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‘Lost soul’ named Keystone Leader • Research/Outreach goes global Portals welcome campus visitors • College reaccreditated, ranked

The mission of the Auburn University College of Education is to build a better future for individuals, our state, our nation and our world. We fulfill our mission by preparing competent, committed and reflective professionals as we engage in outstanding teaching, cutting-edge research and meaningful outreach. The keystone, the topmost stone of an arch, serves as a visual reminder of our mission. Just as the keystone supports and holds an arch together, education holds intact the promise of a better future for all.

C ollege of E ducation O ffice of the D ean 3084 H aley C enter A uburn , A labama 36849-5218

V o l u m e v, 2 0 0 8

C o l l e g e

Non-profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 530 Montgomery, AL

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

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Honor Roll Spo tlight

Donna Anderson Mellons ‘75 honored by friends for years of teaching

Volume V, 2008

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After a nearly 30-year career as a physical education teacher, Donna Mellons ‘75 retired from Wrights Mill Road Elementary School in Auburn, Ala. in 2004. The school that she dedicated her entire career to has most definitely felt the benefits of her love and passion for education. In addition to her teaching, she spent countless afternoons making sure students got on the right bus safely, as well as coordinating May Days, Spirit Days and Field Nights. She encouraged, challenged and helped students meet and exceed their potential. Always willing to pitch in and lend a hand, Mellons embodies the spirit all educators share.

The Keystone is an annual publication of the Auburn University College of Education, produced and distributed to alumni and friends of the college through the generous contributions of private donors. Dea n

Dr. Frances K. Kochan

She is described by her colleague, friend and fellow College of Education alumna Susan Housel ‘73 as a “woman of generosity and grace.” Mellons was honored through the Honor Roll by her Wrights Mill Road Elementary colleagues and Alpha Delta Kappa friends whose combined contributions allowed them to commemorate her retirement in this meaningful way. This honor certainly embodies Mellons’ tireless dedication to the improvement and well-being of the students, teachers and staff of Wrights Mill Road Elementary School.

Dir e c t o r o f Ext erna l R el at i o n s

Michael Tullier, APR

Keys t on e edi t o r

Colleen Bourdeau

Mellons is a two-time graduate of Auburn University’s College of Education, earning both her bachelor and master’s degrees from the college.

Lay ou t, D es i g n a n d P hot ogra p hy

Amanda J. Earnest Ricky Lee Whittemore II

  The Auburn University College of Education has established The Honor Roll—a permanent listing of individuals who have been recognized by current or former students, colleagues, family members or friends through a charitable contribution of $500.

Cont ri bu t i n g W r i t e r s

Dr. Jamie Carney Chris Groccia Tuan Huyhn Amanda Mullins Dr. Ellen Reames Dr. Leah Robinson Dr. Peggy Shippen

Thanks to the AU Office of Communications and Marketing for contributing content. Additional photography by AU Athletic Department, AU Photographic Services and J.Lawrence Photography.

Send address changes to eduinfo@auburn.edu, or by mail to the attention of Michael Tullier, APR Auburn University College of Education 3084 Haley Center Auburn, Alabama 36849-5218 334.844.4446 education.auburn.edu eduinfo@auburn.edu

Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer. ©2008, Auburn University College of Education

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  The Honor Roll is a fund created to commemorate the significant roles of educators in our lives. The names of honored educators and contributions by the individuals who honored them are prominently displayed on a plaque in the College of Education.

  Honorees receive a certificate suitable for framing, a lapel pin commemorating this special tribute, a location card that details the location of the plaque in Haley Center and a special memento from the college announcing their induction to The Honor Roll.   Funds contributed to The Honor Roll are used to provide student scholarships and faculty support and to assist the college in enhancing its high-quality programs. Therefore, your giving not only honors your memorable educator, but it ensures future educators will be well prepared.   To receive more information, please contact the Office of Development at 334.844.5793.


contents Portals gives Education visual identity on campus From ‘lost cause’ to proven leader: Keystone Leader Rev. Chette Williams ‘86 Boyd: 2007 AU top teacher Research/Outreach goes global Three added to ranks of college’s distinguished professors

8-9 Around Auburn 16-17 Retired Faculty and Staff

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38 49 51

56-57

Spring Awards Ceremonies

22-23

58-59

Rehabilitation and Special Education

National Advisory Council

24-25

Kinesiology

26-27

Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

28-29

Curriculum and Teaching

60-77 Alumni News

52-53 College Knowledge

78-79

54-55 Scholarship

80-89 Donor Recognition

Ceremony

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[departments]

[every issue] 4-7 Student Success

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Campaign Update

30-31

Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology, and School Psychology

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Learning Resources Center

33

Truman Pierce Institute

34-35

Office of the Dean

36 Autism Center

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

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[ We l c o m e f r o m D e a n K o c h a n ]

T

he front and back cover of this year’s Keystone paints the picture perfectly—education is a portal, not only to Auburn University, but to the world. If you’ve been to campus, you might have seen our college’s portals at the top of the Thach Avenue concourse between Foy Union and Cater Hall. While each AU college and school will have similar portals around campus, I think it’s fitting that the portals representing the College of Education be the ones that welcome you as you enter the main entrance to campus.

I hope you’ll read more about the inspiration behind these portals, not to mention the local talent behind their artistry, on page 11 of the magazine. News of our portals isn’t the only thing that excites me about this edition of the Keystone. As we continue to expand our coverage of the academics, research and outreach in our college, we see our faculty, staff, students and alumni in action—in building better futures for all—locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. We are truly making the world our classroom and laboratory, and the efforts highlighted in this edition are just a sampling of the fine work occurring in our college. I’m equally excited about the new additions to our faculty and staff—especially the additions to the college’s leadership team. At the start of this school year, we announced the appointment of two associate deans and two new department heads. After reading about these proven leaders, I think you’ll agree that our college is poised for some amazing opportunities in the years to come. We strive to help our students reach their potential as competent, committed and reflective professionals. You can see that through the success stories of our alumni in our “Alumni Notes” section and through our many alumni spotlights. Many of our students, however, aren’t waiting for their degrees to establish that proven track record of success. In the initial pages of this edition, you can read about some of the ways our Education students have demonstrated leadership on campus, in their chosen field and beyond.

I hope you’ll allow this edition of the Keystone to be your portal to the wonderful work occurring in our college— work that is truly building better futures for all. War Eagle!

Frances K. Kochan, Ph.D. Dean and Wayne T. Smith Distinguished Professor

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008


NCATE continues teacher accreditation Auburn University’s College of Education has proven its commitment to producing quality teachers for our nation’s children by achieving continuing accreditation under the performance-oriented standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the organization responsible for professional accreditation of teacher education. The College of Education has been continuously accredited by NCATE since 1959. NCATE currently accredits 623 institutions, which produce two-thirds of the nation’s new teacher graduates each year. As of fall 2007, 99 institutions were candidates or pre-candidates for accreditation. “The announcement of our NCATE continuing accreditation reaffirms the excellence of our teacher-education programs, the expertise and dedication of our faculty and staff, and the high quality of our campus and school partnerships,” said Dean Frances Kochan.

Professional accreditation is one way to assure the public that schools of education are graduating well-qualified teachers ready for today’s classrooms. NCATE-accredited schools must meet rigorous standards set by the profession and members of the public. In April 2007, members of an NCATE accreditation team conducted an on-site visit that included document review, classroom observations, and interviews with students, faculty, staff, administrators, and alumni as well as campus, civic, and school partners. The accreditation team was jointly composed of teacher educators, administrators and P-12 school faculty from across the country as well as state members responsible for individual program approvals.

Studies show that teacher quality is the most important factor in preschool through 12th-grade student achievement.

U.S.News ranks college among top third of schools For the sixth consecutive year, Auburn University’s College of Education has been ranked by U.S.News and World Report for the quality of its graduate programs, faculty achievement and research efforts. In its 2009 Best Graduate Schools publication published in March 2008, the college was ranked 77th among the 250 schools evaluated by U.S.News. The ranking places the college in the top third of schools nationwide. Besides being ranked 77th, the College of Education is ranked 57th among public institutions included in the rankings published online at www.usnews.com. In addition, the college was the highest-ranked school of education—public or private—in Alabama. “Beyond the recognition of being ranked in the top third of schools this year is how the rankings system contributes to our college’s assessment and evaluation system,” said Dean Frances Kochan. “As we strive to evaluate our college’s efforts in a meaningful way, the process of collecting this data on an annual basis and having it to compare to our regional and peer institutions is part of our overall assessment efforts.” Each fall, college administrators complete a survey from U.S.News that reports the college’s research funding, GRE scores and acceptance rates for entering doctoral students, and the number of faculty and graduate students in the college. Data from these metrics account for 60 percent of the college’s overall score. U.S.News adds to that a reputational score based on feedback from a national survey of education and university administrators at colleges and universities, as well as a national sampling of school superintendents, all who rate the college’s reputation on a one-to-five scale. The college’s Rehabilitation Counseling program remains ranked 17th nationally and 14th among public institutions—a ranking assigned to the program last year as part of U.S.News’ two-year cycle of ranking health-related disciplines.

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Dr. Lora Bailey Ad viser

Th omandra Sam

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Sh eila Moore

Education students selected as Holmes Scholars

ollege of Education doctoral students Sheila Moore and Thomandra Sam were selected as Holmes Scholars during the 2007-2008 academic year. The Holmes Scholars Program provides Education graduate students from underrepresented ethnic groups or students with disabilities who have aspirations of higher education careers with enriched academic experiences, career training and concentrated professional mentoring.

Moore is focusing her studies on educational leadership—primarily in administration of elementary and secondary education. She obtained her undergraduate and master’s degrees from Tuskegee University in 1982 and 1986, respectively. Moore brings ample professional experience to her doctoral studies, as she was a teacher, principal and central office administrator with the Buffalo Public Schools system in New York from 1990 to 2001. Her professional goal is to become a tenure-track professor in the area of K-12 instructional leadership. “As a Holmes Scholar, I look forward to benefitting from the mentoring and collaboration opportunities with other like-minded professionals,” Moore said. “I expect it will enrich my academic career with scholarly experiences.” “Sheila has been a tremendous force in the redesign efforts of our [department’s] Master’s Educational Leadership Program—her communication and interpersonal skills in the workplace make her an excellent candidate for the Holmes Scholars Program,” said Dr. Ellen Reames, an assistant professor in the college’s Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology. Sam, who is studying counseling psychology, joined the doctoral program in 2005 after obtaining her undergraduate degree from Louisiana State University. She is the president of the AU Black Graduate and Professional Student “Sheila and Thomandra embody what the Association, which is a campus-wide organization program looks for in candidates. They have the dedicated to graduate and undergraduate students’ experience and display the leadership abilities professional development. Sam represents the that make a Holmes Scholar.” college to alumni, donors and others as a secondyear member of its Student Ambassadors. Her goal Dr. Lora Bailey, Holmes Schol ar Adviser is to become a university professor.

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EFLT students model leadership on AU’s Graduate Student Council Two doctoral students were elected to one-year terms, beginning March 2008, as executive officers of the Auburn University Graduate Student Council. The organization acts as the official graduate student representation in university affairs and the Student Government Association. The GSC, which strives to fulfill the unique needs of graduate students, promotes research activities and works to improve the conditions under which graduate students live and work. Brittny Mathies will serve as vice president-elect and Linxiang Zhu will serve as treasurer. As vice president-elect, Mathies, who expects to graduate in 2010 in educational psychology, calls and chairs all meetings of the GSC Senate, and serves or appoints an official representative to the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students Organization. She previously served as GSC Events Committee chair. Mathies hopes to ensure that AU recognizes the contributions of all graduate students. “I believe that graduate students should always feel that they made the right decision to attend Auburn,” she continued. “It is also my intent to motivate graduate students to become more involved in the Auburn community—on both university and larger community levels.” As treasurer, Zhu accepts all financial responsibilities of the GSC. She is responsible for proposing the GSC annual budget and submitting it to the SGA treasurer, providing a monthly financial report to the SGA treasurer, and keeping track of all GSC expenditures. Zhu, a graduate research assistant working in the college’s Truman Pierce Institute, expects to graduate in 2009 in

[Student Success]

educational psychology. She originally became involved with the GSC in 2006 “to make friends with people who share the same interest in fulfilling the needs of graduate students, especially College of Education and [Department of] Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology students, as well as of international students.” Both Mathis and Zhu are GSC senators representing the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology. LaTasha Ramsey, a higher education administration doctoral candidate and EFLT senator last year, now serves as chair of the GSC Events Committee and member of the GSC executive board.

Education students selected for Who’s Who Congratulations to the 14 students from the College of Education selected for the 2007-2008 Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities. These students were among the 162 students nominated by AU faculty based on, among other criteria, grade point average, and participation and leadership on campus and in the community. Christina Leigh Castelin Porshia Lynnette Parker Holly Marie Cauthen Karmen Nicole Pinckney Alexandria McCall Conn Kate F. Tiffany Lauren Allyce Vercelli Erin Atrell Cornelison Chandler Stewart White Aimee Noelle Goheen Jessica Kay Wiggins James L. Houle James Brown Moseley Cynthia Alana Wyatt

Holmes Scholars continued “I want to stimulate thought in my students and have them so interested and captivated that they are able to share and teach me,” Sam said. “I believe that learning is incremental and ongoing—a journey that both the student and professor embark on together each semester.” “Thomandra is the kind of person for whom I believe that the Holmes Scholars Program looks for,” said Dr. Randolph Pipes, a professor in the college’s Department of Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology and School Psychology. “She has a strong interest in research, commitment to social justice and has a track record in terms of leadership and responsibility.” Dr. Lora Bailey, Auburn’s Holmes Scholar adviser and a past AU Holmes Scholar herself, can see the benefits that Moore and Sam will gain from the program. “As a former scholar of three years, I was able to meet with deans of education nationally who were part of the [Holmes Scholar] partnership. I was able to interact with other scholars who were able to help me with the dissertation process and my vita,” said Bailey, who is an associate professor in the college’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching. “Sheila and Thomandra embody what the program looks for in candidates. They have the experience and display the leadership abilities that make a Holmes Scholar.” The two new Holmes Scholars join Cheron Hunter as the three current scholars in the college. Hunter, who was named a Holmes Scholar in 2006, was elected as the national Holmes Scholars president in January 2007. Auburn continues to build leaders as Moore ran unopposed for the Holmes Scholars national vice president position at the January 2008 conference. The Holmes Scholars program was established in 1991 and allows participants to hold prominent leadership positions in their universities. For more information, visit education.auburn.edu/coediversity/holmes.

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[Student Success]

Chi Sigma Iota has named Auburn counselor education doctoral student Nikki Vasilas as a 2008-2009 Chi Sigma Iota fellow. The international counseling society awards only 10 fellowships per year to counselor education students. Vasilas is Auburn’s 10th counselor education doctoral student to receive the award in the last decade. It provides recipients with opportunities to develop their leadership skills and broaden their professional network through service to Chi Sigma Iota. As part of the fellowship, Vasilas must attend Chi Sigma Iota leadership training sessions and the organization’s awards ceremony and reception, as well as serve as representative of her Chi Sigma Iota chapter at the society’s annual assembly. In addition, Vasilas must provide a minimum of 10 service hours

Exemplary students marshal AU graduation ceremonies Seniors Amy White ‘08 and Bradley Bearden ‘07 were selected by the college as graduation student marshals at the spring 2008 and fall 2007 ceremonies, respectively. This honor allows these exemplary students to carry the college banner ahead of their graduating peers at the start of the ceremony.

Counselor student selected as Chi Sigma Iota fellow on a Chi Sigma Iota committee or task force and provide a written report of her service activities. Vasilas was nominated for the award by Drs. Jamie Carney, Suhyun Suh and Chippewa Thomas of the college’s Department of Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology and School Psychology. “Nikki’s nomination was based on her leadership in her Auburn chapter (Iota Delta Sigma), which has been highlighted by community, regional and national involvement in advocacy programs and mentoring,” said Carney, a professor of counselor education. “She has also been highly involved in national presentations, publications and research teams,” Carney said. Vasilas expects to receive her doctorate in spring 2009 and then teach at the university level. Vasilas also plans to continue providing individual counseling and consultancy work through a private practice in the community.

Smith receives Chick-fil-A scholarship In April 2008, Kinesiology student Jermaine Smith received a scholarship from the Tiger Town Chick-fil-A to continue his college studies. Smith, from Montgomery, Ala., is a health promotion major with a minor in sport coaching. The $1,000 scholarships are awarded to Chick-fil-A employees.

White, an elementary education major from Eufaula, Ala., will graduate summa cum laude. Upon graduation, she will have also completed an honors thesis qualifying her for senior honors status through the university. Active in eight campus honor societies as well as several other campus organizations, White most recently served as president of the College of Education’s Student Council. She plans to start her teaching career and creating a learning environment that is beneficial for both her students and herself. Bearden, a secondary mathematics education major, was an active member of the college’s Auburn Mathematics Education Society. A dynamic AMES member, he created the AMES Web site and was instrumental in recruiting new members and attracting more than 20 students to regularly attend the meetings. He was responsible for organizing the club’s affiliation with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the local and state organizations. Students are selected for this honor each semester by college administrators who evaluate nominees based on academic performance as well as involvement in the college.

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Education students gather on Cater lawn


Graduate students present original research at minority conference

C

heron Hunter and Bethany Stewart, doctoral students in the college’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching, presented original research papers at the Research Association of Minority Professors (RAMP) 27th annual conference held February 7-9, 2008, in Houston, Texas. The educational and scientific association provides minority scholars and professors the opportunity to engage in culturally relevant research projects and present research that relates to the African-American experience. It also encourages students to become involved in systematic research activities. Hunter, a reading education doctoral student, presented an exploratory study, “He Looks Just Like Me!: Understanding How African American Elementary Students Use Their Culture to Make Literary Meaning.” While her purpose in presenting was to gather feedback and suggestions about the direction her research should take, Hunter gained even more.

“I feel blessed to have been surrounded by caring professionals who share my passion for learning and strive to be role models and mentors to minority graduate students like myself. Ultimately, I hope

that I can be that bridge to a doctorate for another graduate student one day,” she said. Stewart, an elementary education graduate student, presented a paper titled “When All Else Fails: Do Teachers Resort to Teaching Science the Way They Were Taught?” The paper compares and contrasts science teaching methods of novice and veteran teachers, and their perceived attitudes toward science instruction based on those childhood experiences.

RAMP gave Stewart valuable experience. “It provided me with my first opportunity to present my graduate work. It is always beneficial to receive feedback on research, while learning and gaining insight from others in both similar and unlike disciplines,” she said.

Hunter and Stewart attended RAMP at the encouragement of Dr. L. Octavia Tripp, assistant professor in the department and RAMP member. Tripp has served as Hunter and Stewart’s mentor and adviser for the student projects. Tripp thought Hunter and Stewart could benefit from attending a small conference of research professors and other doctoral students from across the country. “It is important for graduate students to participate in conferences because it helps them prepare for when they report their research for their dissertation,” she said. “It prepares them to write scholarly papers and it also serves as opportunity to network and meet future colleagues in their field.”

McWatters receives AU 2008 President’s Award Katie Elizabeth McWatters of Collierville, Tenn., received the 2008 President’s Award. The President’s Award is designed to recognize one outstanding student in each school or college who has completed at least three semesters at Auburn University while maintaining a minimum scholastic average of 3.40 (including the transfer record) and who possesses outstanding

qualities of leadership, citizenship, character and promise of professional ability. McWatters will graduate spring 2008 with a bachelor’s degree in exercise science from the Department of Kinesiology. Following graduation, McWatters plans to pursue a graduate degree at Duke University. “She is very bright, writes well and is very good at thinking critically. Katie also has a wealth of physical therapy volunteer and observation experiences, both locally with Human Performance Rehabilitation Center and East Alabama Medical Center, and with hospitals in her home state of Tennessee. She has been accepted into the graduate program in physical therapy at Duke University, which is quite an accomplishment,” said Dr. Mark Fischman, Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor in the Department of Kinesiology.

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A Message from the President

I

trust many of you already know that Auburn is in the process of developing a strategic plan that will set our goals in 10 major categories for the next five to 10 years. The categories are: undergraduate education; research and graduate education; faculty retention and development; employee retention and development; infrastructure and facilities; alumni engagement; development; image and reputation; international engagement; and miscellaneous. As we near the end of the planning stage and begin with the implementation, I continue to be boldly optimistic about the future of Auburn University, because the strategic plan will further enhance the outstanding programs, policies, faculty and student body here on “the loveliest village.” Others are also noticing Auburn’s assets. For the second year in a row, a Harvard-based educational collaborative rated Auburn University among the best workplaces in America for tenure-track junior faculty. In a survey of workplace conditions for faculty working toward tenure, the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education rated AU as “exemplary” in three categories: tenure practices overall, tenure reasonableness, and policy effectiveness overall. Of course, the outstanding faculty, exceptional students and dedicated staff in the College of Education have always played a prominent role in making Auburn University such an appealing choice for prospective college students.   In 2008, U.S.News and World Report ranked the college’s graduate program 77th nationally—in the top 30 percent of 250 evaluated schools of education. The Rehabilitation Counseling program remains ranked 17th by U.S.News and World Report. And, as of last fall, the college employed 100 faculty members, of which 15 hold titled professorships and 79 percent of tenure-track faculty are tenured. I am pleased with the significant efforts coming from Dean Kochan and the College of Education that contribute to Auburn University’s image as a first-class academic and research institution. War Eagle,

Jay Gogue ‘69

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008


[Around Auburn]

AU ‘exemplary’ workplace for junior faculty For the second year in a row, a Harvard-based educational collaborative study rated Auburn University among the best workplaces in America for tenure-track junior faculty. In a survey of workplace conditions for faculty working toward tenure, the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education rated AU as “exemplary” in three categories: tenure practices overall, tenure reasonableness and policy effectiveness overall. This was the second set of survey results released by the educational collaborative. In results reported in December 2006, AU was rated among the top institutions for junior faculty satisfaction with their institutions in terms of career progress, colleagues and institutional support. “The COACHE surveys show that Auburn is a very attractive place for faculty as well as students,” said Dr. Jay Gogue. “Talented, young Ph.D.s with outstanding potential will look to these surveys in choosing the universities where they will settle and develop that potential. We expect that they will pay extra attention to institutions, like Auburn, that have earned the ‘exemplary’ rating.” The collaborative measured factors affecting workplace quality at 78 member institutions with almost 7,000 tenuretrack faculty members. The 56 universities and 22 liberal arts colleges were evaluated in separate categories. The collaborative’s report is gseacademic.harvard.edu/~coache.

available

online

at

AU scholarship funding surges 25 percent Auburn University has seen a 25-percent increase in funding for student scholarships this academic year totaling a record $18.5 million. Auburn students saw an increase in funding for both need-based and merit-based scholarships. Spirit of Auburn scholarships, a new program of financial assistance for students with outstanding academic records, led the way with more than $2.5 million in scholarships in its first year. Enrollment officials predict continued growth in scholarships, with funding for Spirit of Auburn scholarships expected to double in the next academic year, which starts in August. The record increase in scholarship funds came as the result of a 2006 commitment by the AU Board of Trustees to significantly increase scholarship aid to Auburn students. That pledge came in a year in which Auburn was awarding a then-record amount of $14.8 million in scholarships. Almost two-thirds of the $18.5 million in scholarship funding this academic year was in university awards, which are open to students in any major. Another $5 million went to students through departmental scholarships in their AU colleges and schools, and $1.6 million was in the form of academic scholarship waivers.

Harry Philpott, AU’s 11th president, dies at age 90 Dr. Harry Melvin Philpott, who served as Auburn University’s 11th president from 1965 to 1980, died Jan. 28, 2008. He was 90 years old. During his tenure, Philpott led Auburn University through what was up to that time the university’s greatest period of growth. He is credited with broadening AU into a truly comprehensive university beyond its then agricultural and mechanical college focus. Known for his congenial manner, Philpott was often called a “people person” and friends and colleagues remember him being accessible to all university groups, especially students. Auburn grew from offering 63 fields of study to offering degrees in more than 140 areas during Philpott’s presidency. The schools of business and nursing were formed, the school of arts and sciences was reorganized and several new departments were created.

Born on May 6, 1917, Philpott received his undergraduate degree from Washington and Lee University in 1938 and subsequently began an administrative career there as director of religious activities. He was a Baptist minister and served as a chaplain in the U.S. Navy during World War II, seeing action with the Third and Fifth Fleets in the Pacific Theater. In 1947, Philpott earned a doctorate in religion and higher education from Yale University. He taught religion at the University of Florida (1947 to 1952); served as dean of religious life and head of the religion and philosophy department at Stephens College (1952 to 1957); and returned to the University of Florida as vice president (1957 to 1965) before coming to Auburn. He received an honorary doctorate from Auburn in 1981 and continued to live in Auburn after his retirement.

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008


Portals give Education visual identity on campus Education is not only a keystone in building a better future for all, but is now a welcoming portal to all visiting campus via the eastern Thach Avenue entrance. Sculptured terra cotta panels depicting education disciplines joined others on campus in August 2007 as part of a campus-wide program adorning pedestrian walkways with entry portals depicting the efforts, mission and history of Auburn University’s 13 colleges and schools. “This is a form of public art that captures the many facets of Auburn,” said Catherine Love of AU’s Office of Campus Planning and Space Management. “The portals will also have terra cotta rosettes copied from those on Samford Hall. It is a step toward our goal of improving the beauty and interest of our outdoor spaces.” Like other portals completed and in development, the portals representing the College of Education at the east end of the Thach Avenue concourse, between Foy Student Union and Cater Hall, are composed of 10-foot-high brick columns. Each column has four 18-by-24-inch panels—one on each side—showing various aspects of the college and its related professions. As matching columns, they have the same four panels, but on different sides. Education’s portals were the third set to be installed. Previously completed portals representing the Harrison School of Pharmacy and the College of Sciences and Mathematics are found at the west end of the Thach pedestrian corridor and at the east end of Roosevelt pedestrian corridor, respectively. Pharmacy’s images include a mortar and pestle, patient and pharmacist, opium poppy, and serpent and chalice, which is the traditional symbol of the practice of pharmacy. Depicting the College of Sciences and Mathematics are an astronomer, microbiologist with a microscope, mathematician and chemist. AU Associate Professor Gary Wagoner of the Department of Art, based in the College of Liberal Arts, and his former student, Joanna Campbell Blake, who worked with sculptor Raymond Kaskey on the World War II Monument in Washington, D.C., are designing and sculpting the panels. “The deans give us photos or a list of themes they feel best portray their schools,” said Wagoner. “Joanna and I work collaboratively on

the designs, which are drawn to scale, transferred to an oil-based clay and then sculpted in relief.” Blake, a 1999 alumna, sculpts in her Washington, D.C., studio and sends molds of the sculpted elements to Auburn, where Wagoner creates and fires the finished terra cotta panels in the studio. The molds are being saved for possible future reproductions. “To have such artistic talent as that of Gary and Joanna right here at Auburn University makes this project all the more special,” Love said.

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“To be a chaplain, you don’t demand respect from players and coaches—you earn that respect.” Rev. Chette W i ll i a m s ‘ 8 6

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008

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From ‘lost cause’ “ From ‘lost cause’ toproven proven leader to leader

[Keystone Leader]

From Hard Fighting Soldier Chapter 1, “A Prodigal”

The challenges he faced while playing SEC football at Auburn University and his pursuit of that degree ultimately made Williams into the person he is today, and for that, the College of Education honored him as its 2008 Keystone Leader-in-Residence. Now known to current Auburn football players and coaches as “Brother Chette,” AU Football team chaplain and author of the book Hard Fighting Soldier: Finding God in Trials, Tragedies and Triumphs, Rev. Chette LaRue Williams Sr. completed his bachelor’s degree in the college’s Adult Education program in 1986. He was recognized with the college’s Keystone Leader honor through a variety of events, including a campus lecture and visits with Education students, in March 2008. Williams is the college’s sixth Keystone Leader-in-Residence. Established in 2003, the Keystone Leader program introduces students to proven leaders in education, human services, health services, community services and the public sector. The program emphasizes that education—like the keystone of an arch—serves a central, supporting role in society. The college strives to develop competent, committed and reflective professionals who utilize education in building better futures for all. For the past eight years, Williams has served as the Auburn University football team’s chaplain and the campus director for the university’s Fellowship of Christian Athletes. He is also president of IMPACT ministries through the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ chaplaincy training program. >>

“Chette,” [Coach James Daniel] said, “you’re a problem. A bad seed….You stay out late, you come home drunk or high, and you’re on academic probation. You argue and fight with your coaches and your teammates…. “.…we think it’s time for you to move on.” “….Finally,” I asked, “What do you mean?” “I mean you’re off the team.” ….I rolled over in the bed and stared at the wall…. What was he talking about? Auburn was my school. I pulled the pillow up under my head, and in that instant I knew I was the lost son, the prodigal. Except I had no father to go home to. Calvin Williams Sr. was even more lost than I was. I had hardly spoken to him in nearly two years, since he and Mama divorced. The closest man I had to a father right now was Coach Dye, and he had just kicked me off the team.

Maybe I was a lost cause.

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s a teenager, Chette Williams watched some of the greatest college football coaches of all time—Bear Bryant, Shug Jordan and Vince Dooley—come through his front door to recruit his big brothers. As a result, Williams’ game plan for life came to include three goals: one, play Southeastern Conference football; two, get a college education; and three, make his mama proud.

reprinted with permission

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From ‘lost cause’ to proven leader continued “The blessing that we have as chaplains so often is to be used by God in a way that is unique and different from many other ministries,” he said. “To be a chaplain, you don’t demand respect from players and coaches—you earn that respect. And then you earn the right to be heard. And because of that, players and coaches trust you. They come in and share things with you that they won’t share with others. The crises are different each day, but the blessing is that there’s somebody there for them.” Williams chronicles his time at Auburn, his family and how God called him to his current vocation in his 2007 book, Hard Fighting Soldier. The book recounts how, as a scrappy young Auburn football player, he went from being feared and rejected—his own teammates said he “wasn’t worth praying for”—to becoming one of the most influential mentors in college football today. It was those turbulent times in his own life and football career under Coach Pat Dye that give him credibility with the players of today’s generation, according to Coach Tommy Tuberville. “That’s one of the great things about Chette,” Tuberville said. “He’s been there. He understands what these guys are going through. He helps the older guys grow and the younger guys get on the ship.” Carnell Williams, during his time on the Auburn Football team, echoed that sentiment. “I think Brother Chette is like a father away from home,” he said. “When you know a guy has played and has been through what you’ve been through, you tend to hone in more on what he says.”

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His memoir tells of personal milestones that include his three letterman years playing Auburn football, his studies at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and his service as pastor of New Covenant Baptist Church in New Orleans, associate pastor of New Song Baptist Church in Mobile, and president of IMPACT Ministries in Spartanburg, S.C. “When [Coach Tuberville] came here from Ole’ Miss [in 1999],” he recalled, “he called me and said, ‘I have a defensive coordinator and an offensive coordinator, and I’m looking for a ‘spiritual coordinator.’” Today, Williams is doing more than just working with players. Through the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ chaplaincy training program, Williams, alongside program director Wes Yeary, is applying his foundations in adult education to training and developing FCA college team chaplains across the country through the AU-based program. Williams is married to the former Lakeba Hibbler, who completed a master’s degree in the College of Education’s Community Agency Counseling program in 2004. The couple has three children: Lauren Denise, Caitlyn Mae and Chette LaRue Jr. Past College of Education Keystone Leaders-in-Residence include Susan Dryden Whitson ‘91, former press secretary to First Lady Laura Bush; Alabama State Treasurer Kay Ivey ‘67; and Wayne T. Smith ‘67, chairman, president and CEO of Community Health Systems.

For more about the Keystone Leader program and our past honorees, visit education.auburn.edu/alumni/keystoneleader.html


D

r. Pamela C. Boyd, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching, was named as one of only two top AU teachers for 2007. Along with Dr. Roland Dute of the College of Sciences and Mathematics, Boyd received Auburn University’s Gerald and Emily Leischuck Endowed Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching.

The award carries a $10,000 stipend for each recipient. Emeritus senior administrators Dr. Gerald and Mrs. Emily Leischuck established the endowment in 2005 to recognize the university’s teachers, and AU presented the first Leischuck Endowed Presidential Awards the same year. Both the Leischucks had taught in public schools in the 1960s, and as College of Education alumni, both maintained close ties to the college during and after lengthy careers as Auburn administrators. Boyd and Dute were nominated by other faculty and former students and were recommended for the award by a selection committee and the provost.

“She is among the most sincere, caring, compassionate and supportive teachers I have ever known.” Dean Frances Kochan

“Education, at any level, is only as good as the quality of teaching,” said Provost Dr. John Heilman. “Drs. Boyd and Dute help elevate the quality of teaching to a very high level at Auburn University. They consistently serve as an inspiration for their students and are role models for other faculty at Auburn and beyond.”

Boyd is a teacher of teachers. A faculty member for 14 years, she teaches undergraduate students in the College of Education and active teachers in public schools across the region through the college’s outreach programs and AU’s Graduate School. Among other activities, Boyd was coordinator of the college’s Elementary Education program from 2002 to 2005, and she has been active in formal and informal partnerships with several Alabama schools—including those in the Auburn City Schools system. Among letters supporting her nomination, several teachers in public schools cited Boyd as a role model for their teaching styles and philosophy, which includes a commitment to preparation and collaboration.

Huntley appointed EARIC director Jane Huntley joined the college’s East Alabama Regional Inservice Center (EARIC) in the fall of 2007 as director. She holds a master’s in special education and an education specialist degree in administration and supervision from the State University of West Georgia. She has served as a classroom teacher, assistant superintendent for personnel, executive director of both the Metro Atlanta and Northwest Georgia Regional education service centers and as program director for the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Huntley most recently coordinated the development of the Georgia Master Teacher Certification, which recognizes teaching performance based on the achievement and progress of students. EARIC, operated under the direction of a 16-member governing board, serves schools in 15 east central Alabama school districts. EARIC provides a wide range of professional development offerings, including resources, training and services for area teachers and administrators. EARIC also assists school staff development coordinators in planning and conducting system and building-based inservice training. In addition, the inservice center works closely with the Alabama State Department of Education as a vehicle for providing professional development related to statewide initiatives. Visit www.auburn.edu/academic/education/earic for more information about its offerings.

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D

r. Andrew M. Weaver retired at the end of August 2007 after 47 years as a faculty member in AU’s College of Education. During that time, he held positions as a professor, coordinator for graduate programs for junior college faculty, director for the Center for Economic Education, department head for the college’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching, and acting associate dean for the College of Education.

Weaver (center) pictured with Drs. Robert Rowsey (retired, left) and Terry Ley (retired, right)

We a v e r r e t i r e s after 47 years

Weaver’s specialty is social science education, which he began teaching at AU in 1960. During his tenure in the college, he was the major professor for 63 doctoral students. In 2004, he won the college’s Outstanding Faculty Award for Outreach. During his time on the AU faculty, Weaver saw 10 U.S. presidents and nine university presidents. When the Paul S. Haley Center was completed in 1969, Weaver was one of its first occupants. Since then he had occupied three offices during his 38 years in the building.

Weaver completed graduate degrees at the University of Tennessee: a doctorate in educational administration in 1960 and a master’s in history in 1955. He earned a bachelor’s in social science in 1951 from Tennessee Tech University. His professional career started in 1954 at Park Junior High School and then East High School in 1958—both located in Knoxville, Tenn. In 1960, he took a position with Auburn and had been with the College of Education since.

“Andy Weaver’s dedication to education is an inspiration to us all,” said Dean Frances Kochan. “He has enriched the lives of countless students, teachers and colleagues. His contribution is truly immeasurable.”

Spencer concludes more than three decades of college service

The College of Education bids farewell to seven of its own during the past academic year. While we wish them well in retirement, we are saddened to lose such talented, committed professionals. Curriculum and Teaching/Dean’s Office Dr. Andrew Weaver Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology Dr. William Spencer Wynadine Morris Kinesiology Dr. G. Dennis Wilson Rehabilitation and Special Education Dr. Ronald Eaves Pat Dawson Professional Education Services Linda Gresham

In March 2008, the College of Education celebrated the 36 years of service rendered by Dr. William Spencer. Spencer officially retired from the college in December as a professor emeritus and past department head in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology. Spencer joined the Auburn faculty in 1971 as an instructor in the college’s then Foundations of Education Department. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1972, granted tenure with a promotion to associate professor in 1977, and promoted to full professor in 1993. Twice he served as department head: from 1979 to 1985 of then Foundations of Education Department and again from 2001 to 2006. Beyond service as department head, his time at Auburn has included service as department graduate program officer and

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member of the AU Graduate Council. Spencer was awarded the college’s Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award in 1991. He continues to remain active in graduate education, currently chairing 14 doctoral committees and serving on 22 other doctoral committees both in the department and in other departments throughout the college. His tenure on the faculty has included chairing 45 doctoral committees to completion. Spencer completed his graduate studies at the University of Illinois, where he completed a master’s degree in social foundations of education in 1969 and a doctorate in comparative and international education in 1972. He earned his bachelor’s in mathematics education at Southern Illinois in 1963.


Wilson retires after 34-year AU career Coming to the college as an assistant professor in 1973, Dr. G. Dennis Wilson retired in December 2007 after 34 years of teaching, scholarship and administrative contributions to the college and its Department of Kinesiology.

[Retired Faculty and Staff]

After completing master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Tennessee, he joined the Auburn faculty, later to be appointed as professor in 1984. In 1998, he was among the first in the college honored with the Wayne T. Smith Distinguished Professorship. He was appointed by Dean Jack Blackburn, first as interim Health and Human Performance department head in 1981, then on a permanent basis in 1983—serving until stepping down in 2004 after 24 years. “He was truly committed to serving the faculty and ensuring a quality education for thousands of students,” said Dr. Mary Rudisill, Kinesiology department head and Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor. “Faculty members who had the good fortune to serve under Dennis have only the utmost respect for him and his service to the university, the community and beyond.” Despite administrative duties, Wilson continued to be an active researcher, publishing in many journals throughout his career. He served as the chair for the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics and the NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sport from 1997 to 2002, and president for the Southeast American College of Sports Medicine from 1997 to 1998. He earned an SACSM service award in 1993. Wilson was honored by department faculty in 2005 through the creation of an annual scholarship fund in his name, which was recently endowed. Today, the G. Dennis Wilson Endowed Graduate Award provides support for graduate students who contribute to the teaching and research needs in the Department of Kinesiology.

Wilson with Kinesiology department head Dr. Mary Rudisill

Wilson with Dr. Jane Moore (retired)

Scholarship A chance to honor retirees Established in 2006, the Retired Faculty Club Scholarship was created with the goal of building an endowed scholarship for undergraduate students pursuing a degree in education. While established by college retirees, it offers former students a chance to make a financial contribution in a retiree’s honor. Checks should be written to “Auburn University Foundation” with the endowment name noted in the check’s memo line. For additional information, please call 334.844.5793 or send your contribution to: College of Education, Office of Development, 3084 Haley Center, Auburn, AL 36849-5218.

Ley creates endowment for graduate students

Former Education professor Dr. Terry C. Ley has created an endowment through a planned gift to be awarded to a graduate student in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching’s English Education program. From 1974 until his retirement in 2001, Ley taught undergraduate and graduate courses in English and reading education, was coordinator for English and Reading education, and was the assistant department head and graduate program officer in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. In 1998, Ley was among the first faculty named by the college as a Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor. The endowment will aid a graduate student in an area on which Ley focused his research and publications while a professor. His contribution to the college will be an asset in helping the future of students. As a respected former professor, his influence in the college will be felt for many years to come.

Prior to his arrival in Auburn, Ley grew up in Cedar Falls, Iowa, where he graduated from Iowa State Teachers College in 1961. For 13 years, he taught secondary English and reading in three public schools in Cedar Rapids, which also included serving as English department head at John F. Kennedy High School. After completing his master’s and doctoral programs in English education at the University of Iowa, Ley ventured south and began his career at Auburn University in 1974.

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What do you love most about AU?

[Student Ambassadors]

Friendly people, football, ah there is so much I love. I guess you could say I was born into the AU family. My first two Thanksgivings were spent in a motor home outside of Legion Field.

Who have you met at Auburn that inspires you?

Lora Haghighi, President Oliver Aaron

Junior Elementary Education Pelham, Ala.

Susan Whitson, an education alum, who began her career teaching in Birmingham. She believes that education builds the foundation for whatever you want to do in life. With all her accomplishments from being a spokesperson for FBI to being the First Lady’s press sectary, the thing she is most proud of is being a teacher. Her career has illustrated that an education degree can be used to travel many paths.

What would you like to do after graduation?

Master’s candidate Higher Education Administration Dadeville, Ala.

Initially, I would like to teach sixth grade in Birmingham and eventually move into administration and maybe even work in education policy.

Most interesting thing you’ve done? Julie Allbritton

Senior Collaborative Special Education Lilburn, Ga.

I was on “Who Wants to be a Millionaire” at Disney World when I was 13. I got out on the $1,000 question— something my family teases me about all the time.

Mallory Appleton

Senior Elementary Education Vestavia Hills, Ala.

How did you spend spring break?

Betsy Baughman

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I traveled to Juarez, Mexico, on a mission trip to build houses for the people of Casa por Cristo. This was my second spring break building houses there.

Georgia Bennett

Senior Elementary Education Mountain Brook, Ala.

Junior Elementary Education Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

Casey Breslin

Mary Lawrence Chandler

Doctoral candidate Junior Exercise Science Early Childhood Education Keystone • Volume V, 2008 Hagerstown, Md. Carrollton, Ga.

Lora with Aubie, 1987

Meredith Collins

Senior Music Education (vocal) Hoover, Ala.

Alex Conn

Senior Social Science Education Huntsville, Ala.


Kelli Cox

Kara Delvizis

Junior Mathematics Education Millbrook, Ala.

Sophomore Social Science Education Franklin, Tenn.

Lauren Hendricks

Meredith McCoy

Joanna Everett

Kendall Griffin

Junior English Education Jasper, Ala.

Junior Mathematics Education Hoover, Ala.

Mark McGhee

Lowery Oaks

Master’s candidate Elementary Education Decatur, Ala.

Junior Mathematics Education Lanett, Ala.

Senior Business Education Eclectic, Ala.

Cambre Prater

Cindy Rutherford

Thomandra Sam

Junior Early Childhood Education Selma, Ala.

Whitney Sharp

Junior Elementary Education Hoover, Ala.

Master’s candidate Foreign Language (French) Education Auburn, Ala.

Doctoral candidate Counseling Psychology Opelousas, La.

Doctoral candidate Exercise Science Roswell, Ga.

Justin Shroyer

Christina Spragg

Doctoral candidate Exercise Science Coshocton, Ohio

Laura Smith

Senior Elementary Education Homewood, Ala.

Shanna Smith Senior Adult Education Hoover, Ala.

Doctoral candidate Counseling Psychology Mobile, Ala.

Amy White

Claire Wilkinson

Clarissa Williams

Melissa Williams

Senior Elementary Education Eufaula, Ala.

Junior Early Childhood Education Selma, Ala.

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Senior Elementaryin Education Keystone Building Clanton, Ala.

Doctoral candidate

K-12 Educational Administration a Better Future for All 19 Montgomery, Ala.


[Student Council]

2007-2008 Committees Activities Brittany Williams, chair Camp War Eagle Hannah Paxton, chair Catherine Araszkiewicz Lynze Durham Kathryn Mangum Sammi Snoddy Rebecca Vining Committee of 19 Brittany Williams, chair Amber Wright Fundraising Mandy Wynn, chair Mallory Appleton Libby Hill Christina Nolan Scholarship Bria Pete, chair Service Betsy Baughman, chair Shannon Coleman Danielle Diehl Lacie West Social Courtney Nims, chair Katelyn Jernigan Laura Langham Katie Rutledge Susan Steele T-shirt Courtney Shannon, chair Adviser Dr. Peggy Dagley

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Student Council helps fight war on hunger

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he College of Education Student Council promotes camaraderie between students and the College of Education. The group also encourages membership in all organizations within the college, and its members are involved in various college outreach and service efforts. Senior Amy White led the Student Council as president during the 2007-2008 academic year, while Dr. Peggy Dagley served as faculty adviser. White, an elementary education major from Eufaula, Ala., originally wanted to be part of the organization as a way to get more involved on campus. After participating in the Student Council as a member, and eventually serving as scholarship chairman, White was eager for the chance to lead the organization. As president, she has worked to increase student participation in the organization. “Student Council offers so many options for campus involvement, as well as networking opportunities. The more people are involved, the more chances are available,” White said. This year, the Student Council was active in raising money for the war on hunger and the Committee of 19, a campus-wide, student-led group that helps raise awareness of international hunger and encourages donors to contribute 19 cents a day to help feed children in some of the world’s poorest nations. The Student Council created a large piggy bank out of a life-sized fiberglass tiger donated to the group. The council had the tiger painted by a local auto paint shop and asked community children to put their handprints on it. The tiger is now located in the Auburn University Bookstore, where individuals can still contribute to the cause. White continued by saying, “The best part of being involved with the College of Education’s Student Council is the people I get to work with. This year I have had the privilege of working with Dean Kochan, the college’s National Advisory Council, one of the 2007-2008 Miss Auburn candidates—as well as an amazing adviser and committee.”


Amy White

Senior Elementary Education Eufaula, Ala. President

Lora Haghighi

Micaela Ellson

Jeff Mustin

Whitney Dykes

Junior English Language Arts Education Madison, Ala. Vice President

Junior Social Science Education Poway, Calif. SGA Senator

Junior Elementary Education Louisville, Ala. SGA Senator

Cambre Prater

Ashley Evans

Meagan Harrington

Junior Elementary Education Pelham, Ala. Secretary

Junior Elementary Education Hoover, Ala. Treasurer

Senior Secondary Social Science Education Eufaula, Ala. Historian

Senior Early Childhood Education Macon, Ga. Webmaster

Brittany Williams

Hannah Paxton

Becky Macintire

Mandy Wynn

Senior Early Childhood Education Greenville, Ala. Activities Chair

Sophomore Elementary Education Auburn, Ala. Camp War Eagle Chair

Sophomore Elementary Education Auburn, Ala. Campus Chair of Committee of 19

Senior Elementary Education Chatom, Ala. Fundraising Chair

Bria Pete

Betsy Baughman

Courtney Nims

Courtney Shannon

Sophomore Early Childhood Education Hoover, Ala. Scholarship Chair

Senior Elementary Education Mountain Brook, Ala. Service Chair

Junior Elementary Education Mobile, Ala. Social Chair

Senior Elementary Education Loganville, Ga. T-Shirt Chair

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Conference helps youth with disabilities navigate life’s transitions

[Rehabilitation and Special Education]

For 18 years, the annual Alabama Transition Conference has assisted youth with disabilities in making the transition into young adulthood. This year’s conference was dedicated to helping such youth take charge of their life. “About 700 stakeholders interested in and dedicated to improving services and post-school outcomes of these youth attended the conference each year,” said Diane Glanzer, Auburn Transition Leadership Institute outreach coordinator, who also coordinates the annual event.  This year’s opening session featured LeDerick Horne, a successful young adult from New Jersey living with a learning disability, and Dr. Jim Martin, professor and researcher at the University of Oklahoma. Horne and Martin appeared courtesy of a Secondary Transition State Capacity Building Initiative, a partnership of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, and the National Association of State Directors of Special Education. Ryan Easterly, a Hartselle, Ala., native now with the HSC Foundation in Washington, D.C., highlighted the Tuesday night banquet. Entertainment was provided by Garrett Miles, a Alabamian and college student who has opened for entertainers such as B.J. Thomas and George Jones. He was the young soloist runner-up in Alabama’s 2005 VSA competition.

Dr. Karen Rabren, director of the Auburn Transition Leadership Institute, conveys gratitude to Dr. Phil Browning, department head of Rehabilitation and Special Education, for hosting the Alabama Transition Conference from 1991 through 2007.

Other notable guests at the conference included Dr. Larry Kortering of the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center; Dr. Bill East, executive director of the National Association of State Directors of Special Education; and Carl Suter, executive director of the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation.

“This conference provides a forum for all involved to come together for a common purpose,” said Dr. Karen Rabren, director of the Auburn Transition Leadership Institute and associate professor in the college’s Department of Rehabilitation and Special Education. “It is an enjoyable and meaningful event and it is great to be around others who share the mission of improving the lives of youth and young adults with disabilities.”

Building Brighter Futures for Youth & Young Adults with Disabilities

Building Dunn elected vice-president ofBrighter Futures for Youth & Young Adults with Disabilit Council for Learning Disabilities Dr. Caroline Dunn, special education professor and director of the master’s program in secondary special education, has been elected national vice-president of the Council for Learning Disabilities (CLD). This is a four-year appointment in which Dunn will hold the office of president in 2010. CLD is an international organization concerned about issues relating to students with learning disabilities. Dunn, a faculty member at Auburn University since 1991,

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earned her master’s and doctoral degrees in special education from the University of Texas. Her research focus is on secondary students and young adults with disabilities and how these individuals can best be prepared for adult roles. She is the founder and director of an innovative master’s program in secondary special education, which is the only program of its kind in Alabama. To read more on Dunn’s research visit education.auburn.edu/rse/ facultystaff/resumes/dunn

Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Tonya Smith

Administrative Support Assistant


Positive reinforcement leads to elementary student success

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r. AmySue Reilly, associate professor, plays an instrumental role in arranging the Early Childhood Special Education and Collaborative Teacher Summer Learning Clinic in Auburn, Ala. The program, which serves K-5 students at Wrights Mill Road Elementary School, is an intensive four-week summer school for students who are in danger of being retained due to poor academic performance.

[Rehabilitation and Special Education]

This mentoring relationship provides support, guidance and feedback to the students and helps create competent, capable and confident teachers. Reilly plays an active role in planning and executing the clinic. Prior to kicking off the clinic each summer, she holds a two-week preparation session to discuss instruction, curriculum intervention strategies, classroom management, and methods of data collection. During the summer clinic, she meets daily with her university students to review their performance and the effectiveness of strategies being used. Reilly uses these sessions as opportunities for the students to learn and grow in their teaching. Using daily data collection in graph format, they are able to chart how the elementary students are progressing.

The program uses positive reinforcement to build self confidence among students who are not performing well Lynda Tremaine ‘68, principal at Wrights Mill Road in school. Specifically, the Elementary, is pleased with clinic focuses on mastering the alliance between the “The partnership that we have established math and reading objectives two learning institutions. with the AU College of Education has played through learning stations a vital role in our success.” “Our partnership that provide students with is a win-win learning the skills they need to be Lynda Tremaine, principal environment for everyone successful learners. The low W r i g h t s M i ll R o a d E l e m e n t a r y S c h o o l involved,” she said. “Dr. student-teacher ratio allows Reilly and I both believe students to receive personalized, one-on-one instruction they that this collaborative effort has helped us establish an may not receive during the regular school year. exceptional professional learning community.” The hands-on practicum experience also benefits the Wrights Mill Road Elementary has been selected nationally college’s students who are honing their teaching skills. It allows the Alabama State Department of Education to compete for undergraduate and graduate students to work with general the Blue Ribbon School award. This achievement recognizes education, at-risk and special-needs students by putting theory schools that are either academically excellent in their state or into practice, and applying various teaching and intervention have demonstrated dramatic gains in student achievement. strategies they have learned in the classroom. Wrights Mill Road ranks in the top 10 percent of the state for Several practicum students are paired with a Wrights test scores, and Tremaine credits the summer learning clinic Mill Road Elementary general education teacher who acts with helping achieve such success. as a mentor and instructor to the up-and-coming teachers.

Browning earns scholarship, completes distance education specialist certification Dawn Browning has completed a two-year distance education certification program from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This certification program provides a curriculum of professional development courses to build knowledge, skills and leadership in distance education and e-learning. Included are teaching strategies, learning strategies, technology, instructional design, evaluation, learner support and management. Browning, an academic program assistant, is the distance education coordinator for the Rehabilitation Counseling program and author

of AU’s Rehabilitation Education Online (www. auburn.edu/cspd). She was awarded a scholarship from the University of Wisconsin to complete this program as part of an international Collaborative Learning Group. This group was composed of 18 learners representing diverse professions in the military, private design, business, K-12 and higher education. The curriculum included learning at a distance, distance education technology, instructional systems designs, learner support services and managing distance education in higher education.

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D r . M a r y E. R u d i s i l l , a Wayne T. Smith distinguished professor, was appointed department head for the Department of Kinesiology, formerly known as the Department Human and Health Performance, in fall 2007. She had served as acting department head since 2003.

[Kinesiology]

Her primary research objectives have been to learn more about what motivates children to learn to move and engage in physical activity. Rudisill’s past experiences working with the United States Olympic Committee as the team sport psychologist provided invaluable experiences as it relates to motivation theory and its application to people of all ages. Presently, Rudisill and her colleagues are developing motivational climate physical play curricular materials for implementation in early childhood settings. Her goal is to transform physical education and play programs for young children into highly motivating experiences that promote lifelong physical engagement and healthy lifestyles. She currently collaborates with early childhood motor specialists around the world and has spent the past three years researching Chinese culture and early childhood education in China. Rudisill is also a researcher in the Motor Behavior Center at Auburn University and is the director of a research program designed to create and investigate model physical play programs for infants and young children. Rudisill earned her doctorate in movement science education from The Florida State University in 1985.

Biomechanic doc students receive equipment grant Adam Knight and Andrea Sumner, doctoral students in biomechanics, were named recipients of a Bertec Equipment Grant. The students’ strong research proposal awarded them free use of Bertec balance assessment and training systems equipment for one year in order to conduct their own research project. Knight and Sumner plan to study the effects of standing at a height off the ground versus standing on the ground, and how to train to better compensate for and improve balance.

Dr. Leah Robinson Assistant Professor Motor Behavior

Dr. JoEllen Sefton Assistant Professor Biomechanics

Bertec Corporation sponsored its first research competition to promote original, academic research. It was open to students of all levels in various academic fields. The competition allowed 14 young researchers from across the country access to cutting-edge equipment and technology.

URL: http://education.auburn.edu/facultystaff/facultystaffspotlight

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[Kinesiology]

In August 2007, the Department of Health and Human Performance changed its name to the Department of Kinesiology to better describe just what the department is all about. “Kinesiology, “the scientific study of human movement, encompasses all aspects of the department’s mission.

Beginning in fall 2007, the Department of Kinesiology began offering a master’s degree in exercise science with an athletic training specialization. This program is designed for certified athletic trainers looking for an elite program to prepare them for an outstanding clinical career or entry into a doctoral program. This program combines academic, research and clinical experience to provide a multifaceted learning experience. The ATC program, under the direction of assistant professor Dr. JoEllen Sefton, offers students the opportunity to work with world-class faculty and participate in cutting-edge research. The master’s degree and specialization is a two-year program with a required research project or research thesis. Core courses are designed to provide a base of knowledge and include current trends in athletic training, biomechanics, advanced exercise physiology, research methods, applied anatomy, sports injury, motor learning, neuromuscular control, scientific writing and statistics. For more information, go online to education.auburn.edu/ academic_departments/kine/academicprograms/graduate-ats.

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Opinion Editorial

[Editorial]

Ever thought of becoming a principal?

Now may be the time to pursue that goal

By Dr. José Llanes, department head, Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, and Dr. Frances Kochan, dean

W

e just concluded a study here in Auburn University’s College of Education that indicates that about one third of the approximately 1,500 school principals in Alabama plan to retire this year. In this study, more than 60 percent of these principals were already qualified to retire under Alabama law, indicating that the state faces the likelihood that another 500 Alabama school principals could retire within five years. This level of principal retirements has not been seen in this state for more than 15 years. As a result, the market for new jobs in this category has dramatically increased and will continue to do so for several years. At the same time that this increase in retirements is occurring, rapidly growing areas of the state, such as Auburn/Opelika, will experience new growth that will necessitate building new schools and hiring more principals. This dramatic change comes at an auspicious time for Alabama. In 2005, Gov. Bob Riley convened a Congress on School Leadership, which delivered new standards for principal preparation for the state. Auburn University was one of four institutions selected by the Alabama State Department of Education to transform the curriculum, methods, processes and outcomes of its Instructional Leadership Program. The new program, based in AU’s College of Education, is one of only two approved by the Alabama School Board thus far. The Auburn Instructional Leadership Program was designed with the assistance of eight school districts. These educational partners include Alexander City Schools, Auburn City Schools, Lee County Schools, Lowndes County Schools, Macon County Schools, Opelika City Schools and Tallapoosa County Schools. AU and these school systems will count upon the collaboration of about 25 school-based coaches, who will share teaching, advising and mentoring responsibilities with university faculty. In order to assure that each future principal is well-trained and fully qualified, no more than 25 students will be admitted to the program. These individuals will engage in intensive field-based experiences and comprehensive assessments to make sure that they are well prepared to over administrative positions that will be vacated this coming year and in the future. The program has been accelerated so that new graduates can emerge in a year, instead of the typical two or three

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years required by most programs. Graduates will have the knowledge and skills to craft effective schools where every child learns to his or her full potential. These graduates are expected to have the leadership skills necessary to continually improve the environment for effective education, thus keeping the schools they lead at the vanguard of the future needs in this state. At AU, the College of Education has recruited a faculty member for the Instructional Leadership Program from among the best-qualified instructional leaders in the nation. We are committed to ensuring that the program remains current, vital and effective. We in the college believe education is a keystone in a democratic society. Just as a keystone—the central, topmost stone of an arch—holds the structure together, education serves a central, supporting role in society. Education is the essential profession because, without it, our culture would be unable to produce new doctors, engineers, inventors, artists and others that will keep this state and this country at the forefront of the global economy. Research demonstrates that the principal is a key element in the school success. The principal can change schools and change lives. Our students, our state and our nation need educational leaders who can help our schools excel. The Auburn program will be rigorous, but graduates will succeed. So, if you have at least two years of teaching experience and believe you can make a difference in the lives of generations of children in your community, the time could not be better to join this essential profession. For information, call 334.844.3067, e-mail ilpp@auburn.edu or find the Instructional Leadership Preparation Program link by clicking “Academic Programs” at education.auburn.edu/eflt. *** Editor’s Note: The views expressed are those of the contributor and do not necessarily represent the views of the university.


EFLT ranked 7th in faculty productivity

[Educational Foundations, L e a d e r s h i p a n d Te ch n o l o g y ]

Faculty productivity within the college’s Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology is among the highest in the country, according to a recent report that assessed academic departments on their scholarly output. The Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, released in fall 2007 by Academic Analytics, ranked productivity in the department, as seventh in the U.S. The FSP Index measures the annual productivity of faculty on several factors including publications (books and journal articles), citations of journal publications, federal research funding and awards and honors received by faculty. The FSP analysis creates, at the discipline level, a scale based on the cumulative scoring of a program’s faculty using these measures compared against national standards. “This department is vital not only because of its degree programs, but to other disciplines throughout the college and university,” said Dr. Jose Llanes, professor and department

Sheri Downer, M.A.L.S.

Coordinator, Educational Media and Technology

head. “The faculty work in this area is central to what we as educators do in the classroom and beyond.” In addition to being ranked seventh, Auburn University was the only southeastern university among the top 10. “Sometimes, the nomination becomes an honor in itself,” Llanes noted, “but being ranked in a list that includes universities we know to be the ‘best’ in the country speaks volumes about the work our faculty is doing.” The index is published annually and is partly financed by the State University of New York at Stony Brook. It utilizes a methodology created after a decade of study of faculty productivity by Lawrence B. Martin, graduate dean at Stony Brook. For more information, visit www.academicanalytics. com/TopSchools/TopPrograms.aspx.

Dr. Timothy Havard Assistant Professor Educational Leadership

Dr. Jung Wong Hur Assistant Professor Educational Media and Technology

Dr. Daniel Henry

Assistant Professor Educational Psychology

Sheryl Parker

Administrator Academic Programs

Dr. Ellen Reames

Assistant Professor Educational Leadership

Dr. Lynne Patrick

Coordinator, ILPP Program & Clinical Associate Professor

URL: http://education.auburn.edu/facultystaff/facultystaffspotlight

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[ C u r r i c u l u m a n d Te a ch i n g ]

Preparing students to be agriscience teachers The college’s Agriscience Education program, based in the department of Curriculum and Teaching since 1999, prepares individuals to educate middle and high school students, and adults in the field of agriscience. Students take a variety of courses in general education, technical agriculture and professional education. Courses in technical agriculture provide students with a general understanding of animal and poultry science, horticulture, agronomy and soils, agricultural economics, agriculture mechanics, forestry, plant science, environmental science and aquaculture. Professional education courses prepare future teachers for classroom and laboratory planning, as well as evaluating local agriscience education programs, assessing student performance and working with diverse learners. In addition, students are required to complete a 15-week off-campus professional internship in a selected school. The Agriscience Education program offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees.

Microsoft Office certification part of Business and Marketing Ed studies

D r . N a n c y H. B a r r y returned to the college’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching in the fall 2007 as professor and department head. She was on the faculty of the Department of Curriculum and Teaching at Auburn from 1990 to 2000. Barry served as professor, graduate coordinator and chair of music education at the University of Oklahoma from 2000 to 2007. There, she received the Henry Daniel Rinsland Memorial Award for Excellence in Educational Research in 2006 and a Presidential Professorship in 2007. She is an international scholar in music education and author of articles in numerous research publications in such journals as Arts and Learning, Psychology of Music, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Contributions to Music Education, UPDATE and Bulletin of Research in Music Education, among others. Barry currently serves as editor of the Journal of Technology in Music Learning. She holds master’s and doctorate degrees in music education, as well as certificates in electronic music and computers in music, from The Florida State University. 

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Business and marketing education students are better equipped than ever to enter the teaching field. As of fall 2007, the Business and Marketing Education program requires all students in the program seeking initial teaching certification (undergraduate students and fifth-year alternative master’s students) to become Microsoft Certified Application Specialists prior to beginning their internship. In order to pass the certification exams, students must show proficiency in Microsoft 2007 programs—including Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. “These certification exams prepare our students to become competent teachers,” said Dr. Leane Skinner, an associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. “It gives them the skills they need to succeed in the profession, and sets them apart from other students in the field.” Recommended by the National Business Education Association and Alabama State Department of Education, this certification gives AU students an advantage when completing their internship and competing for jobs. The certification gives future secondary-level teachers confidence they have met industry standards, and the school systems in which interns are placed are pleased that the students are equipped with such skills. As an outreach effort, the department offers summer workshops to Alabama business and marketing educators. The in-service helps current teachers prepare for the Microsoft certification exams. In addition, business and marketing education students must pass the Internet and Computing Core Certification (IC3), a basic computer and Internet literacy exam.


‘Reading genie,’ summer clinic foster reading skills

F

or 11 years, Auburn’s very own “reading genie” has been helping children who need help reading through the Summer Reading Program. The Auburn University Reading Clinic offers an individualized summer reading program for children who are not yet reading accurately or fluently. Supervised by Dr. Bruce Murray, the “reading genie” and associate professor of reading education, the program is geared toward kindergarten, elementary and middle-school students struggling with decoding, fluency or comprehension. It typically serves around 40 children each summer. Children in grades K-2 are paired with junior and senior education majors. Led by a patient and caring tutor, kindergartners get a head start in formal reading instruction, and first and second graders typically gain a full reading level during the summer. Students in second through sixth grades work with graduate students and experienced teachers on a

[ C u r r i c u l u m a n d Te a ch i n g ]

comprehensive assessment of reading problems and special instruction designed to help advance the student in reading. Struggling readers receive an initial comprehensive assessment at the start of the clinic, and progress is continually monitored. A post-test is given during the final session to evaluate gains. At the close of the program, parents receive a literacy report with assessment results and recommendations for continued success. Murray, who has been among the college’s Curriculum and Teaching faculty since 1996, started the program so teacher candidates could gain valuable experience working with struggling readers—even during the summer months when schools are out of session. He believes children benefit greatly from participating in the program. “We expect all participants to improve their decoding ability, reading fluency, comprehension and reading enjoyment,” Murray said. The 2008 summer clinic is on track to serve more children than ever before, as a record number of students are enrolled in reading education courses this summer. For more information, contact Bruce Murray at 334.844.6934.

AU students connect with Loachapoka High School students through music Drs. Jane Kuehne and Kimberly Walls have begun a project that connects Auburn University music education students with students at Loachapoka High School in the Lee County School System in Alabama. The initial goal of this project is for Auburn University and Loachapoka High School students to have valuable teaching and learning experiences in music and music technology. With help from the Auburn University College of Education and support from partners in Loachapoka, the first music technology work station was placed in use in fall 2007. Auburn University Education students and Loachapoka High School students will use this for on-campus practicum teaching and distance learning lessons in music and music technology. Future plans include adding more computer work stations, thereby allowing more students to have hands-on learning experiences.

While AU students gain teaching experience, connecting with the high school students will give them valuable tools in music and music technology for the future. The project will help reinforce the philosophy behind what the music education program in the College of Education teaches. This philosophy “emphasizes that all children and adolescents should be provided musical experiences leading to appreciation for creation and performance, understanding of the role of music in daily living, and opportunity to develop musical skills and knowledge.”

DaNavian Spratling Administrative Support Assistant

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[Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology and School Psychology]

Ern uses NAC grant to create building-based student support teams

Dr. Greg Ern, assistant professor of school psychology, has put the mini-grant he received from the college’s National Advisory Council to good use. His work has created a valuable partnership between the College of Education and Auburn (Ala.) City Schools. Ern’s project, “Designing School-wide Support Systems to Promote Student Success,” provides free-of-charge training and technical assistance to school-based teams within Auburn City Schools. It is designed to improve academic and behavioral outcomes for all children. The training provides teams with a framework for developing high-quality, research-based practices and interventions that are responsive to the needs of teachers,

students and parents. It includes specific training components, such as collaboration and teaming, building coaching capacity and support, coordinating school resources, identifying and clarifying problems, developing intervention and monitoring and evaluating on-going progress In addition, teams reflect on their current functioning. Ern supplies educators with methods for designing, implementing and evaluating student responsiveness to intervention. The College of Education’s National Advisory Council is comprised of alumni and friends of the college. As a part of their support of the college, National Advisory Council members personally fund research and outreach efforts by the faculty. Annual grants are typically under $2,000; however specific amounts depend on the funding interests and quantity of applications received. Proposals are reviewed by members of the council’s Academic Affairs Committee, after which the committee makes a proposal to the full council for action at its spring meeting.

COUN faculty lead graduate global studies initiative in South Korea Drs. Suhyun Suh and John C. Dagley will lead a group of graduate students and professionals in the Auburn community in a new global studies initiative this summer, along with the AU Office of University Outreach. The primary purposes of the program are to build the educational infrastructure for developing academic exchange programs with South Korea, a country whose industrial and business connections with the Auburn area are burgeoning; to expand personal international experiences of Auburn educators that will in turn enhance quality of service provided Korean families; and to prepare graduate students whose educational programs include international experiences and global studies. Educational experiences provided in the program will include lectures, joint graduatelevel classes with Korean students and

South Korea Keystone • Volume V, 2008 30Seoul,

professors, guided tours and classical readings. Eight participants will be selected from the pool of applicants to serve as the inaugural cohort. Each selectee may receive significant financial support for travel, lodging and meal expenses if current funding procurement efforts are successful. The academic home of the program will be Korea University, one of the country’s most prestigious universities, located in Seoul. In addition to educational field trips and guided tours in Seoul and the surrounding areas, the program also includes a four-day visit to three important cities in China — Shanghai, Suzhou, and Hangzhou. Proposed dates for the 2008 trip are June 30 to July 19. Inquiries about this international initiative should be directed to jdagley@auburn.edu or 334.844.2978.


[Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology and School Psychology]

Cutting-edge technology prepares future counselors

F

aculty members from the College of Education’s Department of Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology and School Psychology are among the few Counselor Education programs in the country using advanced technological methods to evaluate and train counselors and future faculty members. Currently, most counselor and educational training programs use a mix of methods to evaluate student counseling sessions—most being either live supervision or the reviewing of taped sessions. However, these methods often do not provide an opportunity to edit tapes or highlight specific skills or areas to be evaluated. As a result, the department’s Technology Committee, chaired by Dr. Jamie Carney, in conjunction with Dr. Susan Bannon and Brian Phillip of the Learning Resources Center, researched alternative methods available in the areas of supervision, training and educational interventions. The goal was to find practices allowing students to be more actively engaged in assessing their tapes, and provide faculty with an opportunity to assess skill development and provide training in a more integrated manner. The researchers identified the Larcaman Video Player and software as such technology.

The Larcaman Player and software, which functions similarly to replay technology used in sports, allows for a counseling session or a teaching observation to be digitally recorded and saved on a secure computer site accessible by student and faculty. Using the software provided, students can edit copies of their sessions to highlight specific skills, demonstrate the use of counseling interventions, or provide evidence of how they integrated a teaching method in their classes. Students can also identify sections of the tape where they have questions or are concerned about what happened in their counseling, teaching or supervision session. In addition, the software allows for labeling capabilities so students can label various components of their session that demonstrate the use of a specific counseling or supervision skill. Drs. Debra Cobia, Jamie Carney and Annette Kluck developed a specific coding and labeling process to identify counseling and supervision skills. This provides an opportunity to evaluate not only if a student has demonstrated a skill, but also their understanding of how that skill can or is demonstrated and effectively used.

Counselor education graduate students (from left to right) Ty Stafford, Algem Hopkinson, Eric Crumley and Evelyn Cage review recorded video sessions.

This technology has provided an opportunity for students and faculty to use some of the most advanced methods to train and prepare future counselors, supervisors and faculty in counselor education. It has implications for other teaching areas in the college where completing demonstration, observation or critique is essential.

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[Learning Resources Center]

LRC provides gateway to educational resources for the 21st century pre-service teacher The college’s Learning Resources Center provides preservice teachers and teacher education faculty with educational resources for the 21st century. Through APTPLUS™ accounts, pre-service teachers can access (free of charge) simultaneous, multiple database searches that include Discovery Education streaming, PowerMediaPlus, Thinkfinity, Encyclopedia Britannica and Alabama Public Television local productions. Here, students find materials and resources that correlate with state and national curriculum standards. Pre-service teachers from all content areas can navigate the user-friendly Web site to locate video clips, podcasts, multimedia resources, articles, images, lesson plans and assessment materials. The wealth of resources helps students and teachers effectively use technology for educational purposes. It allows current and future educators to incorporate streaming video clips and other technology into lesson plans, which aids in the teaching of particular concepts. Previously, these resources were available only to current K-12 teachers with teaching certificates. Pre-service teachers did not have the opportunity to learn how to use these technological resources effectively in the classroom. Dr. Susan Bannon, associate professor and Learning Resources Center director, worked with the resources in schools in the past. After approaching Alabama Public Television (APT) to determine if the resources could be made available to preservice teachers when APT re-licensed their resources. Auburn University’s College of Education was the first teacher preparation-program in Alabama to begin offering APTPLUS™ accounts to future teachers.

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Bannon also provides APTPLUS™ training and support for college faculty and students. Each semester, she illustrates the use of technology for educational purposes to pre-service teachers through College of Education core courses, technology courses and teaching methods courses. She plans to collaborate with APTPLUS™ staff to develop online training materials illustrating how these resources can be used to enhance teaching and learning. Dr. Paris Strom, associate professor of child development and learning theory, believes that having this technology available to students is instrumental in their success. “Our college students are able to learn how to integrate technology into their lesson plans, therefore engaging their students in technology that they wouldn’t otherwise have access too. Students of all ages need more exposure to technology and online learning to succeed in today’s society,” Strom said.


LEARN focuses efforts on building leadership capacity The need for continuous, sustainable professional development for school administrators and teacher leaders in 10 Alabama school districts is being addressed by Leadership for Effective Academic Reform, Now (LEARN). The Truman Pierce Institute coordinated and sponsored three regional conferences as part of the on-going LEARN initiative funded by the Alabama State Department of Education. After assessing present skill levels as school leaders, school administrators and teacher leaders collaborated with TPI personnel to develop and implement professional development focused on leadership capacity building. Such professional development would occur by addressing individual, sitespecific, and network-wide leadership and school improvement needs and engaging in action research teams concentrating on areas of need within their school systems. In order to accommodate busy schedules and limited travel allowances, TPI held regional conferences in Auburn, Montgomery and Tuscaloosa. The focus of these conferences was improving leadership capacity and working conditions in schools. There was a specific theme for each of the conferences,

[Truman Pierce Institute]

thereby allowing participants to select the conference matching their particular need. Sessions were offered on motivation, peer coaching, research and best practices, active student engagement in learning, creating professional learning communities, building team commitment, systems thinking, and sustaining continuous improvement. Based on the evaluations and the excitement from the groups, it was clear that the topics were appropriate and the conferences were a huge success. During summer 2008, TPI will host a conference for superintendents and central office administrators focused on preparing schools to meet the future learning needs of students and communities. An internationally known scholar and researcher, Dr. Joseph Pascarelli, will be the keynote speaker. For additional information about LEARN projects offered through the Truman Pierce Institute, contact TPI Director Dr. Cindy Reed, or TPI associates Chris Groccia or Sheila Moore, at 334.844.4488—or visit the institute’s Web site at education.auburn.edu/tpi.

LEARN LAN

Students learn ways to improve their own learning Alabama leaders and students met to discuss how to create positive environments for learning at a two-day conference in January 2008 which was hosted by the Truman Pierce Institute. The conference, held as part of TPI’s on-going Leadership in Action Network (LAN) initiative funded by the Jessie Ball du Pont Fund, attracted more than 230 high school student leaders and chaperones representing eight Alabama school districts. Conference participants worked in school district teams to identify issues that impede effective learning, and developed action plans to collaboratively address one of these issues. These teams identified and addressed topics that included effective communication, mentoring, apathy, technology, scheduling and school atmosphere. Following these work sessions, a panel of Alabama leaders that included Alabama State Treasurer Kay Ivey (a 1967 College of Education alumna); Alabama State Representative Betty Carol Graham; Dr. Samory Pruitt, vice president for community outreach at the University of Alabama; and Bob Ritchey, education specialist with the Alabama State Department of Education. Panelists offered insight about how they became leaders and tips for maximizing opportunities as students prepare to graduate from high school and pursue future endeavors. The Leadership in Action Network (LAN) program purposes include improving instructional leadership in schools by increasing the leadership capacity of traditional and non-traditional student leaders in fifth through 12th grades; LAN also considers tools to encourage college attendance after high school graduation, and create school-based teams of administrators, teachers and student leaders who can identify barriers to effective student learning and work together to resolve those issues by engaging in action research. As part of this work, the Truman Pierce Institute developed an eight-school-system network to facilitate learning within the network while sharing resources and ideas to improve learning. Student leaders receive on-going leadership training in their local schools and at the institute’s coalition-wide conferences. Participating school districts include Bullock County Schools, Dallas County Schools, Fayette County Schools, Hale County Schools, Lee County Schools, Macon County Schools, Sumter County Schools and the Tallapoosa County School District.

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[Office of the Dean]

D r . D a n i e l L. C l a y comes to Auburn University from Western Illinois University, where he was the associate dean of academic affairs for the College of Education and Human Services. As the college’s newly appointed associate dean of administration, research and innovative programs, Clay brings experience and a new perspective. As associate dean, Clay facilitates research and innovation within the college. He is responsible for administration and oversight of the college’s budget, research and grant activities, technology transfer and international programs. His personal research focuses on children with chronic illnesses or disabilities and their integration into schools. Clay’s work has been published in the Journal of School Health, Journal of School Nursing, Rehabilitation Psychology and the Journal of Counseling Psychology among many others. He has received funding for his work from the U.S. Department of Education, private foundations and other state and federal funding agencies. Clay received his doctorate, with a focus on counseling psychology, from the University of Missouri. Prior to his employment at Auburn and Western Illinois, he was on the faculty at the University of Iowa, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Michigan State University School of Medicine.

COE faculty, staff again set pace for on-campus giving For the second year in a row, College of Education faculty and staff set the pace for employee contributions to Auburn University through the campus-wide annual Faculty Staff Campaign. Giving in the college rose in 2007 by 11 percent to nearly 73 percent. During the inaugural campus campaign in 2006, the college posted overall giving of 62 percent. Campus-wide giving in 2007 rose to 55 percent, with the College of Education achieving 18-percent greater giving among its personnel. Compared to giving within other AU colleges and schools, the College of Education was third after the School of Nursing and School of Pharmacy. Overall campus giving in 2007 surpassed employee giving at all other SEC schools and established Auburn as one of the top schools in the country for supportive faculty and staff.

Molly McNulty Development Coordinator

Joanne Merritt

Administrative Assistant

“This shows tremendous support on behalf of our faculty and staff,” said Dean Frances Kochan. “They already give so much through their work with students and other professionals—this is just additional testimony of their commitment to the college and education.”

URL: http://education.auburn.edu/facultystaff/facultystaffspotlight

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>>


[Office of the Dean] Professional Education Services D r . S u s a n K . V i l l a u me served as the college’s interim associate dean for academic affairs and certification officer from May 2005 until her official appointment to the post in fall 2007. During that time, she successfully led the college’s 2007 National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) reaccreditation efforts. Villaume joined the AU faculty in 1989. Her teaching interests center on developing reading and language arts teachers who have in-depth understandings of language and literacy processes and who have the professional qualities needed to use their evolving knowledge and expertise to continue growing and learning. Her current research interests follow three integrated lines of research: the thought processes of highly effective teachers; the instructional conversations that take place in the classrooms of highly effective teachers; and the attributes of professional development that promote and nurture thoughtful application of research-based instruction. During the past several years, Villaume has worked extensively with the ongoing professional development of reading coaches in the Alabama Reading Initiative. She has served as department co-editor of The Reading Teacher, the most widely read journal in the field of reading education. Villaume received her doctorate from The Ohio State University, concentrating her studies in reading, language arts and children’s literature.

Six units in the college achieved 100-percent participation by their faculty and staff: Department of Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology and School Psychology; Dean’s Office; Department of Kinesiology; Learning Resources Center; Professional Education Services; and Truman Pierce Institute. Only two college units achieved 100-percent participation in the 2006 campaign.

<<

The Faculty Staff Campaign is a component of the university’s overall $500 million “It Begins at Auburn” campaign that began in 2001. In this campaign, which runs from March to May, employees are encouraged to participate as a symbol to alumni and donors of the personal investment they are willing to make in Auburn University.

Becca Grace

Coordinator of Student Services

Shellian Hennes

Administrative Support Assistant

Lori McLean

Academic Adviser

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[Autism Center]

The Auburn University Autism Center dedicates itself to maximizing the potential of individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Today, 1 in 150 children are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Autism is a neurological disorder that impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines.

Pro grams help individuals, families maximize p otential 2 0 0 8 U p c o m i n g E ven t s C a m p A u t i s m S m i l e s a t C h i l d r en ’s H a r b o r i n A l e x a nde r C i t y , A l a . M a y 2-4, 2008 Camp Autism Smiles is a two-day camp for 15 children with autism and their families. The camp provides children with autism a safe and rewarding camp experience, while affording parents and siblings the opportunity for peer support in a relaxed recreational setting. Individualized “fun” is provided for children with autism, their typical siblings and their parents. Although the 2008 camp is full, applications for the next camp will be available February 2009 at education.auburn.edu/autismcenter. A u t i s m S u mme r C l i n i c J u ne 2-27, 2008 The Autism Summer Clinic is an enrichment program focusing on academics, social skills, communication and appropriate behavior for children with autism. The clinic will take place this summer at Yarbrough Elementary School in Auburn, Ala. The 2008 clinic represents the eighth year that children with autism have been included in the clinic. In 2007, there were six classes for children with autism ranging in age from 3 to 17 years old. As of April 2008, space was available for the clinic and applications are available at education.auburn.edu/autismcenter. P a r en t s ’ D a y O u t Parents’ Day Out is planned for the second Saturday of each month. The Auburn University Autism Center is partnering with the Auburn University Student Government Association to offer respite care for parents of children with autism. The Autism Center will open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month to provide care for children with autism, while their parents enjoy the time in any way they desire. SGA students have volunteered to assist Autism Center staff in providing child care services. Center staff will be on hand to supervise activities and SGA volunteers, who have received training on working with children with autism. Please contact Whitney Meade or Doris Hill at 334.844.2005 for more information.

Assisting

young adults with autism

The Auburn University Autism Center’s Transition Program assists individuals with autism as they transition into adulthood, with an emphasis on employment. Transition planning for the students enrolled in the program is based on each individual’s strengths, preferences, skills, sensory needs and interests. Program staff work closely with the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services, as well as other adult service agencies, to provide the optimal transition plan for each student. For more information about any of the Autism Center’s programs, call 334.844.2004 or visit education.auburn.edu/autismcenter.

Dr. Jennifer Sellers Assistant Director

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Opinion Editorial

[Editorial]

Preschool is not a numbers game; teacher-training, community count

S

By Dr. Lora Bailey, associate professor, Department of Curriculum and Teaching ome may argue that having too much of a good thing is fine, and, for some things, it might well be.

However, recent considerations by the state of Alabama to increase the number of preschool programs in the name of expanding services to reach more preschool children and families may not be fine. This is especially true if such an expansion does not incorporate the emphasis on quality curricula or on the need for qualified teachers. The focus of any increase should be clearly on increasing school readiness for Alabama’s preschool-aged children.

Recent research related to advancing teaching and learning in early childhood settings focuses on the use of an integrative approach to designing curricula. There is much evidence that this is the most effective method for assuring that children will experience high-quality instruction. Schools of education, universities and teacher trainers must focus on helping new and experienced teachers weave preschool subject matter together in a level appropriate for each child’s education if these teachers’ efforts are to lead to increased learning and school readiness. This is especially important for effective teaching of preschool and primary grade children, especially those who lack access to high-quality programs. Thus, there is a need to focus teacher training on researchbased methods such as integrative curriculum to improve the quality of new and existing early childhood teachers.

Recent research regarding school readiness shows that there is indeed a direct correlation between teacher and program quality and school readiness. In fact, teacher quality and an appropriate early childhood curricula are the pillars of an effective preschool program.

There is also a need for parent training to help families become more involved in student learning. While increasing teacher quality is important, there is also a need to develop a nucleus of support for young children and their families.

Characteristics that denote teacher quality include advanced levels of content knowledge and the appropriate use of teaching methods. For early childhood teachers, this content and pedagogy is related to how children grow and develop socially, emotionally, cognitively, culturally and physically. Regardless of preschool teachers’ level of certification or the route they choose to earn early childhood credentials, teacher education programs must help teachers understand how children learn. Preschool and primary level teachers must understand how children grow and develop across these domains.

to early childhood programs assures better education. Poor students suffer when per-child spending is inadequate, and they suffer if funds are misused. However, the likelihood of improving the quality of preschool programs and school readiness improves markedly when two conditions are met. First, funds must be used to increase teacher quality using practices grounded on sound research. Equally important, funds must be spent to establish sources of support for children and families.

Reform initiatives must be centered on connecting schooling Regardless of how teachers earn certification, it is incumbent efforts to informal home learning activities already in place. We upon teacher educators and teacher education programs must establish a system for connecting families with existing to equip future teachers with the ability to understand how state and private sources of help. School administrators, higher children grow and develop. No matter what route early education institutions, parents, families and communities childhood teachers take can and should work “Teacher quality and an appropriate early to earn early childhood collaboratively to advance teaching credentials, we student learning and childhood curricula are the pillars of an must be assured they begin increase school readiness. effective preschool program.” their teaching careers There is no as highly qualified and capable of developing high-quality guarantee that simply increasing the number of preschool programs suitable for preparing the children they teach for programs in a given state increases overall school readiness. school success. Neither is there a guarantee that simply increasing funding

In college, future teachers learn how children construct new knowledge and how they grow and develop. In order for early childhood teachers to design environments and curricula suitable for children in that age group, these teachers must understand best practices. These are practices that require appropriate knowledge about early childhood educational content and pedagogy.

If we are to move our state in a direction where school readiness is no longer an issue, we must give an equal amount of attention to preparing highly-qualified teachers and highquality programs with community involvement as we do to increasing the number of programs in the state. *** Editor’s Note: The views expressed are those of the contributor and do not necessarily represent the views of the university.

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[Outreach and Research]

A

uburn University’s Dr. Peggy Shippen is addressing the problem of widespread functional illiteracy among Alabama prison inmates. Studies indicate that released inmates who return to society lacking basic literacy skills are often unable to find employment and consequently are likely to be incarcerated again.   Shippen, an assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation and Special Education, has organized an outreach project in collaboration with the Central Alabama Laubach Literacy Council, the Society of St. Dismas (a faith-based organization) and the Alabama State Department of Corrections. The program pairs inmate volunteer tutors who read above the seventh-grade level with volunteer students who are not yet reading at the sixth-grade level.   The goal of the program is to increase the reading level of student participants to at least the sixth grade level, so that they will be qualified to enter a GED preparation program. The first step is to administer individual reading tests to determine reading skill levels. Those inmates who wish to be tutors and are qualified are trained in the methods of an adult basic reading program. One-to-one tutoring sessions are scheduled twice weekly for 90 minutes at a time. Inmates, both tutors and students, are assessed every six months to measure reading growth. Once a student reaches the sixth-grade reading level, he receives a GED study guide as his “graduation gift” and as an incentive for his next educational goal.   As of April 2008, the program has been in place at Bibb Correctional Facility in Brent, Ala., for a year, and at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elenore, Ala., for six months. More than 230 inmates have been assessed for placement as students or tutors. Education graduate students Whitney Meade, Shelley Henthorne and Nick Derzis, as well as volunteers from the Society of St. Dismas, assisted Shippen in administering the individual reading assessments. About 100 of those tested are now actively participating as students or tutors.   “There continues to be great interest in the program,” said Bibb Chaplain Eddie Smith, who noted a waiting list of inmates who see the advantages of participating. Warden Cheryl Price said, “We are pleased with the reading program’s progress and what it adds to our educational efforts.” The inmate tutors have expressed their enthusiasm about the chance to help others by sharing a skill during their time in prison and one tutor described it as a “powerful experience.”

38

Keystone • Volume V, 2008


[Outreach and Research]

te

Building a better future in our sta

s e c u d e r h c a e tr u o y c a r Lite recidivism among Alabama prisoners

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

39


Building a better future in our nation

Encouraging children to be lifelong movers

40

Keystone â&#x20AC;˘ Volume V, 2008


T

he college’s Department of Kinesiology plays home to the Motor Behavior Center. Under the guidance of Drs. Leah Robinson, Mary Rudisill and Mark Fischman—and in collaboration with Dr. Danielle Wadsworth (Exercise Psychology Lab)—the center aims to encourage young children to become lifelong movers.

The center has a particular interest in the overall health and wellness of young children, especially those of African descent and from rural and underserved areas. This research is especially important because African-American children are at a greater risk of poor health and obesity. Currently, a state of emergency exists in Alabama as it relates to the health status of young African-American children. Data indicates that 18 percent of Alabama’s young children were recently classified as obese—and this percentage is increasing each year. The ultimate goal of the work within the Motor Behavior Center is to not only to contribute to the scholarly knowledge within the discipline, but also to society. The researchers feel that it is essential for more studies to focus on underrepresented and underserved populations, which will aid in diminishing the current health disparities that exist in our nation. Recent research projects with the Motor Behavior Center have investigated the effect of various physical play/movement programs on children’s participation in physical activity, motor skill development and psychological wellness. The goal is to learn more about what motivates young children to move and engage in physical activity, and to encourage them to be lifelong movers. To date, findings from these projects are promising and support the effectiveness of the center’s movement programs on the overall health and wellness of young African-American children. Upcoming projects within the center will explore the following factors in our target population: the effects of physical activity on cortisol responses the relationship of motor skill ability and physical activity participation, and the effect of interactive gaming exercise equipment on physical activity participation and other social and psychological factors.

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

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42

Keystone â&#x20AC;˘ Volume V, 2008


Building a better future in our nation

History program explores persistent societal issues D

r. John Saye, professor of social science education in the college’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching, is developing a new way of examining history. Spurred by students’ consistent ranking of history as their least favorite subject, Saye and co-project director, Dr. Thomas Brush (Indiana University) have developed the Persistent Issues in History (PIH) Network, which re-conceptualizes the way teachers organize history and social studies material for middle and high school students.

Rooted in problem-based inquiry, the Persistent Issues in History Network looks at history as a process and a tool that can help students rationalize what they see in today’s world. A departure from traditional content-knowledge teaching, PIH is centered on the notion that big ideas make history matter; in other words, several fundamental questions exist that continue to crop up in society. Saye believes students need to experience historical thinking first-hand, and PIH encourages students to work directly with historical artifacts. Technology also plays an important role in facilitating student understanding of and critical thinking about historical issues. Ultimately, Saye believes PIH will help students become competent democratic citizens. By using history as a tool to help citizens make sense of the world, PIH facilitates students’ ability to make reasoned judgments about historical issues, therefore allowing them to make better decisions about current societal issues. Saye is in the second year of a three-year project examining the implementation of PIH-based teaching methods. He has teamed up with history faculty at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School to develop lesson plans that are focused on problembased inquiry. A group of teachers and researchers meet during the summer to prepare a PIH lesson, which centers on a fundamental question. The team works in reverse of traditional instructional methods: PIH starts with a big idea or persistent historical question and then develops a lesson plan whose content is organized around that fundamental question. The educators also develop a culminating project that challenges students to put the knowledge they have just gained to the test by addressing the answer to that persistent question. The researchers have found great success with inquiry-based teaching. Teachers who were first hesitant about the approach are now convinced of its effectiveness in communicating historical information and actively engaging students. Mac Matthews, world history teacher at Auburn Junior High School, is a testament to the program’s success. Observing PIH for the first piqued his interest in another teacher’s classroom, Matthews’ interest about this fundamentally different teaching approach. Now in his fifth year of employing PIH in the classroom, Matthews remains passionate about the student-focused strategy and plans to use it for the remainder of his teaching career. “PIH has radically altered my view of what students can—and should—do in a classroom,” he said. “Students now see why they are learning the content. They have a purpose, and that purpose is relevant to them. They perform and learn like never before. History is boring no longer. Large numbers of my students tell me, semester after semester, that they look forward to my class every day.” Matthews continued, “Students ‘get’ this. They think. They learn. They are equipped for life in a complex society and world. That’s real teaching.”

For more information, visit www.PIHnet.org.

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

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Building a better future in our nation

44

Keystone â&#x20AC;˘ Volume V, 2008


s their tours of duty over in the Middle East end, American soldiers are returning to the states and seeking college degrees. Some may have lost a sense of what life was before being sent into combat and may need assistance to become reacquainted with collegiate life.

Dr. David DiRamio, an assistant professor in the College of Education’s Adult and Higher Education program and veteran of the U.S. Navy, has been working with veterans and researching the topic of veteran’s education. “In the coming years, as combat veterans in the tens of thousands enroll in colleges following their service in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, they are likely to require support services,” DiRamio said. “We expect that 90 percent of veterans will attend 200 colleges and universities in this country. Auburn University is one of those institutions.” DiRamio serves as the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) liaison for the American Council on Education (ACE). ACE has designed a program to ensure our nation’s heroes receive the full support of the higher education community as they transition from the battlefield to civilian life. The project—Severely Injured Military Veterans: Fulfilling Their Dreams—launched in April 2007 and has assisted more than 150 service members to date.

DiRamio helps severely wounded veterans by finding a “transition sponsor” or “program volunteer” at a cooperating college or university after they complete rehabilitation at military hospitals. The sponsor or volunteer will help the veteran by providing information, encouragement and advocacy. In the process of finding a transition sponsor, an ACE personnel member will contact DiRamio and notify him that a veteran may want to pursue his education at a particular college or university. DiRamio will then utilize resources, such as being a NASPA member, and proceed to contact members at the specified college or university to see if they are available to aid the veteran in their transition to collegiate life.

“Serving in ACE’s ‘Fulfilling the Dream’ project has been rewarding for me. On a personal level it is gratifying to help a severely wounded veteran move forward in his or her transition to civilian life, including attending college,” said DiRamio. His research on veteran’s education has led him to co-author two manuscripts about IraqAfghan veterans as college students. One of the manuscripts was a multi-campus interview project entitled, “From Combat to Campus: Voices of Student Veterans.” The interview project originated from research at three college campuses that 25 veterans were attending. It focused on the needs that veterans may have while on campus and ways for institutions to assist them.

Veteran Participant: Ryan Haerer, U.S. Army The Ohio state University

Program Volunteer: Dan Allen

• Injured in 2005

• Single leg, above the knee amputee

• Internship at the National Zoo during recovery and therapy

• Science major (goal to be a veterinarian)

The Ohio State University

• Director, Student Affairs Fiscal Support Services

• Colonel (Ret.) in the U.S. Army Reserves

• Senior military liaison for Iraq reconstruction, U.S. Embassy, Civil Military Operations Directorate in Baghdad A Keystone (2005-2006)

in Building a Better Future for All

45


D

r. Cari Dunn, a professor in the college’s Department of Rehabilitation and Special Education department, spent the spring 2007 semester on sabbatical in Chile. She was interested in learning about the services provided to students with disabilities and establishing relationships with other disability-related professionals in South America. Dunn was involved in various cultural and professional development activities while abroad. She visited United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization to learn more about its idea of inclusive education or making the right to education available to both children and adults—with particular attention to those at-risk of discrimination. Dunn arranged visits with non-profit organizations that support inclusive practices in public and private schools. She visited the Corporation for Development of Learning (CDL), an organization devoted to at-risk students with learning problems whose families have limited resources. She also visited special education faculty and educators in Chile. Dunn and Dr. AmySue Reilly, AU associate professor in Dunn’s department, met with faculty at The Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación to discuss the perception of inclusión that exists in Chile. Like in the United States, inclusión holds different meanings for different people. Another topic of discussion was the need for additional assistance for students with highincidence disabilities (i.e. mild mental retardation, learning disabilities, behavior disorders). Many of these students are not served well in the public schools. In addition, many Chilean schools have only one special educator to serve all children in the school. “It was such a wonderful learning experience. It broadened my understanding of disabilities and particularly my understanding of issues related to disabilities in rural areas. I would like to return and extend my learning in the near future,” she said.

46

Keystone • Volume V, 2008


Building a better future in our world

Dunn explores international approaches to special education in Chile

Torres del Paine National Park, southern Chile, South America A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

47


Building a better future in our world

Groccia partnership takes best teaching tactics to global level

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Keystone â&#x20AC;˘ Volume V, 2008


T

hrough his work as director of Auburn University’s Biggio Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, Dr. James Groccia has supported the university’s goals of excellent teaching and enhanced learning. Through his recent efforts, however, Groccia has taken this charge to a global degree by working to enhance the teaching effectiveness of an entire country.

Groccia, who also serves as an associate professor of educational leadership in the college’s Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology, has formed higher education partnerships within Saudi Arabia. These partnerships promise to enhance the country’s advanced learning system through some of the same tactics he employs in assisting AU instructional faculty and campus administrators. In 2007, Groccia, who was then president of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education, attended an international conference in Sheffield, England, on behalf of the organization. At the conference Groccia made several presentations on academic training, which later led to an invitation by King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, to host a series of workshops for the campus’ faculty and administrators. “The higher education system in Saudi Arabia and in the Arab world is growing exponentially,” Groccia said. “Officials recognize they cannot rely on current methods with which they have been successful with in the past. Critical thinking and problemsolving skills gained through active and engaged learning and innovative teaching are being seen as essential outcomes for future educational and economic development.” Groccia presented to department heads and academic leaders from Saudi Arabian institutions on the importance of staff development, active learning, building academic portfolios, and enhancing educational productivity and quality. Subsequent to these presentations, he has been asked to put together a series of training programs across Saudi Arabia. Groccia has also been invited back to KFUPM as well as to King Saud University in Riyadh—Saudi Arabia’s oldest and premier university—and King Khalid University in Abha—the newest public university in Saudi Arabia—to offer similar presentations. He noted surprise during one of his early trips to discover that his book, On Becoming a Productive University: Strategies for Reducing Cost and Increasing Quality in Higher Education, which he co-edited for publication in 2005, had been translated into Arabic and was known by Saudi Arabian education officials. Groccia’s work will help aid Saudi Arabia’s transition from importing foreign workers for health, banking and communication to developing their own people for these careers. He noted that education policies in Saudi Arabia are changing and officials recognize the need to expand higher education so more disciplines and training can be offered to more people—including more broadly to women, which represents a cultural as well as educational shift in thinking. His long-range goal is to assist institutions in developing more effective higher education systems and teaching methods. There are only 14 state-supported universities and eight to 10 private universities in Saudi Arabia. The country has shown its commitment to higher education by planning to build 11 additional universities in the next five years. “An interesting challenge is going to be how Saudis maintain their religious and social traditions while liberalizing their thinking in academics,” Groccia said.

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

49


Leischucks equip college to meet critical teaching needs

E

stablished in December 2007 by 1964 Education alumni Dr. Gerald and Mrs. Emily Leischuck, the Leischuck Endowed Professorship for Critical Needs in Education will equip the college to recruit and retain faculty in the most critical, understaffed disciplines of K-12 schools. Such focus will allow the college to remain adaptive and responsive to the needs of contemporary school systems and its students.

Initially, the professorship, available for associate or full professors, will center on programs preparing K-12 mathematics teachers, science teachers or educational administrators (principals or superintendents). Currently, Alabama and many other states are experiencing a teacher shortage in the areas of mathematics and science, and the supply of educational administrators is also poised to decline sharply in the next few years (see page 30 for details). The college’s dean will review national, regional and statewide data every five years to determine if the critical needs areas have changed. “The Leischucks are not only addressing the significant needs area in education with this professorship, but by making it available to associate and full professors,” Dean Frances Kochan said, “they are equipping the college with a recruitment tool for professors and associate professors alike.” Current Alabama teacher shortage areas (grades levels, if applicable, appear in parenthesis)

Art Band English/Language Arts (7-12) Family Consumer Science (9-12) Foreign Languages (7-12) Guidance and Counseling (7-12) History/Social Science (7-12) Math (7-12) Music Science (7-12) Special Education • Autism (7-12) • Gifted (6-12) • Learning Disabled (7-12) • Mentally Retarded (7-12) • Multi-Handicapped (7-12) • Speech • Visual-Hearing Impaired Source: “Teacher Shortage Areas, Nationwide Listing: 1990-1991 thru 2006-2007,” released April 2007 by the U.S. Department of Education

50

Through their many philanthropic acts, the Leischucks have demonstrated their commitment to and passion for education and Auburn University. Teaching awards at both the college and university level bear their names and recognize teaching excellence by faculty. At AU, Emily Leischuck earned a master’s degree in counselor education. She served nine years in student affairs programs as Panhellenic adviser and assistant to the dean of women, followed by 12 years in the Office of the President. During those years, she served as assistant to the AU president and the Board

Keystone • Volume V, 2008

of Trustees, retiring in 1995 with emeritus status. Long supportive of student organizations and a frequent leader in communityservice activities, she was a 1996 recipient of AU’s Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award for Humanitarian Leadership. In recognition of her efforts on behalf of Auburn students and the entire Auburn family, the university named a residence hall, Emily Reaves Leischuck Hall, in her honor in 1998. Gerald Leischuck began his 35-year Auburn career in 1962 as a graduate assistant in the College of Education. Shortly after earning a doctorate in educational leadership in 1964, he joined the staff of what is now AU’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment. He served as executive director of that office from 1966 to 1989, and as secretary to the Board of Trustees from 1989 to 1997. From 1992 until retiring with emeritus status in 1997, he also served as executive assistant to the president. After retirement, he returned for two years as a consultant to the Board of Trustees. He also served on the Auburn City Schools Board of Education from 1977 to 1987, and was its president from 1980 to 1985. In 2000, AU presented an honorary doctor of humane letters degree to Gerald in recognition of his career achievements and university service. The endowed professorship is not the couple’s first effort in recognizing educating excellence. In 2000, the couple began partially funding the college’s top two teaching awards given in the areas of undergraduate and graduate instruction. In 2005, the university presented the inaugural Gerald and Emily Leischuck Endowed Presidential Awards for Excellence in Teaching, also funded by the couple. These awards recognize two full-time, tenured faculty members who have demonstrated effective and innovative teaching methods and a continuing commitment to student success through advising and mentoring inside and outside the classroom. The Leischucks have also endowed the Leischuck-Reaves Endowment for Scholarships at Auburn in honor of their parents, Claude and Emily Tyson Reaves and Steve and Nellie Leischuck. In addition to their support of Auburn, the couple has established or provided for scholarship programs at Huntingdon College, Birmingham-Southern College and the University of Northern Colorado.


Three added to ranks of College’s

distinguished professors

I

n November 2007, the College of Education added three to its ranks of distinguished professors. Dr. E. Davis Martin received the Wayne T. Smith Distinguished Professorship, while Drs. David Pascoe and David Shannon received Humana-Germany-Sherman Distinguished Professorships. As a faculty member in the Department of Rehabilitation and Special Education since 2003, Martin teaches courses in rehabilitation history and philosophy, psychosocial aspects of disability and case management. He holds national certification/licensure in rehabilitation counseling and vocational evaluation, as well as diplomate status as a vocational expert. Currently, he is the project director of a $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Martin is the graduate program director for the Rehabilitation Counseling program and the co-coordinator for the department’s doctoral program in Rehabilitation and Special Education. Pascoe, who completed his doctorate from Ball State University, has been with Auburn University since 1990 and has spent the following 18 years as an exercise physiologist and director of the Thermal Lab in the Department of Kinesiology. Pascoe is also the organizer/director of the international Thermal Research Consortium, which integrates a diverse, multi-disciplined investigative team that provides understanding through the collaborative expertise, efforts, skills and knowledge of researchers.  Shannon received a doctorate in research methodology and statistics from the University of Virginia in 1990.  He coordinates the doctoral program in Educational Psychology and teaches classes in research methods and statistics in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology. He currently serves as the president-elect for the Eastern Educational Research Association and is the regional editor for Educational Research and Evaluation. Wayne T. Smith Distinguished Professors Dr. Philip Browning, 1999 Dr. Joseph Buckhalt, 2003 Dr. Mark Fischman, 2004 Dr. Terry Ley, 1998* Dr. Frances K. Kochan, 2005 Dr. Richard Kunkel, 1998* Dr. E. Davis Martin, 2007 Dr. T. Gilmour Reeve, 1998* Dr. Mary Rudisill, 2004 Dr. Janet Taylor, 2001* Dr. Randall McDaniel, 2002 Dr. G. Dennis Wilson, 1998*

Humana-GermanySherman Distinguished Professors Dr. Craig Darch, 1999 Dr. Bruce Gladden, 1999 Dr. David D. Pascoe, 2007 Dr. David M. Shannon, 2007 Dr. Bonnie White, 2002

Each distinguished professorship was made possible by the generosity of the college’s alumni and friends. The Wayne T. Smith Distinguished Professorship was established in 1996 through the Humana Foundation and in honor of Wayne T. Smith. Smith, then chief operating officer of Humana Corporation, and a loyal College of Education alumnus, saw the need for the college to have such professorships to recruit, reward and retain outstanding professors in education.  This distinguished professorship was the first of its kind in the college, and was first presented in 1998. The Humana-Germany-Sherman Distinguished Professorship originated through the Humana Challenge Grant of $200,000 to partially fund an endowed distinguished professorship. The college was required to raise an additional $100,000 to complete the fund. Two National Advisory Council members and their wives—Gordy ‘48 and Gloria Germany, and Gordon ‘57 and Miriam Sherman—generously met the challenge. The first Humana-Germany-Sherman Distinguished Professorship was awarded in 1999 and continues to reward professors of the highest caliber. These professorships allow the college to recognize and retain high-quality and renowned faculty considered leaders in their fields. In addition to the prestige these professorships carry, they provide deserving faculty with additional compensation and travel resources for a five-year period. With the addition of these three distinguished professors, the College of Education has honored a total 19 faculty members through these professorships and the Mildred Cheshire Fraley distinguished professorships. The college last named a distinguished professor in 2005. 

Mildred Cheshire Fraley Distinguished Professors Dr. Glennelle Halpin, 2003 Dr. Marie Kraska, 2003 *retired

AA Keystone Keystone in Building BuildingAa Better Future for All

51


Male (661)

1% 1%

Female (1,746) Male (661)

(25 5 ) A f r i c a n - A m erican

( f al l 2 0 0 7 )

( 9 ) A m e r i c a n Indian ( 1 4 ) Asian ( 2 9 ) H i spanic

11%

0%

1% 1%

Enrollment, by ethni ci t y

1% ( 2 , 0 4 0 ) C a u casian

1%

E nrollment, by classification

Freshman (364)

(25 5 ) A f r i c a n - A m erican

Sophom ore (376)

( 9 ) A m e r i c a n Indian

Junior (412)

( 1 4 ) Asian

(14) Asian

(29) Hispanic

Senior/Second Degree (496)

( 2 9 ) H i spanic

Master’s (421)

Education Specialist (29)

1%

Sophomore (376) Junior (412) Senior/Second Degree (496)

( f a ll 2 0 0 7 )

615 total

613 total

Freshman (364)

Freshman (364)

Master’s (421)

Fu l l Profe s s or

As s oci ate Profe s s or

Education Specialist (29)

As s i s tan t Profe s s or

Doctoral (305)

I n s tru ctor/Ad j u n ct Sophom ore (376)

1%

(2 00 6 -2 0 0 7)

500

557 total

600

521 total

700

640 total

Doctora l (305)

Education Degrees Conferred 1%

Junior (412) Senior/Second Degree (496)

400

( f a l l 2 0 07 )

E nrollment, Degress Conferred

0%

(fall 2007)

11%

1%

( f a l l 2 0 07 )

(9) American Indian

(fall 2007)

by c lassification Enrollment, by classificat i on

(2,040) Caucasian (255) African-American

Master’s (421) Education Specialist (29)

300

Doctora l (305)

Unde r g r aduate

200

Mas te r ’s/ S pe c i al i s t 100

52

2006-2007

2005-2006

2004-2005

2003-2004

D o c to r al 2002-2003

0

Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Fac u l ty by l evel as pe rc en t of to tal

( 2 , 0 4 0 ) C a u casian

The College of Education has the largest graduate enrollment and fifth-largest undergraduate enrollment on campus.

Enroll men t , by et h n i ci t y

(f al l 2 0 0 7 )

En rol l m en t , by gen

0%

Female (1,746)

En rol l men t , by et h n i ci t y

(f al l 2 0 0 7

En rol l

11%

(f al l 2 0 0 7 )

En rol l men t , by gen d er

[College Knowledge]

* each year is summer to spring

18.6 percent growth in degrees since 2002-2003


College of Education Giving: â&#x20AC;&#x153;It Beings at Auburnâ&#x20AC;? Campaign

[College Knowledge] 20

$15,000,000

03

$1,691,644

$14,134,778

$12,745,852

04

20

$3,000,000

Total as of March 31, 2008

$10,848,190

$9,163,766

$6,545,417

06

$5,641,359

08 07

20 05

20

$6,000,000

20

$9,000,000

20

$12,000,000

Teacher Education Programs

02

20

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education

$0

Alabama State Board of Education

College of Education Endowments

Department of Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology, and School Psychology

$6,000,000

American Psychological Association

$5,000,000 Market Value of Endowments

Accreditations, Endorsements or Certifications held by the College of Education

Counseling Psychology doctoral program Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs

$4,000,000 $3,000,000

Department of Curriculum and Teaching

$2,000,000

National Association of Schools of Music

$1,000,000 $0

2001 2002

2003

2004

2005 2006 2007

Research and Outreach funding, all sources

Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology Full Member, University Council for Education Administration Department of Kinesiology

2002-2003

American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education

$4,069,168

2003-2004

American College of Sports Medicine, University Connection Program endorsement

$3,200,000

2004-2005

Department of Rehabilitation and Special Education

$4,708,286

Council on Rehabilitation Education

2005-2006

$6,739,544

2006-2007

$5,195,938

$0

$1.0

$2.0

$3.0

$4.0

(in millions)

$5.0

$6.0

$7.0

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

53


2007-2008

Scholarships

• 105 undergraduate scholarships and 13 graduate awards • more than $210,000 awards this year • 20-percent increase in the awards given for 2006-2007

Undergraduate Scholarships Alabama FFA Officers Alumni Association Annual Scholarship Gary Ray Bell Jr., Fort Payne, Ala. Hester Wear Atchison Endowed Scholarship Mallory Joy Cadrette,   Montgomery, Ala. Kathryn Gilbert Mangum,   Montgomery, Ala. Martin Luther and Exa Beck Endowed Scholarship Amy Elizabeth Berger, Katy, Texas Candice Hope Churchwell,   Smiths Station, Ala. Meredith M. Collins, Hoover, Ala. Catherine Ann Foster,   Indian Springs Village, Ala. Ralph Carroll and Willie Mae Boles Endowed Scholarship Denise K. Adkison, Madison, Ala. William Joseph Bowen, Fort Payne, Ala. Marsha Burns Burney Endowed Scholarship Emily Lauren Frazer, Fort Payne, Ala.

Rachel Catherine Shields,   Homewood, Ala. Laura Elizabeth Tucker, Greenville, Ala. Lillian Cross Davis Endowed Scholarship Michael Hays Batson,   Lawrenceville, Ga.

John R. Dyas Jr. Endowed Scholarship Yolanda McDonald, Huntsville, Ala. Mildred Cheshire Fraley Endowed Scholarship Erica Diane Curtin, Mobile, Ala. Jessica Michelle Froning,   Charlotte, N.C. Wendy Amarie James,   Mount Olive, Ala. Glennor Aann Neilson, Northport, Ala. Jessica Marie Norman, Moody, Ala. Jalesia V. Sims, Tuscaloosa, Ala. April Dian Yarbrough,   Alexander City, Ala. Margaret Graves Frazier Endowed Scholarship Stephen Craig Matthews,   Greenville, Ala.

Dr. J. Floyd Hall Endowed Scholarship Leah Joyce Carpenter, Lanett, Ala. William Shane Haws, Brantley, Ala. Rachel Kirksey Sparkman,   Hartselle, Ala.

Comer Foundation Annual Scholarship Kelli Elizabeth Cox, Millbrook, Ala. Katie Michelle Higginbotham,   Jackson, Ala. Amanda B. Patrick, Enterprise, Ala.

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Julia Collins Isbell Annual Scholarship Emily Jeanette Abston, Tuskegee, Ala.

Betty McLendon DeMent Endowed Scholarship Jacob Daniel Johnson, Crawford, Ala.

Betty Thrower Freeman Annual Scholarship Amy Catherine White, Eufaula, Ala.

College of Education Student Council Annual Scholarship Micaela Nicole Ellson, Madison, Ala.

Sam L. Hutchison Endowed Scholarship Mallory Lynn Appleton,   Vestavia Hills, Ala. Victoria Christine Burns, Auburn, Ala. Whitney Heather Dykes, Louisville, Ala. Lindsey Dianne LaMarque,   Deatsville, Ala. Timothy McWhorter, Ruston, La. Cassie Simpson, Brentwood, Tenn. Lauren Vercelli, Montgomery, Ala. Ann Elizabeth Williams, Auburn, Ala.

Humana Foundation Endowed Scholarship Lisa Melaine Collins, Opelika, Ala. Kelli Michelle Crumpton, Clanton, Ala. Maribeth Delores Hasse, Hartselle, Ala. Jordan Kasey King, Andalusia, Ala. Kristina Danielle Owen,   Memphis, Tenn. Anna Caroline Trefethen,   Vestavia Hills, Ala. Amber Dale Wright, Decatur, Ala.

William L. Brazelton, Guntersville, Ala. Amy Brooke Harbison,   Sylvan Springs, Ala. Ashley Brook Jacobs, Huntsville, Ala. Emily Beth Mills, Fort Payne, Ala. Audrey Mathis Stockdale,   Reeltown, Ala. JulieAnna Marie Whiting, Foley, Ala. Cortney B. Winton, Heflin, Ala. Emily Catherine Young, Oxford, Ala. Dr. Maxwell C. King Annual Scholarship Ashley Dianne Boulware,   Alexander City, Ala. Richard C. Kunkel Endowed Scholarship Amanda Marie Cummings,   Birmingham, Ala. Kendall Louise Griffin, Hoover, Ala. James W. and Elaine B. Lester Endowed Scholarship Kaitlin L. Costello, Marlton, N.J. Jessica Elliott, Dallas, Ga. Elizabeth Hardy Fain,   Montgomery, Ala. Kristen Elise Horne, Opelika, Ala. Stephen Perry Phillips, Ozark, Ala. Karmen Nicole Pinckney,   Simpsonville, S.C. Kristan Reynolds Whitman,   Charlotte, N.C. Lauren Nicole Ruzbacki, Kennesaw, Ga.


Marcus Dewone Walton,   Birmingham, Ala. Jessica Kay Wiggins, Vestavia Hills, Ala. R.W. Montgomery Endowed Scholarship Terra N. Dixon, Mobile, Ala. Kathryn Flurry and Harrell Ray Morgan Endowed Scholarship Amanda Marie Baldonado,   Madison, Ala. JoAnn Granberry Murrell Endowed Scholarship Mallory Ryan Atkins, Nashville, Tenn. Meagan LeAnne Baird, Leeds, Ala. Andrea Jade Elliott, Douglas, Ala. B.B. and Frances Nelson Endowed Scholarship Brittney Diane Garnett, Tallassee, Ala. Annie Laura Newell Endowed Scholarship Megan M. Robertson, Oneonta, Ala. Reese Harold Woytek, Hartford, Ala. Sandra Bridges Newkirk Endowed Scholarship Brian R. Dilworth Patrons of the Keystone Dean’s Circle Scholarship Katherine Leslie Stamps, Madison, Ala. Harold and Shirley Patterson Annual Scholarship Melissa Lynn Manly, Vestavia Hills, Ala. Matthew Wayne McLaughlin,   Brentwood, Tenn. Lucy B. Pittman Endowed Scholarship Leah Bethany Smith, Sylacauga, Ala. Charles M. and Frances Skinner Reeves Endowed Scholarship Carli Virginia Hentschel, Jackson, Ala.

Rachel Lee Sherbakoff,   Knoxville, Tenn. Katelin Nicole Tyra, Hoover, Ala. Chandler Stewart White IV,   Auburn, Ala. Richard A. Scott Annual Scholarship Danielle Vae Diehl, Chelsea, Ala. Shelby Flannagan Pope, Anniston, Ala. Kathryn McClellan Strock Annual Scholarship Whitney Michelle Brooks,   Monroeville, Ala. Angelo and Joy Love Tomasso Endowed Scholarship Alexandra M. Conn, Huntsville, Ala. Shannon Michelle Perman,   Kenosha, Wis. Chibukia Pete, Hoover, Ala.

Continuous Improvement Graduate Assistantship Allison Nicole Connelly, Alaedo, Texas William Thomas Haley Memorial Annual Assistantship Evelyn Cage, Atlanta, Ga. James R. and Frances R. Molnar Graduate Student Award Demetriss LaShun Locke,   Monroeville, Ala. JoAnn Granberry Murrell Endowed Scholarship Justin Kurrass, Pine Mountain, Ga.

Earl H. “Buddy” Weaver Endowed Scholarship Summer Paige Watts, Gadsden, Ala. Ronald J. Weaver Endowed Scholarship Lisa M. Danos, Sandusky, Ohio Yvonne Williams Endowed Scholarship Angela Marie Mustain, Decatur, Ala. Theodore Franklin and Winnifred Phillips Yancey Endowed Scholarship Angela Marie Mustain, Decatur, Ala.

Graduate Awards Barbara Booth Baird Graduate Student Award Bethany Bianca Stewart, Athens, Ga.

Robert L. Saunders Endowed Scholarship Jonathan Wayne Adams,   Five Points, Ala. Marley Layne Fincher, Smyrna, Ga. Cynthia Marvin Coleman Scott Endowed Presidential Scholarship Jessica Joy Carter, Birmingham, Ala. Lindsay Melissa Cooper, Mobile, Ala. Dana Barret Freeman,   Birmingham, Ala. Heather Marie Friedrich,   Hinesville, Ga. Stephanie Michelle Holmes,   Hoover, Ala. Heather Michelle Lewis, Trussville, Ala. Katie Elizabeth McWatters,   Collierville, Tenn. Maria Elizabeth Powell,   Aliceville, Ala.

[Scholarship Ceremony]

Frederick Grant Maynard II,   Columbus, Ga. Dr. Dennis J. Sabo Memorial Fellowship Melissa Tier Williams,   Montgomery, Ala. Paul W. Scheid Graduate Student Award Kristi Paige Fuller Paquette,   Phenix City, Ala. F. Allen and Louise K. Turner Foundation Annual Graduate Assistantship John Abernathy, Collinsville, Ala. G. Dennis Wilson Endowed Graduate Award Felipe Araya, Heredia, Costa Rica

Wendy Baker Memorial Graduate Student Award Jane Wallis Turnbull, Columbia, S.C. Elizabeth Williams Brazelton Fund for Excellence Michael Alan Keim, Warne, N.C. Albert Hamilton Collins Annual Fellowship Lamont E. Maddox, Dunwoody, Ga.

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

55


2007 Faculty, Staff and Student Award Recipients Andrea Lee Owens

Patricia Lauren Rockwell Outstanding Graduate Student Curriculum and Teaching

Shu-Ching Wang

Outstanding Graduate Student Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Loriane E. Parish

Suzanne Woods-Groves

Abby L. Watts

Beverly L. DeVane

Samantha Newcomb

Outstanding Graduate Student Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology, and School Psychology

Outstanding Graduate Student Rehabilitation and Special Education

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Curriculum and Teaching

Amy N. Pendleton

Wynadine H. Morris

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Rehabilitation and Special Education

Dr. Jared A. Russell

Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Undergraduate Faculty Teaching Award Health and Human Performance

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Outstanding Undergraduate Student Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Outstanding Graduate Student Health and Human Performance

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Health and Human Performance

Outstanding Staff Award Administrative/Professional Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Outstanding Staff Award Office Administration Learning Resources Center

Seval Gรณmez

Dr. Danielle Wadsworth

Dr. David D. Pascoe

Dr. Karen S. Rabren

Dr. Susan H. Bannon

Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Graduate Faculty Teaching Award Health and Human Performance

Keystone โ€ข Volume V, 2008

Outstanding Faculty Award for Research Rehabilitation and Special Education

Outstanding Faculty Early Career Award Health and Human Performance

Outstanding Faculty Award for Outreach Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology


2008 Faculty, Staff and Student Award Recipients

Christina Castelin

Outstanding Graduate Student Counselor Education, Counseling Psychology, and School Psychology

John â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chadâ&#x20AC;? Duncan Outstanding Graduate Student Rehabilitation and Special Education

Alyshia Chavez

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Rehabilitation and Special Education

Paige Paquette

[Spr ing Awards]

Jennifer Bell

Casey Breslin

Outstanding Graduate Student Curriculum and Teaching

Outstanding Graduate Student Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Outstanding Graduate Student Kinesiology

Amy White

Kerron Stewart

Jenna Valaer

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Curriculum and Teaching

Charlotte Barnes

Outstanding Staff Award Administrative/Professional Office of the Dean

Dr. Jada Kohlmeier

Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Undergraduate Faculty Teaching Award Curriculum and Teaching

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Educational Foundations, Leadership and Technology

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Kinesiology

Regina Hutchinson

Dr. Leah Robinson

Outstanding Staff Award Office Administration Curriculum and Teaching

Dr. Kimberly Walls

Emily and Gerald Leischuck Outstanding Graduate Faculty Teaching Award Curriculum and Teaching

Outstanding Faculty Early Career Award Kinesiology

Dr. Peter Hastie

Outstanding Faculty Award for Research Kinesiology

AA Keystone Keystone in Building BuildingAa Better Future for All

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[National Advisory Council]

Council

Membership Dr. Tim Alford ‘68

Consultant, workforce/ economic development Pelham, Ala.

Donna Carpenter Burchfield ‘71

Lawyer, King & Spalding Atlanta, Ga.

Dr. Katrice Albert ‘02

Vice Provost for Equity, Diversity and Community Outreach, Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, La.

The Hon. Victor Gaston ‘80 State Representative, Alabama House of Representatives, 100th District Mobile, Ala.

Nancy Culpepper Chancey ‘62

Chairwoman, CH&B Inc. Enterprise, Ala.

Dr. Cynthia Ann Cox ‘77 Special education teacher, Coronado Unified School District Coronado, Calif.

Mary Chambers Gross ‘65 Retired high school educator Melbourne, Fla.

Dr. J. Floyd Hall ‘48

Retired school superintendent and professor Greenville, S.C.

Dr. Nathan L. Hodges ‘74 President, Bowling Green Technical College Bowling Green, Ky.

Susan McIntosh Housel ‘73 Retired elementary education Auburn, Ala.

Dr. Imogene Mathison Mixson ‘63 Retired community college academic dean Ozark, Ala.

58

Education consultant and retired school counselor Opelika, Ala.

Dr. Harold Patterson ‘54

Retired school superintendent Guntersville, Ala.

Kym Hass Prewitt ‘86

Executive director, Children’s Literacy Guild of Ala. Birmingham, Ala.

Dr. Frances Skinner Reeves ‘71 Retired mental health counselor West Point, Ga.

Dr. Ron Saunders ‘70 Superintendent, Barrow County Schools Winder, Ga.

Dr. Thomas N. Taylor ‘60 Retired superintendent Clinton, Miss.

Dr. W. Mabrey Whetstone, Jr. ‘73

Emily Reaves Leischuck ‘64

Leslie S. Woodson ‘80

Sharon Rochambeau Lovell

Catherine Cary Zodrow ‘72

Hedy White Manry ‘71

Col. Hollis Messer ‘55 (US Army-Ret.)

Dr. Patsy Boyd Parker ‘70

Director, Special Education Services, Alabama Department of Education Titus, Ala.

Superintendent, Auburn City Schools Auburn, Ala.

Vestavia Hills, Ala.

Chancellor, Dallas County Community College District Dallas, Texas.

Retired school superintendent Union Grove, Ala.

Dr. J. Terry Jenkins ‘83

Retired, Auburn University Auburn, Ala.

Dr. Wright L. Lassiter Jr. ‘78

Dr. Byron Nelson Jr. ‘57

Trainer/technical writer, EDS Corporation Alabaster, Ala.

Resource classroom assistant, Ogletree Elementary School Auburn, Ala.

Vice president, IBM Global Solutions Leadership Cornelius, N.C.

Agent, ONO Realty Orange Beach, Ala.

Dr. Shirley Kelley Spears ‘71 Director, B.B. Comer Memorial Library Sylacauga, Ala.

Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Susan Dryden Whitson ‘91 Former White House press secretary, Office of the First Lady Washington, Va.

2007-2008 New Members


The College of Education’s National Advisory Council is a network of college alumni and friends who advocate to those outside the college and guide those working within it. Members of the council are appointed by the dean after being nominated by council members and college leadership. Appointments to the National Advisory Council are for a three-year term.

[National Advisory Council]

The council convenes in Auburn twice a year—once in the fall and spring—and works as needed through committees and correspondence the rest of the year. Members serve on one of four committees: Academic Affairs, Development, External Relations or Internal Relations. The chairs of these committees, along with the council chair, comprise the council’s Executive Committee. Advisory council members epitomize the college’s mission to build better futures for all through their professional contributions. These professionals and retired individuals represent private, public and nonprofit business and organizations throughout the country. In addition their council service, council members regularly attend the college’s special events and spread its message through their involvement in other Auburn University programs, committees and boards. To recommend a someone for service on the council, or to inquire yourself about serving on the council, contact Michael Tullier, APR, the college’s director of external relations, at mtullier@auburn.edu or call 334.844.1324.

Council funds nearly $4K in annual mini-grants Through personal annual contributions of at least $100 each, members of the National Advisory Council fund mini-grants for College of Education faculty. Many of these grants fund start-up programs or help new faculty establish research programs—often providing seed money or the leverage needed by faculty to pursue larger external grants later.

Executive C o mm i t t e e Council Chair

Chair, External R e l at i o n s C o mm i t t e e

This year, the National Advisory Council awarded two grants totaling $3,850 to:

James “Jim” Manley ‘60

William D. “Bill” Langley ‘63

Chair, Internal R e l at i o n s C o mm i t t e e

Chair, D e v e l o p m e n t C o mm i t t e e

Retired banker, SunTrust Bank Decatur, Ga.

Business Owner, Sidewinder Inc. Columbus, Ga.

• Dr. Leah Robinson, an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, for “Stepping Stones to Physical Activity: Teachers to Implement High Autonomy Physical Activity Programs”

• Dr. Peggy Shippen, an assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation and Special Education, for “Investigating the Effectiveness of a Computer-Based Reading Program for Incarcerated Youth”

Past council mini-grant activity can be found at education.auburn.edu/alumni/nac. Chair, Academic A f fa i r s C o mm i t t e e

See all the faces of our council members at education.auburn.edu/ alumni/nac Dr. Carol Edmundson Hutcheson ‘69 Retired principal Columbus, Ga.

Dr. Joyce Reynolds Ringer ‘59 Retired executive director, Georgia Advocacy Office Auburn, Ala.

Dr. J. Carlton Smith ‘67 Retired superintendent Vestavia Hills, Ala.

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

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AU coaches find success A

uburn University College of Education graduates can be seen in a variety of places in addition to the classroom. One needs to look no further than the golf course at the Auburn University Club or the sidelines of Jordan-Hare Stadium to see two College of Education graduates in action. Kim Evans ‘81, head coach for AU Women’s Golf, and James Willis ‘03, linebackers coach for AU Football, both hold degrees from the college. Evans, who earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education in 1981, is in her 14th season as head coach. The idea of returning to her alma mater was “awesome” and made her “feel like a kid on Christmas morning,” she said. “I loved going to school here, so it was a very special opportunity when I was able to come back and coach at Auburn. I’m proud to be able to tell recruits and other people that I am an Auburn graduate.” Willis, a former Auburn Tigers linebacker, returned in 2006 to coach linebackers. He received his bachelor’s degree in adult education in 2003 after taking time off to pursue a NFL playing career. He played seven seasons in the NFL from 1993 to 1999 as a linebacker with the Green Bay Packers, Philadelphia Eagles and Seattle Seahawks. He also played linebacker for one season in 2001 for the XFL’s Birmingham Bolts. “Having a chance to come back to a place where I pretty much grew up is special,” Willis said. “Being back around a lot of familiar faces and friends and seeing some of the same old things I used to see made me really miss it; it is good to come back.”

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008


On a daily basis, both coaches see the benefit of having degrees in education. Willis believes that if it were not for the things he learned in the classroom, he would not be the kind of coach he is today.

[Alumni]

“I learned how to communicate with my players, how to evaluate players and their needs, how to find out the best way to teach them and the best way to get those guys to learn,” he said. Evans has found her education degree to be particularly useful in her coaching career. “Coaching and education are both about communication. You have to be able to effectively communicate with individuals and a team, whether it’s inside a classroom or outside on the golf course,” she said.

“Coaching and education are both about communication.” K i m E va n s ‘ 81 Willis agreed that his degree in education benefits everything he does as a coach. He can see it influence the way he schedules his day, plans meetings, assesses films and applies special attention to an athlete learning aspects of the team’s defense. The coaches try to teach their players more than just the “ins” and “outs” of their respective athletic sport. Willis teaches players that, literally, there is more to life than football, and that there is a real world out there. “A common trap we all fall into as athletes is that we kind of live in a bubble, thinking that football is life and that it will always be here,” Willis said. “So I try to bring our players back down to reality every day and always talk about life and not just football, but also how football can give lifelong lessons.” Evans, who was recently inducted into the National Golf Coaches Association Hall of Fame, also stresses important life lessons to her players outside of golf. “Number one, I teach my players to have a great attitude. I tell them the only two things that can’t be taken from you are your education and your attitude, unless you let them.”

on the field with education degrees Maria Martinez and Coach Kim Evans at a NCAA regional tournament A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All 61


2006  2005  2004  2003  2002  2001  2000  1999  1998  1997  1996  1995  1994  1993  1992  1991  1990  1989  1988  1987  1986  1985  1984  1983 

Dr. J. Terry Jenkins ‘83 Hedy White Manry ‘71 Gordon M. Sherman ‘57 Dr. Joyce Reynolds Ringer ‘59 Dr. Shirley Kelley Spears ‘71 Dr. Betty McClendon DeMent ‘71 Dr. Wayne Teague ‘50 Dr. J. Floyd Hall ‘48 Alice “Ruthie” Bolton ‘90 Dr. Earl “Buddy” Weaver ‘62 Kay E. Ivey ‘67 Wayne T. Smith ‘68 Dr. John M. Goff ‘72 no receipient Reita Ethel Clanton ‘74 Dr. Marilyn Clark Beck ‘66 Jeanne Swanner Robertson ‘67 Dr. John H. “Pete” Mosley ‘58 Dr. Gerald S. Leischuck ‘64 Dr. Ann M. Neely ‘77 no receipient Dr. Robert L. Saunders ‘47 Dr. Merle Royston Friesen ‘76 Dr. Wayne Teague ‘50

Raley ‘71 named 2007 Outstanding Alumnus

Dr. J. Phillip Raley ‘71, a three-time graduate of the College of Education, was selected for and presented with the college’s 2007 Outstanding Alumnus Award. Raley earned a master’s degree in counseling and guidance in 1971, and educational leadership master’s and doctorate degrees in 1973 and 1986, respectively.

His 37-year teaching career began in Troy City (Ala.) Schools in 1969 after completing a bachelor’s in social studies at Troy University. Raley relocated to Opelika City (Ala.) Schools in 1970 as a counselor at Opelika High School—the start of a 36-year Opelika career that included serving as a counselor, principal and assistant superintendent. He retired as superintendent of Opelika City Schools in 2006—a position in which he spent nearly half his career. “Dr. Raley is a tremendous advocate, not only for education, but specifically for our College of Education,” Dean Frances Kochan noted. “Many of our college’s field-based and professional development programs would not be what they are today without his involvement, support and partnership focus. Under his leadership, Opelika City Schools has remained a vital component to many of our school-based programs and initiatives.” Raley’s successful tenure as superintendent was well documented and acclaimed. He was named “superintendent of the year” five different times: 2007 by the Alabama School Communicators Association in January; 2006 by the Alabama Community Education Program; 1998 by the University of Montevallo; 1997 by the American Association of School Administrators; and 1991 by the East Alabama Vocational Education Council. His other honors include the Excellence in Educational Leadership Award (1997) from Auburn’s College of Education and Spirit of Opelika Award (2004) from the Opelika Chamber of Commerce. “A true test of the quality of the leadership a person gives an organization is the condition of that organization when he leaves. Dr. Raley left our school board in the best position you can possibly imagine,” said O.D. Alsobrook III, chairman of the Opelika School Board. “He was certainly skilled in everything from infrastructure to hiring quality staff—administrators and teachers—and was a real visionary in keeping the school board abreast of where we should be,” Alsobrook continued. “The caveat to that is doing it within the financial constraints given him. He did a masterful job of positioning us to where we needed to be with the money he had to work with.” Despite his retirement, Raley still remains committed to and supportive of educating and improving the lives of others. In 2007, he was named director of Achievement Center-Easter Seals in Opelika. The nonprofit organization, which serves five east Alabama counties, provides vocational development and extended employment programs for individuals with physical, mental and developmental disabilities, assists them in obtaining competitive or extended employment, and helps maximize their independent-living skills.

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008

His current civic and community service includes volunteer work as a board member of the Opelika Arts Association and Opelika’s First United Methodist Church. He is a previous board member of the Opelika Chamber of Commerce and Colonial Bank of Lee County, and also served on the College of Education’s National Advisory Council. His wife, Sara, is a 1983 graduate of the college with a degree in early childhood education.


Broughton ‘05 dedicated to helping those with disabilities

S

erving people with disabilities is second nature for H. Gray Broughton, a 2005 graduate of the College of Education with an master’s in rehabilitation counseling. Broughton, who is passionate about serving those with special education needs, acts as chief executive officer and owner of his own private rehabilitation company. Broughton Associates, Inc. has served the Richmond, Va., area since 1982, with the exception of the years 1999-2002, during which time Broughton served as commissioner of the Virginia Department of Rehabilitation Services. During his tenure as commissioner, Broughton was responsible for five major programmatic rehabilitation areas in the state of Virginia, including all vocational rehabilitation field and regional offices, disability determination services regional offices, the Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center, community-based programs, and administrative services. As provider of a range of contemporary rehabilitation service needs, Broughton’s company offers medical coordination services and disability management advisement, vocational assessments and job placement for worker’s compensation claimants, and expert witness testimony. Indeed, Broughton, himself, may be described as a “jack-of-all-trades.” His numerous professional titles, all of which are highly respected in the field of rehabilitation, include certified rehabilitation counselor, licensed rehabilitation provider, and American Board of Vocational Experts diplomate.

community living for young people with disabilities making the transition to the adult world. Broughton serves as a member of the board of directors of Northstar Academy, an independent school that provides individualized instruction in a structured and nurturing environment to students in grades K-12 with a broad range of learning differences in the Richmond, Va., area. The school’s purpose is to strengthen student skills to allow them to return to their home schools and to provide a full academic curriculum through the 12th grade for students who may benefit from the program. Broughton assumed responsibility as Northstar’s chairman of the board last year, and already, under his direction, significant changes have occurred that indicate future stability and growth for the school. According to Beth Daly, former chair of development for the Northstar Academy board of directors, “annual giving increased last year by an astounding 254 percent.” Broughton has overseen the hiring of a new director of development and the completion of a five-year strategic plan. Not only has he tripled the endowment fund, but he has begun the process of partnership that will create a multi-functional community for people with disabilities. The proposed NuSolutions Partnership will include Northstar Academy, the Faison School for Autism, a transition to life/vocation/higher education program, an independent living center for people with special needs, and a special needs college that will prepare students with disabilities for careers. “This is a wonderful opportunity” said Broughton. “We are looking for a new campus for Northstar Academy which will be at least five times the size of the current campus and will increase the school’s capacity for students from 100 to 250.”

Broughton’s advocacy is also evident in the concept of total

Education professors, students recognized by ΦΚΦ for academic excellence Drs. Karen Rabren and Craig B. Darch, both of the Department of Rehabilitation and Special Education, were initiated into the Auburn University Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi. Rabren, an associate professor of special education, is the director of the Auburn Transition Institute and has been on the college faculty since 2000. Darch, a Humana-GermanySherman distinguished professor, is a professor of special education and has been at Auburn since 1982. In addition, Phi Kappa Phi also inducted 15 College of Education students in December 2007. Phi Kappa Phi, founded in 1897, is the nation’s oldest, largest and most selective all-discipline honor society. It promotes the pursuit of excellence in all fields of higher education; recognizes outstanding achievement by students, faculty and others through election to membership and through various awards for distinguished achievement; and engages the community of scholars in service to others.

The Auburn University Chapter was established in 1914 and initiates more than 400 members annually. Membership is open to qualified scholars with integrity and high ethical standards from all academic disciplines.

Fall 2007 College of Education student inductees Denise K. Adkison Amy Whitcomb Arrant Bradley Maverick Bearden Elizabeth Hardy Fain Donna Hester Black Flannagan Carol Goodman Gudauskas Ivy M. Hopkins Julia Renee Huff

Stephanie Lynn Littman Timothy A. McWhorter Emily Beth Mills Katherine Leslie Stamps Laura Ross Stephenson Lisa A. Vogel Shelley D. Walls Summer Paige Watts

A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

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Let us know what’s happening in your life! Submit your news, as well as updates to your contact information, using the online alumni update form on the home page of education.auburn.edu

1959 Terry McCollum, senior vice president of claims for ALFA Insurance, retired after 43 years with the company. McCollum, who earned a bachelor’s in general social science education, was named claims adjustor in 1962. Five years later he was promoted to district claims manager. He was named senior vice president of claims in 1979. His wife, Anna Salter McCollum, received a master’s in general education from AU in 1958.

1962 Evelyn Branch Bond was named Community Course Teacher of the Year by the AU Outreach Program Office (OPO). Bond, who has been teaching community courses for more than 30 years, instructs one of OPO’s most popular courses, “Computers for Older Adults”. Bond earned an master’s in general education.

1966 Dr. Ruth Cranford Ash retired as deputy state superintendent of education instructional services

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in the Alabama State Department of Education in March 2008. She joined the department in October 2004. Previously, she was dean of the Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education and Professional Studies at Samford University, a teacher, assistant principal, director of curriculum and staff development, assistant superintendent and superintendent in Alabama public schools. A twotime AU graduate, she received a bachelor’s in English/language arts education in 1966 and a doctorate in administration of elementary and secondary education in 1985.

1967 Alice Beattie, a retired teacher from Collier Co. Public Schools in Naples, Fla., started a “Cat in the Hat” reading program for children. James earned a bachelor’s in elementary education. Jeanne Swanner Robertson released a new CD entitled “Flat-out Funny,” which was featured on XM Radio. Robertson earned a bachelor’s in health/physical education.

Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Pamela Sullivan Wilson, a teacher at Avery’s Creek Elem. in Arden, N.C., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed a bachelor’s in elementary education.

1970 Cynthia Southern Jackson, a secondary English teacher, was named teacher of the year at Opelika (Ala.) Learning Center. She earned a bachelor’s in general education in 1970 and a master’s in elementary education in 1980. Nelda Garrett Lawrence, who earned a bachelor’s in education, has been teaching in Georgia for six years after retiring with 25 years of teaching social studies in Alabama. She currently teaches at Northside High School in Warner Robins, Ga., where she was recognized as a STAR (Student Teacher Achievement Recognition) teacher. Beth Gregory St. Jean is employed by the Georgia Teacher Alternative

Preparation Program as an alternative certification supervisor. She supervises candidates who have become teachers after working previously in math, science or special education careers. She retired from the Cobb Co. School District in Atlanta in 2005. St. Jean received a bachelor’s in elementary education.

1971 Dr. Barbara Jane Holt serves as director of Head Start Knowledge and Information Management Services in Washington, D.C., the central source for disseminating information and resources from Head Start to teachers and parents. Holt earned a bachelor’s in secondary education in 1971, a master’s in counseling education in 1975, and a doctorate in health policy in 1993.

1972 Linda Rowell Darnell, a teacher at Cary Woods Elem. School in Auburn, Ala., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She earned both bachelor’s

(1972) and master’s (1986) degrees in elementary education. Miria King-Garner is employed by the Etowah Co. School System in Gadsden, Ala. In 2007, She began her 36th year with the school system as principal of Gaston School, a K-12 school. She earned her bachelor’s in elementary education in 1972 and her master’s in education in 1975. Donald Layne Smith was one of seven former Lawrence Co., Ala., players and coaches inducted into the Lawrence Co. Sports Hall of Fame in April 2008. A 1972 graduate with a bachelor’s in health and physical education, his coaching and teaching career has included experience at Moulton Middle School, Lawrence Co. High School, Speake High School and East Lawrence High School. From 1985 to 1999, ELHS was one of the most successful baseball programs in the state, with his teams never having a losing season. He retired from coaching baseball in 2000 at ELHS, but returned to coaching—this time softball—in 2004. In 2007, he began coaching


softball at Lawrence Co. High School.

1973 Alice

Edwards Yarbrough, a second-grade teacher at Dean Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala., was named the school’s teacher of the year. Yarbrough received a bachelor’s in elementary education in 1973 and a master’s in general education in 1977.

1974 Mary Johnston Murphy of Jenks (Okla.) West Intermediate School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed a bachelor’s in elementary education.

1975 Patricia Spinks Woody teaches at Cary Woods Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in elementary education.

1977 Debbie Wehle Anderson serves as assistant principal for Mitchell Elem. School in Tampa, Fla., and consults for several national publishers in the area of reading. Anderson earned a bachelor’s in elementary education. Jennifer Sudduth Williamson, who retired from teaching after 28 years, now works as a decorating consultant

and owner of Tropical Woods & Flooring in Foley, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in vocational education. Dr. Charles Spraggins, a teacher at Columbus (Ga.) High School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. After completing a bachelor’s in biological sciences at Auburn in 1975, Spraggins completed a bachelor’s in education (1977), master’s in science education (1979) and doctorate in general science education (1984) in the AU College of Education.

program for her contribution to the successful integration of technology in education in K-12 schools. Rice earned a bachelor’s in office administration in 1979, and bachelor’s (1983) and master’s (1989) degrees in business education.

1980 Beverly Bains Anderson is employed by Oneonta (Ala.) City Schools

1979

Dr. Lilli Land, principal at Auburn (Ala.) Early Education Center, was named Alabama’s National Distinguished Principal by the National Association of Elementary School

[Alumni Notes] Principals in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Education. Land earned a bachelor’s in 1980, a master’s in 1982, an education specialist degree in 1989 and a doctorate in 1998— all in early childhood education.

Alumni Spotlight

Smith ‘68 Named Best CEO in Tennessee, U.S.

1978 Lynn Hart Edwins of Calusa Elem. School in Miami, Fla., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed bachelor’s (1978) and master’s (1980) degrees in elementary education.

as a kindergarten teacher. Anderson earned a bachelor’s in early childhood education in 1980 and her National Board Certification in early childhood education in 2002.

W ay n e T. S m i t h ‘ 6 8 has

garnered high praise for his work as chairman, president and chief executive officer of Community Health System. The Franklin, Tenn.based company owns, operates or leases more than 120 general acute care hospitals in 28 states.

Business Tennessee named Smith its “CEO of the Year” in October 2007 for his success in overseeing the largest publicly traded health care company in the country. Institutional Investor echoed those sentiments and named Smith the “Best Healthcare CEO” in America in January 2008. Since Smith’s arrival in 1997, CHS has grown from $742 million in net revenue to more than $4.0 billion. This represents a compound annual growth rate of 24 percent— the strongest record of revenue growth in the industry. For the last four years, Smith has been selected by the readers of Modern Healthcare Magazine as one of the “100 Most Powerful People in Healthcare.”

Debbie Rice, technology coordinator for Auburn (Ala.) City Schools, was nationally recognized by the “Making It Happen”

Smith, who earned his bachelor’s in general education in 1968 and master’s in general education in 1969, serves as the college’s Campaign Committee chair and was the college’s inaugural Keystone Leader-in-Residence in 2003. In addition to his personal contributions, two distinguished professorships and an endowed undergraduate scholarships are credited to him through contributions made on his behalf by the Humana Corporation during his 23 years of service as the company’s president and chief operating officer. Smith’s wife, Cheryl, is also a 1968 College of Education graduate.

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1982 Dr. Merry Slagh Boggs serves as associate professor and assistant department chair at Texas A&M Commerce in Commerce, Texas. She earned a bachelor’s in elementary education. Dr. Terry Roberson is serving as interim vice president for academic affairs for the 2007-2008 academic year at the University of Montevallo in Montevallo, Ala. He earned his doctorate in educational leadership Deborah Williamson, a teacher at Trenton (Fla.)

Elem. School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. Her bachelor’s is in art education. Jerry Williamson, horticulture instructor, was named teacher of the year at Opelika (Ala.) High School. Williamson earned a bachelor’s in agricultural education.

1983 Dr. J. Terry Jenkins has received many accolades during his 36-year education career. Having spent

28 years as a superintendent, Jenkins has been named “superintendent of the year” in both Alabama and Georgia. In 2007, he was named one of the top 10 tech savvy superintendents in the nation by eSchool News. He received his doctorate in general education.

1984 Dr. Camille Wright currently serves as director of secondary instruction for Madison City (Ala.) Schools. She is responsible for curriculum and instruction for grades 7-12. Wright, a former principal, earned her bachelor’s (1984) and

Alumni Spotlight

ia Saunders ‘70 named Georg Superintendent of the Year D r . R o n S au n d e r s , a 1970

College of Education graduate, was selected by the Georgia School Superintendents Association as the 2008 Georgia Superintendent of the Year. He was unanimously nominated for this honor by the Barrow County Board of Education, where he has served as superintendent since 1998. Under his leadership, the school system has dramatically increased its teacher retention rate, drastically reduced its student dropout percentage, and increased the professional learning opportunities for teachers almost tenfold. In May 2007, the school system received an “exemplary” rating from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Saunders was also named one of the nation’s top 10 most “tech savvy” K-12 executives for his outstanding ed-tech leadership and vision by eSchool News. Among the many reasons he was selected was the establishment of the “Direct to Discovery” program that dramatically expands learning opportunities for middle and high school students and his work in creating long-term educational partnerships with the Georgia’s three tier-1 research universities.

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master’s (1986) degrees in elementary education. Dr. Gary Preston is an associate professor of physical education at North Georgia College and State University in Dahlonega. Preston earned a bachelor’s (1984) and master’s (1986) in physical education.

1985 Susan Bolen is pursuing her doctorate in elementary education at the University of Georgia. Bolen, a former thirdgrade classroom teacher who expects to graduate in December 2009, also serves as an instructional coach at Timothy Road Elem. School and Fowler Drive Elem. School in Athens, Ga. Upon graduation, Bolen hopes to become an elementary school principal. Bolen received a bachelor’s in elementary education.

1986 Dr. Lanie Adair Dornier, department chair of Health and Exercise Sciences at Louisiana Tech University, was awarded the Roger Thomas Luffey Endowed Professorship for her contributions and leadership to the department and university. Dornier earned an master’s in health and physical education in 1986 and a doctorate in health and human performance in 1990. Mary Michele Pritchett, a teacher at Riverchase Elem. School in Hoover, Ala., is among the nearly

8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed a bachelor’s in elementary education.

1987 Cheryl McDonald Hilyer, a kindergarten teacher at Carver Primary School in Opelika, Ala., was named as the school’s 2007 teacher of the year. She earned both bachelor’s (1987) and master’s (1995) degrees in early childhood education. Mary Jane McDade Loftus teaches at Carver Elem. School in Opelika, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in elementary education. Michelle Kemp Ramsey, teacher and literacy coach at Beulah Elem. School in Valley, Ala., had her second book, Skill-Building Math Activities Kids Can’t Resist!, published. Ramsey earned a bachelor’s in fashion merchandising in 1983 and a bachelor’s in elementary education in 1987. Paul Rykowski, a teacher at Leesburg (Fla.) High School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. He completed a bachelor’s in general social science education. Blair Suggs Sharon iis a teacher in Alexander


Alumni Spotlight

City (Ala.) Schools. She earned bachelor’s (1987) and master’s (1990) degrees in education. Melvin Smith, a special events coordinator in AU’s Career Development Services, is president of the Alabama Association of Colleges and Employers. He received the 2007 AACE Success Award as the Outstanding Placement Professional. Smith earned a bachelor’s in elementary education in 1987, a master’s in student development in 1995 and a master’s in elementary education in 1998.

1988 Ann Day Carey serves as executive director of HomeAid Atlanta, a nonprofit organization working to provide transitional housing for the temporarily homeless in partnership with the Greater Atlanta Home Builders Association. She has a master’s degree in education. Tommy Hunter was named principal at Ardmore High School in Athens, Ala. Hunter, whose bachelor’s is in human exercise science, previously served as assistant principal at Elkmont High School since 2004. He taught science and coached football, softball and baseball coach at Elkmont since 1998. Melinda Pierce McCollough, a teacher at Elba (Ala.) Elem. School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to

Muschamp ‘96 Continues Success in College Coaching Will

M u s c h a mp ‘96, current defensive coordinator and linebackers coach at the University of Texas, is one of the most respected assistant coaches in college football. Just last season, Muschamp was a finalist for the Broyles Award, an honor given to the nation’s top assistant coach.

Muschamp, who received a master’s degree in adult education from the college, moved to Texas in 2007 after spending two seasons as defensive coordinator and defensive backs coach at his alma mater, Auburn University. Before Muschamp’s arrival in Auburn in 2006, he worked under the tutelage of then-LSU Head Coach Nick Saban from 2001 to 2004, and then followed Saban to the Miami Dolphins for the 2005 NFL season. During Muschamp’s time at Auburn and LSU, his defense teams received national recognition for ranking in the top 10 for total defense and scoring defense. Muschamp is able to apply what he learned in the classroom to his time spent instructing on the football field. He sees coaching as a method of teaching and believes that teaching is to inspire learning. “You learn a lot in adult education about dealing with mature adults and helping them from a standpoint of learning and being able to handle different situations,” Muschamp said. The coach also sees his degree being put to use in his daily life. Muschamp views each day as a way to keep learning through our interactions with others and being able to relate to everyone’s differences. “Nobody is the same…I’ve been able to apply what I have learned in the classroom to everyday life through working with people. That’s the most important thing about being able to relate with people,” he continued. Muschamp also aims to instill life lessons in his players on the field that will benefit them at the end of their playing careers. He achieves this by stressing three things— discipline, commitment and hard work—and he believes that football is a great tool in making those correlations. “I think football is a great teacher of life in being able to handle adverse situations and tough circumstances,” he said. “I want our kids to have that carryover into life.”

achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed a bachelor’s in elementary education.

1989 Twinkle

Andress Cahas been serving as Ala. Gov. Bob Riley’s senior adviser since 2007. Cavanaugh is the first woman to lead a vanaugh

major political party in Alabama, when she was elected as the chairman of the Alabama Republican Party in 2005. She has worked for the Republican National Committee

and made a bid for state treasurer in 2002. Her bachelor’s degree is in secondary school science and social studies.

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Parker honored for distinguished service to Alabama State University

Dr. Patsy Boyd Parker ‘70 has dedicated her life to students across the state of Alabama. An education consultant and retired school counselor, Parker has shown tireless commitment to providing young people with opportunities to excel academically and live fulfilled lives. Parker provided 27 years of devoted service to the Alabama State University Board of Trustees. She was first appointed to the board in 1981 by the late Alabama governor George Wallace and served until 1996. Parker then received her second appointment by former governor Fob James Jr. and served from 1996 to 2007. During her tenure, Parker served as vice chairwoman, and she holds the distinction of being the first chairwoman of the board.

Parker was recently honored by ASU when she acted as the university’s commencement speaker in May 2007. During her address at the university’s 275th commencement exercise, Parker advised graduates to meet the challenges of the time and make the most of what they have. She also encouraged them to achieve greatness and leave their own footprints in the sand. The university further recognized Parker by presenting her with an honorary doctorate of humane letters. ASU President Joe A. Lee and the Board of Trustees bestowed this honor upon Parker as recognition and admiration of her many years of service to the university. Parker, who graduated as class valedictorian from Alabama State University in 1961, earned her master’s degree in counselor education from Auburn in 1970. While at Auburn, she was instrumental in organizing the university’s first black sorority, Delta Sigma Theta. She and her husband William live in Opelika, Ala. and are members of the college’s Patrons of the Keystone-Dean’s Circle. She serves as a member of the college’s National Advisory Council. Leann Sampson White was named Alabama’s 2007 No Child Left Behind American Star of Teaching by the U.S. Department of Education. The honor recognizes one teacher in each state and Washington, D.C. White, who earned a bachelor’s (1989) and master’s (1992) in elementary education, is a fifth-grade teacher at Dean Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala.

1990 Kimberly Burns Cobb, a teacher at Clay-Chalkville High School in Pinson, Ala., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. Her bachelor’s is in secondary school English education.

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Mary Hendrix Knight, a reading coach at McDavid-Jones Elem. School in Citronelle, Ala. (Mobile Co. Public Schools), is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed a bachelor’s in early childhood education. Leigh Nichols Owen is a teacher at Auburn (Ala.) High School. Owen earned a bachelor’s (1990) and master’s (1994) in behavior disturbance. Dr. Sandra WallingsSpivey is director of secondary education for Madison Co. Schools in Huntsville, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s in math and English education in 1990, a master’s in math education in 1992

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and a doctorate in educational leadership in 2004.

1991 James Aulner, who earned a bachelor’s (1991) and master’s (1997) in general social science education, retired from the Alabama National Guard in 2007 after 20 years of service, including duty in Iraq. He is currently vice principal of Valley (Ala.) High School. Dr. Stephanie Danley teaches at Ogletree Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s (1991), master’s (1994) and doctorate (1997) in elementary education. Margaret St. John, who earned her master’s in secondary school English, received a 2007 Educator of Distinction award from the Coca-Cola Scholars

Foundation. The award, given nationally to 250 educators, is based on nominations from high school student Coca-Cola Scholar winners. An English teacher at Auburn (Ala.) High School, she retired at the end of the 2006-07 school year after teaching 20 years. Lesley Susan Teem of T.T. Minor Elem. School in Seattle, Wash., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She earned master’s degrees in secondary school English education (1991) and rehabilitation and special education (1996).

1992 Thomas Kenneth Bennett is director of

music at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Auburn, Ala. He earned bachelor’s (1992) and master’s (2007) degrees in vocal music education. Lisa Ard Brackett is a teacher at Newton (Ala.) School. She earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. John Pennisi, English and journalism teacher at Auburn (Ala.) High School, was selected as the Auburn City Schools secondary teacher of the year. He was also named by the Alabama Department of Education to the “Sweet 16” list of finalists for Alabama Teacher of the Year. Pennisi earned bachelor’s (1992) and master’s (1996) degrees in secondary English language arts education.


1993

Crouse’s doctorate from AU is in education.

Chris Brandt works as a teacher and basketball coach at Auburn (Ala.) High School. He earned bachelor’s (1993) and master’s (2006) degrees in adult education.

Kristy Lynn Ray Shaw, a teacher at Wetumpka (Ala.) Elem. School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She has bachelor’s (1994) and master’s (1995) degrees in early childhood education.

Steve Coker, who earned a bachelor’s in physical education, works at Opelika (Ala.) High School. Lewis Graydon was named Sanford Middle School’s Teacher of the Year. Graydon, a social studies teacher in Lee Co., Ala., received his bachelor’s in general social science 1993 and his master’s in 1994. Christina Graham Stamps works as a parttime math instructor at Jefferson State Community College in Hoover, Ala. Stamps earned her bachelor’s in secondary education/mathematics.

1994 Jennifer Owens Cook of Rome, Ga., is a security analyst for CARE International. She earned bachelor’s degrees in secondary education (1994) and anthropology (1996) while at Auburn. Dr. David Crouse authored his first novel, War by Other Means. He is currently the director of technology for Roanoke City (Ala.) Schools. He previously taught at Opelika (Ala.) High School and served as assistant principal at Opelika Middle School.

Jennifer Lynn Welch Thompson, a teacher at Gardendale (Ala.) Elem. School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She earned a bachelor’s in music education.

1995 Cynthia Ann Bishop teaches at Drake Middle School in Auburn, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in secondary math education. Robin Landreth is a second-grade teacher in Five Points, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s in early childhood education. Julie Chipman Moncrief is as a speech pathologist for Tri-Rehab in Auburn, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s in speech pathology in 1995 and a master’s in communication disorders in 1998.

1996 Perry Outlaw is a teacher at Carver Elem. School

in Opelika, Ala. Outlaw earned a bachelor’s in physical education.

1997 Dr. Jerlando F. L. Jackson is an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He completed his master’s in higher education administration at Auburn in 1997. His research interests include administrative diversity, executive behavior and academic entrepreneurship in higher and postsecondary education. He served as

director and instructor of a course at the American Educational Research Association’s annual meet-

ing held in New York, N.Y., in March 2008. The course advanced the research skills and competencies of graduate students in the area

of African Americans and education research. Christine Carmichael Sexton, of Gresham Elem. School in Birmingham, Ala., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. Her bachelor’s is in learning disabilities.

1998 Pepper linger

Hilleke Delis a special educa-

Alumni Spotlight

Women Tigers’ Courtside rs ‘Voice’ Retires after 40 Yea S u s a n “ N u n ” N u n n e l ly

director of Campus Recreation at Auburn University, retired in January 2008 after 40 years of service.

Nunnelly, who holds two degrees from the College of Education, served in a multitude of roles during her time on the Plains. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in health/physical education in 1970, Nunnelly taught at Berry High School in Birmingham, Ala. She returned to Auburn in 1971 to serve as a graduate assistant in the then Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. After receiving her master’s degree in education in 1971, Nunnelly taught in the department as an instructor and served as director of Intramural Sports. From 1973 until 1976, she coached the AU Women’s Basketball team. She was appointed assistant director of Recreational Services in 1976 and director in 1984. Nunnelly served as faculty adviser for the AU cheerleaders from 1989 to 2004, and has been a member of the Camp War Eagle staff since the program was established in 1994. AU Women’s Basketball fans will recognize Nunnelly’s voice as that of the courtside announcer at home games.

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tion teacher at Samford Middle School in Opelika, Ala. She completed a bachelor’s in rehabilitation services in 1998 and a master’s in special education in 2000. Dr. Suzanne WoodsGroves accepted a position at the University of Iowa. Beginning fall 2008, she will serve as an assistant professor of special education. She earned a bachelor’s in early childhood education in 1998, as well as a master’s (1999) and doctorate (2007) in rehabilitation and special education. Casey Carrigee Harlan, of Vestavia Hills High School in Birmingham, Ala., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She holds a bachelor’s (1998) in foreign languageFrench education and a master’s (1999) in secondary school English education from Auburn. Dr. Timothy Loomis is an officer in the U.S. Air Force at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico. He earned a doctorate in exercise physiology. William Walker is an English teacher at Butts Co. Schools in Jackson, Ga. He recently trained with Erin Gruwell in Long Beach, Calif., and is now a Freedom Writer Teacher. He has AU bachelor’s degrees in English (1995) and secondary school English (1998).

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1999 R. Allan Allday accepted a new position at Oklahoma State University in fall 2007 as an assistant professor of special education. Allday, who earned his master’s (1999) and a doctorate (2004) in special education, received a grant through the Fulbright Scholar Program to teach the spring 2008 semester at a university in Kiev, Ukraine. Allday’s wife, Carrie, is also an Auburn alumna and works as a special educator. Kristen Marie Bland Roberts, a teacher in DeKalb Co. (Ga.) Schools, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. Her bachelor’s is in exercise science. Jennifer Sand Spencer, a fifth-grade teacher at Wrights Mill Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala., was named the school’s teacher of the year. Her bachelor’s degree in elementary education. Jonathan Spidle serves as president of Fitness Together Franchise Corp. in Birmingham, Ala. Spidle earned a bachelor’s in health promotions. Kris Strickland, who earned a bachelor’s in science education, is a chemistry teacher and track coach at Paul W. Bryant High School in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Last year, his track team (at Madison

Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Central High School) won the Mississippi Track and Field 5A State Championship.

rill earned a bachelor’s in secondary school mathematics education.

2000

Luci Page Monk of Cannongate Elem. School in Sharpsburg, Ga., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed a bachelor’s in early childhood education.

Karen Berry is a teacher at Carver Elem. School in Opelika, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s in early childhood education. Scott Burnett, who is employed by Trussville City Schools (Ala.) as a P.E. teacher, received National Board Certification for teachers in 2005. He is mentoring two other candidates as they purse the certification as well. He earned his bachelor’s in physical education in 2000 and his master’s in higher education administration in 2001. Brandon Cobia serves as wellness director for Shaklee Corporation, a homebased wellness business he runs with his wife in Nolensville, Tenn. Cobia received his bachelor’s in exercise science in 2000 and his master’s in health promotion in 2001. Kevin Garrison serves as an instructor at Blue Schoolhouse in San Marcos La Laguna, Guatemala. Garrison earned a bachelor’s in general social science education. Read more on page 76. Dr. Chad Merrill, a teacher at Vestavia Hills High School in Birmingham, Ala., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. Mer-

Valerie Stephens Whitt is an assistant principal and fifth-grade teacher at St. Rose Academy in Birmingham, Ala. She completed a bachelor’s in elementary education.

2001 Courtney Cooper, who works as a physical education teacher, earned her master’s in health and physical education in 2007 from Columbus State University. Cooper earned a bachelor’s in physical education in 2001 from Auburn. Shelley Henthorne is pursuing her doctorate in special education at Auburn. A two-time AU alumna, she received a bachelor’s in special education-mild learning and behavioral disorders in 2001 and a master’s in special education-collaborative teacher in 2003. Karissa Everett Lang, a teacher at Leon Sheffield Elem. School in Decatur, Ala., is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in

2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. She completed a bachelor’s in elementary education. Jason Noah works as an administrative assistant for Faith Presbyterian Church in Birmingham, Ala. He earned a bachelor’s from Auburn in history and English in 2000, and a master’s in secondary English language arts education in 2001.

2002 Jenny Earnest Galimore, a third-grade teacher at Yarbrough Elem. School in Auburn, Ala., was named the school’s 2007 teacher of the year. She earned a bachelor’s (2002) and master’s (2004) degree in elementary education. Stephanie Suggs Mila teacher at Hewitt-Trussville (Ala.) High School, is among the nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. Her master’s is in general science education. lard,

Tina Hayles Williams teaches at West Forest Elementary School in Opelika, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s in elementary education in 2002 and a master’s in reading education in 2005.

2003 Anita Autio Bryan was named outstanding biology teacher for the state


of Alabama. Bryan, who resides in Mobile, Ala., earned her master’s in biology education. Emily Hage Craig works as a counselor at Memorial Parkway Junior High School in Katy, Texas. Craig earned a bachelor’s in history/English in 1996 and master’s in counseling in 2003. Brook Galloway Davidis employed by the DeKalb Co. (Ala.) Board of Education as a teacher. Davidson earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education in 2003.

son

Ashley Moore is assistant director of admissions at Dublin School in Dublin, N.H. Her bachelor’s is in physical education.

Jordan Phillips is a teacher and Student Government adviser at Crossville (Ala.) High School. In 2005, he was named a finalist in the History Channel’s “Save Our History” project with his World War II oral history project of DeKalb veterans. He was named vice president of Landmarks of DeKalb, a local historical society that restores and preserves local history. His bachelor’s is in social science education. Wendy Arthur Weimar is a teacher at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School. She earned a bachelor’s in secondary math education. Kisha Tolbert Woods of Tarrant (Ala.) Elem. School, is among the

nearly 8,500 teachers nationwide to achieve National Board Certification in 2007 from the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards. Her bachelor’s is in early childhood education.

2004 Callie Best teaches at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School. Her bachelor’s degree is in general science education. Jana Bice Hall teaches at Dean Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in elementary education. Kelly Hollingsworth, a music teacher at Auburn (Ala.) Early Education Center, was named the

school’s 2007 teacher of the year. She holds a master’s in music education. Geralyn Murray teaches at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School. She received a bachelor’s in collaborative special education. Andrea Rushing Patten is a teacher in Alexander City (Ala.) Schools. She earned a master’s degree in library media and technology. Kristin White Sims is a pre-K teacher of children with special needs. Sims earned bachelor’s (2004) and master’s (2005) degrees in early childhood special education.

2005 Robert Baughman, who earned his bachelor’s degree in physical education, is a P.E. teacher at Auburn (Ala.) Early Education Center. Baughman was featured by the Opelika-Auburn News article about the shortage of male teachers. Debra Young Byrd teaches at Opelika (Ala.) Middle School. She received her bachelor’s in secondary math education. Emily Roper Flowers teaches elementary music at Ashford (Ala.) Elem. School. She earned a bachelor’s in music education: vocal.

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Tina Gilbert is coordinator of assistive technology and testing at the University of Texas at Austin. She earned her master’s degree in education.

Leigh Taylor Morgan teaches at Dean Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education.

Eric Larson teaches chemistry at Pekin (Ill.) Community High School. He also coaches the boys’ soccer team. Larson received his master’s in chemistry education.

Ashley Rials teaches first grade for Geneva Co. Schools in Slocomb, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in early childhood education.

Thomas Mangum works for Verizon Wireless in Charleston, S.C. He earned a bachelor’s in secondary education in 2005 and will receive a master’s in business administration from Charleston Southern University in December 2008.

Maurice Smith won the silver medal at the World Athletics Championship in Osaka, Japan, in October 2007. The decathlon athletic competition was comprised of 10 different track-and-field events. Smith, who resides in Auburn, Ala., is optimistic about his chances for the 2008 Olympic Games

in Beijing, China. He earned his bachelor’s in adult education. Erin Weil is a teacher at Wrights Mill Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s (2005) and a master’s (2006) in collaborative special education.

2006 Dr. Tracy Bennett is an instructor at Wallace Community College in Dothan, Ala. She received a doctorate in curriculum and instruction. Justin Bruce works at Opelika (Ala.) Learning Center. He earned a

bachelor’s in collaborative special education. Blake Busbin teaches at Auburn (Ala.) High School. Busbin earned a bachelor’s (2006) and a master’s (2007) in general social science. Erin Cook is a teacher at Dean Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Cook earned a bachelor’s in elementary education. Marion Elizabeth Cook is a fifth-grade teacher at Wrights Mill Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. She earned her bachelor’s in elementary education. Patricia Arendall Daniel is a preschool teacher for

Preschool of America in New York, N.Y. Daniel earned her bachelor’s in elementary education. Lindsay Donohue is a teacher for Hixson High School in Chattanooga, Tenn. She received a bachelor’s degrees in secondary science education and in history in 2006. Emily Green teaches at Cary Woods Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in elementary education. Will Herring was named to the inaugural class of the National Football Foundation’s National Honor Society. The group includes 345 players from

Donda West ‘80, former university educator, Kanye’s mother, dies at 58 Dr. Donda West, the mother of hip-hop star Kanye West and past department chair of Chicago State University’s English Department, passed away in November 2007 at the age of 58. West earned her doctorate in secondary education from Auburn University College of Education in 1980. She had gained notoriety as the mother of rap artist and music producer Kanye West, but was known in higher education circles for her 31-year career that began in the early 1970s at Morris Brown College in Atlanta and continued at Chicago State University in 1980. Before leaving the profession in 2004 to assist son Kanye with his career, her professional achievements included being a Fulbright Scholar and chairing CSU’s English Department. Prior to her passing, West helped to manage her son’s professional activities; serve as chief executive of West Brands, the parent company of her son’s businesses; and chair of the Kanye West Foundation, an educational nonprofit with the mission of helping to combat the severe dropout problem in high schools across the country. In May 2007, she released Raising Kanye: Life Lessons from the Mother of a Hip-Hop Superstar. In the book, she reflected not only on her famous son but on all the things she learned about being his mother Associated Press along the way. Referred to as a “powerful and inspiring memoir,” the book chronicles difficulties she faced, from being a single, African-American mother to her later experiences as Kanye’s manager as he rose to superstardom. *** Thanks to our friends with the Auburn Alumni Association for sharing this information from their Spring 2008 edition of Auburn Magazine. The magazine is just one of the benefits of joining the association. For more information or to join, visit www.aualum.org today.

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195 schools who earned a 3.2 or better grade point average. An Opelika, Ala., native, he earned a bachelor’s in exercise science and was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks. Nicole Huff is a teacher at Yarbrough Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Huff earned a bachelor’s in elementary education in 2006 and a master’s in collaborative special education in 2007. Crystal Luxton teaches mathematics at Julian High School in Chicago, Ill.. She earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics education. Jessica Moulton teaches at Opelika (Ala.) Middle School. Moulton earned a bachelor’s in general social science education. Michele Martin Murmer teaches at Auburn (Ala.) High School. She earned a bachelor’s degree in collaborative special education. Andra Danielle Parrott, a teacher at Bob Jones High School in Madison, Ala., was awarded a $1,000 New Teacher Grant from the Alabama Power Service Organization. The award assists new teachers in purchasing additional resources for their students and classroom. Parrott received a master’s in biology education. Margaret Pettey is a second-grade teacher at Valley Elementary School in Pelham, Ala. She earned her bachelor’s in early childhood education.

Jennifer Strekas, who earned a master’s in secondary English language arts education, received one of 18 fellowships to attend a Holocaust education summer seminar in New York. Strekas, a seventh-grade enrichment teacher at Sanford Middle School in Opelika, Ala., has also been employed by eLearning Online, an initiative of the Alabama State Department of Education and Alabama Public Television, to provide quality professional development to teachers online. She was part of the second cohort of Alabama teachers taking part in the training offered through EdTech Leaders Online. Montasha Tate is a teacher at Ogletree Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s in elementary education. Kimberly Womack teaches at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School. She earned a bachelor’s degree in secondary mathematics education.

2007 Katie Dunaway Anderson teaches at Carver Primary School in Opelika, Ala. She completed a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education. Ashley McCullough Brock teaches eighthgrade physical science at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School. Brock earned a bachelor’s in general science education. While at Auburn, she was a member and

AU alumni social network now online:

Education offers group for alumni and friends

Ever wonder what your freshman-year roommate is doing now? How to use your Auburn University connections to land a job? “Tiger2Tiger,” a new feature of AU alumni’s Web site, allows graduates to network with other Tigers around the world. Tiger2Tiger is a free online community provided by AU’s Office of Alumni Affairs exclusively for Auburn alumni. Individuals may use the site to invite friends into their own circles; form discussion groups in areas of interest; look for jobs; and help other alumni find open positions in specific career fields. The community has the look and feel of other popular social networks, yet is open only to AU alumni and employers who want to advertise job openings to AU graduates. Alumni are not required to be members of the Auburn Alumni Association in order to use the site. To get started, click on the Tiger2Tiger link at www.aualum.org. Register, complete a profile, then search for friends and colleagues to add to your personal network. While you’re searching, use the “Find” feature in the “Groups” section to search for the “College of Education Alumni and Friends” group and get connected to the College of Education! *** Thanks to our friends with the Auburn Alumni Association for sharing this information from their Spring 2008 edition of Auburn Magazine. The magazine is just one of the benefits of joining the association. For more information or to join, visit www.aualum.org today.

president of the college’s Student Ambassadors. Sarah Byrd is a teacher at Dean Road Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Byrd received a bachelor’s in elementary education. Dan Cater, who received a bachelor’s in music education, teaches at Drake Middle School in Auburn, Ala.

Dr. Stan Cox is principal of Opelika (Ala.) High School. He was appointed by Ala. Gov. Bob Riley and State Superintendent Dr. Joe Morton to serve on the Governor’s Congress on School Leadership–Part 2. He also served as co-chair of the Governor’s Congress Task Force 2, which was responsible for writing Standards for Alabama’s

Instructional Leaders. He holds a doctorate in educational leadership. Catherine Culleton received a Alabama Power New Teacher grant for $1,000. Her bachelor’s degree is in secondary mathematics education. Richard D’Amico teaches at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School. He received

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t h g i l t o p S lumninamed Ala. deputy ABice ‘77

elor’s degree in early childhood education. Latavia Peters teaches in the Auburn (Ala.) City Schools system. She earned a bachelor’s degree in rehabilitation and special education.

superintendent of education D r . T o mm y B i c e , a 1977 graduate of the college and superintendent of the Alexander City (Ala.) Schools, has been appointed Alabama’s deputy superintendent of education for the Alabama Department of Education. Bice was recommended by Dr. Joe Morton ‘69, state superintendent, and unanimously accepted by the state Board of Education in April 2008.

Rebecca Petty, who received her bachelor’s in elementary education, was named the Phenix City, Ala. public school “Rookie Teacher of the Year.” She is currently working on her master’s in elementary education at Auburn.

Bice replaces Dr. Ruth Ash ‘85, who retired March 31. He will oversee all aspects of instruction for the state’s education department. A superintendent for Alexander City Schools since 2003, he has also served Alabama students as a teacher, psychometrist, regional director for the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind, adjunct professor, career and technical education director and principal. He is legislative chair and president-elect of School Superintendents of Alabama, and serves on the Standards Committee for the Governor’s Congress on School Leadership.

Jennifer Short Murdock is employed by Auburn (Ala.) High School. She holds a bachelor’s in secondary math education.

“We are very fortunate to have an educator of Dr. Bice’s caliber,” Morton said. “His strengths and expertise, along with our dedicated staff, will help us continue to focus our efforts on improving the overall quality of K-12 education in Alabama.” He received bachelor’s and doctorate degrees in special education from Auburn in 1977 and 1984, respectively. In addition, he completed a master’s in special education from the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and attended both the Harvard Institute for School Leadership and the National Academy for Superintendents at Ohio State University.

a bachelor’s in secondary English education. Laura Daniel teaches at Auburn (Ala.) Early Education Center. Her bachelor’s is in early childhood special education. Rachel Edmundson works as a teacher at Ogletree Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Edmundson earned a bachelor’s in elementary education. While at Auburn, she was

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a member of the college’s Student Ambassadors.

general social science education, teaches at Opelika (Ala.) Middle School.

Karin Fuller teaches at Auburn (Ala.) Junior High School. Her bachelor’s degree is in general science education.

Shea Smith Knighton teaches at Yarbrough Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Her bachelor’s is in elementary education.

Justin Henderson teaches at Opelika (Ala.) Middle School. He earned a bachelor’s in general social science education.

Brittany Lea teaches at Auburn (Ala.) High School. She earned a bachelor’s in collaborative special education.

Brandon Johnson, who earned a bachelor’s in

Emily Lord is a teacher at Auburn (Ala.) Junior

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High School. She earned her bachelor’s in secondary English education. Ashley McCulloch teaches at Opelika (Ala.) High School. She earned a bachelor’s in secondary English education. Bryan Moore, who earned a bachelor’s in general social science education, teaches at Opelika (Ala.) High School. Elizabeth Odom teaches at Southview Primary School in Opelika, Ala. She completed a bach-

Dr. Oleg Sinelnikov earned his doctorate in physical education from Auburn and is now an assistant professor of sport pedagogy at the University of Alabama. Danny Spencer works as a teacher at Opelika (Ala.) Middle School. Spencer earned a bachelor’s in secondary mathematics education. Morgan Spires teaches at Carver Elem. School in Opelika, Ala. She received a bachelor’s in elementary education. While at Auburn, she was a member of the college’s Student Ambassadors. Eron Smith teaches at Auburn (Ala.) High School. Smith earned a bachelor’s degree in music education.


Amanda Little Smither is a teacher at Morris Avenue Intermediate School in Opelika, Ala. She earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. Abby Watts is a fourthgrade teacher at Yarbrough Elem. School in Auburn, Ala. Watts received her bachelor’s in elementary education. Kacey Wilson teaches at Auburn (Ala.) Early Education Center. She earned a bachelor’s degree in early childhood special education.

FRIENDS IN MEMORIAM: Doug Alley, retired English education professor in the AU College of Education, died in March 2008 at the age of 83. During the 1980s, Alley, a creative writer, directed three summer institutes on literacy criticism and the teaching of literature, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. In addition, he served as the college’s coordinator of English education for several years. He retired in 1990.

Lide '06 combines life passion with education S

tacy Lide ‘06 is using her bachelor’s in early childhood education to teach children something other than reading, writing and arithmetic. Her classroom lacks a chalkboard— in fact, it lacks furniture. It’s just Lide, a hardwood floor and a larger-than-life mirror.

Lide, a Huntsville, Ala., native who has danced since the age of 5, has made her classroom a dance studio in Auburn, which she opened in 2007.

“Dancing has always been my passion,” said Lide, who serves the artistic director for Variations Dance Studio. “My experiences within Auburn’s education curriculum provided me with many valuable opportunities to grow as a teaching professional and ultimately helped me to achieve my dream in becoming a dance educator.”

As artistic director, Lide is responsible for overseeing the artistic side of the company’s production, choosing material to be performed, and teaching ballet, jazz and lyrical classes. Her students range in age from pre-school through college.

Lide has danced with the Huntsville Ballet Company and Alabama Ballet and received further training at the Vail (Colo.) International Ballet, American Ballet Theater and Southern Ballet Theatre—just to name a few. Throughout her dance career, Lide has performed a versatile range of roles in various ballet productions. She is currently working with her students in their first production of Sleeping Beauty. In June 2007, she was among 27 of the auditioning 7,000 dancers to advance to the Las Vegas round of FOX’s television reality series “So You Think You Can Dance.” During the competition, Lide completed each audition round, which included ballet, ballroom, jazz, hip-hop, contemporary and Broadway dance styles.

If you have good news to share in next year’s Keystone, submit your news or update your contact information by e-mailing eduinfo@auburn.edu or visit education.auburn.edu/alumniupdate A Keystone in Building a Better Future for All

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Garrison ‘00 finds fulfillment as

English teacher in Guatemala Kevin Garrison’s workdays usually start before 7:30 a.m. and don’t end until dark. He and his wife, Victoriana, and their toddler-aged daughter, Pamela Sebastian, live with his father-in-law in San Marcos La Laguna, Guatemala. They share a home equipped only with running water that they use in a pila (a large sink) to wash both dishes and laundry.

While in San Marcos, Garrison met up with Blue Schoolhouse founder and Internet entrepreneur Wayt King of Atlanta, Ga., who with wife Linda established the school in February 2007. The friendliness of the Kaqchikel Maya people of San Marcos touched the Kings, but they were shocked by the lack of educational resources available to San Marcos children. During 2007, Blue Schoolhouse worked with school administrators, teachers and parents in helping provide for textbooks, musical instruments, physical education equipment, utilities, teacher and student subsidies and satellite Internet connectivity for the school computer lab.

While living without electricity isn’t glamorous, Garrison, a 2000 secondary social science graduate originally from Waterloo, Iowa, wouldn’t have it any other way. He has At the school, Garrison works with students spent four years in Guatemala, where he works from 8 to 21 years of age, but there are no as an instructor at Blue Schoolhouse, teaching restrictions on those who can attend school English to third through ninth graders. He in Guatemala. Many of the local children lose also maintains the tiny school’s library and schooling time as they balance education with serves as the the need to “Education is the key to any community help support school’s choir director— their families. that wants to succeed.” skills he picked Te a c h i n g up as an AU Libraries student worker and choir English is important, but it’s sharing lessons member from elementary school through his about life that Garrison finds most fulfilling. time at Auburn. “Being a Christian, I often share Bible His first job out of school was at Chambers scriptures with my students or simply practical Academy in LaFayette, located in east central advice about daily life,” he said. Alabama. There, he learned from a fellow teacher about the difference his daughter was There are times when Garrison said he gets a little homesick. When that happens, he making through the Peace Corps in Africa. looks at the lives he’s positively affecting, and “That’s when I knew I wanted to do knows he’s in the right place. something that made a difference in the “I truly feel satisfied with my work here,” world,” he said. Garrison said. “There are times when I feel Garrison’s first trip to Guatemala tired; but I believe the opportunity to be here as a teacher was with the Peace Corps is something the Lord Jesus opened up for To learn more about the in January 2003. Six months later, he me, and that he will give me the strength to Blue Schoolhouse Program got sick and returned to Alabama— carry on.” and how you can help, visit: but the memories of his time in blueschoolhouse.weebly.com Guatemala lingered. An online job The strength to preserve is at the center of or www.atitlanresource.com. posting for an English teacher gave Garrison’s mission of ensuring the future of San Marcos and the families living there. him he chance to return. “I felt like I hadn’t completed my mission * * * there,” Garrison said, attributing the strength to step out in faith to much prayer and God’s guidance—especially in mastering the local dialect. While Garrison’s wife and her family speak the ancient Mayan language, Kaqchikel, he’s still learning it as he goes along.

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The Keystone appreciates The Opelika-Auburn News and reporter Donathan Prater for their permission to reprint portions of an article originally published on October 26, 2007.


Education Alumni Q&A: Cindy Haygood ‘78, Athens, Ga. >>

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Please tell us about your life after graduating and how you got involved with your current career. In the fall of 1978, I went to work as a director establishing the afterschool programs for Athens Academy. I eventually would teach 4 year olds—who are the most awesome people on the planet—for 16 years and wear many hats from spirit director to administrative assistant with PTO to writing conduct handbooks. In 1985, my best friend and I started a company where we taught two classes—“In the Pink” for elementary school girls and “Blue Blazers” for boys. We filled in a niché for families in Athens who traveled, entertained and wished for their young people ease in social settings. We were trained by the Protocol School of Washington, D.C. I went to work full time for Perfectly Polished, The Etiquette School. In 2005, we acquired the children’s division of the Protocol School of Washington and moved the training headquarters to Georgia to establish The Etiquette and Leadership Institute. This is the school where we train adults from all over the world to use curriculum we have written on social skills, manners, leadership skills and social dance. So now, I continue to teach young people social skills, leadership skills and social dance and I train adults to do this work, too. And, it is hardly work!

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How did an education degree contribute to your life?

I am convinced that my degree from Auburn is superior. At Auburn, I learned understanding the subject matter was just the beginning. Knowing and understanding the learner was even more dynamic when it comes to effective teaching. Dr. Gordon Bond, a history professor at Auburn, made a lifelong impression on me with his use of humor and love of teaching. He was the one professor who modeled

the love of learning. He was someone I took more than the required courses from because I knew I was in the midst of a great teacher. So, one hallmark of a great teacher is that others learn the subject and also catch the spirit of learning how to be a better teacher.

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As a graduate of Auburn, what I remember most about my time on campus is…the people— Dean and Mrs. Foy, President and Mrs. Philpott, Dr. Gordon Bond, Dean Cooper, Mrs. Evelyn Jordan, life-long friends from towns all over Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama and Florida; cheering for first downs, breakfast in Foy Union, wearing painters pants and bandanas for dirty hair days….oh, my goodness, we were stylish!

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What is it like raising an Auburn family? It is a challenge in bulldog territory. I tell everyone that we are in Athens doing missionary work. And, sometimes that joke falls flat…. those people are actually threatened by our presence. My husband, Daniel, graduated from AU in 1977 in general business and worked in AU Student Affairs as an assistant to the dean with responsibilities for fraternities and Tiger Cub. This was just after Dean Foy had retired and they were in a search for the new dean and Daniel filled in. I graduated in ‘78; we married and moved to Athens, Ga., where Daniel finished law school in 1981. Our son, Sam, is a senior at AU and has been on medical leave for a year. He will finish his last semester and graduate in August 2008. He was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma, a nasty pediatric soft-tissue cancer in April 2007 and has undergone a year of chemo and radiation. And, is cancer free!!! He was on the Auburn Flyers Cycling Team and training to be an ironman. He will be married in September to Abby Johnson (‘07 interior design) who he met while a freshman at AU.

Our daughter, Cait, is a sophomore and is a double major in political science and public relations. She is involved with her sorority and will study abroad with Auburn this summer. My sister went to Auburn and finished her nursing degree at Emory before AU had a nursing program. My brother is married to an Auburn grad. Both of Daniel’s brothers graduated from Auburn and married Auburn graduates. I have a nephew who is a freshman at AU! I would say it is definitely a family convention.

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The most rewarding/favorite thing about your current job is...watching young people put into action little things like using a confident voice and leadership posture in making a presentation, or understanding why and where a name badge goes, or confidently having dinner with a prospective employer, or playing a leadership role in their school or job.

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My life won’t be complete until I...live in New York in August and attend the Mostly Mozart concert series EVERY DAY!

Learn more about Cindy’s professional pursuits at www.perfectlypolished.com

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[Campaign Update]

cation, Dear Friends of the College of Edu to witness the outpouring of Committee, it has been rewarding n paig Cam ’s ege coll the of ir As cha n. The generosity of alumni, the “It Begins at Auburn” campaig ing dur ds frien and ni alum our suppor t from ugh March 31, 2008, the elming. From October 1, 2001, thro rwh ove n bee has f staf and lty bination of outright gifts, friends, facu paign commitments through a com cam in ion mill $14 than e mor d college raise successful campaign effort on s campaign is the college’s most Thi s. gift ned plan and ges pled multi-year al $5.75 million goal. record and is 246 percent of our initi 7, the college: nt accomplishments with you. In 200 ifica sign of ber num a e shar to I wish rate in overall commitments from • experienced a 12-percent growth fiscal year 2006 to fiscal year 2007 d professorship • added a new $300,000 endowe from private foundations • secured more than $500,000 commitments totaling $1,175,000 • added seven new endowment rs on the college’s Honor Roll • honored 11 additional educato memberships • added seven new Dean’s Circle t opportunities • created 11 new student suppor from $180,000 in 2006 $210,000 in student suppor t—up than e mor rded awa • ge to almost 73 percent on faculty and staf f giving percenta cati Edu d ease incr • t of each and ever y donor. enal success because of the suppor nom phe a such was ” urn Aub at n and generosity; all “It Begins k each of you for your participatio than I on, cati Edu of lege Col the On behalf of n Committee members and A special thanks to our Campaig ce. eren diff a e mak ll— sma and r participation has been a gifts—large ication were vital in this effort. You ded and ent lvem invo se who rs other voluntee for others. tremendous asset and an example oing suppor t continues well e in March, but the need for ong clos a to n draw e hav may n paig The cam Auburn will strengthen the and volunteers continue making in ors don our ents stm inve The re. into the futu Together we should continue or for family members and friends. me, for , you for an beg it re whe foundation er future for all. Education as it seeks to build a bett our commitment to the College of War Eagle!

Wayne T. Smith ‘68 Campaign Committee Chair

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e v i G o t s y a W

[Campaign Update]

Annual Giving e in the form of or t h ig r t u O ad cation can be m credit

d even by lege of Edu al proper ty, an Gifts to the Col on rs pe or te ta needs. Every real es t and long-term cash, securities, en rr cu ’s ge lle ard talented t the co are used to rew card, to suppor ns tio bu ri nt co ities, honor the going day, annual, on larship opportun ho sc ith w ts nize labs and studen lty, and moder and promising cu fa d te ca di much more. ts of de uipment—and accomplishmen eq rt -a he -t of stateeet current and resources to m classrooms with ith nts w an de e th ovide um giving amou im in m no ve These funds pr ha hese ge priorities. T emerging colle ti-year period. ul m a er ged ov e and can be pled Roll acknowledg to our Honor ns io ut ni ib um tr al on — Honor Roll. C family members ues, friends or ag ce through lle en co er ff s, di or a at e educ have mad ho w ees receive e— ik al suppor t. Honor of ns and non-alumni ea m r he al toring or ot itable for form education, men and lapel pin su te ide the ca ts ifi ou rt ce ue e aq iv rpetual pl pe a a commemorat on n io us well as incl presentation, as bution of $500 inimum contri M . ce ffi O s n’ ecial group of Dea cle. This sp ir C s ’ n ea -D futures by Keystone to build better on Patrons of the si is m ’s ge advance the ts the colle s necessar y to ce friends suppor ur so re al ci on a perpetual the finan bers are listed em giving the dean m e cl ir C s ecial events . Dean’ are invited to sp d college’s mission an s ce ffi O s al contribution the Dean’ Minimum annu . plaque outside ar ye e th ut througho with the dean ars ged for three ye of $1,000, pled

Endowments

. keep on giving y the gifts that ul tr gs e in ar rn ns ea tio d an dona stment income These invested rtion of the inve principal. An po al a in ly ig on or , e ar Each ye ded to th ad is er nd ai m our college’s e re is spent while th your legacy with k lin to ay w t a grea ts, faculty and endowment is suppor t studen n e ca ts en m st inve $25,000, payabl future, as these ts levels begin at en m w do en imum programs. Min ned gift through a plan or s ar ye over five

Planned Gifts

giving in your ing charitable ud cl in of e qu t beyond is a techni ur loyal suppor yo te Planned giving ua et rp pe fits can tate plan to day. These bene to s financial and es fit s ne be g income stream hile realizin taxes, lifetime te your lifetime w ta es d to an e on on incom wealth passed include savings ter amount of ea ests, life gr a qu s, be ce as an es st cl such vehi e ud and, in some in cl in s ft gi ft annuities, . Planned designations, gi ry family members ia fic ne be te ement plan be used to crea insurance, retir tates. They can ppor t. es su e lif m d ra an og ts pr rships or so es charitable trus of pr , ps hi r scholars endowments fo

College Giving Priorities Student Support.

To attract outstanding students in every academic field, we need significant funding for scholarships, fellowships and teaching assistantships. In addition, we seek to support student recruitment, diversity programs, international studies and research opportunities.

Faculty Support.

Endowed chairs and professorships are a powerful tool for attracting and retaining preeminent faculty by recognizing scholarly excellence, as well as providing competitive salaries and resources for research, travel and professional development. Additional funds for excellence offer immediate assistance to the current and emerging needs of faculty and staff.

Program Support.

Our college creates programs that put our students and faculty in touch with society. The numbers of individuals who benefit from the programs are countless. Ultimately, these programs allow students and faculty to affect the lives of those beyond our campus while gaining practical, invaluable and hands-on experience.

Our college’s develo pment staff can assist you in making any of these types of contributions or answer any questions you might have rega rding them. Contac t the college’s Office of Development at 334.844.5793 or fin d out more online at education.auburn.ed u/giving.

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College of education campaign committee

&.&*

Chair Wayne T. Smith ‘68 Chairman, president and CEO Community Health Systems Nashville, Tenn. Members Nancy Chancey ‘62 Chair, CH&B Inc. Enterprise, Ala. Dr. Elizabeth Cheshire ‘62 Retired principal Montgomery, Ala. Judi Gaiser ‘60 Former educator Birmingham, Ala. Dr. Terry Ley Professor emeritus AU College of Education Auburn, Ala. James “Jim” Manley ‘60 Retired banker Decatur, Ga. Dr. Jane Moore Professor emerita AU College of Education Auburn, Ala. Dr. Byron Nelson ‘57 Retired superintendent Union Grove, Ala. Dr. Harold Patterson ‘54 Retired superintendent Guntersville, Ala.

Dr. Frances Skinner Reeves ‘71 Retired mental health counselor West Point, Ga. Dr. Joyce Ringer ‘59 Retired executive director Georgia Advocacy Office Auburn, Ala. Dr. Robert Rowsey ‘73 Professor emeritus AU College of Education Opelika, Ala. Gordon Sherman ‘57 Principal Lamon & Sherman Consulting Atlanta, Ga. Jerry F. Smith ‘64 Chief executive officer J.F. Smith Group Auburn, Ala. Jule Collins Smith ‘99 Houston, Texas Robert Williams ‘69 Retired manufacturing specialist 3M Decatur, Ala. Dr. G. Dennis Wilson Retired distinguished professor emeritus AU College of Education Auburn, Ala.

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&.&* Named for the year in which the Department of Education (now the College of Education) was established, the 1915 Society recognizes donors whose lifetime contributions and commitments to the College of Education have reached a cumulative total of $25,000 or more. Pillar of Honor: $1,000,000 o r m o r e The Humana Foundation (in honor of Wayne T. Smith) John P. Manry and Hedy White Manry Wayne T. Smith and Cheryl Glass Smith Paul J. Spina Jr. and Bena Spina Anonymous

P i l l a r o f D e d i c at i o n : $500,000 - $999,999 Charles Fraley* and Mildred C. Fraley* Alma Holladay Anonymous

P i l l a r o f Co m m i t m e n t: $100,000 t o $499,999 AB Dick Company The Alabama Power Foundation Martin L. Beck Jr. Ralph Carroll Boles* and Willie Mae Boles The Caring Foundation The Caroline Lawson Ivey Memorial Foundation Jon E. Chancey and Nancy C. Chancey Estate of Arthur F. and Ruth J. Coss Betty T. Freemen Beryl McCann Hathcock* David E. Housel and Susan McIntosh Housel Sam L. Hutchison* The Jessie Ball DuPont Foundation Gerald S. Leischuck and Emily R. Leischuck James W. Lester* and Elaine B. Lester* The Malone Family Foundation

James A. Manley and Harriett Manley R. Wayne McElrath John L. Moulton and Betty F. Moulton James L. Murrell Bill W. Newton and Sarah B. Newton Sue Atchison Pearson Beth Sabo Richard T. Scott Jr. Albert James Smith Jr. and Julia Collins Smith Jerry F. Smith Joseph J. Russell and Elizabeth H. Russell Angelo Tomasso and Joy Tomasso Earle C. Williams and June A. Williams Anonymous

P i l l a r o f F r i e n d s h i p: $25,000 t o $99,999 James E. Baker Jr. Ralph W. Banks and Barbara Yancey Banks* Anne Brooks The Coca-Cola Foundation The Comer Foundation Laura Haley Creel Edmund C. Dyas IV (in honor of Betty McLendon DeMent) David S. Elder and Judy V. Elder C. Warren Fleming Paul E. Flowers and Barbara M. Flowers Nancy Y. Fortner Byron P. Franklin Sr. and Meriam L. Franklin Ronald O. Gaiser and Judi. B. Gaiser T. Gordy Germany* and Gloria Germany J. Floyd Hall and Martha S. Hall Floreine H. Hudson James W. Hutcheson and Carol E. Hutcheson Kay E. Ivey Kay Hathaway Jones William Kochan and Frances K. Kochan Donald Lambert and Betty Lambert Terry C. Ley and Helen M. Ley The Ligon Foundation Carolyn G. Mathews Imogene M. Mixson

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[Donor Recognition]

Installed in summer 2006, the College of Education’s 1915 Society donor wall allows the college to visibly recognize those whose cumulative gifts, pledges, or planned gifts total at least $25,000. The plaque, bearing imagery of the keystone, is visible in the lobby of Haley Center’s south entrance. The plaque—divided into the four “pillars,” or giving levels, of the 1915 Society—is updated regularly with the names of the society’s newest members.

NEW 1915 SOCIETY MEMBERS

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Jane B. Moore Kathryn Flurry Morgan* Byron B. Nelson and Carolyn Nelson Sarah E. Newell* Sandra Bridges Newkirk Harold Patterson Sr. and Shirley Patterson James Roger Payne and Angela Payne Elizabeth A. Ponder Richard A. Price and Barbara M. Price Charles M. Reeves* and Frances Skinner Reeves Barry N. Straus and Denise H. Straus H. Earl Tunner John W. Turrentine and Jane H. Turrentine Lila Lansing White J. Knox Williams and Jean Pierce Williams Robert J. Williams and Yvonne Williams Jo Williamson G. Dennis Wilson and Dianne Wilson Mark T. Wilton and Cynthia L. Wilton Anonymous (members as of April 15, 2008) *deceased

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Patrons of the Keystone-Dean’s Circle Patrons of the Keystone believe that education is central to building a better future for all. Patrons of the Keystone demonstrate their support of the College of Education by committing a multi-year pledge of financial support to the Dean’s Circle Fund. Each year, donations to the Dean’s Circle Fund provide the resources necessary for the college to exceed current levels of excellence in advancing its tri-fold mission of academic instruction, research and outreach. All alumni and friends of the College of Education are d invited to become Patrons of sey an w o R the Keystone by committing t ‘84 Rober Shaw e a pledge of at least $1,000 per i b b e D year for a minimum of three consecutive years.

ng, Browni h t i d Ju ‘89 and George d all, an H e i s Su g rownin Phil B

ker ‘70 r. with r a P d Boy rker S a P Patsy m Willia n Kochan and Dea

[Donor Recognition]

Shirle y ‘71 & Ted S with D pears ean K ochan

Imogene Mixson ‘63, Mark Wilton ‘93 and Cynthia Wilto n ‘04

Dr. Carlton Smith ‘67, C ambre Prate Meredith r, Collins, Tho m as Taylor ‘6 Laur 0, a Ann aylo r, Future Lora H A Keystone in Building aTBetter for All aghigh83 i


2007

Key Contributors

The Auburn University College of Education expresses its gratitude to the many alumni, friends and organizations who are key contributors to the college and its mission. This support helps the college in building better futures for all through its academic, research and outreach initiatives. This list of contributors recognizes cumulative calendar year outright gifts made to the College of Education during 2007.

Pillars

of Trust reco gn izi ng donors who ha ve contributed at leas t $1,000 and more

Mr. & Dr. Donald Adams Alabama FFA Alumni Association Mr. Andrew T. Baird Mr. & Dr. William Baird Drs. Jim and Susan Bannon Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Preston Bolt Mr. Herman G. Broughton Dr. Philip Litimer Browning Mr. & Mrs. R. Bryant Mrs. Donna Burchfield Mr. & Mrs. Robert Burkholder Mrs. Nancy Tilden Campbell Caring Foundation Mrs. Terrell Smyth Cheney Dr. Elizabeth S. Cheshire Mr. David Henry Clark Dr. Debra Cobia & Mr. Donald Adams College of Education Student Council Comer Foundation Mrs. Ruth J. Coss-Estate Dr. Cynthia Ann Cox Dr. Laura Haley Creel Mr. & Mrs. S. Eugene Dekich Mr. H. Joe Denney Mr. & Mrs. Wesley Wilkerson Diehl Dr. & Mrs. Edmund Covington Dyas Mr. C. Warren Fleming Mr. & Mrs. Paul Flowers Mr. & Mrs. Robert Benson Forester Rev. & Mrs. Byron Paul Franklin Mrs. Betty Thrower Freeman Mrs. Barbara D. Gosser Mr. & Mrs. George Stafford Hall Dr. & Mrs. J. Floyd Hall Mrs. Dottie W. Hankins Mrs. Beryl McCann Hathcock* Dr. Virginia Hayes Mrs. Joan Davidson Holder Mrs. Joyce A. Horsley Mrs. Lisa V. Hourigan Dr. & Dr. James Hutcheson Mrs. Peggy Kling Iber Mrs. Kay E. Ivey Mrs. Alice Beattie James Jessie Ball duPont Foundation

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Mrs. Kay H. Jones Dr. Larry Howard Kelley Mrs. Martha McQueen Kennedy Dr. Maxwell Clark King Dr. Frances Kochan & Dr. William Kochan Mr. William D. Langley Dr. & Mrs. Gerald Leischuck Dr. & Mrs. Terry Ley Mrs. Eleanor Haywood Loyd Malone Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. James Autrey Manley Mrs. Hedy White Manry Dr. Imogene Mathison Mixson Dr. Jane Barton Moore Mrs. Kathryn Langlois Munro Mr. Edward F. Murray Jr. Mr. James L. Murrell Dr. & Mrs. Byron Nelson Mrs. Sandra L. Newkirk Dr. Joan Vignes Newman Mr. & Mrs. Bill Newton Mrs. June Sellers Nichols Mr. John Randall Parrish Dr. & Mrs. Harold Dean Patterson Mr. & Mrs. James Roger Payne Mrs. Sue Atchison Pearson Mr. & Mrs. William Frederick Pepper Mr. Joseph C. Piazza Mr. & Mrs. David Scott Poole Mrs. Elizabeth C. Powell Lt. & Mrs. Richard Alan Price Mr. & Mrs. James Ray Dr. Frances Skinner Reeves Mr. & Dr. Kenneth Wayne Ringer Mrs. Theresa Robertson Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Roser Dr. & Mrs. Robert Ellis Rowsey Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Julius Russell Saks Incorporated Foundation Ms. Martha Houston Sasser Dr. & Mrs. Robert Ronald Saunders Dr. J. Boyd Scebra Mr. & Mrs. Todd Anthony Schuster Dr. Debbie L. Shaw Ms. Kathryn Milner Shehane Mrs. Marcia Loftin Sheppard Mr. & Mrs. Albert James Smith Mr. Jerry Franklin Smith Dr. & Mrs. John Carlton Smith Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Thomas Smith

Keystone • Volume V, 2008

Mr. & Mrs. Mikell Dean Speaks Mrs. Robbie Q. Stephenson Dr. & Mrs. Barry Straus Dr. Thomas Newton Taylor The Hach Scientific Foundation The Ligon Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Todd Pershing Thornell Dr. Landa L. Trentham Dr. Louise Kreher Turner Dr. & Dr. Andrew Weaver Ms. Lila Lansing White Mrs. Susan Dryden Whitson Mr. Harry R. Wilkinson Mr. Robert J. Williams Dr. & Mrs. George Dennis Wilson Dr. & Dr. James Witte Ms. Leslie S. Woodson Anonymous

P i l l a r s o f L oya lt y reco g n i z i n g d o n o r s w h o h a ve g i ven $ 5 0 0 to $ 9 9 9 Ms. Mary Ann Pugh Arant Mrs. Patricia Brown Baughman Mr. James Conrad Bishop Ms. Linda Louise Bomke Ms. Rita Ann Brantley Ms. Thelma P. Braswell Mrs. Wanda F. Coffman Mrs. Dorothy Hackney Crook Dr. & Ms. John Carl Dagley Mr. Joseph Franklin Daniel Ms. Dorothy Wilson Doten Mrs. Jodie Brantley Faith Mr. & Mrs. James Luther Flatt Mr. & Mrs. Reed Freeman Mr. Barry Lynn Gilliland Mrs. Carolyn Campbell Golden Mrs. Constance Jordan Green Mrs. Virginia Derby Grimes Mrs. Brenda J. Hartshorn Dr. Rodney S. Hinton Dr. Bessie Mae Holloway Mrs. Vicki Evans Hough Mr. & Mrs. David Emerson Housel Mr. R. Kenneth Johns Mr. & Mrs. James Thomas Kerr Ms. Kate Kiefer Dr. & Mrs. Donald Lambert Dr. José R. Llanes Mr. & Mrs. James Alton Lockett Col. William Long Jr. Dr. Randall Scot McDaniel Dr. C. William McKee

Dr Wilbur Miller & Dr. Marie Kraska Ms. Luellen Nagle Mr. J. David Nicholson Mrs. Karen Stapp O’Brien Mr. & Mrs. Howard Parker Mr. William Parker & Dr. Patsy Parker Mr. & Mrs. Donald Ray Parmer Mrs. Deborah Smith Pass Mr. Daniel Mose Pate Mrs. Mary Jeanette Pate Mrs. Gail Roberts Pellett Mrs. Janice S. Polmatier Mr. & Mrs. John Prien Dr. Karen Jackson Rabren Mr. John Major Schuessler Mrs. Lucy T. Scott Mrs. Julie Huey Spano Mr. & Dr. Ted Spears Mr. & Mrs. Paul Joseph Spina Dr. Holly A. Stadler Dr. Karl K. Stegall Dr. Suhyun Suh Dr. Edwin Alfred Thompson Dr. Martha Williams Thompson Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Hawley Tuberville Ms. Fay Turner Mrs. Toni Thompson Turpen Mrs. Joan Dickson Upton Mr. George Clayton Vandiver Mrs. Susan Carr Wadsworth Mrs. Leah Hubbard Walton Mrs. Marion Scott Wear Mr. & Mrs. John Michael Weigle Mrs. Teresa F. Wetherbee Mrs. Edna Hulme Willis Mrs. Cynthia Lee Wilton Mr. & Mrs. Cecil Meadows Yarbrough

Pillars

of Hope reco g n i z i n g d o n o r s w h o h a ve g i ven $ 1 0 0 to $ 4 9 9

Mr. & Mrs. C. Maitland Adams Dr. Gwendolyn J. Adams Mrs. Joyce Adkins Adams Mr. Kenneth Ray Adams Dr. Sue Blair Adams Mrs. Sue Martin Adams Rev. Walter M. Albritton Jr. Mrs. Julia S. Alexander Mr. Clarence Terrell Alford Dr. & Mrs. Timothy Opal Alford Mr. & Mrs. Syed Asim Ali

Mrs. Leigh Cannon Allbrook Ms. Holly Ann Allen Dr. Martha Langston Allen Mrs. Lydia Moore Almand Dr. & Mrs. Stanley Gene Aman Mr. Jeffry Albert Angermann Mrs. Katherine Dixon Anglin Ms. Elizabeth Mae Armistead Dr. Richard Crump Armstrong Dr. & Dr. James Serenous Austin Mrs. Carol Dent Auten Ms. Laurie E. Averrett Mrs. Linda Garrett Awbrey Dr. Richard B. Backus Mr. W. Jay Baggett Mrs. Adelene Reeder Bailey Mrs. Cindy Stough Bailey Dr. Charles D. Baird Mr. Fred E. Baker* Mr. & Mrs. Barry Dale Ballard Mr. & Mrs. William Bradford Bancroft Mr. Frank Barbaree Mr. William M. Barge Jr. Dr. Diane Ledbetter Barlow Mrs. Corinne Ham Barnes Dr. Pat Harris Barnes Mrs. Beth Thomas Barnett Mrs. Rhonda Raley Barrett Dr. Mary Sue Barry Ms. Janis Mills Beavin Ben Meriwether Livestock Photography Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Bennett Ms. Marian Collins Bentley Mrs. Kitty Adams Bergin Mrs. Jane Moody Bergman Mrs. Patricia J. Bethel Dr. Thomas Reginald Bice Mr. & Mrs. Paul Bingham Mr. & Mrs. Jim Black Mr. & Mrs. James David Blackerby Mr. David K. Blacklidge Ms. Gina Carol Blackstock Mr. George F. Blake Mrs. Barbara J. Blankenship Lt. Col. Daniel W. Bloodworth Jr. Mrs. Nikki Martin Bodie Mr. Stephen Douglas Boling Mrs. Jane Sharp Bolinger Mrs. Sally Pearce Bolling Mrs. Patricia Hughes Bolton Mrs. Jan G. Borelli Ms. M. Diane Boss Dr. Robert Ralph Bouchard Jr. Mr. Roger Wayne Bowen


Dr. Pamela C. Boyd Mr. William D. Boyd II* Mrs. Camilla H. Bracewell Dr. Carol Campbell Bradshaw Mrs. Julee Jambon Brandt Mr. & Mrs. Perry Branyon Mrs. Virginia T. Braswell Mrs. Debra Rowe Brazell-Price Mrs. Carol Breeding Dr. James A. Briley Dr. Richard E. Brogdon Mr. James Wesley Brooks Mrs. Judilyn Brooks Mr. James D. Brothers Ms. Beverly E. Brown Mrs. Kathy Zeigler Bruce Mrs. Donna Johnson Bryan Mrs. Melissa Shey Bryan Mrs. Tina Frazer Buchner Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Bumpers Dr. & Mrs. Ernest Burdette Mr. & Mrs. James Burleson Ms. Kathryn Burnett Dr. Ray G. Burnham Mr. & Mrs. John Burns Mrs. Pallie J. Butler Mrs. Rose Marie Butler Mrs. Rebecca Page Byard Ms. Melanie Ann Cadenhead Mr. John Ray Caldwell Mrs. Mona Murray Callahan Mr. & Ms. Joseph Camp Mrs. Charlotte C. Campbell Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Eugene Campbell Mrs. Priscilla Pace Cannon Mrs. Linda Mason Carleton Mrs. Molly M. Carmichael Dr. Jamie Carney Dr. Pamela Sissi Carroll Mr. & Mrs. L. Scott Carson Mrs. Deborah Hopkins Carter Mr. & Mrs. Edward Cash Mr. & Mrs. James Castleberry Mrs. Debra Nathan Caudill Ms. Kristen Lynn Cawthon Mrs. Laura Laney Center Mrs. Lea Crumpton Chaffin Mrs. Sandra Baxley Chafin Mrs. Margaret G. Chambers Mrs. Vicki Rindone Chambers Mrs. Nancy C. Chancey Mrs. Laura Jones Chandler Dr. Russell L. Chandler Ms. Charlene T. Chapman Mrs. Sue Boyd Chipman Mrs. Tanya Densmore Christensen Col. Charles S. Ciccolella Mrs. Fannie G. Clark Mrs. Julia Parker Clark Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Cleiland Mr. Dwight L. Cobb Mrs. Karen Petersen Cochran Dr. Daniel Joseph Codespoti Mr. & Mrs. Buford Cole Mr. & Mrs. Charles Jackson Cole Mr. Edwin Paul Collier Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Eldridge Ruthven Collins Mrs. Deirdre Bailey Colter Mr. Mitt Seymour Conerly Jr. Mrs. Sally A. Conley Mr. James O. Conway Mr. & Mrs. James Allen Cook

Dr. Milton Olin Cook Mr. & Mrs. William Cook Mrs. Martha R. Cooper Mr. & Mrs. Calvin Gregory Copeland Mrs. Lettie Green Cornwell Dr. Hollie Anderson Cost Mrs. Andrea Duddles Couch Dr. Johnny William Covington Mrs. Lori Dammes Cowley Mr. Randle Clifton Cox Mrs. Barbara B. Crabbe Mrs. Shirley Tuggle Crafton Dr. Franklin R. Croker Mrs. Diane Myrick Cropp Mrs. Peggy B. Culbertson Mrs. Beatrice D. Dallas Dr. Judith Carter Damewood Mrs. Linnie Luker Daniel Mrs. Emily Carpenter Davis Mrs. Jo Teal Davis Ms. Olivia A. Davis Mrs. Rochelle Morriss Davis Dr. Homer Alphonso Day Dr. Joseph J. Day Jr. Mrs. Marjorie Sellers Day Mr. Dennis Lee Dean Mrs. Jane Gheesling Deaton Mrs. Brenda Glenn Dee Mrs. Ann Harris De Hart Ms. Lorraine de la Croix Mr. James N. Dennis Mr. Kirby S. Derrick IV Mrs. Bena Whittelsey DeVaney Mrs. Laverne Annette Dignam Dr. David C. Diramio Mrs. Priscilla Gilmer Dixon Mrs. Suzette Lauber Doepke Mrs. Molly Story Dorman Mr. Sylvester Van Dowdell Dr. Janna Dresden Mrs. Deborah A. Dresher Ms. Kathryn R. Driscoll Mrs. Luci Howard Driscoll Mr. John Morgan Druary Mrs. Sheila R. Duffield Dr. Marla Hooper Dunham Mr. Darell Payton Dunn Mrs. Janet Canipe Durant Dr. Patricia Lenora Duttera Mr. & Mrs. Charles Louis Dyas Mr. William Lee Ennis Mr. & Mrs. John Simmons Espy Ms. Kimberley P. Evans Mrs. Judith Jones Faris Mr. & Mrs. Timothy Eugene Farley Mrs. Martha M. Featherston Mrs. Susan M. Fell Dr. Linda Felton-Smith Ms. Ann Marie Ferretti Mr. Wade H. Fleming Mrs. Ellen C. Flenniken Mrs. Julia C. Floyd Mrs. Sharon Wadsworth Foery Dr. Jenny G. Folsom Ms. Leigh A. Forman Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Wayne Forrester Capt. Marvin F. Forrester Mrs. Joanna Johnston Foster Mrs. Frances B. Fowler Mr. Rex Frederick Mrs. Edith Young Fuller Mr. & Mrs. Edwin Fuller Dr. John Lewis Fulmer* Mrs. Barbara Hutson Fussell

Mrs. Judi B. Gaiser Mrs. Melissa T. Gambill Dr. Thomas R. Gann Jr. Mr. Robert Gannon Ms. Joyce L. Garrett Mr. Ronald L. Garrett Dr. Henry Victor Gaston Dr. Bobby J. Gilliam Mr. & Mrs. James Loyd Givins Mr. Thomas A. Glanton Mrs. Carolyn Gnann Dr. John M. Goff Drs. Richard & Jennifer Good Mrs. Anne Carpenter Goodell Mr. Willis Marion Goolsby Mrs. Doris Jones Graves Mr. Charles Heath Green Mrs. Lula Watson Green Mrs. Sue W. Gresham Dr. Kathryn Uzzell Griffin Ms. Carole S. Griffith Mrs. Krystal A. Grizzard Dr. James E. Groccia Mrs. Mary Chambers Gross Mrs. Sylvia Ballow Gullatt Mr. James Ross Gurley Mrs. Alisa Marsh Gyauch Mrs. Candis Hamilton Hacker Mrs. Cindy Nunnelley Hafer Dr. Jane Nelson Hall Mr. Thomas Lynn Hall Mrs. Susan Hetzel Hallmark Mr. Lynwood Hector Hamilton Mrs. Patricia L. Hamilton Mr. Richard Robert Hamilton Ms. Helen Frances Hanby Mr. & Mrs. David Timothy Hanes Mrs. Billie Cooper Hanks Dr. Jacqueline T. Harbison Mrs. Jennifer Sims Hardison Mrs. Amy Peinhardt Harley Lt. Col. Edgar Harlin Jr. Mr. Jonathan David Harper Mr. Terry W. Harper Mr. Archie L. Harris Mrs. Jeanne Wynne Harrison Dr. Vicki Sue Hawsey Mrs. Linda Oliver Hay Mrs. Mary Hunt Hayes Mrs. Cynthia H. Haygood Ms. Reba Carol Haynes Mrs. Theresa D. Haynes Ms. Ann Wynell Helms Mrs. Linda Moore Henderson Dr. Mary Catherine Henderson Mrs. Susan Buck Herran Mr. Charles* and Margie Herron Karen Uthlaut Herron Mrs. Barbara Reed Hester Mrs. Margaret Leach Hester Mrs. Carolyn Kerr Hickerson Mrs. Elizabeth Powe Hickman Mrs. Paula Cheek Hicks Mr. Roger Alan Hildebrandt Mrs. Sara Wade Hill Mrs. Holli Carter Hiltbrand Capt. & Mrs. William Harlan Hinson Mrs. Carroll Lanier Hodges Ms. Cathy H. Hoefert Ms. Leah D. Hoffman Mrs. Mary Shoffeitt Hoffman Mr. & Mrs. Gary Parrish Hollis Mr. Terry Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal Holloway Mrs. Linda Wilson Holt

Mrs. Nancy Pritchett Hood Mrs. Ramona Hamrick Hood Mrs. Kathryn Sansocie Hoppe Mrs. Michal Hearn Hopson Mr. William Patrick Horton Rev. William B. Howell Mrs. Patricia Shipman Hudson Mrs. Susan Spratlin Hudson Mrs. Nancy F. Huey Mrs. Harriette H. Huggins Mr. & Mrs. George Huguley Mr. & Mrs. Paul Ernest Hunt Mr. & Mrs. William Luther Hydrick Mrs. Kathleen Hogan Ingram Hon. Kenneth F. Ingram Dr. Teresa Singletary Irvin Mrs. Nancy Gilreath Jackman Mrs. Suzanne Wiggins Jagar Dr. James T. Jenkins Dr. Paul Jhin Dr. Harold Johnson Mrs. Jane McFarland Johnson Dr. Paul Edwin Johnson Mrs. Penelope D. Johnson Mrs. Patricia R. Johnston Mr. Carlton Richard Jones Ms. Doris Jeanne Jones Mrs. Elizabeth W. Jones Mr. Thomas Farrell Jones Mrs. Linda Hall Jordan Mrs. Kimberly Young Kelley Mrs. Mary Jane Kelley Dr. Betty Harrison Kennedy Mrs. Erwin D. Key Mr. Homer F. Kindig Jr. Dr. Debra Craig King Mrs. Catherine P. Kirkpatrick Mrs. Carol Engle Kline Dr. Annette S. Kluck Dr. Jane G. Knight Mr. Charles A. Knowles Dr. Jada L. Kohlmeier Mrs. Judy Liles LaFollette Mrs. Barbara Jean Lammon Mrs. Kathleen High Land Mr. Stephen Paul Landram Mrs. Betty McFaden Lange Mr. Lawrence Mark Lasky Mrs. Carolyn Ennis Latham Mr. & Mrs. Othni James Lathram Mrs. Gail Cartledge Laye Mr. Jeff Eugene Leatherman Rev. & Mrs. Lowell Ledbetter Mr. Sam F. Ledbetter Jr. Dr. Adele Blair Ledford Mrs. Wendy Drew Lemmon Mrs. Mary Neill Lester Mrs. Jean Hammock Leverett Mrs. Carol Thompson Lewis Dr. Eddie T. Lindsey Mrs. Carolyn Ellis Lipscomb Dr. Kimberly Braxton Lloyd Mrs. Lela Melson Lofton Dr. Martha D. Long Mrs. Joyce Hemphill Lott Mrs. Sharon R. Lovell Dr. Cynthia Rolen Lumpkin Mrs. Jeanne Hall Lynch Dr. Martha S. Maddox Mr. Eli Thomas Malone Mrs. Sherry Nunn Manley Mr. D. Dale Mann Mrs. Jane Morrow Mann Mrs. Vicki Morgan Marley Mr. Mark Elwood Marshall

Mrs. Elizabeth McLain Martin Dr. Everett Davis Martin Jr. Mrs. Jan M. Mason Ms. Sarah Frances Mason Mr. & Mrs. Frank Estes Massey Ms. Margaret Lonello Mathes Mr. & Mrs. Robert Laird Mayo Mr. & Mrs. Melvin McAllister Mrs. Jennifer Boissel McCain Mrs. Linda Kay P. McCartney Dr. Theresa M. McCormick Dr. William T. McCown III Mr. Gary D. McCrory Mrs. Lynn Zell McDaniel Rev. & Mrs. Byron McEachern Mr. Y. Mark McElreath Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Lester McFatter Mrs. Nancy Eich McGuire Mrs. Rebecca Burdette McKay Mrs. Pamela Perry McKee Mrs. Marianne B. McLemore Mrs. Carol S. McLeod Mrs. L. Anne McMahan Mrs. Paula Stapp McMillan Mr. Locklyn C. McMurphy Mrs. Mary Elizabeth McNair Mrs. Virginia P. McPheeters Mrs. Carolyn Hunter Meeks Dr. Emily A. Melvin Col. & Mrs. Hollis Messer Mr. Roy Gene Mezick Mrs. Joanne Webb Michael Dr. Johnnie Harris Miles Mr. Walter Sammy Miller Dr. & Mrs. Billy Mills Mrs. Deborah Krueger Milton Mr. Joseph Marvin Mims Mr. Frankie Lewis Mitchum Dr. James Carleton Mohan Mrs. Deborah Horne Monroe Mr. Harry Virgil Moore Mrs. Joanna Y. Moore Mrs. LeAnn Pope Moore Mrs. Mary Martin Moore Mrs. Lynn R. Moran Mr. Sheldon L. Morgan Mr. & Dr. Jack Franklin Morrow Mrs. Anne Harbert Moulton Mrs. Karen H. Mullins Mr. Michael Peeples Murphy Mrs. Nan Timmerman Nabors Dr. & Mrs. James Nave Dr. Doris Luker Needham Mr. Harry E. Neff III Mrs. Brenda Bowen Neisler Dr. Susan Rhodes Nelson Mrs. Sandra M. Nesbitt Mrs. Mary Hollis Newell Mrs. Dianne Kimbell Newman Mrs. Twana Hughes Newton Mrs. Amy Moore Nicholas Mrs. Dorothy S. Norris Mrs. Joy Camp Nunn Col. and Mrs. Dalton Huey Oliver Mr. & Mrs. Russell Julius Olvera Mrs. Kathryn Ryall Ormsby Mr. Bob Osborne Dr. Dawn Ossont Ms. Christina Marija Ovnic Mr. & Mrs. Charles Ray Owen Mr. & Mrs. Michael Scott Owens * deceased

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Dr. Norman Lewis Padgett Mrs. Joan T. Palestini Mrs. Dorothy Crump Parker Mrs. Diane Taylor Parks Mrs. Cheryl Lynne Parmelee Dr. David O. Parrish Ms. Lynn Parrish Dr. Gordon D. Patterson Mrs. Susan McKay Peacock Mrs. Martha Woods Peake Mrs. Virginia Boyd Pearson Mrs. Mary Frances Peery Mr. & Mrs. William Pennington Mrs. Lucinda O. Petway Mrs. Leigh Farrar Pharr Mr. Brian John Phillip Mr. & Mrs. Brian Keith Phillips Mrs. Jean Little Phillips Mr. Jerry Frank Phillips Mr. Jonathan C. Phillips Mrs. Sherri Hill Plant Mrs. Sue Miller Pogue Mr. & Mrs. William Pollak Ms. Elizabeth A. Ponder Mrs. Judy Terry Powell Mr. Donald B. Powers Jr. Mr. & Mrs. John Runnels Prewitt Mrs. Louise Gandy Price Mr. Walter R. Pridmore Mrs. Erma Carlisle Proctor Mrs. Stacy Williams Proffer Mrs. Mayrelizbeth P. Pryor Mr. John David Puckett Mrs. Thelma Williams Purdie Dr. Michael Roy Ragsdale Mr. & Mrs. Warner Raines Dr. Cynthia J. Reed Dr. Janet Mills Reid Mrs. Jean Brown Reid Dr. Douglas Wayne Reynolds Mr. & Mrs. John Richardson Mrs. Caroline Hume Ristad Mrs. Patricia F. Robbins Mrs. Frances W. Roberts Mr. Jeremy Edward Roberts

Mrs. Lillian Hussey Roberts Mrs. Pamala C. Roberts Dr. William Ladon Roberts Mrs. Jeanne S. Robertson Mrs. Christina S. Robinson Dr. Deborah Irene Rodgers Mrs. Carole Pierce Rogers Mrs. Rachel H. Rogers Mr. Robert W. Rogers Dr. Donald O. Rooks Mrs. Joan Rose Mrs. Robin L. Rose Mrs. Tracie C. Rosencrance Lt. Col. John Ross Jr. Mrs. Kelley Ledbetter Rote Mrs. Cynthia B. Rothstein Mrs. Dell Hodge Rovansek Mrs. Mary Sumrall Roy Mrs. Sue Thomason Rye Mrs. Janice Ham Saidla Mrs. Carole Bell Sanders Mrs. Donna Tatom Sanders Mr. Robert L. Sanders Mrs. Pamela Gordon Sandlin Mr. & Mrs. James Sands Mr. & Dr. Alfred Danny Sanspree Mrs. Susan Harris Saudek Dr. John W. Saye Dr. C. Cayce Scarborough Mrs. Martha Vest Scarbrough Mrs. Shirley King Scarbrough Mr. Roger P. Schad Mrs. Delores Mae Schaefer Mrs. Sharon Langham Scheer Mr. Anthony P. Schilleci Ms. Allison E. Schoo Ms. Elizabeth Ann Scott Mrs. Kay Richardson Selah Ms. Amelia Leigh Senkbeil Mrs. Martha Jones Senkbeil Mrs. Maura Frances Shaffer Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Shelton Mrs. Elizabeth T. Sheppard Mrs. Carol Curtis Sheridan Mrs. Connie Lynn Shewchuk

Mrs. Alisa Walker Shivers Mrs. Kathleen B. Shivers Ms. Sandra S. Sikes Dr. Lois Angela Silvernail Dr. F. Morgan Simpson Dr. Robert G. Simpson Mrs. Ann Blizzard Sims Mr. David Allen Sims Lt. Col. George B. Singleton Jr. Mrs. Sue Ellen T. Sisson Dr. V. Shamim Sisson Mr. & Mrs. Charles Eugene Skinner Mrs. Cindy Freeman Slaughter Mr. & Mrs. W. Reese Slaughter Lt. Col. William T. Sledge Sr. Mr. Robert N. Smelley Mr. Charles Ray Smith Mrs. Elizabeth Bagby Smith Mrs. Emily Sellers Smith Mrs. Emwynn Neal Smith Mr. James Roy Smith Mrs. Julianne J. Smith Mrs. Lavonia W. Smith Dr. Mary Alice Smith Mrs. Natalie Boman Smith Mrs. Jacqueline Lee Sneed Dr. Ronald Joseph Spitznagel Dr. Ernest Clayton Spivey Dr. Donna Kilker Stalcup Mrs. Gloria C. Standard Mrs. Barbara Hewitt Stanfield Mrs. Linda English Stanley Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Joseph Steele Mrs. Virginia B. Stephens Mr. Henry J. Stern Steve Means Campaign Fund Mrs. Helen M. Stewart Rev. & Mrs. Marcus Crowder Stewart Mrs. Bonnie Lawler Stinson Mr. Billie L. Stone Mrs. RoseLyn G. Stone Mrs. BrendaLandrum Straub Mrs. Jane Paxton Street

Col. Joey Strickland Mrs. Kathleen G. Strickland Mr. Robert H. Stubbs II Mrs. Amy Cinci Sullins Mrs. Holly Whitt Sutherland Mrs. Patricia H. Swecker Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Lewis Swindle Dr. & Mrs. T. Lavon Talley Mrs. Anne Williams Taylor Mrs. Gayle Jones Taylor Dr. & Mrs. Wayne Teague Mr. Michael Douglas Tedder Dr. John Waits Teel Mrs. Virginia Perry Teem Mr. Richard Graham Tenhet Mrs. Cynthia Smalshof Terry Mr. Calvin E. Thames Dr. Rhonda R. Tharp Mr. & Mrs. Sam Thomason Mrs. Anne Lees Thompson Mr. Foy Campbell Thompson Dr. Jan Dowdle Thornton Mrs. Louise Manley Thrower Mrs. Dianna Swisher Tillery Dr. & Mrs.* Wilbur Tincher Mrs. Joy Love Tomasso Dr. A. Eugene Tootle Mrs. June M. Torbert Mrs. Mary Townsend Mr. & Mrs. Michael Joseph Tullier Mrs. Debra Usry Turner Mr. & Mrs. Randall Scott Uthlaut Mrs. Rhonda Burks Van Zandt Dr. Martha Hay Vardeman Mrs. Nancy Brown Veale Mrs. Teresa Peters Vest Dr. Susan K. Villaume Mrs. Jan Christman Vowell Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Fredrick Wade Mrs. Leann Coker Walker Mr. Arnold D. Wallace Dr. Kimberly Curley Walls

Mrs. Amy Lawrence Walton Mrs. Virginia Barnett McCall Warren Mrs. Mary Jo Wasson Dr. Samuel William Watkins Mr. & Mrs. Harold Otto Watson Mr. & Mrs. Joel Colley Watson Dr. Jacquelynn Wattenbarger Mrs. Marilyn A. Watts Mrs. Elizabeth Mason Wayne Mrs. Giscene Rister Weaver Dr. & Mrs. Harry Weaver Mrs. Laurie McKinney Weitzel Ms. Barbara Brown White Mr. & Mrs. James Jerome White Ms. Marilyn L. Whitley Mr. Donald Earl Whitlock Mrs. Christine T. Wiggins Mr. & Mrs. David Hardy Wilkins Mrs. Carol S. Williams Dr. Linda Yates Williams Mr. & Mrs. Roscoe Mayxell Williams Ms. Jane Kerr Williamson Mr. Jeffrey Wade Williamson Mr. R. Boyd Williamson Mr. K. Ted Wilson Mrs. Vickie Mayton Wilson Mrs. Jeannine Pippin Wing Mrs. Carolyn Sutton Wingard Mr. Marvin R. Woodall III Mrs. Theles S. Woodfin Dr. Shirley H. Woodie Mr. & Mrs. John Wynn Woods World Class Educational Travel LLC Mrs. Beth Morgan Wright Mrs. Jeanette Milton Wyrick Dr. June Thomas Young Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Zodrow Mrs. Kathy Zoghby * deceased

Play your cards right...

And you reward yourself and Auburn students. The new Spirit of Auburn credit card featuring the WorldPoints® program contributes to Auburn’s scholarship fund while building rewards for you, too. By using this card for all your everyday purchases, you share the Auburn spirit by benefiting students who most deserve academic scholarships – at no additional cost to you – and you ultimately help shape the future of Auburn. Even more reason to enjoy redeeming all the points you earn for cash rewards, travel or merchandise. One good turn deserves another.

For more information and to apply for this card, visit www.auburn.edu/spiritcard For information about the rates, fees, other costs, and benefits associated with the use of this card or to apply, visit www.auburn.edu/spiritcard and refer to the disclosures accompanying the online credit card application. This credit card program is issued and administered by FIA Card Services, N.A. Bank of America and the Bank of America logo are registered trademarks of Bank of America Corporation. MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Inc., and is used by the issuer pursuant to license. Platinum Plus and WorldPoints are registered trademarks of FIA Card Services, N.A. The Spirit of Auburn credit card is made possible by the Auburn Spirit Foundation for Scholarships (ASFS), which is affiliated with Auburn University. This advertisement was paid for by the ASFS. © 2008 Bank of America Corporation.

KeystoneAd.indd 1

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Why did you decide to get involved as an Auburn Fund caller? On top of the fact that I have great peers to work with and the hours are nice as a student, money still needs to be raised for Auburn and its individual colleges and schools. Auburn is at its all-time high for enrollment—with that enrollment comes more computer labs, classrooms, and state-of-the-art equipment that every Auburn student should have. Knowing that I am helping out future Auburn students is one of the most rewarding jobs. What’s the craziest thing a caller has said to you on the phone? I’ve had many crazy calls from alumni and friends, but that’s what makes my job fun and interesting. I have had many alumni trying to set me up with their sons. However, the one that takes the cake is when an alumni offered me a teaching position at his school. At first I thought he was joking, but he then gave me his number and told me to call him when I graduated and he promised to get me a job. As tempting as it sounds, the place where the job was offered was a little too far from home for me to accept. However, I still have his number just in case. What’s your best memory so far as an Auburn student? So far it has to be Tiger Nights this past fall. It was so nice to just hang out with fellow students and just have fun instead of studying! We did everything from making a wax hand to listening to music on Cater lawn. What is your favorite thing about AU? I love the fact that Auburn is such a diverse family! It really helps broaden your perspective on learning! What is your favorite location on campus? As much time that I have spent in the library, I must say that I have grown quite attached to it. However, I wouldn’t say that it is my favorite place on campus. Auburn University has a beautiful campus, which makes my decision hard. I would have to say that my all time favorite place on campus is Cater lawn. It is in the heart of Auburn University and provides a

chance to just sit and watch the diverse students walk across campus. What is your favorite thing to do on campus? Football games of course! But on a daily basis, I really just like to take the time and sit down! Enjoy the environment around me. Why did you decide to attend Auburn University? One of the main reasons I decided on Auburn was the traditions and family spirit that moved me when I visited. It didn’t hurt that my brother, who graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering in August 2004, was also a huge influence. Another main reason I decided on Auburn was the determination of the College of Education. They really believe that education is what will promise a better future. As a future teacher it is important to have a degree from a place that believes in you and believes in your career to touch others lives. What is your favorite Auburn tradition? I LOVE the Tiger Walk. It just gets everyone so pumped up and excited you can’t help but to be in a great mood to cheer on the Tigers. Of course rolling Toomer’s is also great—if you ever feel the family spirit from Auburn University that’s where it would be. There are so many students, family of students, alumni, faculty, etc... after every win to celebrate together. It’s a true time to bond with your Auburn family. What are your career goals? Hopefully, I will be in a teaching environment that has great mentors and peers where I can achieve tenure. I also would like to continue my education by pursuing either a master’s degree in elementary education or counseling. What do you hope to do after graduation? I really hope to have a job and start teaching as soon as possible. I also would really like to become more involved with my community and start giving back like so many others have done for me.

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Pearson ‘49 memorializes family’s passion for education through scholarships

A

rmed with a home economics degree from the College of Education, Sue Atchison Pearson began in 1949 a teaching career that included teaching fifth grade in Phenix City, Ala., Columbus, Ga., and Jefferson City, Ala. She went from teaching children to applying home economic skills in demonstrating appliances for the gas company. She promoted gas products in every venue from cooking schools to private homes. This allowed her to stay home with her son, John, until he started seventh grade. She renewed her teaching certificate and began teaching fifth grade until her retirement. A lifelong supporter of education, Pearson has established endowed scholarships in the College of Education, as well as AU’s School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences. Recent contributions allow both endowments to immediately recognize student achievement, while planned gifts committed by Pearson to the university will provide for even greater assistance later.

“It is the highlight of my year to interact with the students,” she continued. “I have been very pleased with the students who have received the scholarships and I know my mom would have been pleased.”

Pearson also created the Rose Eugene Atchison Endowed Scholarship in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences in honor of her father. This scholarship supports forestry students who are active in the community and school organizations. She describes her father Rose Eugene as a man with determination, strong work ethic and a love of children. Sue and her husband Jack H. Pearson ‘49 (accountancy) also established a scholarship at the University of Alabama, in memory of their son John Pearson, who passed away in 1976.

In the College of Education, the Hester Wear Atchison Endowed Scholarship, created by Pearson and her niece Kay Hathaway Jones ‘62 (accountancy), honors the memory of Hester Atchison—Sue’s mother and Kay’s grandmother. Atchison, a strong and spiritual woman, was gifted musically with a beautiful voice and a deep belief in education. This scholarship provides support for students in the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Teaching. “My parents were avid supporters of education,” Pearson said. “They encouraged all of their children to attend college. I believe their passion for education was passed on to me.

Malone Family Foundation grants $304,975 to math ed The Auburn University Foundation has received a gift of $304,975 from the Malone Family Foundation of Dothan Alabama to fund a project entitled “Improving Grades 6-12 Mathematics Education in East Alabama Using Technology” directed by Drs. Marilyn Strutchens and W. Gary Martin, professors of math education in the College of Education. This project will enhance the activities of the TEAMMath project, a unique partnership that includes Auburn University’s College of Education and College of Sciences and Mathematics, Tuskegee University and 15 school districts in East Alabama, working together to improve mathematics education in east Alabama. Currently in its fourth year of a five-year grant from the National Science Foundation’s Math and Science Partnership program, TEAM-Math has made great strides in improving student scores on state-mandated achievement tests. The gift will provide participating schools state-of-the-art mathematics software designed to enhance student learning of math as well as graphing calculators, resources that the schools

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Keystone • Volume V, 2008

frequently cannot afford. It also provides intensive preparation for the teachers in effectively using the technology. “The Malone Family Foundation is delighted to partner with Auburn University and TEAM-Math to promote mathematics education in East Alabama,” said Alyson Malone of the Malone Family Foundation. “We are dedicated to funding programs we believe will help improve the education of the children and young adults of Alabama, thus giving them better opportunities for success in life. TEAM-Math has worked diligently to devise a program aimed at improving mathematics programs in East Alabama, and we look forward to seeing the results of this endeavor.”


Honor Roll Spo tlight

Donna Anderson Mellons ‘75 honored by friends for years of teaching

Volume V, 2008

30

After a nearly 30-year career as a physical education teacher, Donna Mellons ‘75 retired from Wrights Mill Road Elementary School in Auburn, Ala. in 2004. The school that she dedicated her entire career to has most definitely felt the benefits of her love and passion for education. In addition to her teaching, she spent countless afternoons making sure students got on the right bus safely, as well as coordinating May Days, Spirit Days and Field Nights. She encouraged, challenged and helped students meet and exceed their potential. Always willing to pitch in and lend a hand, Mellons embodies the spirit all educators share.

The Keystone is an annual publication of the Auburn University College of Education, produced and distributed to alumni and friends of the college through the generous contributions of private donors. Dea n

Dr. Frances K. Kochan

She is described by her colleague, friend and fellow College of Education alumna Susan Housel ‘73 as a “woman of generosity and grace.” Mellons was honored through the Honor Roll by her Wrights Mill Road Elementary colleagues and Alpha Delta Kappa friends whose combined contributions allowed them to commemorate her retirement in this meaningful way. This honor certainly embodies Mellons’ tireless dedication to the improvement and well-being of the students, teachers and staff of Wrights Mill Road Elementary School.

Dir e c t o r o f Ext erna l R el at i o n s

Michael Tullier, APR

Keys t on e edi t o r

Colleen Bourdeau

Mellons is a two-time graduate of Auburn University’s College of Education, earning both her bachelor and master’s degrees from the college.

Lay ou t, D es i g n a n d P hot ogra p hy

Amanda J. Earnest Ricky Lee Whittemore II

  The Auburn University College of Education has established The Honor Roll—a permanent listing of individuals who have been recognized by current or former students, colleagues, family members or friends through a charitable contribution of $500.

Cont ri bu t i n g W r i t e r s

Dr. Jamie Carney Chris Groccia Tuan Huyhn Amanda Mullins Dr. Ellen Reames Dr. Leah Robinson Dr. Peggy Shippen

Thanks to the AU Office of Communications and Marketing for contributing content. Additional photography by AU Athletic Department, AU Photographic Services and J.Lawrence Photography.

Send address changes to eduinfo@auburn.edu, or by mail to the attention of Michael Tullier, APR Auburn University College of Education 3084 Haley Center Auburn, Alabama 36849-5218 334.844.4446 education.auburn.edu eduinfo@auburn.edu

Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer. ©2008, Auburn University College of Education

O T HE H ON

R

R OLL

T HE

H ON

OR

R OLL

  The Honor Roll is a fund created to commemorate the significant roles of educators in our lives. The names of honored educators and contributions by the individuals who honored them are prominently displayed on a plaque in the College of Education.

  Honorees receive a certificate suitable for framing, a lapel pin commemorating this special tribute, a location card that details the location of the plaque in Haley Center and a special memento from the college announcing their induction to The Honor Roll.   Funds contributed to The Honor Roll are used to provide student scholarships and faculty support and to assist the college in enhancing its high-quality programs. Therefore, your giving not only honors your memorable educator, but it ensures future educators will be well prepared.   To receive more information, please contact the Office of Development at 334.844.5793.


‘Lost soul’ named Keystone Leader • Research/Outreach goes global Portals welcome campus visitors • College reaccreditated, ranked

The mission of the Auburn University College of Education is to build a better future for individuals, our state, our nation and our world. We fulfill our mission by preparing competent, committed and reflective professionals as we engage in outstanding teaching, cutting-edge research and meaningful outreach. The keystone, the topmost stone of an arch, serves as a visual reminder of our mission. Just as the keystone supports and holds an arch together, education holds intact the promise of a better future for all.

C ollege of E ducation O ffice of the D ean 3084 H aley C enter A uburn , A labama 36849-5218

V o l u m e v, 2 0 0 8

C o l l e g e

Non-profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 530 Montgomery, AL

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

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2008 Keystone  
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