earn the award since it was first presented in 2001 include: 2011 Wayne T. Smith ’68 president and CEO of Community Health Systems, one of the nation’s leading acute care hospital operators 2010 Robert Kenneth Johns ’57 former president/COO of Sea-Land and founder/CEO of The Hampshire Management Group 2007 Earl H. (Buddy) Weaver ‘62 former interim VP for alumni and development at Auburn University and past president of Auburn Alumni Association 2001 James Ralph “Shug” Jordan ’32 former Auburn University head football coach

Austin embarked on a third tour of Iraq in 2010 as commanding general of Operation New Dawn with the mandate of stabilizing Iraq and improving relations with its government and its people while overseeing the drawdown of 50,000 U.S. soldiers. Those on the ground in Iraq credit Austin with playing a critical role in America winning the war and creating a climate that allowed for a transfer of power. “Gen. Austin has served our nation in the United States Army with distinction,” Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said in supporting Austin’s nomination for Auburn’s Lifetime Achievement Award. “Serving five times in combat zones, Lloyd worked tirelessly to enhance our regional military partners, counter-terrorist and counter-insurgency capabilities in order to help the nations of the region help themselves against the many threats to stability they face.”

Cool under pressure Those who have known Austin for any length of time aren’t surprised by his ability to provide calm, focused leadership under the most trying circumstances imaginable. Frances Hesselbein, president and CEO of the Leader to Leader Insti-

tute, has often conducted leadership workshops for Austin and his officers over the years. During one of Austin’s deployments to Iraq, the general and his officers set up a video conference with Hesselbein. About 15 minutes into a spirited discussion of leadership, Hesselbein heard a deafening cacophony and the screen went dark. “I sat, not moving, praying they were all right, they were safe,” Hesselbein recalled. “Then, the screen lit up, and in a cool voice, Gen. Austin said, ‘Frances, I apologize for all the noise, but two bombs fell nearby; they didn’t hit anything.’ And we continued our leadership dialogue, Lloyd and his men on the battlefield of North Baghdad and I in New York City.” That unwavering focus and ability to solve problems and inspire others will come in handy in his current role as vice chief of staff. Austin serves as the principal advisor and assistant to Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno. In his new position, Austin will help the Army address such concerns as family and soldier support systems, including treatment of wounded warriors and soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries. The man once described in print as the “hero you should know” will now leverage his education, training and leadership skills to help the heroes we may not know so well, the men and women who have returned home from active duty and those who remain deployed. The man described by Mullen as “the best of the best” will do his part to ensure that those who have served their country honorably are well-served in return. “He is both a soldier and a statesman,” Mullen wrote of Austin. “… He personifies the ideals of 21st century service.”

Elementary ed graduate’s excellence earns audience with president E

l e m e n ta ry e d u c at i o n g r a d uat e Megan Good Tucker ’04 doesn’t believe in teaching science from a text book.

She believes in conveying material in a distinctive way that enables it to leap off book pages, computer screens and blackboards and capture students’ imaginations. Every so often, the lessons leap out of airplanes. During her tenure as a fourth-grade teacher at Kenwood Elementary School in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., Tucker once surprised her students by having members of an Army Special Forces team parachute out of an airplane and land on campus as a way of underscoring a lesson.

photo: National Science Foundation

About the Lifetime achievement award

Her fresh approach represents one of the many reasons why she earned the 2010 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, the highest honor of its kind. Tucker, who was selected as the top science teacher in Florida, earned $10,000 check and a trip to the White House in May 2011. While there, she and other educators met with President Obama and learned of his desire for a rather ambitious science project. “He stated that he wished he could clone us,” Tucker said. Tucker and her husband recently relocated to California due to his assignment to Edwards Air Force Base. She discussed her approach to teaching, as well as the professional development she received as an Auburn student. The Presidential Awards are obviously a pretty big deal. What does it mean to you to earn such an honor, knowing that there was such strong competition for it? Being a recipient of the Presidential Award is a very humbling honor. I feel so blessed to be in a profession where I have the satisfaction of inspiring the scientists and

engineers of tomorrow. Receiving this award brings honor to the many individuals who have taken time to show me the power of science inquiry and aerospace education. More importantly, the Presidential Award credits all of my students, who challenge me to excel each and every day to benefit their learning.

In what ways do you feel your experiences in the College of Education prepared you for the challenges you face on a daily basis? Are there any favorite professors or classes that stand out from your time here? Auburn’s College of Education did an exceptional job of preparing me for the challenges that I face on a daily basis. Through the assigned practicums and

student teaching, I was exposed to the daily trials and joys of teaching throughout my degree program. It was so beneficial to be in a classroom as often as possible to see the real world application of my courses. As far as a favorite professor, I truly enjoyed Dr. [Octavia] Tripp. She taught elementary science and her class really started to ignite my science passion. She really introduced me to the idea of using NASA curriculum to enhance my lessons and teaching. I also really learned a lot from my practicum and student teaching at Wrights Mill Road Elementary. My mentor teachers, Dotsy Carter, Sandy Resa, and Jennifer Spencer, provided me with valuable hands-on experiences and classroom management techniques that I still use in my classroom today. 

What do you enjoy most about working with fourth-graders, and how do you tailor your lessons to them? My favorite part about working with fourthgraders is their sense of humor along with the fact that they still really look up to you CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Courtesy of U.S. Department of Defense

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The Auburn Alumni Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award honors recipients for outstanding achievements in their professional lives and recognizes their integrity and stature. Other College of Education graduates to earn the award since it was first presented in 2001 include: 2011 Wayne T. Smith ’68 president and CEO of Community Health Systems, one of the nation’s leading acute care hospital operators 2010 Robert Kenneth Johns ’57 former president/COO of Sea-Land and founder/CEO of The Hampshire Management Group 2007 Earl H. (Buddy) Weaver ‘62 former interim VP for alumni and development at Auburn University and past president of Auburn Alumni Association 2001 James Ralph “Shug” Jordan ’32 former Auburn University head football coach

Austin embarked on a third tour of Iraq in 2010 as commanding general of Operation New Dawn with the mandate of stabilizing Iraq and improving relations with its government and its people while overseeing the drawdown of 50,000 U.S. soldiers. Those on the ground in Iraq credit Austin with playing a critical role in America winning the war and creating a climate that allowed for a transfer of power. “Gen. Austin has served our nation in the United States Army with distinction,” Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said in supporting Austin’s nomination for Auburn’s Lifetime Achievement Award. “Serving five times in combat zones, Lloyd worked tirelessly to enhance our regional military partners, counter-terrorist and counter-insurgency capabilities in order to help the nations of the region help themselves against the many threats to stability they face.”

Cool under pressure Those who have known Austin for any length of time aren’t surprised by his ability to provide calm, focused leadership under the most trying circumstances imaginable. Frances Hesselbein, president and CEO of the Leader to Leader Insti-

tute, has often conducted leadership workshops for Austin and his officers over the years. During one of Austin’s deployments to Iraq, the general and his officers set up a video conference with Hesselbein. About 15 minutes into a spirited discussion of leadership, Hesselbein heard a deafening cacophony and the screen went dark. “I sat, not moving, praying they were all right, they were safe,” Hesselbein recalled. “Then, the screen lit up, and in a cool voice, Gen. Austin said, ‘Frances, I apologize for all the noise, but two bombs fell nearby; they didn’t hit anything.’ And we continued our leadership dialogue, Lloyd and his men on the battlefield of North Baghdad and I in New York City.” That unwavering focus and ability to solve problems and inspire others will come in handy in his current role as vice chief of staff. Austin serves as the principal advisor and assistant to Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno. In his new position, Austin will help the Army address such concerns as family and soldier support systems, including treatment of wounded warriors and soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries. The man once described in print as the “hero you should know” will now leverage his education, training and leadership skills to help the heroes we may not know so well, the men and women who have returned home from active duty and those who remain deployed. The man described by Mullen as “the best of the best” will do his part to ensure that those who have served their country honorably are well-served in return. “He is both a soldier and a statesman,” Mullen wrote of Austin. “… He personifies the ideals of 21st century service.”

Elementary ed graduate’s excellence earns audience with president E

l e m e n ta ry e d u c at i o n g r a d uat e Megan Good Tucker ’04 doesn’t believe in teaching science from a text book.

She believes in conveying material in a distinctive way that enables it to leap off book pages, computer screens and blackboards and capture students’ imaginations. Every so often, the lessons leap out of airplanes. During her tenure as a fourth-grade teacher at Kenwood Elementary School in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., Tucker once surprised her students by having members of an Army Special Forces team parachute out of an airplane and land on campus as a way of underscoring a lesson.

photo: National Science Foundation

About the Lifetime achievement award

Her fresh approach represents one of the many reasons why she earned the 2010 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, the highest honor of its kind. Tucker, who was selected as the top science teacher in Florida, earned $10,000 check and a trip to the White House in May 2011. While there, she and other educators met with President Obama and learned of his desire for a rather ambitious science project. “He stated that he wished he could clone us,” Tucker said. Tucker and her husband recently relocated to California due to his assignment to Edwards Air Force Base. She discussed her approach to teaching, as well as the professional development she received as an Auburn student. The Presidential Awards are obviously a pretty big deal. What does it mean to you to earn such an honor, knowing that there was such strong competition for it? Being a recipient of the Presidential Award is a very humbling honor. I feel so blessed to be in a profession where I have the satisfaction of inspiring the scientists and

engineers of tomorrow. Receiving this award brings honor to the many individuals who have taken time to show me the power of science inquiry and aerospace education. More importantly, the Presidential Award credits all of my students, who challenge me to excel each and every day to benefit their learning.

In what ways do you feel your experiences in the College of Education prepared you for the challenges you face on a daily basis? Are there any favorite professors or classes that stand out from your time here? Auburn’s College of Education did an exceptional job of preparing me for the challenges that I face on a daily basis. Through the assigned practicums and

student teaching, I was exposed to the daily trials and joys of teaching throughout my degree program. It was so beneficial to be in a classroom as often as possible to see the real world application of my courses. As far as a favorite professor, I truly enjoyed Dr. [Octavia] Tripp. She taught elementary science and her class really started to ignite my science passion. She really introduced me to the idea of using NASA curriculum to enhance my lessons and teaching. I also really learned a lot from my practicum and student teaching at Wrights Mill Road Elementary. My mentor teachers, Dotsy Carter, Sandy Resa, and Jennifer Spencer, provided me with valuable hands-on experiences and classroom management techniques that I still use in my classroom today. 

What do you enjoy most about working with fourth-graders, and how do you tailor your lessons to them? My favorite part about working with fourthgraders is their sense of humor along with the fact that they still really look up to you CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Courtesy of U.S. Department of Defense

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alumni photo: National Science Foundation

Auburn Alumni Association honors Clark ’96 David Clark ’96 developed an understanding of logistics helping ensure that instruments and equipment arrived intact at stadiums around the country during his time as a member of the Auburn University marching band. He has since applied that knowledge for the benefit of Amazon, the multinational electronics company and online retail giant. Clark’s leadership and attention to detail help assure that Amazon customers have a positive experience ordering and using popular products such as the Kindle. The Auburn Alumni Association honored Clark for his professional success by selecting him for one of its 2011 Young Alumni Achievement Awards. The awards recognize Auburn graduates 40 years old or younger for significant professional achievements and community service. Candidates are nominated by faculty, staff, and members of the Auburn Alumni Association. Clark, who earned a music education degree from the college, currently serves as vice president of Global Customer Fulfillment at Amazon. He previously served as vice president of Amazon.com’s North American Operations and as regional vice president of North American Operations and Engineering.

‘TUCKER’ CONTINUED

and want to learn. I make sure to make my lessons as engaging and entertaining as possible. If there is a creative or hands-on way to teach something, I make sure to find it because I have found that this is the best way to have my fourth-graders relate to the content that is being taught. I also like that kids at this age have the ability to be independent and really step up to the plate when challenged in the classroom.

Outstanding alum gets cheers for use of chair

I

t doesn’t matter if his audience

includes classroom teachers or principals, parents or educational policymakers. Alabama State Superintendent of Education Tommy Bice ’77 often engages listeners by employing what at first seems to be a curious visual aid.

Tucker poses with Carl Wieman, associate director for science of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and National Science Foundation Deputy Director Cora Marrett.

It sounds as though you enjoy being very hands-on and creating interactive exercises. What are some of your favorites? I have millions of hands-on activities, but some of my favorites come from my extensive unit focused on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). One that I really enjoy is when we do lunar core sampling. We use our imagination, which the students know gets turned on at the beginning of class. I transport them to the “moon” and they are geologists discovering what the soil is made of. Each student gets a mystery snack-size candy bar and a clear straw. We talk about what core sampling is on Earth and why it is used. The students then use their straws to take a core sample of the “moon rock” (candy bar). As scientists, they compare their sample to other students and write down observations. They also hypothesize as to what the different layers could represent. 

Before that, Clark served as director of The Amazon Customer Excellence System.

A message that sits well

What was your experience at the White House like? Did President Obama spend much time discussing education issues with your group? The experience at the White House was amazing. We were given a private tour and then taken to the second floor to get a picture with President Obama. When the President entered the room, he first took the time to thank us for what we do every day in the classroom as well as to tell us how important our jobs are to the nation. He stated that he wished he could clone us. He took the time to talk to each of the 84 of us and speak words of encouragement. It really impressed me that he made it a priority to speak with each of us. 

He often brings a small wooden chair to the podium with him when he speaks, or he may include a photo of one in his PowerPoint presentations. Whether real or virtual, the chair always underscores Bice’s central message for educators and parents alike. The chair is a constant and represents the bedrock for Bice’s philosophy as an educational leader.

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Bice, who earned his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees in mental retardation from the College of Education, has occupied a seat of influence in state education circles for quite some time. The Alabama Board of Education named him the state’s new superintendent of education in November 2011. Bice, who joined the Alabama Department of Education in 2008, had served as the state’s deputy superintendent of education for instructional services. He assumed the position of state superintendent in January 2012.

courtesy of Alabama State Department of Education

“If we always remember what’s best for the child in the chair, how can we make the wrong decisions?” Bice often asks.

Bice’s track record for putting the needs and interests of children above all else inspired the College of Education to select him for its 2012 Outstanding Alumnus Award. He was honored at the college’s 31st Annual Awards and Recognition Ceremony in April. “Dr. Bice often uses ‘the chair’ as a symbol of the classroom and, more importantly, each student who might sit in that chair to learn,” said Cindy Reed, director of the col-

64

lege’s Truman Pierce Institute and Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck endowed professor for educational leadership. “In many ways, the chair brings the conversation back to what should be our most important focus – the children we serve in our public schools.”

He succeeded Joe Morton ’69, a secondary education graduate of the college who retired in August 2011 after serving as state superintendent for more than seven years.

“Dr. Morton built a solid foundation,” Bice said after being named superintendent. “And I’m going to remain focused on one very important thing – to do what’s right for kids.” At the time of Bice’s selection last November, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said he came away impressed by his administrative credentials, knowledge of state communities and value of technical education. Bice previously served as superintendent of the Alexander City (Ala.) School System and also held posts as a high school principal, a career tech director, alternative school director and teacher, special education and

residential school director and early childhood education teacher and parent trainer. He began his career as a teacher at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind. “He’s been a principal and an administrator on a local level,” Bentley said. Bice has also maintained a strong relationship with the College of Education, serving as an adjunct professor of educational leadership and often making appearances as a guest speaker at events held by the Truman Pierce Institute.

o u t s ta n di n g a l u m n i A look at the recipients of the College of Education Outstanding Alumni Award since 2008. For a full list, visit education. auburn.edu/alumni/alumniawards.html 2011 Dr. Beverly Warren ’90

2009 Dr. Joseph Morton ’69

2010 Wayne McElrath ’52

2008 Dr. Ron Saunders ’70

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alumni photo: National Science Foundation

Auburn Alumni Association honors Clark ’96 David Clark ’96 developed an understanding of logistics helping ensure that instruments and equipment arrived intact at stadiums around the country during his time as a member of the Auburn University marching band. He has since applied that knowledge for the benefit of Amazon, the multinational electronics company and online retail giant. Clark’s leadership and attention to detail help assure that Amazon customers have a positive experience ordering and using popular products such as the Kindle. The Auburn Alumni Association honored Clark for his professional success by selecting him for one of its 2011 Young Alumni Achievement Awards. The awards recognize Auburn graduates 40 years old or younger for significant professional achievements and community service. Candidates are nominated by faculty, staff, and members of the Auburn Alumni Association. Clark, who earned a music education degree from the college, currently serves as vice president of Global Customer Fulfillment at Amazon. He previously served as vice president of Amazon.com’s North American Operations and as regional vice president of North American Operations and Engineering.

‘TUCKER’ CONTINUED

and want to learn. I make sure to make my lessons as engaging and entertaining as possible. If there is a creative or hands-on way to teach something, I make sure to find it because I have found that this is the best way to have my fourth-graders relate to the content that is being taught. I also like that kids at this age have the ability to be independent and really step up to the plate when challenged in the classroom.

Outstanding alum gets cheers for use of chair

I

t doesn’t matter if his audience

includes classroom teachers or principals, parents or educational policymakers. Alabama State Superintendent of Education Tommy Bice ’77 often engages listeners by employing what at first seems to be a curious visual aid.

Tucker poses with Carl Wieman, associate director for science of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and National Science Foundation Deputy Director Cora Marrett.

It sounds as though you enjoy being very hands-on and creating interactive exercises. What are some of your favorites? I have millions of hands-on activities, but some of my favorites come from my extensive unit focused on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). One that I really enjoy is when we do lunar core sampling. We use our imagination, which the students know gets turned on at the beginning of class. I transport them to the “moon” and they are geologists discovering what the soil is made of. Each student gets a mystery snack-size candy bar and a clear straw. We talk about what core sampling is on Earth and why it is used. The students then use their straws to take a core sample of the “moon rock” (candy bar). As scientists, they compare their sample to other students and write down observations. They also hypothesize as to what the different layers could represent. 

Before that, Clark served as director of The Amazon Customer Excellence System.

A message that sits well

What was your experience at the White House like? Did President Obama spend much time discussing education issues with your group? The experience at the White House was amazing. We were given a private tour and then taken to the second floor to get a picture with President Obama. When the President entered the room, he first took the time to thank us for what we do every day in the classroom as well as to tell us how important our jobs are to the nation. He stated that he wished he could clone us. He took the time to talk to each of the 84 of us and speak words of encouragement. It really impressed me that he made it a priority to speak with each of us. 

He often brings a small wooden chair to the podium with him when he speaks, or he may include a photo of one in his PowerPoint presentations. Whether real or virtual, the chair always underscores Bice’s central message for educators and parents alike. The chair is a constant and represents the bedrock for Bice’s philosophy as an educational leader.

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

Bice, who earned his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees in mental retardation from the College of Education, has occupied a seat of influence in state education circles for quite some time. The Alabama Board of Education named him the state’s new superintendent of education in November 2011. Bice, who joined the Alabama Department of Education in 2008, had served as the state’s deputy superintendent of education for instructional services. He assumed the position of state superintendent in January 2012.

courtesy of Alabama State Department of Education

“If we always remember what’s best for the child in the chair, how can we make the wrong decisions?” Bice often asks.

Bice’s track record for putting the needs and interests of children above all else inspired the College of Education to select him for its 2012 Outstanding Alumnus Award. He was honored at the college’s 31st Annual Awards and Recognition Ceremony in April. “Dr. Bice often uses ‘the chair’ as a symbol of the classroom and, more importantly, each student who might sit in that chair to learn,” said Cindy Reed, director of the col-

64

lege’s Truman Pierce Institute and Emily R. and Gerald S. Leischuck endowed professor for educational leadership. “In many ways, the chair brings the conversation back to what should be our most important focus – the children we serve in our public schools.”

He succeeded Joe Morton ’69, a secondary education graduate of the college who retired in August 2011 after serving as state superintendent for more than seven years.

“Dr. Morton built a solid foundation,” Bice said after being named superintendent. “And I’m going to remain focused on one very important thing – to do what’s right for kids.” At the time of Bice’s selection last November, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said he came away impressed by his administrative credentials, knowledge of state communities and value of technical education. Bice previously served as superintendent of the Alexander City (Ala.) School System and also held posts as a high school principal, a career tech director, alternative school director and teacher, special education and

residential school director and early childhood education teacher and parent trainer. He began his career as a teacher at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind. “He’s been a principal and an administrator on a local level,” Bentley said. Bice has also maintained a strong relationship with the College of Education, serving as an adjunct professor of educational leadership and often making appearances as a guest speaker at events held by the Truman Pierce Institute.

o u t s ta n di n g a l u m n i A look at the recipients of the College of Education Outstanding Alumni Award since 2008. For a full list, visit education. auburn.edu/alumni/alumniawards.html 2011 Dr. Beverly Warren ’90

2009 Dr. Joseph Morton ’69

2010 Wayne McElrath ’52

2008 Dr. Ron Saunders ’70

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alumni

A familiar face Former football star David Rocker ’11 finished what he began in the 1980s

T

he man in the next seat

over seems a bit older than the other students in the class, but that isn’t why he seems out of place. His tall, broad-shouldered frame dwarfs his desk, making it look more like a piece of dollhouse furniture than something out of a college classroom. Most of his classmates follow Auburn football, but are far too young to recognize him. Undoubtedly they’ve seen him before, whether they realize it or not. If they happen to pick up a program at a game or browse photos inside Auburn’s football museum, they may see a younger, sepia-tone version of the man’s face staring back at them. Although he may appear out of his element, this man belongs here, even if he is nearly two decades older than the typical college student. David Rocker was a two-time allSoutheastern Conference defensive tackle who helped lead Auburn win three consecutive conference championships. Rocker earned All-American honors in 1990, joining his brother Tracy as the first family tandem to do so. He came

back to Auburn not too long ago because there was something far more meaningful that he didn’t earn before beginning an NFL career in 1990. “It was so funny to be walking with students near the stadium and no one having a clue who they were talking to,” Rocker said. Rocker, who was only two semesters shy of completing an adult education degree, decided that returning to Auburn was a must. He completed his bachelor’s degree in May 2011. His daughters’ upcoming graduation and constant reminders from his mother helped in motivating him to return. Operation Follow Through, an Auburn athletics program initiative, encourages former athletes to return to campus and complete their four-year degrees. This program prompted Rocker, along with many other former athletes such as Bo Jackson, to return to school and pick up where they left off.

“Things were moving forward in my

life and it was the perfect time to come back and get it done,” Rocker said of his re-enrollment.

Three-time College of Education graduate named Alabama’s top superintendent

Maria Witte, associate professor in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, said Rocker was as serious about his schoolwork as he once had been about sacking quarterbacks.

When the School Superintendents of Alabama reveals its finalists for state Superintendent of the Year, chances are that at least one Auburn University College of Education graduate will be in the mix.

“He had the same intensity in the classroom as he did on the field,” Witte said. “Student-athletes that return have such a higher intensity in the classroom than my younger students.” Rocker, who is currently working in the ministry since leaving his football career behind, excelled in her class. He was fully engaged in the interactive setting of the class and was not afraid to get up and speak in front of others. “I would always get ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’ when speaking in front of everyone, and I was like, ‘you don’t understand, I do this every Sunday!’” he said. Rocker also works in school administration and as a defensive line coach for an upstart football program at Point University in Georgia. He also preaches on Sunday mornings as the senior pastor at Gibraltar Ministries in metro Atlanta. In his spare time, Rocker enjoys leading pre-game devotionals with football teams across the Southeast and making appearances on various radio stations and TV shows. Rocker said he hopes to serve as an example to other athletes who may have left academic business unfinished. “You can have all the coaching experience you want but without that degree you will never fulfill your dream of being a head coach,” Rocker said. “That’s when I knew I had to get back in the game and get my degree.”

66

Since the SSA began presenting the award in 1988, 10 of the 25 recipients have earned at least one degree from the College of Education. The 2012 Superintendent of the Year, Larry DiChiara ’81 of Phenix City Schools, is a three-time college graduate. The SSA announced his selection in October 2011. DiChiara earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in special education in 1981 and 1983, respectively, before returning to Auburn to earn a doctorate in school administration in 2000. While completing work on the last degree, DiChiara served as an administrative assistant to former Truman Pierce Institute director Bettye Burkhalter.

admiration for all the current superintendents in the state, those who were finalists, as well as those superintendents who I have known and have since retired. They are my colleagues and friends and are just as deserving.”

The SSA honored DiChiara and eight other Superintendent of the Year finalists during a February 2012 Each of the state luncheon in Montgom“I am especially thrilled for my finalists, including ery. DiChiara received central office staff, school DiChiara, were able to a plaque, a bronze present a $1,000 scholboard, school employees, medallion, and an arship from the SSA to community, and my family as expenses-paid trip to the this honor is a great source of a graduating senior in American Association of their respective school School Administrators pride for them.” systems. National Conference on Larry DiChiara ’81 DiChiara, who has Education in Houston. served as Phenix City’s superintendent By virtue of winning Superintendent of since 2004, teaches graduate courses as an the Year honors at the state level, DiChiara adjunct instructor for Troy University’s became a candidate for National SuperinPhenix City campus. He previously served tendent of the Year. as director of special education and as “I am especially thrilled for my central director of administrative services for Lee office staff, school board, school employees, County Schools, as principal of Loachapoka community, and my family as this honor is Elementary School, and as assistant prina great source of pride for them,” DiChiara cipal and a special education teacher for said. “That in and of itself makes all the Loachapoka High and Elementary Schools. attention worth it. Finally, I have so much Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

67


alumni

A familiar face Former football star David Rocker ’11 finished what he began in the 1980s

T

he man in the next seat

over seems a bit older than the other students in the class, but that isn’t why he seems out of place. His tall, broad-shouldered frame dwarfs his desk, making it look more like a piece of dollhouse furniture than something out of a college classroom. Most of his classmates follow Auburn football, but are far too young to recognize him. Undoubtedly they’ve seen him before, whether they realize it or not. If they happen to pick up a program at a game or browse photos inside Auburn’s football museum, they may see a younger, sepia-tone version of the man’s face staring back at them. Although he may appear out of his element, this man belongs here, even if he is nearly two decades older than the typical college student. David Rocker was a two-time allSoutheastern Conference defensive tackle who helped lead Auburn win three consecutive conference championships. Rocker earned All-American honors in 1990, joining his brother Tracy as the first family tandem to do so. He came

back to Auburn not too long ago because there was something far more meaningful that he didn’t earn before beginning an NFL career in 1990. “It was so funny to be walking with students near the stadium and no one having a clue who they were talking to,” Rocker said. Rocker, who was only two semesters shy of completing an adult education degree, decided that returning to Auburn was a must. He completed his bachelor’s degree in May 2011. His daughters’ upcoming graduation and constant reminders from his mother helped in motivating him to return. Operation Follow Through, an Auburn athletics program initiative, encourages former athletes to return to campus and complete their four-year degrees. This program prompted Rocker, along with many other former athletes such as Bo Jackson, to return to school and pick up where they left off.

“Things were moving forward in my

life and it was the perfect time to come back and get it done,” Rocker said of his re-enrollment.

Three-time College of Education graduate named Alabama’s top superintendent

Maria Witte, associate professor in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, said Rocker was as serious about his schoolwork as he once had been about sacking quarterbacks.

When the School Superintendents of Alabama reveals its finalists for state Superintendent of the Year, chances are that at least one Auburn University College of Education graduate will be in the mix.

“He had the same intensity in the classroom as he did on the field,” Witte said. “Student-athletes that return have such a higher intensity in the classroom than my younger students.” Rocker, who is currently working in the ministry since leaving his football career behind, excelled in her class. He was fully engaged in the interactive setting of the class and was not afraid to get up and speak in front of others. “I would always get ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’ when speaking in front of everyone, and I was like, ‘you don’t understand, I do this every Sunday!’” he said. Rocker also works in school administration and as a defensive line coach for an upstart football program at Point University in Georgia. He also preaches on Sunday mornings as the senior pastor at Gibraltar Ministries in metro Atlanta. In his spare time, Rocker enjoys leading pre-game devotionals with football teams across the Southeast and making appearances on various radio stations and TV shows. Rocker said he hopes to serve as an example to other athletes who may have left academic business unfinished. “You can have all the coaching experience you want but without that degree you will never fulfill your dream of being a head coach,” Rocker said. “That’s when I knew I had to get back in the game and get my degree.”

66

Since the SSA began presenting the award in 1988, 10 of the 25 recipients have earned at least one degree from the College of Education. The 2012 Superintendent of the Year, Larry DiChiara ’81 of Phenix City Schools, is a three-time college graduate. The SSA announced his selection in October 2011. DiChiara earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in special education in 1981 and 1983, respectively, before returning to Auburn to earn a doctorate in school administration in 2000. While completing work on the last degree, DiChiara served as an administrative assistant to former Truman Pierce Institute director Bettye Burkhalter.

admiration for all the current superintendents in the state, those who were finalists, as well as those superintendents who I have known and have since retired. They are my colleagues and friends and are just as deserving.”

The SSA honored DiChiara and eight other Superintendent of the Year finalists during a February 2012 Each of the state luncheon in Montgom“I am especially thrilled for my finalists, including ery. DiChiara received central office staff, school DiChiara, were able to a plaque, a bronze present a $1,000 scholboard, school employees, medallion, and an arship from the SSA to community, and my family as expenses-paid trip to the this honor is a great source of a graduating senior in American Association of their respective school School Administrators pride for them.” systems. National Conference on Larry DiChiara ’81 DiChiara, who has Education in Houston. served as Phenix City’s superintendent By virtue of winning Superintendent of since 2004, teaches graduate courses as an the Year honors at the state level, DiChiara adjunct instructor for Troy University’s became a candidate for National SuperinPhenix City campus. He previously served tendent of the Year. as director of special education and as “I am especially thrilled for my central director of administrative services for Lee office staff, school board, school employees, County Schools, as principal of Loachapoka community, and my family as this honor is Elementary School, and as assistant prina great source of pride for them,” DiChiara cipal and a special education teacher for said. “That in and of itself makes all the Loachapoka High and Elementary Schools. attention worth it. Finally, I have so much Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

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alumni

Former student’s class notes set stage for new textbook with professor With the exception of a new book co-authored by an Auburn University professor, virtually all college textbooks are written by senior professors who are among the leading names in their academic fields. The usual textbook authors are people like Larry Wit, a prominent professor of biological sciences in Auburn’s College of Sciences and Mathematics, where he is also associate dean for academic affairs and has been a member of the biological sciences faculty since 1976. Wit’s “Mammalian Physiology” class has become legendary at Auburn and in medical and related fields, where many of his former students now work. The Auburn professor is co-author of “Biomedical Physiology,” a textbook for graduate students and advanced undergraduates published in Fall 2011 by Kendall Hunt Publishing Co. Based on courses Wit has taught and built upon for more than three decades, the book covers the core principles of physiology that many pre-med students are required to master for admission to medical school and others need in several related professions. Yet Wit is the secondary author of the text. Instead of another senior professor, the primary author is Matthew Goodwin, who earned his doctorate from the College of Education in 2008 and is now a third-year student at Cornell University’s Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. However, Wit and another senior professor, Bruce Gladden, a HumanaGermany-Sherman distinguished professor in the College of Education’s Department of 68

Keystone

Kinesiology, are quick to point out that Goodwin was not a typical graduate student, most of whom take years beyond graduation to get established in a career before even considering — and then, usually, dropping — the idea of tackling a book about a complex subject. The material in the book is gleaned from and builds upon Wit’s extensive knowledge of the field of biomedical physiology — mammalian physiology is an older term for the same subject area. The writing of the book, meanwhile, is an outgrowth of copious notes Goodwin took in Wit’s class. “I usually ask students to produce a paper on a topic of the person’s interest in the course,” Wit recalled. “Matt wondered about writing ‘a perfect set of notes’ for the class, instead. I told him to go ahead and he succeeded admirably. “That was five or six years ago, and it was so complete, we put it on the website for the course.” At the time, Goodwin was in his mid20s, and had arrived at Auburn with bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Furman University in his hometown of Greenville, S.C. He had heard about Wit’s class while on a visit to Auburn before entering the doctoral program in exercise physiology under Gladden. Gladden guided the young doctoral student to Wit’s physiology class in 2006 as part of his academic program. “In the course of pursuing his interest in exercise physiology, he became interested in medicine,” Gladden said. “Physiology is one of the courses that prepare students for medical fields, and Dr. Wit is widely known beyond Auburn as a master teacher and

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

has won several awards for teaching. It was about that time that Matt decided to go to medical school after getting his Ph.D., and his taking that course was certainly a factor.” Goodwin says he went beyond typical note-taking in Wit’s course because existing notes posted by previous students had been too sketchy and were often inaccurate. As a graduate teaching assistant in the Department of Kinesiology, Goodwin would provide students with a packet of notes in courses he taught, and he suggested to Wit that he organize his own notes for Wit’s physiology class and combine them with material the professor was providing to help students. “During his course, I began meticulously taking notes, recording every word he said and then listening to them at night, reading numerous outside sources and e-mailing him often to question a particular view or how I thought it could be better worded,” Goodwin said. “I worked in a physiology lab all day with Dr. Gladden, then stayed up late reading and thinking about physiology from Dr. Wit’s class. For a physiology geek like me, it was a great semester!” The book fulfills many of the goals Wit sets for his classes. “In the book as well as in the classroom, the course must involve more than memorization,” he said. “The questions in the book are developed that way; they require the student to think.” Often in textbook publishing, the senior faculty member is listed first among the authors. However, Wit insisted that his former student be listed first or he would not sign off on the book.

Former Student Ambassador wins spirit-saturated wedding “I am getting a fairy tale wedding in Auburn, the place I love the most,” she said.

Something old? Samford Hall would work nicely, given that it has stood sentry over the Auburn campus since 1888.

The couple’s love story isn’t young of age. Growing up together in Lanett, Ala., located 25 miles north of Auburn, they attended the same church, elementary and high schools, and eventually decided to attend Auburn University together.

Something new? The lush green lawn in front of the beloved clock tower will be transformed into a stage for a couple to exchange “I do’s.”

“We were very good friends all of our lives but didn’t start dating until our sophomore year of high school. We’ve been together ever since!” Oliver said.

Something orange and something blue? For now, former College of Education Student Ambassador Katie Oliver ’10 plans to stick with a wedding gown in traditional white.

Oliver’s mother is actually the inspiration behind the couple giving the contest a shot. She saw the advertisement for the War Eagle Wedding on television one night and immediately called and requested that her daughter and fiancé apply. They agreed as they both thought they would represent Auburn University well.

Oliver and fiancé Slade Ponder, a fellow Auburn graduate, won the first-ever War Eagle Wedding contest sponsored by the university and The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center. The hotel and other sponsors are providing the couple with a variety of in-kind goods and services.

“We were very involved on campus during our time spent at Auburn and felt like we were deserving of a War Eagle Wedding,” Oliver said.

The couple will be given a nearly allexpenses-paid wedding, with the use of Samford Lawn for the ceremony along with the Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center. Other provided items include bridal and bridesmaid dresses, tuxedos, photography and food for the reception. The public, including Auburn fans and members of the university community, was invited to select the War Eagle Wedding couple from three “finalist couples.” In leading up to the wedding, the public will also be able to vote online on numerous aspects of the wedding, including the bridal gown design, bridesmaid dress design, hors d’oeuvres for the reception, flowers and jewelry.

Oliver is currently teaching sixth grade at Springwood School in Lanett. Ponder is employed with State Farm Insurance. The wedding date is set for May 26. After the wedding, the couple plans to take a weeklong honeymoon trip to either Antigua or St. Lucia. “I wish someone would help us vote on that,” Oliver laughed. photos: Flip Flop Foto

The couple has remained fully supportive of each other throughout the War Eagle Wedding contest process.

“This journey has been amazing and I know Slade has enjoyed all the amazing perks just as much as I have,” Oliver said.

Oliver, who earned a degree in early childhood education in December 2010, said the experience has been a dream come true. Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

69


alumni

Former student’s class notes set stage for new textbook with professor With the exception of a new book co-authored by an Auburn University professor, virtually all college textbooks are written by senior professors who are among the leading names in their academic fields. The usual textbook authors are people like Larry Wit, a prominent professor of biological sciences in Auburn’s College of Sciences and Mathematics, where he is also associate dean for academic affairs and has been a member of the biological sciences faculty since 1976. Wit’s “Mammalian Physiology” class has become legendary at Auburn and in medical and related fields, where many of his former students now work. The Auburn professor is co-author of “Biomedical Physiology,” a textbook for graduate students and advanced undergraduates published in Fall 2011 by Kendall Hunt Publishing Co. Based on courses Wit has taught and built upon for more than three decades, the book covers the core principles of physiology that many pre-med students are required to master for admission to medical school and others need in several related professions. Yet Wit is the secondary author of the text. Instead of another senior professor, the primary author is Matthew Goodwin, who earned his doctorate from the College of Education in 2008 and is now a third-year student at Cornell University’s Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. However, Wit and another senior professor, Bruce Gladden, a HumanaGermany-Sherman distinguished professor in the College of Education’s Department of 68

Keystone

Kinesiology, are quick to point out that Goodwin was not a typical graduate student, most of whom take years beyond graduation to get established in a career before even considering — and then, usually, dropping — the idea of tackling a book about a complex subject. The material in the book is gleaned from and builds upon Wit’s extensive knowledge of the field of biomedical physiology — mammalian physiology is an older term for the same subject area. The writing of the book, meanwhile, is an outgrowth of copious notes Goodwin took in Wit’s class. “I usually ask students to produce a paper on a topic of the person’s interest in the course,” Wit recalled. “Matt wondered about writing ‘a perfect set of notes’ for the class, instead. I told him to go ahead and he succeeded admirably. “That was five or six years ago, and it was so complete, we put it on the website for the course.” At the time, Goodwin was in his mid20s, and had arrived at Auburn with bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Furman University in his hometown of Greenville, S.C. He had heard about Wit’s class while on a visit to Auburn before entering the doctoral program in exercise physiology under Gladden. Gladden guided the young doctoral student to Wit’s physiology class in 2006 as part of his academic program. “In the course of pursuing his interest in exercise physiology, he became interested in medicine,” Gladden said. “Physiology is one of the courses that prepare students for medical fields, and Dr. Wit is widely known beyond Auburn as a master teacher and

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

has won several awards for teaching. It was about that time that Matt decided to go to medical school after getting his Ph.D., and his taking that course was certainly a factor.” Goodwin says he went beyond typical note-taking in Wit’s course because existing notes posted by previous students had been too sketchy and were often inaccurate. As a graduate teaching assistant in the Department of Kinesiology, Goodwin would provide students with a packet of notes in courses he taught, and he suggested to Wit that he organize his own notes for Wit’s physiology class and combine them with material the professor was providing to help students. “During his course, I began meticulously taking notes, recording every word he said and then listening to them at night, reading numerous outside sources and e-mailing him often to question a particular view or how I thought it could be better worded,” Goodwin said. “I worked in a physiology lab all day with Dr. Gladden, then stayed up late reading and thinking about physiology from Dr. Wit’s class. For a physiology geek like me, it was a great semester!” The book fulfills many of the goals Wit sets for his classes. “In the book as well as in the classroom, the course must involve more than memorization,” he said. “The questions in the book are developed that way; they require the student to think.” Often in textbook publishing, the senior faculty member is listed first among the authors. However, Wit insisted that his former student be listed first or he would not sign off on the book.

Former Student Ambassador wins spirit-saturated wedding “I am getting a fairy tale wedding in Auburn, the place I love the most,” she said.

Something old? Samford Hall would work nicely, given that it has stood sentry over the Auburn campus since 1888.

The couple’s love story isn’t young of age. Growing up together in Lanett, Ala., located 25 miles north of Auburn, they attended the same church, elementary and high schools, and eventually decided to attend Auburn University together.

Something new? The lush green lawn in front of the beloved clock tower will be transformed into a stage for a couple to exchange “I do’s.”

“We were very good friends all of our lives but didn’t start dating until our sophomore year of high school. We’ve been together ever since!” Oliver said.

Something orange and something blue? For now, former College of Education Student Ambassador Katie Oliver ’10 plans to stick with a wedding gown in traditional white.

Oliver’s mother is actually the inspiration behind the couple giving the contest a shot. She saw the advertisement for the War Eagle Wedding on television one night and immediately called and requested that her daughter and fiancé apply. They agreed as they both thought they would represent Auburn University well.

Oliver and fiancé Slade Ponder, a fellow Auburn graduate, won the first-ever War Eagle Wedding contest sponsored by the university and The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center. The hotel and other sponsors are providing the couple with a variety of in-kind goods and services.

“We were very involved on campus during our time spent at Auburn and felt like we were deserving of a War Eagle Wedding,” Oliver said.

The couple will be given a nearly allexpenses-paid wedding, with the use of Samford Lawn for the ceremony along with the Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center. Other provided items include bridal and bridesmaid dresses, tuxedos, photography and food for the reception. The public, including Auburn fans and members of the university community, was invited to select the War Eagle Wedding couple from three “finalist couples.” In leading up to the wedding, the public will also be able to vote online on numerous aspects of the wedding, including the bridal gown design, bridesmaid dress design, hors d’oeuvres for the reception, flowers and jewelry.

Oliver is currently teaching sixth grade at Springwood School in Lanett. Ponder is employed with State Farm Insurance. The wedding date is set for May 26. After the wedding, the couple plans to take a weeklong honeymoon trip to either Antigua or St. Lucia. “I wish someone would help us vote on that,” Oliver laughed. photos: Flip Flop Foto

The couple has remained fully supportive of each other throughout the War Eagle Wedding contest process.

“This journey has been amazing and I know Slade has enjoyed all the amazing perks just as much as I have,” Oliver said.

Oliver, who earned a degree in early childhood education in December 2010, said the experience has been a dream come true. Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

69


A lum ni Sp ot l igh t

AlumniNOTES 1960s

Nancy Bassham Wiegman [B, 1966, educa-

Tim Alford [B, 1968, secondary education; M, 1972, education leadership/supervision; D, 1985, educational leadership] serves as executive director of the Alabama Construction Recruitment Institute and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

Roger Gargus [B, 1969, secondary education] is retired and residing in Robbinsville, N.C.

Carol Edmundson Hutcheson [B, 1969, elementary education; M, elementary education, 1971; D, elementary education, 1979] is a retired elementary school principal who serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

Elizabeth “Libba” Hunter Russell [B, 1964, social science education], a retired educator and principal, serves on the college’s National Advisory Council. She currently volunteers in running “The Working Closet,” a center for abused women that provides employment support and clothing. Karin de Beek Salyards [B, 1965, elementary education] resides in Haines City, Fla. Nancy Collier Sheddan [B, 1967, education] is retired and living in Clinton, Tenn.

tion/French and biology] teaches yoga at Chico Sports Club in Chico, Calif., and hosts a show on Northstate Public Radio called “Nancy’s Bookshelf.” Guests have included Maya Angelou, Paula Poundstone and Scott Simon.

1970s Rhonda Thompson Beacham [M, 1976, general education] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches at Elyton Elementary School in Birmingham, Ala.

Nathan Hodges [D, 1974, educational administration] serves as president of Bowling Green Technical College in Bowling Green, Ky. He is also a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

L e t u s k n ow what ’ s happ e n i n g i n yo u r l if e ! S u b m i t yo u r n e w s , a s w e l l a s u pdat e s to yo u r c o n tac t i n f o r m at i o n , by c l icki n g t h e a lu m n i u pdat e l i n k o n t h e h o m e pag e o f e d u cat i o n . au b u r n . e d u .

Marguerite Williams Cavagnaro [M, 1975, education], a retired classroom teacher, resides in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Glenda Earwood [B, 1974, secondary education;

M, 1972, education] serves as elementary principal at Briarwood Christian School in Birmingham, Ala.

M, 1975, counselor education] serves as executive director of Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

Donna Carpenter Burchfield [B, 1971, social

Pamela Goodwin Farley [B, 1976, English lan-

Cheryl McClure Blackmon [B, 1971, education;

science education; M, 1973, guidance and counseling] is a lawyer for King & Spalding in Atlanta, where she works in the Employee Benefits and Executive Compensation Practice Group. She also serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

Shirley Varner Capps [B, 1974, education; M, 1985, education] is a technical assistant for the Alabama Department of Children’s Affairs in its Office of School Readiness.

guage arts education] works for Mustang Engineering in Houston, Texas.

Nancy Young Fortner [M, 1971, counselor education], a retired K-12 educator and member of the college’s National Advisory Council, serves on the Auburn Alumni Association’s Board of Directors. She is also a member of the Auburn University Trustee Selection Committee.

Barbara Holt [B, 1971, education; M, 1975, counseling education] is a senior policy analyst at the University of Maryland. Susan McIntosh Housel [B, 1973, elementary education], a retired elementary educator, serves on the college’s National Advisory Council and lives in Auburn, Ala.

Marcia Veal Johnson [B, 1974, counselor education; M, 1977, counselor education; D, 2010, administration of elementary and secondary education] is the director of instruction and personnel for the Russell County (Ala.) School District. Rex Lieffers [M, 1975, vocational education/ rehabilitation services] is a professional development consultant with SIL International. He works with professional staff in Asia as they “reinvent” themselves to serve expanding cultural communities and language groups. He has served with SIL for more than 25 years and has worked and lived in the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand.

Don Love [M, 1976, education] serves as assistant superintendent for the Springdale (Ark.) School District. In 2010, he earned the AdvancED Excellence in Education Award. He has also served as president of the state curriculum administrators’ association and as a member of a state education commission.

Lynn Rotenberry Moran [M, 1977, education] is retired and resides in Alexander City, Ala. Sarah B. Newton [B, 1974, general education]

Membership in the Auburn Alumni Association draws you even closer to your alma mater. As part of our family, you’ll receive the quarterly Auburn Magazine and free entry to the Alumni Hospitality Tent prior to home football games, plus merchandise and service discounts that offer savings on insurance, logo merchandise, hotel stays and more. Already a member? Start saving money now by doing business with our partners and sponsors. For details, see www.aualum.org/benefits.

Join our family.

was appointed by the Auburn University Trustee Selection Committee to serve on the university’s Board of Trustees. She will continue to represent District 7. hood education; M, 1983, early childhood education] is retired after a 36-year teaching career, with her most recent being at Foley Elementary School in Baldwin County, Ala. She married Tom Plott, a 1973 Auburn graduate, in 2011.

Carol S. Williams [B, 1976, elementary education] teaches second grade at Liberty Park Elementary School in Vestavia Hills, Ala.

Debbie Cooper Jarrett [B, 1983, secondary

www.aualum.org/join

education] works as an education technology instructor for South Carolina Educational Television (SCETV).

J. Michael Jones [B, 1985, education; D, 2008, re70

Keystone

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

Soon after graduating from Auburn with an education degree, Ken Johns ’57 helped change the way in which products get from manufacturers to consumers. Johns’ contributions toward streamlining the process that takes goods from point A to point B were recently recognized by the Containerized & Intermodal Institute. The organization presented its 2011 Connie Award to Johns during a December 2011 luncheon in Newak, N.J. The award pays tribute to Johns’ influence in shaping the containerized shipping industry and his ability to impact worldwide trade and transportation. After graduating from Auburn, Johns went to work with Sea-Land Service Inc., then a newly-formed transportation company based in Mobile, Ala. Founded by transportation entrepreneur Malcolm McLean, Sea-Land revolutionized ocean shipping by using cranes and other machines to load and unload large metal containers from ships and easily transfer them to tractor trailer trucks. “In career lasting more than 50 years, Ken Johns is universally recognized as a leader of the international containerized ocean shipping industry,” CII president Allen Clifford said in a press release. “Today, the majority of all international trade is transported via the system of containerized shipping that Johns was a key participant in developing from its very beginning. His more recent work in innovative port consultation had broadened his contributions to our industry.” Johns earned one of the Auburn University Alumni Association’s Lifetime Achievement Awards in 2010 and served as the College of Education’s Keystone Leader-in-Residence in the same year. He served as Sea-Land’s president and chief operating officer from 1979-87. He worked at various levels of the company’s management infrastructure in Mobile, Tampa, Jacksonville, New Orleans and New Jersey. After retiring from Sea-Land, Johns founded The Hampshire Management Group, Inc., where he currently serves as chairman and chief executive officer. The company serves the ocean shipping industry.

Frances McCurry Plott [B, 1973, early child-

1980s w w w. a u a l u m . o r g

Johns ’57 honored as shipping industry pioneer

director at Medical Management Options in Baton Rouge, La. She has also launched an online counseling website, drmaryspeed.com, as a therapy venue for individuals who prefer anonymity, are housebound or serve as caregivers for housebound individuals.

habilitation and special education] serves as Visual Services Division administrator for the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. The program offers employment development, independent living training, library services, business ownership, educational materials and technology for Oklahomans with low vision or blindness.

Nancy (Cissy) Grooms Walters [M, 1980,

Vivian Widner Nordgren [B, 1980, office

counseling] resides in Huntsville, Ala.

administration] is a program coordinator at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville.

Cynthia Sanders Watson [B, 1981, speech pathology] recently completed her 25th year as a public school speech therapist. She has worked at Locust Grove Elementary School in Henry County (Ga.) Schools for more than 20 years.

Julia Reagan [B, 1981, health and recreation administration] resides in Auburn, Ala. Mary Speed [B, 1981, education] is program

1990s Keystone

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71


A lum ni Sp ot l igh t

AlumniNOTES 1960s

Nancy Bassham Wiegman [B, 1966, educa-

Tim Alford [B, 1968, secondary education; M, 1972, education leadership/supervision; D, 1985, educational leadership] serves as executive director of the Alabama Construction Recruitment Institute and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

Roger Gargus [B, 1969, secondary education] is retired and residing in Robbinsville, N.C.

Carol Edmundson Hutcheson [B, 1969, elementary education; M, elementary education, 1971; D, elementary education, 1979] is a retired elementary school principal who serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

Elizabeth “Libba” Hunter Russell [B, 1964, social science education], a retired educator and principal, serves on the college’s National Advisory Council. She currently volunteers in running “The Working Closet,” a center for abused women that provides employment support and clothing. Karin de Beek Salyards [B, 1965, elementary education] resides in Haines City, Fla. Nancy Collier Sheddan [B, 1967, education] is retired and living in Clinton, Tenn.

tion/French and biology] teaches yoga at Chico Sports Club in Chico, Calif., and hosts a show on Northstate Public Radio called “Nancy’s Bookshelf.” Guests have included Maya Angelou, Paula Poundstone and Scott Simon.

1970s Rhonda Thompson Beacham [M, 1976, general education] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches at Elyton Elementary School in Birmingham, Ala.

Nathan Hodges [D, 1974, educational administration] serves as president of Bowling Green Technical College in Bowling Green, Ky. He is also a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

L e t u s k n ow what ’ s happ e n i n g i n yo u r l if e ! S u b m i t yo u r n e w s , a s w e l l a s u pdat e s to yo u r c o n tac t i n f o r m at i o n , by c l icki n g t h e a lu m n i u pdat e l i n k o n t h e h o m e pag e o f e d u cat i o n . au b u r n . e d u .

Marguerite Williams Cavagnaro [M, 1975, education], a retired classroom teacher, resides in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Glenda Earwood [B, 1974, secondary education;

M, 1972, education] serves as elementary principal at Briarwood Christian School in Birmingham, Ala.

M, 1975, counselor education] serves as executive director of Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

Donna Carpenter Burchfield [B, 1971, social

Pamela Goodwin Farley [B, 1976, English lan-

Cheryl McClure Blackmon [B, 1971, education;

science education; M, 1973, guidance and counseling] is a lawyer for King & Spalding in Atlanta, where she works in the Employee Benefits and Executive Compensation Practice Group. She also serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

Shirley Varner Capps [B, 1974, education; M, 1985, education] is a technical assistant for the Alabama Department of Children’s Affairs in its Office of School Readiness.

guage arts education] works for Mustang Engineering in Houston, Texas.

Nancy Young Fortner [M, 1971, counselor education], a retired K-12 educator and member of the college’s National Advisory Council, serves on the Auburn Alumni Association’s Board of Directors. She is also a member of the Auburn University Trustee Selection Committee.

Barbara Holt [B, 1971, education; M, 1975, counseling education] is a senior policy analyst at the University of Maryland. Susan McIntosh Housel [B, 1973, elementary education], a retired elementary educator, serves on the college’s National Advisory Council and lives in Auburn, Ala.

Marcia Veal Johnson [B, 1974, counselor education; M, 1977, counselor education; D, 2010, administration of elementary and secondary education] is the director of instruction and personnel for the Russell County (Ala.) School District. Rex Lieffers [M, 1975, vocational education/ rehabilitation services] is a professional development consultant with SIL International. He works with professional staff in Asia as they “reinvent” themselves to serve expanding cultural communities and language groups. He has served with SIL for more than 25 years and has worked and lived in the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand.

Don Love [M, 1976, education] serves as assistant superintendent for the Springdale (Ark.) School District. In 2010, he earned the AdvancED Excellence in Education Award. He has also served as president of the state curriculum administrators’ association and as a member of a state education commission.

Lynn Rotenberry Moran [M, 1977, education] is retired and resides in Alexander City, Ala. Sarah B. Newton [B, 1974, general education]

Membership in the Auburn Alumni Association draws you even closer to your alma mater. As part of our family, you’ll receive the quarterly Auburn Magazine and free entry to the Alumni Hospitality Tent prior to home football games, plus merchandise and service discounts that offer savings on insurance, logo merchandise, hotel stays and more. Already a member? Start saving money now by doing business with our partners and sponsors. For details, see www.aualum.org/benefits.

Join our family.

was appointed by the Auburn University Trustee Selection Committee to serve on the university’s Board of Trustees. She will continue to represent District 7. hood education; M, 1983, early childhood education] is retired after a 36-year teaching career, with her most recent being at Foley Elementary School in Baldwin County, Ala. She married Tom Plott, a 1973 Auburn graduate, in 2011.

Carol S. Williams [B, 1976, elementary education] teaches second grade at Liberty Park Elementary School in Vestavia Hills, Ala.

Debbie Cooper Jarrett [B, 1983, secondary

www.aualum.org/join

education] works as an education technology instructor for South Carolina Educational Television (SCETV).

J. Michael Jones [B, 1985, education; D, 2008, re70

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Soon after graduating from Auburn with an education degree, Ken Johns ’57 helped change the way in which products get from manufacturers to consumers. Johns’ contributions toward streamlining the process that takes goods from point A to point B were recently recognized by the Containerized & Intermodal Institute. The organization presented its 2011 Connie Award to Johns during a December 2011 luncheon in Newak, N.J. The award pays tribute to Johns’ influence in shaping the containerized shipping industry and his ability to impact worldwide trade and transportation. After graduating from Auburn, Johns went to work with Sea-Land Service Inc., then a newly-formed transportation company based in Mobile, Ala. Founded by transportation entrepreneur Malcolm McLean, Sea-Land revolutionized ocean shipping by using cranes and other machines to load and unload large metal containers from ships and easily transfer them to tractor trailer trucks. “In career lasting more than 50 years, Ken Johns is universally recognized as a leader of the international containerized ocean shipping industry,” CII president Allen Clifford said in a press release. “Today, the majority of all international trade is transported via the system of containerized shipping that Johns was a key participant in developing from its very beginning. His more recent work in innovative port consultation had broadened his contributions to our industry.” Johns earned one of the Auburn University Alumni Association’s Lifetime Achievement Awards in 2010 and served as the College of Education’s Keystone Leader-in-Residence in the same year. He served as Sea-Land’s president and chief operating officer from 1979-87. He worked at various levels of the company’s management infrastructure in Mobile, Tampa, Jacksonville, New Orleans and New Jersey. After retiring from Sea-Land, Johns founded The Hampshire Management Group, Inc., where he currently serves as chairman and chief executive officer. The company serves the ocean shipping industry.

Frances McCurry Plott [B, 1973, early child-

1980s w w w. a u a l u m . o r g

Johns ’57 honored as shipping industry pioneer

director at Medical Management Options in Baton Rouge, La. She has also launched an online counseling website, drmaryspeed.com, as a therapy venue for individuals who prefer anonymity, are housebound or serve as caregivers for housebound individuals.

habilitation and special education] serves as Visual Services Division administrator for the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. The program offers employment development, independent living training, library services, business ownership, educational materials and technology for Oklahomans with low vision or blindness.

Nancy (Cissy) Grooms Walters [M, 1980,

Vivian Widner Nordgren [B, 1980, office

counseling] resides in Huntsville, Ala.

administration] is a program coordinator at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville.

Cynthia Sanders Watson [B, 1981, speech pathology] recently completed her 25th year as a public school speech therapist. She has worked at Locust Grove Elementary School in Henry County (Ga.) Schools for more than 20 years.

Julia Reagan [B, 1981, health and recreation administration] resides in Auburn, Ala. Mary Speed [B, 1981, education] is program

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Tracey Caraway [B, 1992, rehabilitation services; M, 2010, adult education] earned Teacher of the Year honors at Loxley Elementary School in Baldwin County (Ala.). She teaches special education and works with kindergartners and first-graders.

Charles Farmer [B, 1997, general social science education; D, 2008, curriculum and teaching] serves as principal at Summitt High School in Spring Hill, Tenn., and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

WELCOME CL ASS OF

Byron Franklin [B, 1991, adult education] serves as the District 9 representative on the Auburn University Board of Trustees. He is also the director of special marketing and public relations for Birmingham-based Buffalo Rock Co., and the vice president of BBC Foods.

Todd Freeman [M, 1994, social science education] serves as principal of Auburn High School in Auburn, Ala. He previously served for six years as executive director of operations and administrative services for Auburn City Schools and taught social science at Auburn High School for 10 years before moving to the central office.

Cristen Herring [B, 1992, elementary education;

April 26–28, 2012 This year we induct the class of 1962 and honor the classes of 1957, 1952, 1947, and 1942. The weekend will be filled with presentations, tours, special events, dinner at the home of Auburn president Jay Gogue and an induction ceremony followed by a dance featuring the Auburn Knights.

CALL TODAY! (334) 844–1150

Register online at www.aualum.org/goldeneagles

M, 1994, elementary education] serves as associate superintendent of Auburn (Ala.) City Schools. She started with the school system in 1993 and has been principal of both Ogletree Elementary and the Auburn Early Education Center, as well elementary curriculum director for Auburn City Schools.

Chuck Ledbetter [D, 1991, educational leadership] is superintendent of Dublin (Ga.) City Schools and serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

Brian Lemmings [B, 1997, exercise science] is a project manager for iHealth Technologies in Atlanta.

Alan Miller [M, 1997, special education; D, 2009, special education] serves as director of student services for Eufaula (Ala.) City Schools.

Ellen C. Moon [B,1999, rehabilitation services] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She is a learning support specialist at Oak Mountain Elementary School in Birmingham, Ala.

Martha Myers [M, 1994, community agency counseling] is retired from her previous position as community services director for the Lee County Youth Development Center in Opelika, Ala.

Lynda Raye Perry [B, 1995, mental retardation] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She is a teacher with Roanoke (Ala.) City Schools.

Roderick Perry [B, 1995, health promotion; M, 72

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1998, administration of higher education] began his service as a member of the College of Education’s National Advisory Council in 2010. He is senior associate athletic director and director of administration for Wright State University’s Athletics Department in Dayton, Ohio.

Michelle Russell Peterson [B, 1995, elementary education] teaches in the Mobile County (Ala.) Public School System. Melissa Roney [M, 1997, adult education] is a training and organizational development consultant for Aegon/Transamerica in Johns Creek, Ga.

Susan Snyder [B, 1999, elementary education] serves as district math coach for Wake County (N.C.) Schools.

Harrow Hornsby Strickland [M, 1994, elementary education; M, 1998, library media] teaches fifth grade for Auburn (Ala.) City Schools. In 2010, she served as a K-12 Summer Teaching Associate for the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and wrote curriculum content for the K-12 teacher resource website, “History Explorer.”

Kenneth Varner [B, 1995, agricultural education; M, 1998, agricultural education] was named superintendent of Tallassee (Ala.) Schools in 2012. In his previous 18 years with Tallassee Schools, he served as a coach, FFA sponsor, and agriscience teacher at Tallassee High School. In 2004, he became assistant principal at Southside Middle School and became principal there in 2009. Erin Vick [B, 1999, secondary mathematics education] is a mathematics instructor at Auburn University-Montgomery.

the arrival of a son, Nolan, in 2011.

Sirena A. Brock [B, 2005, elementary education] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches first grade at Cedarcrest-Southmoor Elementary School in Baton Rouge, La., and was selected as the school’s candidate for state Teacher of the Year honors.

tion] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches at Benjamin Russell High School in Alexander City, Ala.

Laura Clayton [B, 2009, early childhood special

Laura Jenkins Cooper [M, 2002, community

H. Gray Broughton [M, 2005, rehabilitation and

education; M, 2002, elementary education; D, 2010, reading education] married Terrance O. Davis in November 2011. She earned 2011 National Teacher of Honor status from the Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society for Education and served as Rho Phi capter counselor while an assistant professor at Troy University.

Melanie Buchanan [B, 2006, exercise science] is a physical therapist at Decatur General Hospital in Decatur, Ala.

Kara Burleson [B, 2004, elementary education]

Cheron Hunter Davis [B, 2000, elementary

Jeff Davis [B, 2003, physical education] teaches physical education in Lee County (Ala.) Schools.

was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches fifth grade at Valley Intermediate School in Pelham, Ala.

Bailey DeBardeleben [B, 2011, elementary education] is an elementary school teacher in Shelby County (Ala.) Schools.

Benjamin Burnett [B, 2003, physical education] teaches in the Jefferson County (Ala.) school system.

Desmond Delk [M, 2010, physical education]

Jessica Chrabaszcz [M, 2011, higher education/ sports management] serves as an event coordinator for Auburn University athletics.

Emily Sasser Clark [M, 2002, secondary educa-

tion] teaches first grade at Harmony Hills Elementary School in Silver Spring, Md.

Michael Edmondson [D, 2001, science educa-

affairs counseling] serves as executive director of the Lee County (Ala.) Young Development Center and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

is a health education lecturer at Savannah State University. He also appeared on Oprah Winfrey’s “Farewell Spectacular” as one of the 300 “Men of Morehouse College” who participated in her sendoff. Delk completed his undergraduate education at Morehouse with the help of an Oprah Wynfrey Scholarship, which has provided for the education

Marguerite DeWitt [B, 2010, elementary educa-

Emily Duke [B, 2011, elementary education] teaches second grade at Harlan Elementary School in Florence, Ala.

education] is a special education teacher at John Dibert Community School in New Orleans, La.

Maranda Henderson Brown [D, 2011, counselor education] serves as an adjunct faculty member in the Auburn University College of Education’s Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling, as well as in Troy University Montgomery’s College of Education. special education] is a rehabilitation counselor and CEO of Broughton Associates Inc. in Richmond, Va. He serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

of more than 400 students since its creation.

tion] retired in fall 2011 after serving as coordinator of the Engineering Magnet program and teaches advanced placement chemistry and physics at Northside High School in Columbus, Ga. He is a past recipient of Muscogee County Teacher of the Year, Georgia Secondary Schools Science Teacher of the Year, the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching, and the Tandy Technology Scholar Award.

Stephanie Uptain Freeman [B, 2003, secondary math education] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches mathematics at Leeds High School in Leeds, Ala., and earned the school’s Teacher of the Year award. Erin Cooper French [B, 2006, early childhood education] works at Surgical Clinic PC in Opelika, Ala.

Brittany Lea Gentry [B, 2007, special education] serves as a special education teacher for Homewood (Ala.) High School. In 2011, she married Brant Gentry, a 2006 graduate of Auburn. Andrew Gracia III [B, 2011, elementary education] resides in Salem, Ala.

2000s Katrice Albert [D, 2002, counseling psychology] was named to the Volunteers of America National Board of Directors in 2011. Albert, the vice provost for Equity, Diversity & Community Outreach at Louisiana State University and an adjunct faculty member in its College of Education, will serve on the board’s Governance Committee.

AU BU R N

AU BU R N

N AU BU R

Rachel Baker [M, 2011, foreign language education] teaches at North Cobb Christian School in Kennesaw, Ga. Eugenia Boyd [M, 2011, rehabilitation counseling] works in counseling in Queensland, Australia. Casey Breslin [M, 2006, exercise science; D, 2009, exercise science] serves as an assistant professor of kinesiology in Temple University’s College of Health Professions and Social Work.

Show your Auburn pride and spirit to the world, or at least to other drivers in Alabama (or wherever the road may take you) by purchasing the Auburn University car tag. The tag can feature up to six characters for optimum personalization; personalize your tag at no additional cost. Buy your tag at the county tag office — make a difference and share the spirit in welcoming new students to the Auburn Family by supporting scholarships.

Ashley McCullough Brock [B, 2007, general science education] teaches science for Marengo County Schools in Demopolis, Ala. She welcomed

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alumni n otes

Tracey Caraway [B, 1992, rehabilitation services; M, 2010, adult education] earned Teacher of the Year honors at Loxley Elementary School in Baldwin County (Ala.). She teaches special education and works with kindergartners and first-graders.

Charles Farmer [B, 1997, general social science education; D, 2008, curriculum and teaching] serves as principal at Summitt High School in Spring Hill, Tenn., and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

WELCOME CL ASS OF

Byron Franklin [B, 1991, adult education] serves as the District 9 representative on the Auburn University Board of Trustees. He is also the director of special marketing and public relations for Birmingham-based Buffalo Rock Co., and the vice president of BBC Foods.

Todd Freeman [M, 1994, social science education] serves as principal of Auburn High School in Auburn, Ala. He previously served for six years as executive director of operations and administrative services for Auburn City Schools and taught social science at Auburn High School for 10 years before moving to the central office.

Cristen Herring [B, 1992, elementary education;

April 26–28, 2012 This year we induct the class of 1962 and honor the classes of 1957, 1952, 1947, and 1942. The weekend will be filled with presentations, tours, special events, dinner at the home of Auburn president Jay Gogue and an induction ceremony followed by a dance featuring the Auburn Knights.

CALL TODAY! (334) 844–1150

Register online at www.aualum.org/goldeneagles

M, 1994, elementary education] serves as associate superintendent of Auburn (Ala.) City Schools. She started with the school system in 1993 and has been principal of both Ogletree Elementary and the Auburn Early Education Center, as well elementary curriculum director for Auburn City Schools.

Chuck Ledbetter [D, 1991, educational leadership] is superintendent of Dublin (Ga.) City Schools and serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

Brian Lemmings [B, 1997, exercise science] is a project manager for iHealth Technologies in Atlanta.

Alan Miller [M, 1997, special education; D, 2009, special education] serves as director of student services for Eufaula (Ala.) City Schools.

Ellen C. Moon [B,1999, rehabilitation services] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She is a learning support specialist at Oak Mountain Elementary School in Birmingham, Ala.

Martha Myers [M, 1994, community agency counseling] is retired from her previous position as community services director for the Lee County Youth Development Center in Opelika, Ala.

Lynda Raye Perry [B, 1995, mental retardation] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She is a teacher with Roanoke (Ala.) City Schools.

Roderick Perry [B, 1995, health promotion; M, 72

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1998, administration of higher education] began his service as a member of the College of Education’s National Advisory Council in 2010. He is senior associate athletic director and director of administration for Wright State University’s Athletics Department in Dayton, Ohio.

Michelle Russell Peterson [B, 1995, elementary education] teaches in the Mobile County (Ala.) Public School System. Melissa Roney [M, 1997, adult education] is a training and organizational development consultant for Aegon/Transamerica in Johns Creek, Ga.

Susan Snyder [B, 1999, elementary education] serves as district math coach for Wake County (N.C.) Schools.

Harrow Hornsby Strickland [M, 1994, elementary education; M, 1998, library media] teaches fifth grade for Auburn (Ala.) City Schools. In 2010, she served as a K-12 Summer Teaching Associate for the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and wrote curriculum content for the K-12 teacher resource website, “History Explorer.”

Kenneth Varner [B, 1995, agricultural education; M, 1998, agricultural education] was named superintendent of Tallassee (Ala.) Schools in 2012. In his previous 18 years with Tallassee Schools, he served as a coach, FFA sponsor, and agriscience teacher at Tallassee High School. In 2004, he became assistant principal at Southside Middle School and became principal there in 2009. Erin Vick [B, 1999, secondary mathematics education] is a mathematics instructor at Auburn University-Montgomery.

the arrival of a son, Nolan, in 2011.

Sirena A. Brock [B, 2005, elementary education] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches first grade at Cedarcrest-Southmoor Elementary School in Baton Rouge, La., and was selected as the school’s candidate for state Teacher of the Year honors.

tion] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches at Benjamin Russell High School in Alexander City, Ala.

Laura Clayton [B, 2009, early childhood special

Laura Jenkins Cooper [M, 2002, community

H. Gray Broughton [M, 2005, rehabilitation and

education; M, 2002, elementary education; D, 2010, reading education] married Terrance O. Davis in November 2011. She earned 2011 National Teacher of Honor status from the Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society for Education and served as Rho Phi capter counselor while an assistant professor at Troy University.

Melanie Buchanan [B, 2006, exercise science] is a physical therapist at Decatur General Hospital in Decatur, Ala.

Kara Burleson [B, 2004, elementary education]

Cheron Hunter Davis [B, 2000, elementary

Jeff Davis [B, 2003, physical education] teaches physical education in Lee County (Ala.) Schools.

was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches fifth grade at Valley Intermediate School in Pelham, Ala.

Bailey DeBardeleben [B, 2011, elementary education] is an elementary school teacher in Shelby County (Ala.) Schools.

Benjamin Burnett [B, 2003, physical education] teaches in the Jefferson County (Ala.) school system.

Desmond Delk [M, 2010, physical education]

Jessica Chrabaszcz [M, 2011, higher education/ sports management] serves as an event coordinator for Auburn University athletics.

Emily Sasser Clark [M, 2002, secondary educa-

tion] teaches first grade at Harmony Hills Elementary School in Silver Spring, Md.

Michael Edmondson [D, 2001, science educa-

affairs counseling] serves as executive director of the Lee County (Ala.) Young Development Center and is a member of the college’s National Advisory Council.

is a health education lecturer at Savannah State University. He also appeared on Oprah Winfrey’s “Farewell Spectacular” as one of the 300 “Men of Morehouse College” who participated in her sendoff. Delk completed his undergraduate education at Morehouse with the help of an Oprah Wynfrey Scholarship, which has provided for the education

Marguerite DeWitt [B, 2010, elementary educa-

Emily Duke [B, 2011, elementary education] teaches second grade at Harlan Elementary School in Florence, Ala.

education] is a special education teacher at John Dibert Community School in New Orleans, La.

Maranda Henderson Brown [D, 2011, counselor education] serves as an adjunct faculty member in the Auburn University College of Education’s Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling, as well as in Troy University Montgomery’s College of Education. special education] is a rehabilitation counselor and CEO of Broughton Associates Inc. in Richmond, Va. He serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

of more than 400 students since its creation.

tion] retired in fall 2011 after serving as coordinator of the Engineering Magnet program and teaches advanced placement chemistry and physics at Northside High School in Columbus, Ga. He is a past recipient of Muscogee County Teacher of the Year, Georgia Secondary Schools Science Teacher of the Year, the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching, and the Tandy Technology Scholar Award.

Stephanie Uptain Freeman [B, 2003, secondary math education] was among the more than 6,200 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2011. She teaches mathematics at Leeds High School in Leeds, Ala., and earned the school’s Teacher of the Year award. Erin Cooper French [B, 2006, early childhood education] works at Surgical Clinic PC in Opelika, Ala.

Brittany Lea Gentry [B, 2007, special education] serves as a special education teacher for Homewood (Ala.) High School. In 2011, she married Brant Gentry, a 2006 graduate of Auburn. Andrew Gracia III [B, 2011, elementary education] resides in Salem, Ala.

2000s Katrice Albert [D, 2002, counseling psychology] was named to the Volunteers of America National Board of Directors in 2011. Albert, the vice provost for Equity, Diversity & Community Outreach at Louisiana State University and an adjunct faculty member in its College of Education, will serve on the board’s Governance Committee.

AU BU R N

AU BU R N

N AU BU R

Rachel Baker [M, 2011, foreign language education] teaches at North Cobb Christian School in Kennesaw, Ga. Eugenia Boyd [M, 2011, rehabilitation counseling] works in counseling in Queensland, Australia. Casey Breslin [M, 2006, exercise science; D, 2009, exercise science] serves as an assistant professor of kinesiology in Temple University’s College of Health Professions and Social Work.

Show your Auburn pride and spirit to the world, or at least to other drivers in Alabama (or wherever the road may take you) by purchasing the Auburn University car tag. The tag can feature up to six characters for optimum personalization; personalize your tag at no additional cost. Buy your tag at the county tag office — make a difference and share the spirit in welcoming new students to the Auburn Family by supporting scholarships.

Ashley McCullough Brock [B, 2007, general science education] teaches science for Marengo County Schools in Demopolis, Ala. She welcomed

www.auburn.edu/cartags LTL_KeystoneMag_0212.indd 1

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alumni n otes

Alumni Spot ligh t DeLano ’73 returns ‘home’ as ACS superintendent

Rachel Greer [B, 2010, elementary education] teaches fifth grade in Randolph County Schools in Asheboro, N.C.

Karen Teague DeLano ’73 will soon make the transition from assistant superintendent of Vestavia Hills (Ala.) City Schools to superintendent of Auburn City Schools, but her career move will offer some measure of familiarity.

Taylor Gunter [B, 2011, exercise science; M, 2012, health promotion] has worked in Auburn University’s Office of Public Service as a graduate student.

After all, DeLano received her first glimpse of the school system where she will soon work as a student at Cary Woods Elementary School.

Michael Guthrie [B, 2000, marketing education; M, 2004, adult education] works as a senior “Millennium” consultant for Healthcare Performance Group near Helena, Ala.

DeLano, who was selected in February 2012 to succeed Terry Jenkins ’83, also understands the resources that exist within the College of Education and the national-recognized Professional Development System partnership it supports. DeLano is a three-time College of Education graduate, having earned a bachelor’s in general education, a master’s degree in general education and a doctorate in administration of elementary education.

Denisha Hendricks [M, 2001, higher education administration/sport management; D, 2004, higher education administration] is the director of athletics at Kentucky State University, where she oversees 13 NCAA Division II athletic programs. She also serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

“I finally feel like I have an opportunity to come back to a school system that gave so much to be me over a lifetime,” DeLano said.

Maryann Rucks Hood [B, 2004, early childhood special education; M, 2005, early childhood special education] resides in North Charleston, S.C.

DeLano was chosen from a pool of three finalists. In her position with Vestavia Hills City Schools, she supervised eight schools with more than 500 educators. She was selected Alabama’s Outstanding Curriculum Leader for 2010 by the Alabama Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Marcus Johnson [M, 2011, school counseling] resides in Montgomery, Ala.

Jessica Davis Key [B, 2005, health promotion] is an exercise physiologist at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, Ala.

DeLano also draws on extensive experience as an elementary educator in the state, having served as curriculum coordinator for Elmore County Schools, principal of Shades Cahaba Elementary School in Homewood and an assistant superintendent for Vestavia Hills City Schools since 2000. She also taught professional development frameworks, strategic planning and finance as an instructor at Samford University.

Karissa Everett Lang [B, 2001, elementary education] is assistant principal at Oak Park Middle School in Decatur, Ala.

Kathryn Smith McGraw [B, 2011, general science education] now resides in St. Mary’s, Ga.

David Miller [M, 2010, higher education administration] serves as a scholarship advisor for Auburn University.

Laura Cameron Mott [B, 2009, elementary education; M, 2010, elementary education] teaches fifth grade at Meadowview Elementary School in Selma, Ala. She earned WAKA-TV’s Golden Apple Award in 2011. Landon McKean Nast [B, 2007, elementary education; M, 2009, higher education administration] teaches fourth grade at Brookwood Forest Elementary School in Mountain Brook, Ala.

Jessica Norwood [B, 2008, kinesiology] earned a master’s degree in sport administration from Belmont University and is now a American College of Sports Medicine certified personal trainer. Mel Norwood [D, 2009, higher education administration] serves as director of the First-Year Experience Program at Edward Waters College in Jacksonville, Fla. He reports to the college’s vice president of academic affairs and oversees the office responsible for ensuring successful college transitions for first-year and transfer students.

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Katie E. Oliver [B, 2010, early childhood education] began teaching sixth grade at Springwood School in Lanett, Ala., in 2011. A former College of Education Student Ambassador, she won Auburn University’s War Eagle Wedding contest in 2012 (see story on page 67).

Samantha Pieper [M, 2011, school counseling] works as a counselor at St. James High School in Montgomery, Ala. Audrey Phillips [D, 2010,higher education ad-

Alison Kempey Shockey [B, 2000, elementary education] has taught in Duval County Schools in Jacksonville, Fla., for the last 11 years. Justin Shroyer [D, 2009, kinesiology] accepted a post-doctoral position at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (CDC/NIOSH) in Morgantown, W. Va. His work focuses on the hand biomechanics and the reduction of occupational stressors.

ministration] serves as senior associate director for Cox Communications’ Academic Center in Baton Rouge, La.

Mindy Pennycuff Steakley [M, 2010, library

Christal Cummings Pritchett [M, 2001, business education; D, 2004, career technology/business education] joined the Auburn University College of Education faculty in 2011 as an assistant professor of business and marketing education in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

William Turner [M, 2010, business education] serves as a business education teacher and cooperative education coordinator for the Macon County School District in Tuskegee, Ala.

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media education] serves as a library media specialist for the Lee County (Ala.) Board of Education.

REWARD YOURSELF AND AUBURN STUDENTS

The Spirit of Auburn credit card, featuring the WorldPoints® program, contributes to Auburn’s scholarship fund while building rewards for you, too. To date, our credit card program has generated more than $5.7 million for freshman academic scholarships. By using this card for all your everyday purchases, you share the Auburn spirit by benefiting students who most deserve academic scholarships – at no additional cost to you – and you ultimately help shape the future of Auburn. Even more reason to enjoy redeeming all the points you earn for cash rewards, travel, or merchandise. One good turn deserves another. For details or to apply, visit www.auburn.edu/spiritcard.

The Spirit of Auburn credit card is made possible by the Auburn Spirit Foundation for Scholarships (ASFS), which is affiliated with Auburn University. This advertisement was paid for by the ASFS. For information about the rates, fees, other costs, and benefits associated with the use of these cards or to apply, visit www.auburn.edu/spiritcard and refer to the disclosures accompanying the online credit card application. This credit card program is issued and administered by FIA Card Services, N.A. Bank of America and the Bank of America logo are registered trademarks of Bank of America Corporation. Visa is a registered trademark of Visa International Service Association and is used by the issuer pursuant to license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated and is used by the issuer pursuant to license. Platinum Plus and WorldPoints are registered trademarks of FIA Card Services, N.A. ARG0F0R5 3/06/12 © 2012 Bank of America Corporation.


alumni n otes

Alumni Spot ligh t DeLano ’73 returns ‘home’ as ACS superintendent

Rachel Greer [B, 2010, elementary education] teaches fifth grade in Randolph County Schools in Asheboro, N.C.

Karen Teague DeLano ’73 will soon make the transition from assistant superintendent of Vestavia Hills (Ala.) City Schools to superintendent of Auburn City Schools, but her career move will offer some measure of familiarity.

Taylor Gunter [B, 2011, exercise science; M, 2012, health promotion] has worked in Auburn University’s Office of Public Service as a graduate student.

After all, DeLano received her first glimpse of the school system where she will soon work as a student at Cary Woods Elementary School.

Michael Guthrie [B, 2000, marketing education; M, 2004, adult education] works as a senior “Millennium” consultant for Healthcare Performance Group near Helena, Ala.

DeLano, who was selected in February 2012 to succeed Terry Jenkins ’83, also understands the resources that exist within the College of Education and the national-recognized Professional Development System partnership it supports. DeLano is a three-time College of Education graduate, having earned a bachelor’s in general education, a master’s degree in general education and a doctorate in administration of elementary education.

Denisha Hendricks [M, 2001, higher education administration/sport management; D, 2004, higher education administration] is the director of athletics at Kentucky State University, where she oversees 13 NCAA Division II athletic programs. She also serves on the college’s National Advisory Council.

“I finally feel like I have an opportunity to come back to a school system that gave so much to be me over a lifetime,” DeLano said.

Maryann Rucks Hood [B, 2004, early childhood special education; M, 2005, early childhood special education] resides in North Charleston, S.C.

DeLano was chosen from a pool of three finalists. In her position with Vestavia Hills City Schools, she supervised eight schools with more than 500 educators. She was selected Alabama’s Outstanding Curriculum Leader for 2010 by the Alabama Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Marcus Johnson [M, 2011, school counseling] resides in Montgomery, Ala.

Jessica Davis Key [B, 2005, health promotion] is an exercise physiologist at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, Ala.

DeLano also draws on extensive experience as an elementary educator in the state, having served as curriculum coordinator for Elmore County Schools, principal of Shades Cahaba Elementary School in Homewood and an assistant superintendent for Vestavia Hills City Schools since 2000. She also taught professional development frameworks, strategic planning and finance as an instructor at Samford University.

Karissa Everett Lang [B, 2001, elementary education] is assistant principal at Oak Park Middle School in Decatur, Ala.

Kathryn Smith McGraw [B, 2011, general science education] now resides in St. Mary’s, Ga.

David Miller [M, 2010, higher education administration] serves as a scholarship advisor for Auburn University.

Laura Cameron Mott [B, 2009, elementary education; M, 2010, elementary education] teaches fifth grade at Meadowview Elementary School in Selma, Ala. She earned WAKA-TV’s Golden Apple Award in 2011. Landon McKean Nast [B, 2007, elementary education; M, 2009, higher education administration] teaches fourth grade at Brookwood Forest Elementary School in Mountain Brook, Ala.

Jessica Norwood [B, 2008, kinesiology] earned a master’s degree in sport administration from Belmont University and is now a American College of Sports Medicine certified personal trainer. Mel Norwood [D, 2009, higher education administration] serves as director of the First-Year Experience Program at Edward Waters College in Jacksonville, Fla. He reports to the college’s vice president of academic affairs and oversees the office responsible for ensuring successful college transitions for first-year and transfer students.

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Keystone

Katie E. Oliver [B, 2010, early childhood education] began teaching sixth grade at Springwood School in Lanett, Ala., in 2011. A former College of Education Student Ambassador, she won Auburn University’s War Eagle Wedding contest in 2012 (see story on page 67).

Samantha Pieper [M, 2011, school counseling] works as a counselor at St. James High School in Montgomery, Ala. Audrey Phillips [D, 2010,higher education ad-

Alison Kempey Shockey [B, 2000, elementary education] has taught in Duval County Schools in Jacksonville, Fla., for the last 11 years. Justin Shroyer [D, 2009, kinesiology] accepted a post-doctoral position at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (CDC/NIOSH) in Morgantown, W. Va. His work focuses on the hand biomechanics and the reduction of occupational stressors.

ministration] serves as senior associate director for Cox Communications’ Academic Center in Baton Rouge, La.

Mindy Pennycuff Steakley [M, 2010, library

Christal Cummings Pritchett [M, 2001, business education; D, 2004, career technology/business education] joined the Auburn University College of Education faculty in 2011 as an assistant professor of business and marketing education in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

William Turner [M, 2010, business education] serves as a business education teacher and cooperative education coordinator for the Macon County School District in Tuskegee, Ala.

Vo lu m e I X , 2 012

media education] serves as a library media specialist for the Lee County (Ala.) Board of Education.

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