Page 1

the

S T U D E N T A F FA I R S

ANNUAL REPORT fall 2014 – 2015

auburn university


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TABLE OF CON TEN TS 2 Letter from Bobby R. Woodard, Ph.D.

Associate Provost and Vice President for Student Affairs

4 Why? Because This is Auburn.

Student Affairs Development Team works on capital campaign

5 Welcome to the Division!

Veteran’s Affairs joins the Division of Student Affairs

6 Auburn’s Red Carpet

2015 Involvement Awards recognize outstanding students

8 Fight the Flu

Medical Clinic prepares students for flu season

9 WE.auburn

Auburn begins bystander intervention program training

10 Helping Hands

Student Advocacy & Case Management helps students in crisis

12 From Bid Day to Big Event 2015 in photographs

14 The Doctor Is In

Student Counseling Services welcomes former detection dog as new therapist

16 Be The Creed

Student Conduct launches good behavior campaign

17 Building Success

Recreation and Wellness Center receives national award

18 Home Sweet Auburn

Parent & Family Programs debuts new event at Welcome Week

20 Try Tri-Sigma

Sigma Sigma Sigma joins Auburn Panhellenic

21 The Heart of Campus

Student Center provides on-campus event and meeting space

Auburn University Student Affairs | 1


WAR EAGLE! I am pleased to present the 2014-2015 Student Affairs Annual Report. It’s hard to believe that an entire year has passed since I began my journey at Auburn University. From my first day until now, I’ve had the opportunity to fully experience the warmth of the Auburn Family, and it’s easy to see what makes Auburn special. It’s not one particular thing, but rather it is a combination of the ambition of our students, the dedication of our staff and faculty members, and the support from our alumni and the Auburn community that makes us unique. This report does not simply provide a recap of the past year, but instead, it provides a glimpse of the hard work put forth by our entire staff. In Student Affairs, we are fortunate to not only work for our students, but with our students. We have the opportunity to be part of their experience at Auburn, watching them achieve their greatest dreams and helping to prepare them for the future. We get to be their support, whether it’s in learning leadership skills, navigating a difficult circumstance or practicing interpersonal skills. In this publication, you’ll notice that Student Affairs covers a variety of departments for student support. Specifically, the division consists of 12 departments: Campus Recreation, Greek Life, Health Promotion and Wellness Services, Medical Clinic, Parent and Family Programs, Student Center, Student Conduct and Advocacy and Case Management, Student Counseling Services, Student Involvement, and Veterans Affairs, plus a Development office and an office of Assessment and Strategic Planning for the division. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me if you have any questions, or if Student Affairs can help you in any way.

Thank you,

Bobby R. Woodard, Ph.D.

Associate Provost & Vice President for Student Affairs

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C R E DITS ASSOCIATE PROVOST & VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS Bobby R. Woodard, Ph.D. ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT DEVELOPMENT Haven Hart ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Lady Cox MANAGING EDITOR Elizabeth Stone CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Catherine Abernathy Mallory Ferguson Amy Weaver GRAPHIC DESIGN Elizabeth Hildreth Emily Prestridge PHOTOGRAPHY AU Photographic Services Jenna Burgess Brody Mathews Kenny Moss


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WHY? S T UDENT A FFAI RS DEVEL O P ME N T T E AM WORKS ON C A P I TAL C AMP AIG N

Excerpt from the Division of Student Affairs Case Statement AS PART OF THE Because This is Auburn $1 billion campaign, the Division of Student Affairs has committed to raise $6.3 million toward ensuring the complete “Auburn experience” for current and future generations of Auburn students. The Division of Student Affairs plays a pivotal role in enhancing students’ classroom experiences through access to leadership programs, service initiatives, and recreational opportunities. We cultivate a healthy and supportive campus environment that engages students, advances learning, encourages leadership and prepares them for future success. We empower our students to pursue their passions and develop their full potential, while enriching the quality of their campus experience. “We must create a true learning community capable of providing all students with transformative educational experiences,” said Dr. Bobby R. Woodard, associate provost and vice president for Student Affairs. “This means empowering students to take what they learn in the classroom and applying it to the world around them — preparing them to contribute to their communities and to be quality members of society.”

20 1 4 – 20 15 A SSE SSM ENT H I G HL I G H T S

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The Division of Student Affairs continually focuses on providing the best resources for Auburn’s students and their parents. This means more than just cultivating students’ leadership skills through involvement opportunities and service initiatives — it also means ensuring they have every resource necessary for a successful college experience. Through this campaign, Student Affairs hopes to expand the capacity for more students to hone their leadership potential through LeaderShape,
a nationally recognized program held annually at the WinShape Retreat Center in Rome, Georgia. By endowing travel awards that underwrite the expenses incurred as part of our Alternative Student Break experiences, we can provide students who otherwise couldn’t afford it with the necessary funds to travel during their school breaks and benefit from these unique global service opportunities. Charitable support of Health Promotion and Wellness Services programs and our Student Success Fund can ensure student success by helping them overcome unforeseen obstacles to their physical, emotional, social, cultural and financial wellness.

496

14,588

1,450

The RECREATION and WELLNESS CENTER CELEBRATED its

REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS on CAMPUS

STUDENT ORGANIZATION EVENTS were SUBMITTED to the AUINVOLVE WEBSITE

STUDENTS are CURRENTLY INVOLVED in a STUDENT ORGANIZATION

1 MILLIONTH VISITOR in SPRING 2015


Welcome

TO THE DIVISION VETERAN’ S AFFA I RS J OIN S T HE DIV ISIO N O F ST U DE N T AF F AIR S Written by: CATHERINE ABERNATHY

PREVIOUSLY A STANDALONE DEPARTMENT, the Auburn University Veterans Resource Center has now joined the Division of Student Affairs. The Auburn Student Veterans Association (ASUA) helped spur the decision to make the shift because of the similar goals of Student Affairs and the Veterans Resource Center. “Historically, the mission for Student Affairs developed out of the need for support for students outside the classroom. An important component of that includes developing social tools to help students succeed,” said Dr. Johnny Green, director of the Veterans Resource Center. “Veteran students have an opportunity to meet other students and engage in extracurricular and co-curricular activities that add to their overall well-being.” The Veterans Resource Center offers support to student veterans academically, physically and mentally as they make the transition to civilian life. Auburn University’s consistently significant enrollment of veterans revealed a need for the Veterans Resource Center to be a “one-stop-shop” for student veterans. In addition to having access to traditional academic resources like computers and study spaces that are available in the resource center, student veterans can find help with services offered by the resource center that are more specialized to veterans’ needs.

98%

of INCOMING FRESHMAN STUDENTS COMPLETED ALCOHOLEDU (an educational course on the effects of alcohol)

The Central Alabama Veterans Health Care Services helps veterans learn how to use their Federal Veterans Association (VA) Educational benefits. Student veterans can also receive help with medical benefits and disability claims and find support for coping with physical and mental conditions. The resource center brings in a social worker who can provide confidential counseling for veterans suffering from conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and military sexual trauma. “When a university provides a space where a student veteran can meet other student veterans and are offered the tools to assist them in their transition to civilian life, they thrive academically, physically and mentally,” said Robyn Westbrook, VA certifying official. “When there is a supportive campus environment that engages students, advances learning, encourages leadership, it will prepare students for future success.” Apart from their involvement at the resource center, the ASVA is responsible for planning various events throughout Military Appreciation Month in November. In addition to recognizing Veterans Day, each branch of the military is celebrated on a different day during the month. The ASVA also hosts a demonstration aimed to bring awareness to veteran suicide prevention. The month-long celebration culminates with the annual military appreciation football game in Jordan-Hare Stadium.

93%

of INCOMING FRESHMAN STUDENTS COMPLETED HAVEN (an educational course on prevention of sexual assault)

90.84%

of RESPONDENTS to a SPRING 2015 SURVEY SAID that they are MORE CONNECTED to CAMPUS as a RESULT of their MEMBERSHIP in a GREEK ORGANIZATION

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National Society of Black Engineers receives award for Exceptional Campus Organization.

AUBURN’S

RED CARPET 2015 I NVOL VEM E N T AWAR DS R E C O G N IZ E O U T ST AN DIN G S T UD E NT S Written by: ELIZABETH STONE

STUDENT AFFAIRS, the Office of Student Involvement and the Involvement Ambassadors hosted the 2015 Involvement Awards on Thursday, April 23, 2015. Held in the Student Center Ballroom, complete with a red carpet, this annual awards ceremony honors student leaders and student organizations for their service, commitment and accomplishments throughout the last year. The recipients of the 14 awards, including male student leader of the year, female student leader of the year and exceptional campus organization, are kept confidential until they are announced at the event.  “Student leaders on Auburn’s campus spend countless hours planning events, leading their respective organizations, and giving back to our campus,” said John-Michael Roehm, coordinator for Student Organizations. “Much of the Auburn Experience is gained from what our students do outside of the classroom and the Involvement Awards are an opportunity to gather several hundred student leaders together to recognize the great things their student groups are doing to enhance that experience.”

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This year, an additional award, The Fred and Charlene Kam “Human Touch” Service Award, was announced to recognize and celebrate the achievements of a student organization that is dedicated to making a lasting impact on the lives of the people they serve, as well as actively engaging the student body, faculty and Auburn community in their cause. This award will be funded by a permanent endowment made possible by Dr. and Mrs. Kam. The inaugural “Human Touch” award went to the Auburn Chapter of Best Buddies, a volunteer program the provides opportunities for college students to establish friendships with people with intellectual or development disabilities.  The Office of Student Involvement received 169 nominations for the awards, and 75 of those were selected as finalists to attend the 2015 ceremony. In the 2014-2015 academic year, 14,519 Auburn students were involved in an organization with 362 faculty or staff advisors. The Office of Student Involvement serves over 496 student organizations on Auburn’s campus. For more information, please visit www.auburn.edu/involvement. 


2015 INVOLVEMENT AWARD WINNERS EXCEPTIONAL CAMPUS ORGANIZATION National Society of Black Engineers

OVERCOMING ADVERSITY AWARD Hillel, Jewish Student Organization

FRED & CHARLENE KAM “HUMAN TOUCH” SERVICE AWARD Best Buddies

MALE STUDENT LEADER OF THE YEAR Kyle Marchuk, President of Active Minds

FEMALE STUDENT LEADER OF THE YEAR Sarah Kelly, President of Auburn University Dance Marathon

ORGANIZATION ADVISOR OF THE YEAR Brad Smith, Advisor for the Student Government Association

OUTSTANDING NEW ORGANIZATION Auburn for Water

MOST ENTERTAINING CAMPUS EVENT Auburn University Dance Marathon 2015

OUTSTANDING CULTURAL ACTIVITY Peace Dinner by International Student Organization

OUTSTANDING MEDIA ORGANIZATION The Auburn Plainsman

EXCELLENCE IN PRACTICAL APPLICATION American Pharmacists Association – Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP)

OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC/ PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION Black Graduate and Professional Student Association (BGPSA)

OUTSTANDING SUPPORT ORGANIZATION Student Recruiters OUTSTANDING SPORT & RECREATION ORGANIZATION Ice Hockey Club

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T H E F LU M EDI C AL C L IN IC P R E P AR E S ST U DE N T S F O R F L U SE AS ON Written by: CATHERINE ABERNATHY

INEVITABLY, MEDICAL ISSUES arise on a college campus. Fortunately, Auburn students do not have to go far to receive the help they need. Auburn University’s Medical Clinic is equipped to handle a wide variety of health concerns that students face. The Medical Clinic has a full staff of physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and a nursing staff. During flu season, the Medical Clinic offers flu shots for students who want to be vaccinated. For as long as supplies are available, flu shots are administered weekdays 8 – 11 a.m. and 1 – 4 p.m. with no appointment necessary. “We recommend getting a flu shot every year. While the flu shot does not guarantee that you

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will not get the flu, it does reduce the likelihood,” said Maegan Hamner, director of marketing for the Medical Clinic. “If you do get the flu after having the shot, your symptoms are likely to be significantly less severe.” The Medical Clinic facility is home to Student Counseling Services and Pharmacy Services offered through the Harrison School of Pharmacy. X-ray capabilities, women’s health and a massage therapist are among the other services offered at the Medical Clinic. From administering flu shots and travel vaccines to treating the common cold and other issues, the AU Medical Clinic is equipped to help students with any health concerns that arise at school.


AUBURN B EG I NS B YSTA ND E R IN T E R V E N T IO N P R O G R AM T R AIN IN G Written by: AMY WEAVER Contribution by: CATHERINE ABERNATHY AS PART OF THE AUBURN University Health Promotion and Wellness Services’ efforts to prevent sexual assault and other forms of sexual violence from occurring on campus, 44 faculty, staff and students attended campus-based training on the Green Dot Bystander Intervention program. The Green Dot program has been adapted to Auburn as WE.auburn. The goal of the program is to permanently reduce interpersonal violence by training faculty, staff and students in bystander intervention, as well as how to integrate bystander intervention strategies into trainings, action events and use bystander intervention in everyday work. The Green Dot program has been shown to reduce sexual violence on college campuses by 50 percent.

The Green Dot program describes acts of power-based personal violence as “red dots” to illustrate threatening, risky situations like sexual violence, stalking, bullying and abuse. The mission of the program is to motivate bystanders to take actions and change the “red dots” to “green dots”. A green dot can be any kind of behavior or attitude that demonstrates preventative measures taken against red dot situations. Physically acting is not the only way to create a green dot; green dots can be created from raising awareness on social media or donating money to services that help victims of personal violence among other things. Eventually, proactively creating green dots will outnumber red dots and reduce the prevalence of threatening situations of power-based personal violence overall. Many organizations across campus are pledging their support. Throughout 2015, the Interfraternity Council (IFC) Officers and chapter Presidents have increasingly turned their focus towards sexual assault

Faculty, staff and students participate in training.

prevention and understanding the implications of Title IX regulations on fraternal organizations. IFC leaders participated in Green Dot training and are leading an initiative to implement sexual assault prevention programs in fraternities throughout campus. Throughout the Green Dot training, participants learn how to mobilize bystanders in proactive and reactive behaviors that interrupt acts of violence. The training intentionally invites participants to reconsider their role in prevention and inspires them that even small acts that interrupt interpersonal violence matter. Proactive behaviors referred to as “Green Dots” combat “Red Dots” or acts of violence. Engaging the entire campus population in bystander intervention strengthens the culture that interpersonal violence will not be tolerated if everyone does their part. For more information on the WE.auburn initiative, call Health Promotion & Wellness Services at 334-844-1422.

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Katherine Hettinger meets with students needing assistance.

HELPING

HANDS

ST U DEN T AD V OC AC Y & C ASE M ANAGE ME N T HE L P S ST U DE N T S IN C R ISIS

Written by: CATHERINE ABERNATHY

STUDENT SUCCESS is a priority at Auburn University, but sometimes life gets in the way. It is not uncommon for students to experience difficulties for which they are unprepared. These crises have the potential to negatively affect a students’ performance in the classroom and even impact their retention at school. Auburn University is equipped to help. Student Advocacy and Case Management Services can help students face any struggle that comes their way whether it is medical, mental or personal. Coordinator of Student Advocacy and Case Management Katherine Hettinger ensures that students get the help they need. Her role is to provide support to students throughout their time in college and to work with them as they overcome obstacles. There are many types of struggles that can cause distress for students. Anxiety, depression, suicidal

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thoughts/attempts, short and long term illnesses, injuries, academic concerns, housing concerns, financial hardships and drug and alcohol issues are among the common struggles faced by students. Though these problems can affect a student’s performance academically, the stresses associated with classwork can also cause emotional distress. Hettinger is prepared to help students face anything that comes their way. It is important for students to take advantage of the services offered by Student Advocacy and Case Management when problems occur. Hettinger notes that many students never expect a crisis to happen to them and are subsequently overwhelmed and unprepared for how to respond when they are faced with an obstacle. Typically, students don’t know the first steps they should take to deal with their situation. Case Management Services

can offer help, but many students may not realize that help is readily available. “Most students are not aware of the variety of resources available to them at Auburn because they have never needed to use them,” said Hettinger. “By utilizing Case Management Services, students are able to take the guess work out of who to call and where to go with their problem. I can help them deal with a crisis from beginning to end.” Students’ awareness of Auburn’s available resources can make the difference in their success at Auburn and their mental health. Apart from being unaware of the resources available, some students are hesitant to utilize these resources to receive help. “Although the stigma around mental health is beginning to change, I meet with so many students struggling with depression, anxiety, and thoughts of


201 4– 201 5 S TUD E N T A DVO CACY AN D CAS E MA N AG E ME N T A TOTAL of

754

REFERRALS were RECEIVED

175

REFERRALS were from the CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAM, or CIRT, (an on-call emergency notification program in which student affairs staff are notified about students in crisis)

suicide who wait too long or refuse to get help,” said Hettinger, “There is no shame in admitting that you are struggling, and talking with a professional about how you feel and what you are experiencing can be so helpful. No one should suffer alone.” Student Advocacy and Case Management Services has a plan when it comes to students in distress. Physical accommodations can be made for injured students and emotional support is available for students in emotional turmoil. Faculty and staff are equipped and trained to know how to most effectively support students that are in need of help. Students are in good hands at Auburn when they face personal crises. To report a student concern, call 334-884-1423.

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Comedian Nick Offerman performs during a University Program Council event.

YEAR in

Welcome Week 2015 included a “Glocade” for students, presented by the University Program Council.

REVIEW

Phi Mu wins first place for their performance in Greek Sing.

Students attend the Get Rec’d event at the Recreation and Wellness Center.

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Students participate in stress relieving activities, provided by Student Counseling Services, during finals week.


AU Dance Marathon raises money for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals.

A record number of attendees enjoy dishes from around the world at the International Peace Dinner.

Eagle Eye TV films the weekly live news broadcast on Monday at 8 p.m.

Dr. Woodard takes on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge after being challenged by former SGA President Logan Powell and former SGA Treasurer Richmond Gunter.

Students volunteer their time to help communities through Alternative Student Breaks.

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THE

DOCTOR IS IN

S T U DENT CO UNSEL I NG SERVI C ES WE L C O ME S F O R ME R D E T ECTIO N DOG A S NEW THERA P I ST Written by: AMY WEAVER

AUBURN UNIVERSITY’S Student Counseling Services added a new therapist this summer – “Dr. Moose,” a 7-year-old yellow Labrador retriever. The former bomb detection dog is a welcome addition among the trained staff, but he’s definitely not the office pet. “He’s not here to play all day long,” said Dr. Doug Hankes, director of Student Counseling Services. “In the office, he’s all business. He’s a therapist when he’s in here.” Hankes and Dr. Katie Werner, a senior staff clinician, wanted a therapy dog for the clinic because of the benefits it would bring. “Many universities use dogs strictly for outreach, like taking them through a student center to reach 50 people in an hour,” said Werner, “but dogs can also be used to assist in the care of clients with anxiety or a history of trauma. Research shows that having animal-assisted therapy increases motivation, engagement and emotional expression.” For the student who seeks counseling, Werner said the presence of a dog could make each session more beneficial. And considering Student Counseling Services operates on a short-term model – students generally are limited to 10 50-minute sessions a year – it’s important to make the most out of that time.

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“Research says lots of change can occur in those 10 hours,” said Werner. “In between sessions, students can incorporate what we’ve discussed into their lives and make strides in their treatment. They can be more engaged and motivated from that first session with Moose there.” Even with research on their sides, Hankes and Werner had a number of factors to consider in having a therapy dog, including where it would live and how it would be acquired. The pair eventually found themselves at the Canine Performance Sciences program in Auburn’s College of Veterinary Medicine, where they met Moose and Baxter. Both dogs had worked bomb detection for the Department of Justice, but Auburn’s canine experts were considering putting them in new careers. Both Hankes and Werner admitted they were apprehensive about the possibility of successfully retraining a dog that is used to the intense, high drive environment of bomb detection to be a calming influence in therapy sessions. But Bart Rogers, who trained Moose for bomb detection when he arrived at Canine Performance Sciences in 2010, assured them it was possible. “I was confident that Moose would be able to transition to being a therapy dog because of his personality,” he said. “After

working with him and training him for numerous projects for the last few years, I became aware that he was very versatile and capable of nearly any task. Moose is an intense dog, but also calm, focused and always wants to please.” Rogers said Moose not only excelled at bomb detection, but he was also good at virus detection. He said Moose was able to detect the bovine viral diarrhea virus with a sensitivity of 96 percent and was able to discriminate two other non-target viruses with a specificity of 98 percent. Moose is one of two dogs in the world with this ability. “To Moose, the virus target odor was just another odor he learned to detect,” said Rogers. “He is a very calculated and methodical dog which makes him great at detection.” To transition to therapy, Rogers trained Moose with his new primary handler – Werner. Werner agreed to take on the role, which meant Moose would live with her. She said she has a very understanding husband who accepted adding a third dog into their household. Moose is no stranger to living with other dogs or obeying a handler, but he had never lived in a house before. Werner said he would exemplify extreme obedience and bravery, but if he heard a hair dryer, vacuum or television, he would become cautious and curious


Dr. Katie Werner personally and professionally cares for Moose.

at the unfamiliar sounds. Hankes compared the behavior to dogs and stairs. Most aren’t accustomed to them until they learn to adapt. Rogers spent months working with Moose and Werner to prepare for the Therapy Dogs International test and the American Kennel Club Canine Good Citizen test. Moose passed both and began his new job this summer. The entire staff at Student Counseling Services is equipped to work with Moose. He can be a part of any counseling session as long as the client is comfortable with his presence and he could be a benefit to the client’s circumstances. “I didn’t know if he’d like this kind of work,” said Werner. “He’s very active and trained to follow his nose, but now he looks to each of us on staff for cues, instead of what’s around him.” Hankes said Moose can work with students in individual or group counseling sessions. In a group session, Moose will sit in the middle of the group. When a student gets emotional, he’ll move next to them. Hankes said he doesn’t get in their lap or beg for attention. If the student wants to interact with Moose, they can. Otherwise, he will remain sitting there until their emotions change. Then he’ll move back to the center of the group. “He’s what we call a grounding tool,” said Hankes. “His presence helps a client manage their dissociation and emotions so they can focus on the present.” Werner said a dog can be a successful grounding tool because its presence lowers a person’s blood pressure and releases feel-good hormones, which

aid in processing emotions. Student Counseling Services has started “Let Loose with Moose” this year to allow Moose to work outside the office, interacting with students around campus each week. “Looking at Moose, you can’t tell he was once a detector dog,” Hankes said. “He’s around the office all day. He even comes to our staff meetings and will do his job there if he detects someone’s emotions.” Paul Waggoner, co-director of the Canine Performance Sciences program, said dogs are remarkably well-suited for therapeutic duties because, as much scientific evidence suggests, they have a unique social sensitivity to people. Dogs have been known to pick up on human gestures without explicit training and even yawn when a human companion does, he said. That sensitivity can give dogs the ability to be particularly susceptible to people’s emotions. “It’s fascinating to me that he was so successful in that high energy environment (of bomb detection) and now he’s trained to pick up on our emotions,” added Hankes. Staff and resources permitting, Hankes and Werner would like to add more dogs to Student Counseling Services. “I hope we see more detection dogs retire from their jobs and go on to become service, therapy or companion dogs for people who need them,” added Rogers. “Detection dogs love to work so it would be great if they could continue to have a job that improves the quality of life of people and also makes them happy.”

Auburn University Student Affairs | 15


Dr. George Petrie (1866-1947), Auburn University professor of history, founder of AU football program, author of the Auburn Creed, shown in the first Auburn University football uniform in 18­92.

ST U DE N T C O N DU C T L AU N C HE S G O OD B E HAV IO R C AMP AIG N Written by: ELIZABETH STONE

IN SEPTEMBER 2015, the Office of Student Conduct officially launched the Be The Creed campaign, a campaign to encourage good behavior among Auburn University students and to raise awareness of the Code of Student Conduct. The campaign features the Auburn Creed, which many students memorize before graduation, and also focuses on the author of the creed, Dr. George Petrie. Rather than spotlighting the creed alone, or the specific parts of the Code of Student Conduct, the campaign draws attention to Petrie himself, providing an example to students of the original person to embody what it means to “Be The Creed.” “The Auburn Creed is universally accepted as a set of beliefs we should use as our foundation for making decisions,” said Haven Hart, assistant vice president for student development. “The primary message we are trying to convey through the Be the Creed campaign is for students to reflect the values of the Auburn Creed in all that they do.” During the spring and summer, the Office of Student Conduct recruited a team of staff members and current students to brainstorm ideas for a campaign that would genuinely resonate with students. The campaign was meant to not only raise awareness of the Code of Student Conduct, but also, on a broader level, encourage students to strive to emulate the best of what Auburn has to offer. From these brainstorming sessions, the Be The Creed campaign was created. The campaign spotlights specific parts of the creed including education, honesty and respect. The Office of Student Conduct began distributing information and marketing materials the week before the first home football game and will continue with additional events to increase awareness in the following months. “The Auburn Creed reflects the values that Dr. Petrie believed to be important for Auburn men and women,” added Hart. “We want the words of the creed to come to life through this campaign. It is important that students not only know the importance of being truthful and respectful, etc., but to also demonstrate those ideals through their actions.”

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BUILDING SUCCESS R ECR EATI ON AND WEL L NESS C E N T E R R ECEI VES NA TI ONA L A WAR D Written by: MALLORY FERGUSON

AT THE NATIONAL Intramural Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) Annual Conference and Recreational Sports Expo on March 30, 2015, in Grapevine, Texas, the Auburn University Recreation and Wellness Center received an award for Outstanding Sports Facility. “We are honored to receive this award and grateful every Auburn student has the opportunity to enjoy this amazing facility,” said Jennifer Jarvis, executive director of Campus Recreation. “James Braam, of HOK Sports + Rec Team and formerly 360 Architecture, is ahead of his time. He captured everything our students desired and delivered a ‘wow’ factor that is uniquely Auburn.  He truly raised the bar.”  Presented each year, the NIRSA award honors facilities that demonstrate excellence in a number of critical areas, including architectural design, functionality and how well a facility meets its intended purpose. Winning facilities exemplify the institution’s commitment to providing the higher education experience desired and valued by students. Research is linking robust recreational programs, facilities and services with student success and satisfaction in higher education, says NIRSA. State-of-the art facilities have demonstrated their capacity to greatly enhance the overall student experience, thereby boosting recruitment and improving overall retention.

Auburn University Student Affairs | 17


AU B U RN P AR E N T & F AMIL Y P R O G R AMS DE B U T S N E W E V E N T AT W E L C O ME WE E K

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Written by: CATHERINE ABERNATHY THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME, especially when your home is Auburn, Alabama. This year, Auburn’s newest students were introduced to their new home for the next four years through a new Welcome Week event called “Home Sweet Auburn”. The Home Sweet Auburn event allowed Auburn freshmen and their parents to experience the unique charm that makes it feel only natural to call Auburn home. Home Sweet Auburn kicked off Welcome Week on August 13, 2015, on the Student Center Green Space and featured an extensive group of local vendors and restaurants. Families were able to interact with the vendors and get acquainted not only with the university, but also with the city of Auburn. “We had 30 vendors who are members of the Auburn Chamber of Commerce attend the event,” said Tess Gibson, coordinator for the Office of Parent and Family Programs. “The food options were endless. We had everything from freshly made corn nuggets from Niffer’s to treats from Mylk’s Cookies. We even had options from catering companies and health stores in the area.” The Office of Parent and Family Programs and Welcome Week collaborated for the first time in 2014 and created Blues and Barbecue, the first event designed for both

parents and students to attend. Following the success of last year’s event, Auburn’s Chamber of Commerce identified an opportunity to welcome Auburn students and their families further by engaging them with the community. Thus, “Home Sweet Auburn” was born. The Auburn Chamber of Commerce, the Student Government Association, the Office of Parent and Family Programs and the Welcome Week staff worked together to make Home Sweet Auburn a fun and memorable event. Despite being the inaugural year for the event, Home Sweet Auburn had close to 1,000 attendees. Those in attendance responded positively and survey results revealed that many felt strongly that they would be more likely to visit the businesses again in the future as a direct result of being exposed to them at Home Sweet Auburn. Welcome Week is designed to make the transition to college life smooth for freshmen. As freshmen leave their childhood homes to make a new life at college, the Office of Parent and Family Programs want to make the transition smooth for parents as well. Now, thanks to Home Sweet Auburn, parents and students alike know what it means to call Auburn “home sweet home”.

Vendors featured at Home Sweet Auburn: ACRE, AMSTERDAM CAFÉ, ARRICIA, BEEF ‘O’ BRADY’S, BURGERFI, CHICKFIL-A, COUNTRY’S BARBECUE, EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS, FINK’S CRAFT BAR & GRILL, FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES, FULL MOON BBQ, HORNSBY FARMS, ISLAND WING COMPANY, MAESTRO 2300, MCALISTER’S DELI, MUGSHOTS GRILL AND BAR, MYLKS COOKIES, NEWK’S EATERY, NIFFER’S PLACE, PANERA BREAD, PHILLY CONNECTION, SCHLOTZSKY’S, TAZIKI’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFÉ, THE CELLAR, THE CUP AND SAUCER, TO YOUR HEALTH SPROUTED FLOUR, UNCLE MADDIO’S PIZZA JOINT, WILTON’S CATERING, ZOES KITCHEN

Auburn University Student Affairs | 19


A record number of students wait to receive their bids in August 2015.

TRY TRI-SIGMA SI G M A SI G M A SI G M A J O IN S AU B U R N P AN HE L L E N IC Written by: CATHERINE ABERNATHY

AUBURN UNIVERSITY’S PANHELLENIC COUNCIL has made the decision to add another sorority to the group following an interest in sorority membership that has outpaced the growth in chapters. The addition of the sorority will bring the total number of National Panhellenic Conference (NPC) sororities on campus to 18. As outlined by the NPC, Panhellenic followed a process to invite the nine sororities not currently at Auburn to submit their organization to be considered to join Auburn’s campus. The Panhellenic Extension Committee, comprised of a delegate from each of the 17 existing Panhellenic sororities, met to review the information submitted and chose to move forward with Delta Phi Epsilon and Sigma Sigma Sigma. National representatives from the two sororities were invited to Auburn, met with Panhellenic’s executive officers and the Panhellenic Extension Committee, took a campus tour and made presentations about their sororities to all of Auburn Panhellenic. Following the presentations, Sigma Sigma Sigma was invited to join Auburn’s campus, and the national sorority accepted the invitation. 20 | Annual Report

Record-setting recruitment classes in three of the last five years have spurred the addition of Sigma Sigma Sigma. The goal for adding a new chapter is to hopefully provide more opportunities for sorority membership as well as reduce the membership number of the average sorority. Panhellenic members have been receptive and encouraging of the growth of sorority chapters. “Our Panhellenic is so supportive of one another. There is a great deal of excitement about Sigma Sigma Sigma and all of the ways we can help them out,” said Jill Martin, director of Greek Life. “Now, instead of 17 awesome Panhellenic sororities, we will have 18 awesome sororities.” Sigma Sigma Sigma will begin recruiting after formal Panhellenic recruitment in the fall of 2016. The sorority is scheduled to be fully integrated and operational as a sorority on campus by November 2016. “Supporting a new chapter will be hard work on Auburn Panhellenic at first, but the rewards will be tremendous,” said Martin.


From SEPTEMBER 2014 to SEPTEMBER 2015, OVER 1,600,000 PEOPLE VISITED the STUDENT CENTER and OVER 4,700 RESERVATIONS were made.

THE HEART OF CAMPUS S T UDENT C ENTER P ROVI DE S O N - C AMP U S E V E N T & ME E T IN G SP AC E Written by: CATHERINE ABERNATHY

AUBURN UNIVERSITY’S STUDENT CENTER is one of the most consistently busy places on campus. At any given moment during the day, students can be found running in for a quick meal between classes or seeking a spot to study between exams. On average, the Student Center has 9,000 visitors per day, and in September alone, 209,000 people visited the building. The Student Center is also home to a variety of spaces that can be reserved for many purposes. “Anyone can request a space in the Student Center. We host meetings for student groups, departments and events for the general public,” said Andrea Conti-Elkins, supervisor of Student Center reservations, “We have a variety

of meeting rooms located in the Student Center for groups to rent and use on a daily basis. We have spaces in additional campus buildings as well as outdoor spaces.” The central location of the Student Center makes it an attractive venue for all kinds of groups looking for a meeting space. General meetings, social activities, dinners and even weddings can be held around campus through reservations made through the Student Center. There is a fee for general public groups to use Auburn’s Student Center facilities but campus groups registered with the Center for Student Organizations are not required to pay to reserve and use rooms in the Student Center.

The Student Center is equipped to handle all the different types of groups that use the available spaces. The assortment of available rooms can be set up differently depending on the purpose of the room on any given day and meetings can be held in a variety of conference and boardrooms. There is an assortment of technology capabilities available in each of the available rooms that is regularly updated to keep up with the latest technological advances. Catering services are also available for events taking place in the Student Center. To reserve a space in the Student Center, please visit www.auburn.edu/studentcenter or call 334-844-1320.

Auburn University Student Affairs | 21


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Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational insitution/employer.

Student Affairs 255 Heisman Drive Student Center 3248 Auburn, AL 36849 (334) 844 - 1304 www.auburn.edu/studentaffairs

Student Affairs Annual Report Fall 2014-2015  
Student Affairs Annual Report Fall 2014-2015  

Auburn University Students Affairs released this year's Annual Report in November. The document covers stories and information from fall 201...

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