Page 97

AUBURN SWIMMING AND DIVING HISTORY Games. In the 1982 season, the Auburn men finished fifth and the women were fourth, but after the season Quick became the secondconsecutive AU coach to leave the Plains for the University of Texas. Quick spent six years at Texas, followed by 17 years at Stanford (winning 12 NCAA titles along the way) before returning to Auburn as its head coach prior to the 2007-08 season. Quick was succeeded by John Asmuth, who came to Auburn in 1973 as a swimmer under Eddie Reese. He became an assistant coach in 1976 and was retained by Quick in 1978. Asmuth is best known for helping coach Rowdy Gaines and coaching Per Johannson, an Auburn swimmer who won a bronze medal for Sweden in the 1980 Moscow Olympics and two bronze medals in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. Auburn diving reached new heights in 1987 when Jose Rocha captured the NCAA crown on the 1-meter springboard. During his career at Auburn, Rocha won five SEC titles and was twice named SEC Diver of the Year. In the eight years Asmuth was at the helm of the Auburn program, his teams finished in the top 10 three times and in the top 20 another three years. One of Asmuth’s greatest contributions to Auburn can be seen in the James E. Martin Aquatics Center. Asmuth was a key player in the plans to build a world-class natatorium and served as director of the James E. Martin Aquatics Center from 19902008. Auburn vaulted into the higher echelons of collegiate swimming in the 1990s. Equipped with a world-class facility and a talented, enthusiastic coach named David Marsh, Auburn swimming stood higher than ever before. A product of the Auburn swimming program, Marsh returned to the Plains as head coach in 1990. Over his last five seasons,

Rowdy Gaines remains as one of the most recognizable Auburn swimmers of all time.

Auburn swimming and diving produced 643 All-Americans honors. Success was the story for Auburn under David Marsh. In Marsh’s inaugural campaign, 1991, the Auburn men placed 20th at the NCAA Championships, only a year earlier they had failed to produce any NCAA qualifiers. The women made breakthrough strides in 1992, leaping 27 spots to eighth in the nation after 1991’s disappointing 35th-place finish. The men continued their climb up the national ladder with a 15th place 1992 NCAA finish. For the women, 1993 marked a secondconsecutive eighth-place NCAA finish. Marina Smith took the NCAA crown on the 1-meter springboard. The men rose to sixth at the NCAA Championships. Both teams placed second in the SEC. In 1994, the Auburn men did what no other Auburn swim team had ever done before, win a SEC team title. Swimming in the brand-new Martin Aquatics Center, AU claimed the team title in front of a capacity crowd. The women placed second at conference for the third straight year as Kristie Krueger captured her second SEC 100 butterfly title. At the national meet, the women made history by winning a relay, the 200 medley relay. Auburn became the first women’s team outside of Stanford, Texas and Florida to win a relay in NCAA Championship history in 1994. Stephanie Bowers, Keri Reynolds, Kristie Krueger and Allison Bock combined to win the 200-yard medley relay. Auburn finished fifth as a team. At the NCAA Men’s Championships, Auburn placed fourth and Marsh was named 1994 National Coach of the Year. Kurt Jachimowski inspired the Auburn men to a third-place 1995 NCAA finish, as he won the Tigers’ first NCAA individual swimming crown in 14 years. Jachimowski swam away with the 200 IM title and finaled in both backstrokes at the national meet. The Auburn women finished 13th at the 1995 NCAA Championships. At the SEC Championships, Auburn won its second straight men’s team title, while the women were runners-up for the fourth straight year. Although Tennessee ended Auburn’s twoyear hold on the SEC title in February 1996, the Tigers bounced back in March to finish as the national runner-up, placing second at the NCAA Championships in Austin, just 43 points behind homestanding Texas. Auburn’s team of Scott Tucker, Oliver Gumbrill, Brock Newman and Nick Shackell

claimed Auburn its first relay national title since 1980 at the meet, posting a Jamail Swim Center record in the 400 freestyle relay with a blistering 2:52.87 in the final event of the three-day meet. In all, Auburn broke school records in six events (100, 200 back, 200 and 400 medley relay, 100 fly and 100 breast) at the meet. Three Tigers - John Hargis, Scott Tucker and Nick Shackell - were chosen for the 1996 Olympics. Hargis and Tucker for the U.S. team and Shackell for Great Britain. With two swimmers on the U.S. team, and Shackell for Great Britain. With two swimmers on the U.S. team, Marsh was named as an assistant for the men’s team. Hargis and Tucker returned to the Plains with gold medals for their parts in helping the U.S. place first in the 400 medley and 400 free relays, respectively. A young Auburn women’s team rebounded from a fifth-place SEC finish to place 12th at 1995-96 NCAA Championships in Ann Arbor, Mich., giving Auburn swimming fans reason to be optimistic about the both teams’ futures. Auburn’s women’s team continued to progress in 1997 as the Tigers finished second at SECs and seventh at NCAAs, it’s highest finish since 1994. The women had 10 SEC champions, five NCAA champions and 30 All-American honors. It was 1997, that was the year for the Auburn men, as the Tigers claimed Auburn’s first swimming national title and its fourth SEC championship. The men had 15 SEC champions, 17 NCAA champions and 49 All-American honors. In 1999, the Auburn men brought the NCAA title back home by winning four relays and three individual events. All 17 men earned All-America honors, marking the first time in school history this has happened. En route to claiming the second title, Auburn won its third consecutive SEC title, fifth in six years, proving to be a dynasty. It was another first for Auburn swimming in 2002 as the women’s team captured its first NCAA title. The Tigers brought 11 athletes to Austin, Texas for the meet and all 11 brought home All-America honors with junior Maggie Bowen taking seven of her own. Not to be outdone, the AU men also claimed a championship in 2002, bringing home the hardware from the SEC Championships for the sixth consecutive time. As if Auburn hadn’t already reached the pinnacle of the sport, the 2003 season brought an NCAA first with it. Not only 97

2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide  

2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide

2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide  

2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide

Advertisement